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  Subjects -> METEOROLOGY (Total: 108 journals)
Showing 1 - 36 of 36 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Meteorologica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Atmospheric Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Advances in Climate Change Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Aeolian Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
American Journal of Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Atmósfera     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atmosphere     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Atmosphere-Ocean     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics (ACP)     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions (ACPD)     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Atmospheric Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
Atmospheric Environment : X     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Atmospheric Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Atmospheric Science Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Boundary-Layer Meteorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Bulletin of Atmospheric Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society     Open Access   (Followers: 47)
Carbon Balance and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Change and Adaptation in Socio-Ecological Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ciencia, Ambiente y Clima     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate Change Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Climate Change Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Climate Change Responses     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Climate Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Climate law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate of the Past (CP)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Climate of the Past Discussions (CPD)     Open Access  
Climate Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Climate Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Climate Risk Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Climate Services     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Climate Summary of South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Climatic Change     Open Access   (Followers: 62)
Current Climate Change Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Developments in Atmospheric Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Dynamics and Statistics of the Climate System     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Earth Perspectives - Transdisciplinarity Enabled     Open Access  
Economics of Disasters and Climate Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Energy & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Environmental and Climate Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Dynamics and Global Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers in Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
GeoHazards     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Atmospheric Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
International Journal of Biometeorology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Environment and Climate Change     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Image and Data Fusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agricultural Meteorology     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 193)
Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Climate     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Climatology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Hydrology and Meteorology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Hydrometeorology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Meteorological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Meteorology and Climate Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Space Weather and Space Climate     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
Journal of the Meteorological Society of Japan     Partially Free   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Weather Modification     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mathematics of Climate and Weather Forecasting     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Mediterranean Marine Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meteorologica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Meteorological Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Meteorologische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Mètode Science Studies Journal : Annual Review     Open Access  
Michigan Journal of Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Modeling Earth Systems and Environment     Hybrid Journal  
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Monthly Weather Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Nature Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 119)
Nature Reports Climate Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Nīvār     Open Access  
npj Climate and Atmospheric Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Atmospheric Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Open Journal of Modern Hydrology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revista Brasileira de Meteorologia     Open Access  
Revista Iberoamericana de Bioeconomía y Cambio Climático     Open Access  
Russian Meteorology and Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Space Weather     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Studia Geophysica et Geodaetica     Hybrid Journal  
Tellus A     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Tellus B     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
The Cryosphere (TC)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
The Cryosphere Discussions (TCD)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
The Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Theoretical and Applied Climatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Tropical Cyclone Research and Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Urban Climate     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Weather     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Weather and Climate Dynamics     Open Access  
Weather and Climate Extremes     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Weather and Forecasting     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Weatherwise     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
气候与环境研究     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

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Journal Cover
The Cryosphere (TC)
Journal Prestige (SJR): 3.034
Citation Impact (citeScore): 5
Number of Followers: 5  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1994-0416 - ISSN (Online) 1994-0424
Published by Copernicus Publications Homepage  [62 journals]
  • Snow depth on Arctic sea ice from historical in situ data

    • Abstract: Snow depth on Arctic sea ice from historical in situ data
      Elena V. Shalina and Stein Sandven
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1867-1886, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1867-2018, 2018
      In this paper we analyze snow data from Soviet airborne expeditions, Sever, which operated in late winter 1959-1986, in the Arctic and made snow measurements on the ice around plane landing sites. The snow measurements were made on the multiyear ice in the central Arctic and on the first-year ice in the Eurasian seas in the areas for which snow characteristics are poorly described in the literature. The main goal of this study is to produce an improved data set of snow depth on the sea ice.
      PubDate: 2018-06-05T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Seasonal monitoring of melt and accumulation within the deep percolation
           zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet and comparison with simulations of
           regional climate modeling

