Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1540 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (724 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (387 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (108 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (130 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (130 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 130 of 130 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACSMs Health & Fitness Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Acta Facultatis Educationis Physicae Universitatis Comenianae     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Kinesiologiae Universitatis Tartuensis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ACTIVE : Journal of Physical Education, Sport, Health and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Adapted Physical Activity Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Ágora para la Educación Física y el Deporte     Open Access  
Al.Qadisiya journal for the Sciences of Physical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Sexuality Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Applied Sport Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Work Exposures and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Apunts. Medicina de l'Esport     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arab Journal of Nutrition and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Exercise in Health and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arquivos de Ciências do Esporte     Open Access  
Arquivos em Movimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arrancada     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Athletic Training & Sports Health Care     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
BMC Obesity     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 34)
Childhood Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Comparative Exercise Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
eJRIEPS : Ejournal de la recherche sur l'intervention en éducation physique et sport     Open Access  
Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éthique & Santé     Full-text available via subscription  
Fat Studies : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Body Weight and Society     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Fisioterapia em Movimento     Open Access  
Fitness & Performance Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Food Science and Human Wellness     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Frontiers in Sports and Active Living     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Gelanggang Pendidikan Jasmani Indonesia     Open Access  
German Journal of Exercise and Sport Research : Sportwissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Geron     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Journal of Health and Physical Education Pedagogy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health Education Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Health Marketing Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Health Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Home Healthcare Now     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Human Movement     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Human Movement Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
IISE Transactions on Occupational Ergonomics and Human Factors     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesia Performance Journal     Open Access  
İnönü Üniversitesi Beden Eğitimi ve Spor Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
International Journal for Vitamin and Nutrition Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Applied Exercise Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 58)
International Journal of Athletic Therapy & Training     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
International Journal of Men's Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 93)
International Journal of Obesity Supplements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Spa and Wellness     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sport, Exercise & Training Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Isokinetics and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of American College Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Athlete Development and Experience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Human Sport and Exercise     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Motor Learning and Development     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Physical Activity and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Physical Activity and Hormones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Physical Activity Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education and Human Movement     Open Access  
Journal of Physical Education and Sport Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Physical Education Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Science in Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Sport and Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Sport Sciences and Fitness     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 77)
Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Jurnal Pendidikan Kesehatan Rekreasi     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Kerbala Magazine of Physical Edu. Seiences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kinesiology : International Journal of Fundamental and Applied Kinesiology     Open Access  
Kinesiology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Krankenhaus-Hygiene - Infektionsverhütung     Full-text available via subscription  
Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Médecine & Nutrition     Full-text available via subscription  
Mental Health and Physical Activity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
MHSalud : Movimiento Humano y Salud     Open Access  
Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Obesity Research & Clinical Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Obesity Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Obesity Science & Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Obesity Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pain Management in General Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
PALAESTRA : Adapted Sport, Physical Education, and Recreational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Physical Activity and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Physical Education & Sport Pedagogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Preventing Chronic Disease     Free   (Followers: 2)
Psychology of Sport and Exercise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Quality in Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Race and Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBNE - Revista Brasileira de Nutrição Esportiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
RBONE - Revista Brasileira de Obesidade, Nutrição e Emagrecimento     Open Access  
RBPFEX - Revista Brasileira de Prescrição e Fisiologia do Exercício     Open Access  
Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport     Hybrid Journal  
Retos : Nuevas Tendencias en Educación Física, Deportes y Recreación     Open Access  
Revista Andaluza de Medicina del Deporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Brasileira de Atividade Física & Saúde     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Ciências do Esporte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Cineantropometria & Desempenho Humano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Brasileira de Educação Física e Esporte     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista da Educação Física : UEM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Iberoamericana de Psicología del Ejercicio y el Deporte     Open Access  
Revista Internacional de Medicina y Ciencias de la Actividad Física y del Deporte : International Journal of Medicine and Science of Physical Activity and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue phénEPS / PHEnex Journal     Open Access  
Scandinavian Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
SIPATAHOENAN : South-East Asian Journal for Youth, Sports & Health Education     Open Access  
Spor Bilimleri Dergisi / Hacettepe Journal of Sport Sciences     Open Access  
Sport and Fitness Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Sport Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sport Sciences for Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Sport- und Präventivmedizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
SPORTIVE : Journal Of Physical Education, Sport and Recreation     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sports Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Strength & Conditioning Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Timisoara Physical Education and Rehabilitation Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Turkish Journal of Sport and Exercise     Open Access  
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Здоровье человека, теория и методика физической культуры и спорта     Open Access  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Applied Physiology, Nutrition and Metabolism
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.112
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 34  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1715-5312 - ISSN (Online) 1715-5320
Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Correction: Acute effects of exercise intensity on subsequent substrate
           utilisation, appetite, and energy balance in men and women
    • Authors: Ghalia Shamlan, Paul Bech, M. Denise Robertson, Adam L. Collins
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-07-02T05:48:46Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2020-0446
       
