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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 110 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 49)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Change and Adaptation in Socio-Ecological Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Climate law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 199)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mathematics of Climate and Weather Forecasting     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorological Monographs     Hybrid Journal  
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal  
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Monthly Weather Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 125)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Cryosphere Discussions (TCD)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Weather and Forecasting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

              [Sort by number of followers]   [Restore default list]

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Developments in Atmospheric Science
Number of Followers: 27  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0167-5117
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • Further Titles in this Series
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19


      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • Acknowledgements
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19
      Author(s): Michael E. Schlesinger


      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • Inside Front Cover
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19


      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • Participants
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19


      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • A Statistical Intercomparison of Temperature and Precipitation Predicted
           by Four General Circulation Models with Historical Data
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19
      Author(s): Stanley L. Grotch
      This study is a detailed intercomparison of the results produced by four general circulation models (GCMs) that have been used to estimate the climatic consequences of a doubling of the CO2 concentration. Two variables, surface air temperature and precipitation, annually and seasonally averaged, are compared for both the current climate and for the predicted equilibrium changes after a doubling of the atmospheric CO2 concentration. The major question considered here is: “How well do the predictions from different GCMs agree with each other and with historical climatology over different areal extents, from the global scale down to the range of only several gridpoints?” Although the models often agree well when estimating averages over large areas, substantial disagreements become apparent as the spatial scale is reduced. At scales below continental, the correlations observed between different model predictions are often very poor. The implications of this work for investigation of climatic impacts on a regional scale are profound. For these two important variables, at least, the poor agreement between model simulations of the current climate on the regional scale calls into question the ability of these models to quantitatively estimate future climatic change on anything approaching the scale of a few (< 10) gridpoints, which is essential if these results are to be used in meaningful resource-assessment studies. A stronger cooperative effort among the different modelling groups will be necessary to assure that we are getting better agreement for the right reasons, a prerequisite for improving confidence in model projections.

      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • Comparing and Contrasting Holocene and Eemian Warm Periods with
           Greenhouse-Gas-Induced Warming
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19
      Author(s): Michael C. MacCracken , John Kutzbach
      Periods of the past that are estimated to have been warmer than present are of great potential interest for comparison with simulations of future climates associated with greenhouse-gas-induced warming. Certain features of the climates of the mid-Holocene and Eemian periods, both interglacial maxima, are described. The simulated climatic responses to both types of forcing, in terms of land/ocean and latitudinal averages, are also compared. The zonal average and annual (or seasonal) average radiation fluxes associated with the different-from-present orbital conditions that existed for those interglacials are compared to the radiation flux associated with CO2-induced warming. There are some similarities but also significant differences in the two types of radiation flux perturbations, and there are both similarities and differences in the simulated climatic responses.

      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • Utilization of Paleoclimate Results to Validate Projections of a Future
           Greenhouse Warming
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19
      Author(s): Thomas J. Crowley
      Paleoclimate data provide a rich source of information for testing projections of future greenhouse trends. This paper summarizes the present state-of-the-art as to assessments of two important climate problems. (1) Validation of Climate Models: The same climate models that have been used to make greenhouse forecasts have also been used for paleoclimate simulations. Comparisons of model results and observations indicate some impressive successes but also some cases where there are significant divergences between models and observations. However, special conditions associated with the impressive successes could lead to a false confidence in the models; disagreements are a topic of greater concern. It remains to be determined whether the disagreements are due to model limitations or uncertainties in geologic data. (2) Role of CO2 as a Significant Climate Feedback: Paleoclimate studies indicate that the climate system is generally more sensitive than our ability to model it. Addition or subtraction of CO2 leads to a closer agreement between models and observations. In this respect paleoclimate results in general support the conclusion that CO2 is an important climate feedback, with the magnitude of the feedback approximately comparable to the sensitivity of present climate models. If the CO2 projections are correct, comparison of the future warming with past warm periods indicate that there may be no geologic analogs for a future warming; the future greenhouse climate may represent a unique climate realization in earth history.

      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • The Equilibrium Response to Doubling Atmospheric CO2
    • Abstract: Publication date: 1991
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 19
      Author(s): John F.B. Mitchell
      The equilibrium response of climate to increased atmospheric carbon dioxide as simulated by general circulation models is assessed. Changes that are physically plausible are summarized, along with an indication of the confidence attributable to those changes. The main areas of uncertainty are highlighted.