    • Abstract: Seasonal monitoring of melt and accumulation within the deep percolation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet and comparison with simulations of regional climate modeling
      Achim Heilig, Olaf Eisen, Michael MacFerrin, Marco Tedesco, and Xavier Fettweis
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1851-1866, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1851-2018, 2018
      This paper presents data on temporal changes in snow and firn, which were not available before. We present data on water infiltration in the percolation zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet that improve our understanding of liquid water retention in snow and firn and mass transfer. We compare those findings with model simulations. It appears that simulated accumulation in terms of SWE is fairly accurate, while modeling of the individual parameters density and liquid water content is incorrect.
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • West Antarctic sites for subglacial drilling to test for past
           ice-sheet collapse

    • Abstract: West Antarctic sites for subglacial drilling to test for past ice-sheetcollapse
      Perry Spector, John Stone, David Pollard, Trevor Hillebrand, Cameron Lewis, and Joel Gombiner
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-88,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Cosmogenic-nuclide analyses in bedrock recovered from below the West Antarctic Ice Sheet have the potential to establish whether and when large-scale deglaciation occurred in the past. Here we (i) discuss the criteria and considerations for subglacial drill sites, (ii) evaluate candidate sites in West Antarctica, and (iii) describe reconnaissance at three West Antarctic sites, focusing on the Pirrit Hills, which we present as a case study of site selection on the scale of an individual nunatak.
      PubDate: 2018-06-04T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Exploration of Antarctic Ice Sheet 100-year contribution to sea
           level rise and associated model uncertainties using the ISSM framework

    • Abstract: Exploration of Antarctic Ice Sheet 100-year contribution to sea levelrise and associated model uncertainties using the ISSM framework
      Nicole-Jeanne Schlegel, Helene Seroussi, Michael P. Schodlok, Eric Y. Larour, Carmen Boening, Daniel Limonadi, Michael M. Watkins, Mathieu Morlighem, and Michiel R. van den Broeke
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-105,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Using NASA supercomputers and a novel framework, in which Sandia National Laboratories' statistical software is embedded in the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's ice sheet model, we run a range of 100-year warming scenarios for Antarctica. We find that 1.2 meters of sea level contribution is achievable, but not likely. Also, we find that bedrock topography beneath the ice drives potential for regional sea level contribution, highlighting the need for accurate bedrock mapping of the ice sheet interior.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Velocity increases at Cook Glacier, East Antarctica linked to ice shelf
           loss and a subglacial flood event

    • Abstract: Velocity increases at Cook Glacier, East Antarctica linked to ice shelf loss and a subglacial flood event
      Bertie W. J. Miles, Chris R. Stokes, and Stewart S. R. Jamieson
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-107,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Cook Glacier is one of the largest in East Antarctica may have made significant contributions to sea level during past warm periods. However, despite its potential importance there have been no long-term observations of its velocity. Here, through estimating velocity and ice-front position from satellite imagery and aerial photography we show that there have been large previously undocumented changes in the velocity of Cook Glacier in response to ice shelf loss and a subglacial drainage event.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Future interannual variability of Arctic sea ice in coupled climate
           models

    • Abstract: Future interannual variability of Arctic sea ice in coupledclimate models
      John R. Mioduszewski, Steve Vavrus, Muyin Wang, Marika Holland, and Laura Landrum
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-100,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Arctic sea ice is projected to thin substantially in every season by the end of the 21st century with a corresponding increase in its inter-annual variability as the rate of ice loss peaks This typically occurs when the mean ice thickness falls between 0.2 m and 0.6 m. The high variability in both growth and melt processes are the primary factors resulting in increased ice variability. This study emphasizes the importance of short term variations in ice cover within the mean downward trend.
      PubDate: 2018-06-01T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Spatial and temporal distributions of surface mass balance between
           Concordia and Vostok stations, Antarctica, from combined radar and ice
           core data: first results and detailed error analysis