  • Nutrition interventions in populations with mental health conditions: a
           scoping review
    • Authors: Stephana J. Cherak, Kirsten M. Fiest, Laura VanderSluis, Carlota Basualdo-Hammond, Diane L. Lorenzetti, Sue Buhler, Janet Stadnyk, Lorna Driedger, Lori Hards, Leah Gramlich, Tanis R. Fenton
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Nutrition is a modifiable factor for intervention in mental disorders. This scoping review characterized nutrition intervention research in mental disorders. A 3-category framework characterized nutrition interventions: Guide (e.g., counselling), Provide (e.g., food provisions), and Add (e.g., supplementation). Nutrition interventions were classified as single-component (e.g., Guide) or complex (e.g., Guide-Provide). Sixty-nine trials met inclusion criteria, 96% were randomized controlled trials. Most commonly diagnosed mental disorders were depressive disorder (i.e., persistent) or major depressive disorder (n = 39), schizophrenia (n = 17), and other psychotic disorders (n = 13). Few trials included patients with anxiety disorders (n = 2) or bipolar disorders (n = 3). Several trials (n = 15, 22%) assessed and implemented nutrition interventions to improve dietary patterns, of which 11 (73%) reported statistically significant and clinically important positive effects of nutrition interventions on mental disorders. The majority of the trials (n = 61, 90%) investigated supplementation, most commonly adding essential fatty acids, vitamins, or minerals. The majority (n = 48, 70%) reported either statistically significant or clinically important effect and 31 (51%) reported both. Though most interventions led to statistically significant improvements, trials were heterogeneous for targeted mental disorders, nutrition interventions, and outcomes assessed. Given considerable heterogeneity, further research from robust and clinically relevant trials is required to support high-quality health care with effective nutrition interventions. Novelty Future research on whole-diet interventions powered to detect changes in mental health outcomes as primary objectives is needed. Dietitians may be an opportunity to improve feasibility and efficacy of nutrition interventions for mental disorder patients. Dietitians may be of value to educate mental health practitioners on the importance of nutrition.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-06-04T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0683
       
  • Effect of soluble-viscous dietary fibre on coronary heart disease risk
           score across 3 population health categories: data from randomized,
           double-blind, placebo-controlled trials
    • Authors: Vladimir Vuksan, John L. Sievenpiper, Elena Jovanovski, Alexandra L. Jenkins, Allison Komishon, Fei Au-Yeung, Andreea Zurbau, Hoang V.T. Ho, Dandan Li, Lea Smircic-Duvnjak
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      We applied the Framingham risk equation in healthy, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes populations, following treatment with viscous fibre from konjac-based blend (KBB). KBB yielded reduction in estimated risk score by 16% (1.04 ± 0.03 vs. 0.87 ± 0.04, p < 0.01) in type 2 diabetes, 24% (1.08 ± 0.01 vs. 0.82 ± 0.02, p < 0.01) in metabolic syndrome, and 25% (1.09 ± 0.05 vs. 0.82 ± 0.06, p < 0.01) in healthy individuals. Drivers for decreased risk were improvements in blood cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. The composite coronary heart disease risk across populations was reduced 22% (p < 0.01). Novelty Viscous fibre from konjac-xanthan reduced 10-year relative coronary heart disease using Framingham Risk Score across the glycemic status spectrum.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0728
       
  • Inclusion of female participants in cardiovascular research: a case study
           of Ontario NSERC-funded programs
    • Authors: Ria Wilson, Mary Louise Adams, Kyra E. Pyke
      Pages: 1 - 4
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      This study explored inclusion of female participants in Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada Discovery Grant (NSERC-DG)-funded human cardiovascular research at Ontario universities between 2010–2018. Ninety-six publications were examined and 4 principal investigators were interviewed. Females were excluded/underrepresented in 63% of publications with 49% male-only and 5% female-only samples. The sex-bias appears to be explained by dependence on research knowledge and methodologies that maintain and reproduce a firmly established discourse of the male norm. Novelty Female participants were underrepresented in NSERC DG-funded cardiovascular research at Ontario universities between 2010–2018.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-03-09T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0693
       
