Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1815 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (260 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (96 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (57 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1091 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (183 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (1091 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
IDS Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Computational Social Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Illness, Crisis & Loss     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Im@go. A Journal of the Social Imaginary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
imagonautas : Revista interdisciplinaria sobre imaginarios sociales     Open Access  
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
In Situ : Au regard des sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inclusión y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research     Open Access  
Indonesia Prime     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Infinitum: Revista Multidisciplinar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informação em Pauta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informes Científicos - Técnicos UNPA     Open Access  
Infrastructure Complexity     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
INSANCITA : Journal of Islamic Studies in Indonesia and Southeast Asia     Open Access  
Integrated Social Science Journal : Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University     Open Access  
Inter Faculty     Open Access  
Interações : Cultura e Comunidade     Open Access  
Interim : Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International and Multidisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Development Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences (IJASOS)     Open Access  
International Journal for Transformative Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Academic Research in Business, Arts & Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business and Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue internationale d’études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Cultural and Social Studies (IntJCSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cultural Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Growth and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion     Open Access  
International Journal of Innovative Research and Scientific Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Innovative Research in Social and Natural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Integrated Education and Development     Open Access  
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Korean Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Language and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Management and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Management, Economics and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Qualitative Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social and Allied Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social And Humanities Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
International Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Social Sciences and Education Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Synergy and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of the Sociology of Leisure     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal Pedagogy of Social Studies     Open Access  
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
International Review of Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 233)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
InterSciencePlace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intersticios Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigación Valdizana     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
Iztapalapa : Revista de ciencias sociales y humanidades     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Izvestia Ural Federal University Journal. Series 3. Social and Political Sciences     Open Access  
J : Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Janapriya Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Burirum Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences Research     Open Access  
Journal of Cape Verdean Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Community Development and Life Quality     Open Access  
Journal of Community Services and Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Comparative Family Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Computational Social Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Geography, Politics and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate School Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Surin Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, Rajapruk University     Open Access  
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of International Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Multicultural Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of New Brunswick Studies / Revue d’études sur le Nouveau-Brunswick     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 365, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Population and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Review     Open Access  
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmiah Peuradeun     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Lakon     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
KnE Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology
Journal Prestige (SJR): 4.302
Citation Impact (citeScore): 6
Number of Followers: 365  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0022-3514 - ISSN (Online) 1939-1315
Published by APA Homepage  [90 journals]
  • Frustration-affirmation' Thwarted goals motivate compliance with
           social norms for violence and nonviolence.
    • Abstract: When thwarted goals increase endorsement of violence, it may not always reflect antisocial tendencies or some breakdown of self-regulation per se; such responses can also reflect an active process of self-regulation, whose purpose is to comply with the norms of one’s social environment. In the present experiments (total N = 2,145), the causal link between thwarted goals and endorsement of violent means (guns and war) was found to be contingent on perceptions that violence is normatively valued. Experiments 1–3 establish that thwarted goals increase endorsement of violence primarily among U.S. adults of a lower educational background and/or men who endorse a masculine honor culture. Experiment 4 manipulates the perceived normative consensus of college educated Americans, and demonstrates that thwarted goals increase college educated Americans’ endorsement of whatever norm is salient: prowar or antiwar. Generalizing the model beyond violent means, Experiment 5 demonstrates that goal-thwarted Europeans report increased willingness to volunteer for refugee support activities if they perceive strong social norms to volunteer. Altogether, these findings support a frustration-affirmation model rather than frustration-aggression, whereby thwarted goals increase compliance with perceived norms for behavior, which can increase endorsement of violent means such as guns and war, but also nonviolent charitable actions. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 23 Apr 2020 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The reactance decoy effect: How including an appeal before a target
           message increases persuasion.
    • Abstract: We propose and demonstrate in 11 studies, including more than 4,700 observations, that the persuasiveness of a target message can be increased by the inclusion of a reactance decoy. A reactance decoy is a persuasive message presented before the target message and includes an attitude measurement toward the decoy object. The effect can be explained with reactance theory: The decoy message is presented to create reactance and expressing their attitude toward the decoy object gives participants the opportunity to vent, that is, to reestablish their threatened freedom. This reduces reactance toward the subsequently presented target message, positively influences participants’ willingness to buy the target object (Studies 1, 4a and 4b, 7, and 8), their attitudes toward it (4a and 4b, 5, 7, and 8), their willingness to pay (Study 7), as well as behavioral measures such as time spent looking at the target object description (Study 7) and paying money to enter a raffle for the chance to win the target object (Studies 5 and 6). Moreover, forewarning participants of the persuasive intent of a subsequent message produced greater reactance, which was then vented on the decoy, and in turn increased the valuation of the target object (Study 1). By interchanging the products used as decoy or target objects, we also demonstrate experimentally that the reactance decoy effect occurs independently of the concrete stimuli being used (Study 3). In sum, the reactance decoy effect is a new theoretical framework that also bears important practical applications for many areas of social influence. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 16 Apr 2020 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Does spending money on others promote happiness': A registered
           replication report.