    • Abstract: Spatial and temporal distributions of surface mass balance between Concordia and Vostok stations, Antarctica, from combined radar and ice core data: first results and detailed error analysis
      Emmanuel Le Meur, Olivier Magand, Laurent Arnaud, Michel Fily, Massimo Frezzotti, Marie Cavitte, Robert Mulvaney, and Stefano Urbini
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1831-1850, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1831-2018, 2018
      This paper presents surface mass balance measurements from both GPR and ice core data collected during a traverse in a so-far-unexplored area between the DC and Vostok stations. Results presented here will contribute to a better knowledge of the global mass balance of the Antarctic ice sheet and thus help in constraining its contribution to sea level rise. Another novelty of the paper resides in the comprehensive error budget proposed for the method used for inferring accumulation rates.
      PubDate: 2018-05-31T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Automated detection of ice cliffs within supraglacial debris cover

    • Abstract: Automated detection of ice cliffs within supraglacial debris cover
      Sam Herreid and Francesca Pellicciotti
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1811-1829, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1811-2018, 2018
      Ice cliffs are steep, bare ice features that can develop on the lower reaches of a glacier where the surface is covered by a layer of rock debris. Debris cover generally slows the rate of glacier melt, but ice cliffs act as small windows of higher rates of melt. It is therefore important to map these features, a process which we have automated. On a global scale, ice cliffs have variable geometries and characteristics. The method we have developed can accommodate this variability automatically.
      PubDate: 2018-05-31T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Warm winter, thin ice'

    • Abstract: Warm winter, thin ice'
      Julienne C. Stroeve, David Schroder, Michel Tsamados, and Daniel Feltham
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1791-1809, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1791-2018, 2018
      This paper looks at the impact of the warm winter and anomalously low number of total freezing degree days during winter 2016/2017 on thermodynamic ice growth and overall thickness anomalies. The approach relies on evaluation of satellite data (CryoSat-2) and model output. While there is a negative feedback between rapid ice growth for thin ice, with thermodynamic ice growth increasing over time, since 2012 that relationship is changing, in part because the freeze-up is happening later.
      PubDate: 2018-05-30T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Remote-sensing estimate of glacier mass balance over the central
           Nyainqentanglha Range during 1968 – ∼ 2013

    • Abstract: Remote-sensing estimate of glacier mass balance over the central Nyainqentanglha Range during 1968 – ∼ 2013
      Kunpeng Wu, Shiyin Liu, Zongli Jiang, Junli Xu, and Junfeng Wei
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-90,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      This study presents diminishing ice cover in the central Nyainqentanglha Range by 0.68 % ± 0.05 % a−1, and a mean mass deficit of 0.46 % ± 0.04 m w.e. a−1 since 1968. Mass losses accelerating from 0.42 % ± 0.05 m w.e. a−1 to 0.60 % ± 0.20 m w.e. a−1 during 1968–2000 and 2000–~2013, with thinning noticeably greater on the debris-covered ice than the clean ice. Surface-elevation changes can be influenced by ice cliffs, as well as debris cover, and land- or lake-terminating glaciers and supraglacial lakes.
      PubDate: 2018-05-30T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Solar SW radiative transfer in bubbled ice: spectral
           considerations, subsurface enhancement, and inclusions

    • Abstract: Solar SW radiative transfer in bubbled ice: spectral considerations,subsurface enhancement, and inclusions
      Andrew R. D. Smedley, Geoffrey W. Evatt, Amy Mallinson, and Eleanor Harvey
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-79,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      We describe and validate a Monte Carlo model to track photons over the full range of solarwavelengths as they travel into optically thick bubbled ice. The model considers surface effects,scattering by bubbles and spectral absorption due to the ice. Using representative Antarctic ice bubbleradii and number concentrations we calculate spectral albedos and spectrally-integrated downwellingand upwelling radiative fluxes as a function of depth and find there is a marked subsurface enhancement in both the downwelling and upwelling fluxes relative to the incidence irradiance. This is due to the interaction between the refractive air-ice interface and the highly scattering interior and is particularly notable at blue and UV wavelengths which correspond to the minimum of the absorption spectrum of ice. A subsurface peak is also observed in the available radiative flux at depths of ~ 1 cm, and consequently the attenuation is more complex than can be described by a simple Lambert-Beer style exponential decay law. We find a moderate dependence on the solar zenith angle and surface conditions such as altitude and cloud optical depth. For macroscopic absorbing inclusions we observe geometry- and size- dependent self-shadowing that reduces the fractional irradiance incident on the inclusion's surface. Despite this the inclusions are subject to fluxes that are several times the magnitude of the single scattering contribution and act as local photon sinks. Such enhancement may have consequences for the energy budget in regions of the cryosphere where particulates are present near the surface. These results also have particular relevance to measurements of the internal radiation field: account must be taken of both self-shadowing and the optical effect of introducing the detector.
      PubDate: 2018-05-29T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Impacts of a lengthening open water season on Alaskan coastal communities:
           deriving locally relevant indices from large-scale datasets and community
           observations