  • Life stress and background anxiety are not associated with resting
           metabolic rate in healthy adults
    • Authors: Patrick B. Wilson, Jaison L. Wynne, Alex M. Ehlert, Zachary Mowfy
      Pages: 1 - 5
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      This study examined associations between anxiety, stress, and resting metabolic rate (RMR). Thirty women and 23 men had RMR measured at two visits. Participants also had body composition assessed and completed several questionnaires: State–Trait Inventory for Cognitive and Somatic Anxiety (STICSA), Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI)-3, and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS)-14. The state version of the STICSA was completed at both visits, while the other questionnaires were completed at visit one. RMR was expressed in kilocalories per day and relative to lean mass (RMRrelative). Participants were divided into low-, medium-, and high-anxiety groups based on STICSA trait scores, and RMR was compared among groups using one-way ANOVA. Changes between visits were evaluated using paired t tests and Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. RMR did not change from visit one to visit two (1589 to 1586 kcal/day, p = 0.86) even though STICSA state scores slightly declined (Z-statistic = –2.39, p = 0.017). RMRrelative values were 30.3 ± 3.7, 29.0 ± 1.9, and 29.9 ± 3.6 kcal/kg of lean mass among low, medium, and high trait anxiety groups, respectively (F = 0.70, p = 0.50). No RMR variable significantly correlated with PSS-14, ASI-3, or STICSA scores. This study provides evidence that trait anxiety and life stress do not impact RMR. Whether an association between these factors exists in anxiety disorders remains to be evaluated. Novelty Contrary to previous research, this study found no associations between anxiety and RMR. It is doubtful whether practitioners need to account for healthy subjects’ trait anxiety and stress when analyzing RMR data.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0875
       
  • Effect of inspiratory resistive training on diaphragm shear modulus and
           accessory inspiratory muscle activation
    • Authors: Ryosuke Ando, Toshiyuki Ohya, Kenta Kusanagi, Jun Koizumi, Hayato Ohnuma, Keisho Katayama, Yasuhiro Suzuki
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      This study aimed to elucidate changes in diaphragm and accessory inspiratory muscle (sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and intercostal muscle (IC)) function after a 6-week training program. Nineteen male elite collegiate swimmers were assigned to either a control group (n = 9) or training group (n = 10). The subjects in the training group performed 30 maximum inspirations at a load resistance of 50% of maximum inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) using an inspiratory muscle training device. These were conducted twice per day and 6 days per week. At baseline and after 6 weeks, PImax, shear modulus of the diaphragm, and electromyograms (EMG) of the SCM and IC during a maximal inspiratory maneuver were evaluated. Relative change in PImax was greater in the training group than in controls. The shear modulus during a PImax maneuver had increased significantly in both groups after 6 weeks. EMG amplitudes of the SCM increased in the training group after 6 weeks, but not in the control group. EMG amplitudes of the IC did not change after 6 weeks in either group. These results suggest that 6-week inspiratory resistive training significantly improves the activation of the SCM, which could be one of the major mechanisms behind increases in inspiratory muscle strength after resistive training. Novelty Six-week inspiratory resistive training increased diaphragm stiffness during maximal inspiration maneuver. Six-week inspiratory resistive training increased electromyogram amplitudes of the sternocleidomastoid during maximal inspiration maneuver.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-02-12T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0906
       
  • Interactions of sprint interval exercise and psychological need-support on
           subsequent food intake among physically inactive men and women
    • Authors: Natalya J. Beer, James A. Dimmock, Ben Jackson, Kym J. Guelfi
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of sprint interval training (SIT) and psychological need-support in exercise on postexercise appetite and energy intake. Forty physically inactive men and women (body mass index, 24.6 ± 4.8 kg·m−2; peak oxygen consumption, 26.6 ± 4.9 mL·kg−1·min−1) were randomised to either a need-support or no-support condition, with each participant completing 2 experimental trials involving 30 min of moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT; 60% peak oxygen consumption) and SIT (alternating 15 s at 170% peak oxygen consumption and 60 s at 32% peak oxygen consumption) matched for total work. Perceptions of appetite and appetite-related blood variables were assessed, together with ad libitum energy intake for 3 h following exercise using a laboratory test meal and available snacks. Greater enjoyment, perceived exertion, heart rate, and blood lactate were observed in SIT compared with MICT (all p ≤ 0.006). Ratings of perceived appetite were similar across conditions and trials (p> 0.05); however, active ghrelin was lower following SIT compared with MICT (p < 0.001), and there was a significant condition-by-type interaction for energy intake (p = 0.033), with participants in the support group consuming less energy from foods following SIT (1895 ± 1040 kJ) than MICT (2475 ± 1192 kJ). Findings from this work highlight the need to reconsider traditional exercise guidelines where dietary intake is a concern. Novelty Enjoyment was greater during SIT compared with MICT. Enjoyment and choice were higher among participants provided with psychological need-support. In a need-supportive environment, SIT reduced subsequent energy intake compared with MICT.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-02-04T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0672
       