    • Abstract: Research indicates that spending money on others—prosocial spending—leads to greater happiness than spending money on oneself (e.g., Dunn, Aknin, & Norton, 2008, 2014). These findings have received widespread attention because they offer insight into why people engage in costly prosocial behavior, and what constitutes happier spending more broadly. However, most studies on prosocial spending (like most research on the emotional benefits of generosity) utilized small sample sizes (n < 100/cell). In light of new, improved standards for evidentiary value, we conducted high-powered registered replications of the central paradigms used in prosocial spending research. In Experiment 1, 712 students were randomly assigned to make a purchase for themselves or a stranger in need and then reported their happiness. As predicted, participants assigned to engage in prosocial (vs. personal) spending reported greater momentary happiness. In Experiment 2, 1950 adults recalled a time they spent money on themselves or someone else and then reported their current happiness; contrary to predictions, participants in the prosocial spending condition did not report greater happiness than those in the personal spending condition. Because low levels of task engagement may have produced these null results, we conducted a replication with minor changes designed to increase engagement; in this Experiment 3 (N = 5,199), participants who recalled a prosocial (vs. personal) spending memory reported greater happiness but differences were small. Taken together, these studies support the hypothesis that spending money on others does promote happiness, but demonstrate that the magnitude of the effect depends on several methodological features. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 06 Apr 2020 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • On the effectiveness of approach-avoidance instructions and training for
           changing evaluations of social groups.
    • Abstract: Prior evidence suggests that White participants who repeatedly approach images of Black people and avoid images of White people can exhibit a reduction in implicit racial bias (Kawakami, Phills, Steele, & Dovidio, 2007). In contrast, a recent study by Van Dessel, De Houwer, Gast, and Smith (2015) showed that mere instructions to perform approach-avoidance training in an upcoming phase produces a similar change in implicit evaluations of unfamiliar but not familiar social groups. We report 4 experiments that examined the replicability and generalizability of these findings for well-known social groups. Experiment 1 was a replication of the study by Kawakami et al. (2007) in a different domain (i.e., Flemish students’ bias toward Turkish people) showing relatively weak evidence for small approach-avoidance training effects on implicit evaluations and explicit liking ratings. Experiment 2 replicated the finding of Van Dessel et al. (2015) that approach-avoidance instructions do not influence implicit evaluations of social out-groups and found no instruction effects even when participants first completed training with nonsocial stimuli. Experiment 3 established the presence of a small approach-avoidance training effect on implicit (but not explicit evaluations) in a large online sample. Experiment 4 directly compared approach-avoidance training and instruction effects, corroborating (a) the effect of training on implicit evaluations which was both small and subject to boundary conditions and (b) the absence of such an effect of instructions. There were again no effects on explicit evaluations. Whereas the current findings provide supportive evidence for training-based approach-avoidance effects (on Implicit Association Test [IAT] scores: meta-analytic effect size current experiments: d = 0.18, Bayes Factor = 65.22; current and prior experiments: d = 0.23, Bayes Factor = 4404.42) and evidence for the absence of instruction-based effects (Bayes Factors < 0.19), they also illustrate that there is still much uncertainty regarding the boundary conditions of these effects and the underlying mental processes. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Mar 2020 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The development of effortful control from late childhood to young
           adulthood.
    • Abstract: The present study investigated the developmental precursors of effortful control, a temperament trait that involves the propensity to regulate one’s impulses and behaviors, to motivate the self toward a goal when there are conflicting desires, and to focus and shift attention easily. Data came from the California Families Project, a multimethod longitudinal study of 674 Mexican-origin youth (and their parents), who were assessed at ages 10, 12, 14, 16, and 19. Effortful control (measured via self- and parent-reports) was moderately stable over time (r = .47 from age 10 to 19), and its developmental trajectory followed a u-shaped pattern (decreasing from age 10 to 14, before increasing from age 14 to 19). Findings from latent growth curve models showed that youth who experience more hostility from their parents, associate more with deviant peers, attend more violent schools, live in more violent neighborhoods, and experience more ethnic discrimination tend to exhibit an exacerbated dip in effortful control. In contrast, youth with parents who closely monitor their behavior and whereabouts exhibited a shallower dip in effortful control. Analyses of the facets of effortful control revealed important disparities in their trajectories; specifically inhibitory control showed linear increases, attention control showed linear decreases, and activation control showed the same u-shaped trajectory as overall effortful control. Moreover, most of the precursors of effortful control replicated for inhibitory control and attention control, but not for activation control. We discuss the broader implications of the findings for adolescent personality development and self-regulation. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 30 Jan 2020 05:00:00 GMT
       
  • You’re still so vain: Changes in narcissism from young adulthood to
           middle age.