      PubDate: 2013-09-01T11:05:57Z
       
  • Foreword
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Acknowledgements
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Towards reliable global bottom-up estimates of temporal and spatial
           patterns of emissions of trace gases and aerosols from land-use related
           and natural sources
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Methods for stable gas flux determination in aquatic and terrestrial
           systems
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Some recent developments in trace gas flux measurement techniques
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24

      Meteorological techniques for measuring trace gas fluxes on three important scales not well catered for by conventional methods have been discussed: an inverse Lagrangian dispersion method appropriate for the canopy scale, mass balance methods for small and heterogeneous ecosystems and boundary layer budgeting schemes for the regional scale. The inverse Lagrangian analysis offers a relatively simple measurement scheme for inferring fluxes of trace gases and their source-sink distributions within plant canopies. Inputs are the profiles of mean gas concentration and turbulence within and above the canopy. The analysis provides a bridge between chamber and cuvette measurements on soil and foliage elements and flux measurements on a field scale. Mass balance methods are appropriate for flux measurements in small ecosystems, tens of meters in lateral extent. Fluxes from areas of known geometry are calculated from the rate at which the wind transports gas across the upwind and downwind boundaries of the designated area. The method can fill the gap between chambers of, say, 1 m2 in area and conventional micrometeorological methods representing, say, 104 m2. It can suffer from errors arising from the large number of gas analyses required for a flux determination and may become unreliable when there are light winds and variable wind directions. On the other hand, it is non-disturbing, has a simple theoretical basis, smooths over surface heterogeneity and is independent of atmospheric stability or the shape of the wind profile. Convective and nocturnal boundary layer (CBL and NBL) budgeting techniques are discussed in the context of a recent experiment to estimate regional fluxes of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide in a rural area of southeast Australia. CBL techniques estimate the average surface flux over regions of order 100 km2 through the buildup or drawdown of gas concentration in the atmospheric mixed layer and its depth. An integral form of CBL budgeting was used to estimate daily fluxes. Input data were gas concentrations at 22 m and CBL heights obtained with radiosondes. The atmospheric gas concentrations above the CBL were assumed to be the current clean-air baseline values. It was concluded that even with this simplified obsevation scheme, CBL budgeting can be a very useful survey tool and in regions that are homogeneous in the large, can provide better than order of magnitude estimates of trace gas fluxes. NBL budgeting techniques follow the change of gas storage in the surface layer at night when low-level radiative inversions inhibit vertical mixing. The footprint is difficult to estimate, but is of order 1 to 5 km. On one occasion during the experiment, balloon measurements were made up to a height of 100 m, but routinely, tower-based measurements were made to 22 m. It was concluded that for gases whose emissions do not exhibit marked diurnal cycles, NBL budgets may be simpler alternatives than either CBL budgets or conventional micrometeorological measurements made by day. When diurnal variation is large, both day and night measurements are needed to define the 24-hour flux.

      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Working group report how can fluxes of trace gases be validated between
           different scales'
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Experimental designs appropriate for flux determination in terrestrial and
           aquatic ecosystems
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Toward the use of remote sensing and other data to delineate functional
           types in terrestrial and aquatic systems
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Working group report How can we best define functional types and integrate
           state variables and properties in time and space'
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Modelling carbon dioxide in the ocean: A review
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Simulation models of terrestrial trace gas fluxes at soil microsites to
           global scales
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • The application of compensation point concepts in scaling of fluxes
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Working group report Relations between scale, model approach and model
           parameters
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Validation of model results on different scales
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Role of isotopes and tracers in scaling trace gas fluxes
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Inverse modelling approaches to infer surface trace gas fluxes from
           observed atmospheric mixing ratios
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Working group report How should the uncertainties in the results of
           scaling be investigated and decreased'
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Current and future passive remote sensing techniques used to determine
           atmospheric constitutents
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Participants and contributing authors with fields of research
    • Abstract: 1999
      Publication year: 1999
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 24



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Foreword
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 1 Microclimate, air and temperature
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 2 Humidity
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 3 Parameters for describing air masses and vertical motions
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 4 Radiation and light
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 5 Physics of drop formation and micropore condensation
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 6 Atmospheric water and stone weathering
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 7 Atmospheric stability and pollutant dispersion
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 8 Dry deposition of airborne particulate matter: Mechanisms and
           effects
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 9 Introduction to field measurements
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 10 Measuring temperature
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 11 Measuring humidity
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 12 Measuring wind and indoor air motions
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • Chapter 13 Measuring rainfall and windborne droplets
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
  • References index
    • Abstract: 1998
      Publication year: 1998
      Source:Developments in Atmospheric Science, Volume 23



      PubDate: 2012-12-15T09:30:58Z
       
 
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