  • Effectiveness of collagen supplementation on pain scores in healthy
           individuals with self-reported knee pain: a randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Coen C.W.G. Bongers, Dominique S.M. Ten Haaf, Milène Catoire, Bregina Kersten, Jeroen A. Wouters, Thijs M.H. Eijsvogels, Maria T.E. Hopman
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of 12 weeks collagen peptide (CP) supplementation on knee pain and function in individuals with self-reported knee pain. Healthy physically active individuals (n = 167; aged 63 [interquartile range = 56–68] years) with self-reported knee pain received 10 g/day of CP or placebo for 12 weeks. Knee pain and function were measured with the Visual Analog Scale (VAS), the Lysholm questionnaire, and the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS). Furthermore, we assessed changes in inflammatory, cartilage, and bone (bio)markers. Measurements were conducted at baseline and after 12 weeks of supplementation. Baseline VAS did not differ between CP and placebo (4.7 [2.5–6.1] vs. 4.7 [2.8–6.2], p = 0.50), whereas a similar decrease in VAS was observed after supplementation (−1.6 ± 2.4 vs. −1.9 ± 2.6, p = 0.42). The KOOS and Lysholm scores increased after supplementation in both groups (p values < 0.001), whereas the increase in the KOOS and Lysholm scores did not differ between groups (p = 0.28 and p = 0.76, respectively). Furthermore, CP did not impact inflammatory, cartilage, and bone (bio)markers (p values> 0.05). A reduced knee pain and improved knee function were observed following supplementation, but changes were similar between groups. This suggests that CP supplementation over a 12-week period does not reduce knee pain in healthy, active, middle-aged to elderly individuals. Novelty CP supplementation over a 12-week period does not reduce knee pain in healthy, active, middle-aged to elderly individuals. CP supplementation over a 12-week period does not impact on inflammatory, cartilage, and bone (bio)markers in healthy, active, middle-aged to elderly individuals.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-28T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0654
       
  • Effects of functional training and 2 interdisciplinary interventions on
           maximal oxygen uptake and weight loss of women with obesity: a randomized
           clinical trial
    • Authors: Cauê Vazquez La Scala Teixeira, Danielle Arisa Caranti, Lila Missae Oyama, Ricardo da Costa Padovani, Maria Gabriela Soria Cuesta, Amanda dos Santos Moraes, Letícia Andrade Cerrone, Luiz Henrique Lima Affonso, Silvandro dos Santos Gil, Ronaldo V. Thomatieli dos Santos, Ricardo José Gomes
      Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Our aim was to analyze and compare functional training, interdisciplinary therapy, and interdisciplinary education on cardiorespiratory fitness (CF) and anthropometric characteristics of women with obesity. Forty-four women (age = 39.7 ± 5.9 years, body mass index (BMI) = 35.5 ± 2.8 kg/m2) completed 30 weeks of intervention randomly assigned to 3 groups: functional training (FT) (n = 14), interdisciplinary therapy (IT) (n = 19), and interdisciplinary education (IE) (n = 11). The FT group participated in the training program (3/week), the IT group received the same training intervention plus nutrition (1/week) and psychology advice (1/week) and physical therapy (1/week). The IE group participated in interdisciplinary lectures on topics related to health promotion (1/month). CF (ergospirometry), anthropometry, and body composition (electrical bioimpedance) were measured pre-intervention (Pre) and post-intervention (Post). CF increased (p ≤ 0.05) significantly (Pre vs. Post) in the FT (7.5%) and IT (10.8%) groups, but not in the IE group (1.8%). Body mass (BM), BMI, relative fat mass, and waist circumference significantly (p ≤ 0.05) decreased (Pre vs. Post) in IT (−4.4%, −4.4%, −2.3%, and −5.1%, respectively). The IE group showed a significant decrease in BM (−3.7%), BMI (−3.7%), and waist circumference (−3.5%), whereas the FT group promoted significant decrease in waist circumference (−3.4%). In conclusion, functional training increased CF but only interdisciplinary interventions improved the anthropometric profile of women with obesity. Novelty Interdisciplinary therapy provided more comprehensive adaptations in women with obesity, including morphological variables and CF. Functional training increased CF but reduced only abdominal obesity. Interdisciplinary education provided benefits on morphological variables, but it does not increase CF.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-23T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0766
       