    • Abstract: To date, there have been no long-term longitudinal studies of continuity and change in narcissism. This study investigated rank-order consistency and mean-level changes in overall narcissism and 3 of its facets (leadership, vanity, and entitlement) over a 23-year period spanning young adulthood (Mage = 18, N = 486) to midlife (Mage = 41, N = 237). We also investigated whether life experiences predicted changes in narcissism from young adulthood to midlife, and whether young adult narcissism predicted life experiences assessed in midlife. Narcissism and its facets showed strong rank-order consistency from age 18 to 41, with latent correlations ranging from .61 to .85. We found mean-level decreases in overall narcissism (d = −0.79) and all 3 facets, namely leadership (d = −0.67), vanity (d = −0.46), and entitlement (d = −0.82). Participants who were in supervisory positions showed smaller decreases in leadership, and participants who experienced more unstable relationships and who were physically healthier showed smaller decreases in vanity from young adulthood to middle age. Analyses of the long-term correlates of narcissism showed that young adults with higher narcissism and leadership levels were more likely to be in supervisory positions in middle age. Young adults with higher vanity levels had fewer children and were more likely to divorce by middle age. Together, the findings suggest that people tend to become less narcissistic from young adulthood to middle age, and the magnitude of this decline is related to the particular career and family pathways a person pursues during this stage of life. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 31 Oct 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Owner of a lonely heart: The stability of loneliness across the life span.
    • Abstract: Individuals feel lonely when they perceive a discrepancy between their aspired and their actually experienced amount of closeness and intimacy in social relationships. In the present study, we disentangled developmental constancy factors, time-varying factors such as person-environment transactions, and stochastic mechanisms as sources of interindividual differences in loneliness by applying STARTS models in nationally representative samples from Germany (n = 13,397), Switzerland (n = 6,599), Australia (n = 30,496), and The Netherlands (n = 12,810). Across the 4 studies, we found trait-like sources reflecting developmental constancy factors and the influence of time-varying factors to account for 19–43% and 23–30% of interindividual differences in loneliness, respectively. Depending on the type of measurement instrument, state-like stochastic mechanisms accounted for 30% to 55% of interindividual differences, whereby multi-item measures were less affected by stochastic mechanisms. We found gradual sex differences but considerable differences between age groups regarding the amount of interindividual differences in loneliness accounted for by the three sources. Taken together, the results demonstrate that interindividual differences in loneliness are to a large degree trait-like. Based on these findings, we discuss implications for theory and measurement. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Sep 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Family environment and self-esteem development: A longitudinal study from
           age 10 to 16.
    • Abstract: In this study, we examined the effect of family environment on self-esteem development from late childhood (age 10) through adolescence (age 16), using 4-wave longitudinal data from 674 Mexican-origin families living in the United States. To assess family environment, a multi-informant approach was used (i.e., mother, father, and child) to construct latent variables that minimize the influence of response biases. Using cross-lagged panel models (CLPMs) and random intercepts cross-lagged panel models (RI-CLPMs), we tested the prospective effects of parenting behaviors (warmth, hostility, monitoring, and involvement in child’s education) and other characteristics of the family environment (quality of parental relationship, positive family values, maternal and paternal depression, economic conditions of the family, and presence of father). In the CLPMs, significant positive effects on children’s self-esteem emerged for warmth, monitoring, low maternal depression, economic security (vs. hardship), and presence (vs. absence) of father. With regard to the reciprocal effects, children’s self-esteem predicted positive family values (i.e., importance and centrality of the family) of mother and father. In the RI-CLPMs, the pattern of results was similar (in terms of point estimates of the effects); however, only the effects of maternal depression on child self-esteem, and the effect of child self-esteem on family values of father, were statistically significant. In all models, the effects did not differ significantly for boys and girls, or across ages 10 to 16. The findings suggest that multiple features of the family environment shape the development of self-esteem during late childhood and adolescence. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 19 Sep 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • “The beauty myth: Prescriptive beauty norms for women reflect hierarch-
           enhancing motivations leading to discriminatory employment practices”:
           Correction to Ramati-Ziber, Shnabel, and Glick (2019).