    • Abstract: Impacts of a lengthening open water season on Alaskan coastal communities: deriving locally relevant indices from large-scale datasets and community observations
      Rebecca J. Rolph, Andrew R. Mahoney, John Walsh, and Philip A. Loring
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1779-1790, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1779-2018, 2018
      Using thresholds of physical climate variables developed from community observations, together with two large-scale datasets, we have produced local indices directly relevant to the impacts of a reduced sea ice cover on Alaska coastal communities. We demonstrate how community observations can inform use of large-scale datasets to derive these locally relevant indices.
      PubDate: 2018-05-28T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Snow depth uncertainty and its implications on satellite derived Antarctic
           sea ice thickness

    • Abstract: Snow depth uncertainty and its implications on satellite derived Antarctic sea ice thickness
      Daniel Price, Iman Soltanzadeh, and Wolfgang Rack
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-92,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      Snow depth on Antarctica sea ice is poorly mapped, but accurate data is required to produce sea ice thickness from satellites. This study has used remote sensing/modeling to map the snow depth in a case study area in the Ross Sea. The models provide good snow depths at least as accurate as remote sensing techniques. These snow depths are used to infer sea ice thickness from satellites. With more work, a combination of these techniques could provide a basin-scale sea ice thickness dataset.
      PubDate: 2018-05-28T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Seasonal variations of the backscattering coefficient measured by radar
           altimeters over the Antarctic Ice Sheet

    • Abstract: Seasonal variations of the backscattering coefficient measured by radar altimeters over the Antarctic Ice Sheet
      Fifi Ibrahime Adodo, Frédérique Remy, and Ghislain Picard
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1767-1778, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1767-2018, 2018
      In Antarctica, the seasonal cycle of the backscatter behaves differently at high and low frequencies, peaking in winter and in summer, respectively. At the intermediate frequency, some areas behave analogously to low frequency in terms of the seasonal cycle, but other areas behave analogously to high frequency. This calls into question the empirical relationships often used to correct elevation changes from radar penetration into the snowpack using backscatter.
      PubDate: 2018-05-25T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Iron oxides in the cryoconite on the glaciers over Tibetan Plateau:
           abundance, speciation and implications

    • Abstract: Iron oxides in thecryoconiteon the glaciers over Tibetan Plateau: abundance, speciationand implications
      Zhiyuan Cong, Shaopeng Gao, Wancang Zhao, Xin Wang, Guangming Wu, Yulan Zhang, Shichang Kang, Yongqin Liu, and Junfeng Ji
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-70,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 1 comment)
      Cryoconites from glaciers in Tibetan Plateau and surroundings were studied for iron oxides. We found that goethite is the predominant iron oxide form. Using the abundance, speciation and optical properties of iron oxides, the total light absorption was quantitatively attributed to goethite, hematite, black carbon and organic matters. Such findings are essential to understand the relative significance of anthropogenic/natural impact.
      PubDate: 2018-05-25T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Quantifying light absorption and its source attribution of insoluble
           light-absorbing particles in Tibet an Plateau glaciers from 2013–2015