  • Effects of combined histamine H1 and H2 receptor blockade on hemodynamic
           responses to dynamic exercise in males with high-normal blood pressure
    • Authors: Ashley Naylor, Brian Shariffi, Trevor L. Gillum, Boyer William, Sean Sullivan, Jong-Kyung Kim
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      While postexercise hypotension is associated with histamine H1 and H2 receptor-mediated postexercise vasodilation, effects of histaminergic vasodilation on blood pressure (BP) in response to dynamic exercise are not known. Thus, in 20 recreationally active male participants (10 normotensive and 10 with high-normal BP) we examined the effects of histamine H1 and H2 receptor blockade on cardiac output (CO), mean atrial pressure (MAP), aortic stiffness (AoStiff), and total vascular conductance (TVC) at rest and during progressive cycling exercise. Compared with the normotensive group, MAP, CO, and AoStiff were higher in the high-normal group before and after the blockade at rest, while TVC was similar. At the 40% workload, the blockade significantly increased MAP in both groups, while no difference was found in the TVC. CO was higher in the high-normal group than the normotensive group in both conditions. At the 60% workload, the blockade substantially increased MAP and decreased TVC in the normotensive group, while there were no changes in the high-normal group. A similar CO response pattern was observed at the 60% workload. These findings suggest that the mechanism eliciting an exaggerated BP response to exercise in the high-normal group may be partially due to the inability of histamine receptors. Novelty Males with high-normal BP had an exaggerated BP response to exercise. The overactive BP response is known due to an increase in peripheral vasoconstriction. Increase in peripheral vasoconstriction is partially due to inability of histamine receptors.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-21T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0645
       
  • Detrimental association between quadriceps strength and exposure to
           polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in elderly adults
    • Authors: Yuan-Yuei Chen, Chung-Ching Wang, Tung-Wei Kao, Hui-Fang Yang, Yu-Shan Sun, Wei-Liang Chen
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmental pollutants primarily from the incomplete combustion of organic materials. Myriads of studies have reported the associations between PAH exposure with several adverse health outcomes. However, no previous study had explored the relationship between PAH exposure with muscle strength in the elderly population. In the present study, we included 473 elderly adults who were obtained from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) (2001–2006). PAH metabolites were measured in urine samples. Muscle strength was determined as the isokinetic strength of the quadriceps. Pertinent variables were analyzed by various standard measurements. The association between PAH exposure and muscle strength was examined using multivariable linear regression models. After fully adjusting for covariables, PAH metabolites had a negative relationship with muscle strength, especially 3-fluorene (β = –0.021, 95% CI: –0.042, 0.000) and 2-fluorene (β = –0.020, 95% CI: –0.034, –0.005). Notably, the relationship remained significant in males, but not in females. PAH exposure is associated with decreased muscle strength in the US elderly population. Further studies are needed to bring to light the underlying mechanisms for these findings. In addition, it is important to provide interventions and determine strategies for treating the adverse impact of PAH exposure on dynapenia. Novelty PAH exposure is associated with decreased muscle strength in elderly adults. The adverse impact remains in males.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-18T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0808
       