    • Abstract: Reports an error in "The beauty myth: Prescriptive beauty norms for women reflect hierarchy-enhancing motivations leading to discriminatory employment practices" by Leeat Ramati-Ziber, Nurit Shnabel and Peter Glick (Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Advanced Online Publication, Aug 15, 2019, np). In the article, the first sentence was not set as an epigraph on the first page of the article due to a printer error. All versions of this article have been corrected. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2019-47721-001.) We proposed that the Prescriptive Beauty Norm (PBN), the injunctive demand for women to intensively pursue beauty, reflects motives to maintain gender hierarchy and translates into employment discrimination. In Studies 1a and 1b, the PBN (distinct from other “beauty myth” [Wolf, 1990] components; namely, bodily and grooming standards, and attainability beliefs) uniquely correlated with hierarchy-supporting values and ideologies. In Study 2, experimentally threatening (vs. affirming) gender hierarchy increased PBN endorsement among sexist (but not nonsexist) participants, an effect mediated by power values. In Studies 3 and 4, participants who scored high (vs. low) in sexism (Study 3) and social dominance orientation (Study 4) enforced higher appearance requirements for women in powerful (vs. entry-level), masculine professions. This “beauty tax” targeted women more than men (Study 3) and was mediated by PBN endorsement (Study 4). Illustrating real-life implications, in an organizational setting (Study 5), sexism predicted penalizing “insufficiently groomed” female candidates more for high-power (vs. low-power) jobs. Finally, supporting the hypothesis that the PBN represents a contemporary, subtle replacement for traditional hierarchy-maintaining ideologies that have lost their influence in modern secular society, Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) correlated with PBN endorsement among secular more than among religious respondents (Study 6), whose “ideological arsenal” contains more straightforward means to police women. We discuss practical implications for gender equality, as well as theoretical implications for reconciling evolutionary and feminist perspectives on beauty norms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Embodied remorse: Physical displays of remorse increase positive responses
           to public apologies, but have negligible effects on forgiveness.
    • Abstract: Public apologies struggle to communicate genuineness. Previous studies have shown that, in response to public apologies, perceptions of remorse and levels of forgiveness are often low, while skepticism about motive is high. Furthermore, attempts to reduce mistrust of public apologies by manipulating the verbal component of the message have had limited success. Across 6 studies (combined N = 3,818), we examined whether people respond more positively to public apologies if the apologies are accompanied by nonverbal demonstrations of remorse: operationalized as kneeling (Studies 1 and 6) and crying (Studies 2–5). Overall, embodied remorse had small-to-medium effects on perceived remorse, and through this relationship had reliable effects on perceived likelihood of reoffending, empathy, positive appraisals of the transgressor, and satisfaction with the apology. Positive effects of embodiment emerged regardless of whether transgressions were committed by a collective (Studies 1, 2, and 6) or an individual (Studies 3–5), and were equally strong regardless of whether or not the transgressor issued an apology (Studies 4 and 5). Furthermore, embodied remorse appeared to lie beyond suspicion: if anything, those low in dispositional trust were more positively influenced by embodied remorse than those high in dispositional trust. Despite all these positive effects, embodied remorse did not have a significant effect on forgiveness in any of the studies, and an internal meta-analysis revealed a significant effect that was of negligible size. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Sep 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The social costs of forgiving following multiple-victim transgressions.
    • Abstract: A single transgressor sometimes harms more than just 1 victim. We examine a previously undocumented social cost of forgiving following these multiple-victim transgressions. We find that nonforgiving victims believe that other victims who forgive the common transgressor make their decisions to withhold forgiveness appear ungenerous. Faced with this threat, nonforgiving victims report that other forgiving (vs. nonforgiving) victims have overclaimed their standing to forgive the common transgressor and consequently perceive these forgiving victims as demonstrating a lack of benevolence toward them. Nonforgiving victims also perceive forgiving victims to have relatively little integrity. We test these social costs of forgiving in the field and in the lab across 7 studies plus a meta-analysis of 5 of those studies. We also identify 1 route by which forgiving victims can attenuate the social costs they face: they can affirm other victims’ decisions to withhold forgiveness. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 29 Aug 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Brokering orientations and social capital: Influencing others’
           relationships shapes status and trust.