    • Abstract: Quantifying light absorption and its source attribution of insoluble light-absorbing particles in Tibet an Plateau glaciers from 2013–2015
      Xin Wang, Hailun Wei, Jun Liu, Baiqing Xu, and Mo Wang
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-86,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      A total of 189 snow/ice samples from 67 sites of 7 glaciers in the Tibetan Plateau during 2013–2015 were collected for optical and chemical analysis. The results indicated that the mass mixing ratios of black carbon, insoluble organic carbon, and iron all showed a tendency to decrease from north to south, and the industrial pollution (33.1 %), biomass/biofuel burning (29.4 %), and soil dust (37.5 %) were the major sources of the light-absorbing impurities in Tibetan Plateau glaciers.
      PubDate: 2018-05-25T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Three years of sea ice freeboard, snow depth, and ice thickness of the
           Weddell Sea from Operation IceBridge and CryoSat-2

    • Abstract: Three years of sea ice freeboard, snow depth, and ice thickness of the Weddell Sea from Operation IceBridge and CryoSat-2
      Ron Kwok and Sahra Kacimi
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-98,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 0 comments)
      The variability of snow depth and ice thickness in three years of repeat surveys of an IceBridge (OIB) transect across the Weddell Sea is examined. Retrieved thicknesses suggest a highly variable but broadly thicker ice cover compared to that inferred from drilling and ship-based measurements. Use of lidar and radar altimeters to estimate snow depth for thickness calculations is analyzed and the need for better characterization of biases due to radar penetration effects is highlighted.
      PubDate: 2018-05-25T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Modelling the fate of surface melt on the Larsen C Ice Shelf

    • Abstract: Modelling the fate of surface melt on the Larsen C Ice Shelf
      Sammie Buzzard, Daniel Feltham, and Daniela Flocco
      The Cryosphere Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-2018-84,2018
      Manuscript under review for TC (discussion: open, 1 comment)
      Surface lakes on ice shelves can not only change the amount of solar energy the ice shelf receives, but may also play a pivotal role in sudden ice shelf collapse such as that of the Larsen B Ice Shelf in 2002.
      Here we simulate current and future melting on Larsen C, Antarctica’s most northern ice shelf and one where lakes have been observed. We find that should future lakes occur closer to the ice shelf front they may contain sufficient meltwater to contribute to ice shelf instability.
      PubDate: 2018-05-25T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Archival processes of the water stable isotope signal in East Antarctic
           ice cores

    • Abstract: Archival processes of the water stable isotope signal in East Antarctic ice cores
      Mathieu Casado, Amaelle Landais, Ghislain Picard, Thomas Münch, Thomas Laepple, Barbara Stenni, Giuliano Dreossi, Alexey Ekaykin, Laurent Arnaud, Christophe Genthon, Alexandra Touzeau, Valerie Masson-Delmotte, and Jean Jouzel
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1745-1766, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1745-2018, 2018
      Ice core isotopic records rely on the knowledge of the processes involved in the archival processes of the snow. In the East Antarctic Plateau, post-deposition processes strongly affect the signal found in the surface and buried snow compared to the initial climatic signal. We evaluate the different contributions to the surface snow isotopic composition between the precipitation and the exchanges with the atmosphere and the variability of the isotopic signal found in profiles from snow pits.
      PubDate: 2018-05-24T12:21:14+02:00
       
  • Landform partitioning and estimates of deep storage of soil organic matter
           in Zackenberg, Greenland

    • Abstract: Landform partitioning and estimates of deep storage of soil organic matter in Zackenberg, Greenland
      Juri Palmtag, Stefanie Cable, Hanne H. Christiansen, Gustaf Hugelius, and Peter Kuhry
      The Cryosphere, 12, 1735-1744, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-12-1735-2018, 2018
      This study aims to improve the previous soil organic carbon and total nitrogen storage estimates for the Zackenberg area (NE Greenland) that were based on a land cover classification approach, by using geomorphological upscaling. The landform-based approach more correctly constrains the depositional areas in alluvial fans and deltas with high SOC and TN storage. This research emphasises the need to consider geomorphology when assessing SOC pools in mountain permafrost landscapes.
      PubDate: 2018-05-24T12:21:14+02:00
       
 
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