  • Dietary Salvia hispanica L. reduces cardiac oxidative stress of
           dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats
    • Authors: Agustina Creus, Adriana Chicco, Silvina M. Álvarez, María S. Giménez, Yolanda Bolzón de Lombardo
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Salvia hispanica L., commonly known as chia seed, has beneficial effects upon some signs of metabolic syndrome (MS), such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. However, its action on cardiac oxidative stress associated with MS remains unknown. The goal of this study was to analyze the possible beneficial effects of chia seed (variety Salba) upon the oxidative stress of left ventricle heart muscle (LV) of a well-established dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rat model induced by feeding them a sucrose-rich diet (SRD). Male Wistar rats received an SRD for 3 months. After that, for 3 additional months, half of the animals continued with the SRD, while the other half received the SRD containing chia as the source of dietary fat instead corn oil (SRD+chia). In the LV of SRD-fed rats, chia seed improved/reverted the depleted activity of antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase, and ameliorated manganese superoxide dismutase messenger RNA (mRNA) levels increasing the expression of the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Improved the glutathione redox estate, reactive oxygen species, and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances contents normalizing the p47NOX subunit mRNA level. Furthermore, chia normalized hypertension and plasma levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress biomarkers. The findings show that chia seed intake impacts positively upon oxidative imbalance of LV of dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats. Novelty Healthy effects of chia seed involve an improvement of cardiac antioxidant defenses through Nrf2 induction. Chia seed intake reduces cardiac oxidative stress markers of dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats. Dietary chia seed restores cardiac unbalanced redox state of dyslipidemic insulin-resistant rats.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0769
       
  • Time to exhaustion during cycling is not well predicted by critical power
           calculations
    • Authors: Jesus G. Pallarés, Jose R. Lillo-Bevia, Ricardo Morán-Navarro, Victor Cerezuela-Espejo, Ricardo Mora-Rodriguez
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Three to 5 cycling tests to exhaustion allow prediction of time to exhaustion (TTE) at power output based on calculation of critical power (CP). We aimed to determine the accuracy of CP predictions of TTE at power outputs habitually endured by cyclists. Fourteen endurance-trained male cyclists underwent 4 randomized cycle-ergometer TTE tests at power outputs eliciting (i) mean Wingate anaerobic test (WAnTmean), (ii) maximal oxygen consumption, (iii) respiratory compensation threshold (VT2), and (iv) maximal lactate steady state (MLSS). Tests were conducted in duplicate with coefficient of variation of 5%–9%. Power outputs were 710 ± 63 W for WAnTmean, 366 ± 26 W for maximal oxygen consumption, 302 ± 31 W for VT2 and 247 ± 20 W for MLSS. Corresponding TTE were 00:29 ± 00:06, 03:23 ± 00:45, 11:29 ± 05:07, and 76:05 ± 13:53 min:s, respectively. Power output associated with CP was only 2% lower than MLSS (242 ± 19 vs. 247 ± 20 W; P < 0.001). The CP predictions overestimated TTE at WAnTmean (00:24 ± 00:10 mm:ss) and MLSS (04:41 ± 11:47 min:s), underestimated TTE at VT2 (–04:18 ± 03:20 mm:ss; P < 0.05), and correctly predicted TTE at maximal oxygen consumption. In summary, CP accurately predicts MLSS power output and TTE at maximal oxygen consumption. However, it should not be used to estimate time to exhaustion in trained cyclists at higher or lower power outputs (e.g., sprints and 40-km time trials). Novelty CP calculation enables to predict TTE at any cycling power output. We tested those predictions against measured TTE in a wide range of cycling power outputs. CP appropriately predicted TTE at maximal oxygen consumption intensity but err at higher and lower cycling power outputs.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-14T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0637
       
  • Variability of regional quadriceps echo intensity in active young men with
           and without subcutaneous fat correction
    • Authors: Dustin J. Oranchuk, Matt S. Stock, André R. Nelson, Adam G. Storey, John B. Cronin
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Quantifying echo intensity (EI), a proposed measure of muscle quality, is becoming increasingly popular. Additionally, much attention has been paid to regional differences in other ultrasonically evaluated measures of muscle morphology and architecture. However, the variability of regional (proximal, middle, distal) EI of the vastus lateralis, rectus femoris, and lateral and anterior vastus intermedius has yet to be determined. Twenty participants (40 limbs), were evaluated on 3 occasions, separated by 7 days. Intersession variability of EI with and without subcutaneous fat correction was quantified. Furthermore, the interchangeability of corrected EI across regions was evaluated. Variability of regional quadriceps EI was substantially lower with subcutaneous fat correction (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.81–0.98, coefficient of variation (CV) = 4.5%–16.8%, typical error of measure (TEM) = 0.13–0.49) versus raw values (ICC = 0.69–0.98, CV = 7.7%–42.7%, TEM = 0.14–0.68), especially when examining the vastus intermedius (ICC = 0.81–0.95, CV = 7.1%–16.8%, TEM = 0.23–0.49 vs. ICC = 0.69–0.92, CV = 22.9%–42.7%, TEM = 0.31–0.68). With the exception of the rectus femoris and vastus intermedius (p ≥ 0.143, effect size (ES) ≤ 0.18), corrected EI was greater for proximal and distal regions when compared with the midpoint (p ≤ 0.038, ES = 0.38–0.82). Researchers and practitioners should utilize subcutaneous fat thickness correction to confidently evaluate EI at all regions of the quadriceps. Regional EI cannot be used interchangeably for the vastus muscles, likely because of an increase in fibrous content towards the myotendinous junctions. Novelty Regional quadriceps echo intensity was reliable with and without correction for subcutaneous fat thickness. Intersession variability of regional quadriceps echo intensity was substantially improved following subcutaneous fat correction. Quadriceps echo intensity increased towards myotendinous junctions in the vastus muscles.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0601
       