    • Abstract: Individuals often influence others’ relationships, for better or worse. We conceptualize social influence processes that impact others’ social networks as brokering, and advance a multifaceted model that explains how brokering behaviors can create, terminate, reinforce, and modify others’ network ties. To empirically study brokering, we introduce and validate the Brokering Orientations Scale (BOS), a multidimensional measure that captures individuals’ behavioral tendencies to act as intermediaries, conciliators, and dividers. Six studies (N = 1,723) explored the psychometric properties of the BOS (Studies 1a–c) and investigated the effects of distinct forms of brokering on brokers’ social capital (Studies 2–4). The intermediary, conciliatory and divisive brokering orientations related differently to extraversion, agreeableness, perspective-taking, moral identity, and Machiavellianism, among other individual differences. The effects of brokering on social capital varied as a function of the brokering orientation and the aspect of social capital. Intermediary behavior garnered status; conciliatory behavior promoted trust and prestige; and divisive behavior fueled brokers’ perceived dominance. Overall, the current article elucidates the concept of brokering orientations, introduces a novel measure of brokering orientations, and explains how brokering behavior shapes brokers’ social capital. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Mon, 19 Aug 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • The beauty myth: Prescriptive beauty norms for women reflect
           hierarchy-enhancing motivations leading to discriminatory employment
           practices.
    • Abstract: [Correction Notice: An Erratum for this article was reported online in Journal of Personality and Social Psychology on Sep 5 2019 (see record 2019-53417-001). In the article, the first sentence was not set as an epigraph on the first page of the article due to a printer error. All versions of this article have been corrected.] We proposed that the Prescriptive Beauty Norm (PBN), the injunctive demand for women to intensively pursue beauty, reflects motives to maintain gender hierarchy and translates into employment discrimination. In Studies 1a and 1b, the PBN (distinct from other “beauty myth” [Wolf, 1990] components; namely, bodily and grooming standards, and attainability beliefs) uniquely correlated with hierarchy-supporting values and ideologies. In Study 2, experimentally threatening (vs. affirming) gender hierarchy increased PBN endorsement among sexist (but not nonsexist) participants, an effect mediated by power values. In Studies 3 and 4, participants who scored high (vs. low) in sexism (Study 3) and social dominance orientation (Study 4) enforced higher appearance requirements for women in powerful (vs. entry-level), masculine professions. This “beauty tax” targeted women more than men (Study 3) and was mediated by PBN endorsement (Study 4). Illustrating real-life implications, in an organizational setting (Study 5), sexism predicted penalizing “insufficiently groomed” female candidates more for high-power (vs. low-power) jobs. Finally, supporting the hypothesis that the PBN represents a contemporary, subtle replacement for traditional hierarchy-maintaining ideologies that have lost their influence in modern secular society, Social Dominance Orientation (SDO) correlated with PBN endorsement among secular more than among religious respondents (Study 6), whose “ideological arsenal” contains more straightforward means to police women. We discuss practical implications for gender equality, as well as theoretical implications for reconciling evolutionary and feminist perspectives on beauty norms. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 15 Aug 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
  • Who shines most among the brightest': A 25-year longitudinal study of
           elite STEM graduate students.
    • Abstract: In 1992, the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth (SMPY) surveyed 714 first- and second-year graduate students (48.5% female) attending U.S. universities ranked in the top-15 by science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) field. This study investigated whether individual differences assessed early in their graduate school career were associated with becoming a STEM leader 25 years later (e.g., STEM full professors at research-intensive universities, STEM CEOs, and STEM leaders in government) versus not becoming a STEM leader. We also studied whether there were any important gender differences in relation to STEM leadership. For both men and women, small to medium effect size differences in interests, values, and personality distinguished STEM leaders from nonleaders. Lifestyle and work preferences also distinguished STEM leaders who were more exclusively career-focused and preferred to work—and did work—more hours than nonleaders. Also, there were small to large gender differences in abilities, interests, and lifestyle preferences. Men had more intense interests in STEM and were more career-focused. Women had more diverse educational and occupational interests, and they were more interested in activities outside of work. Early in graduate school, therefore, there are signs that predict who will become a STEM leader—even among elite STEM graduate students. Given the many ways in which STEM leadership can be achieved, the gender differences uncovered within this high-potential sample suggest that men and women are likely to assign different priorities to these opportunities. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved)
      PubDate: Thu, 14 Mar 2019 04:00:00 GMT
       
 
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