  • Association between serum choline and betaine concentrations and
           longitudinal changes of body composition in community-dwelling middle-aged
           and older Chinese adults
    • Authors: Rong-huan Zhong, Jing-an Long, Fan Wang, Si Chen, Yun Luo, Xiao-ting Lu, Dinuerguli Yishake, Yu-ming Chen, Ai-ping Fang, Hui-lian Zhu
      Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      Previous studies suggest that betaine and choline may be beneficial for body composition. However, no longitudinal study has been conducted to illustrate if choline and betaine have long-term effects on changes in body composition. This study aimed to prospectively investigate the association between serum choline and betaine concentrations and 3-year changes in body composition in community-dwelling Chinese adults. This present analysis used data from 1384 women and 554 men aged 40–75 years. Serum concentrations of betaine and choline at baseline were assessed using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Body composition parameters, i.e., muscle mass (MM), fat mass (FM), and body fat percentage (FM%) were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at the first and the second follow-ups. After adjustment for potential cofounders, higher serum choline concentrations were associated with a lower decrease in MM in men (β = 0.022, P = 0.025) and a lower increase in FM and FM% in women with baseline choline concentrations below 21.5 μmol/L (all P for nonlinearity = 0.007); higher serum betaine concentrations were associated with a lower decline in MM and a lower increase in FM and FM% among men whose betaine concentrations were lower than 55 μmol/L (all P for nonlinearity < 0.05). These findings suggest that higher concentrations of serum choline and betaine may be associated with favorable changes in body composition profiles among men and women who have relatively low concentrations, especially in men. Novelty Higher concentrations of serum choline and betaine were associated with favorable changes in body composition. Such favorable associations were more pronounced in men.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2019-0778
       
  • Anti-ulcerogenic activity of Gum Arabic in gastric mucosal injury induced
           by ethanol in male albino rats
    • Authors: Mervat S. Taha, Emad. M. El-Sherbiny, Hala. F. Osman
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism, e-First Articles.
      The present study was performed to evaluate the anti-ulcerogenic activity of Acacia senegal (Gum Arabic) against ethanol-induced gastric mucosal injury in rats. Thirty-six adult male albino rats were divided into 4 groups: group 1 served as a control; group 2 consisted of rats that received 15% of gum in drinking water for 2 weeks; group 3 comprised ulcerated animals administered 5 mL of ethanol/kg body weight by gavage; and group 4 consisted of rats received 15% of gum in drinking water for 2 weeks before ethanol administration. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), malondialdehyde (MDA), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-B1), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), total protein, and albumin were assayed in addition to histological study. The results revealed that ethanol decreased SOD, GPx, and PGE2 in tissue and serum total protein and albumin, while increased MDA in tissue, serum TNF-α, IL-B1, PGE2, ALT, AST, and ALP. Histological findings showed less edema and leucocytes infiltration compared with ulcer group. Furthermore, gum administration elevated PGE2, SOD, and GPx and significantly reduced MDA, TNF-α, and IL-B2. In conclusion, Gum Arabic can enhance gastric protection and sustain the integrity of the gastric mucosa. Novelty The selected dose of Gum Arabic has the ability to decrease the pro-inflammatory cytokines in plasma and gastric tissue, thus enhancing gastric protection and maintaining the integrity of the gastric mucosa. Gum Arabic can compensate for the loss of antioxidants.
      Citation: Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
      PubDate: 2020-01-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/apnm-2018-0233
       
 
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