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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1239 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (18 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (243 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (32 journals)
    - HOMOSEXUALITY (36 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (14 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (17 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (143 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (502 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (38 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (196 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (502 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6     

Cultura Científica     Open Access  
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (12 followers)
Cultural Trends     Hybrid Journal   (9 followers)
Culturales     Open Access   (2 followers)
Culture Mandala : The Bulletin of the Centre for East-West Cultural and Economic Studies     Open Access  
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Demographic Research     Open Access   (9 followers)
Desacatos     Open Access   (1 follower)
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (13 followers)
Development     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Diálogo     Open Access   (1 follower)
Discourse & Society     Hybrid Journal   (108 followers)
Distinktion : Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Doct-Us Journal     Open Access  
Drustvena istrazivanja     Open Access   (2 followers)
Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race     Full-text available via subscription   (5 followers)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
e-Gnosis     Open Access  
Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Économie et Solidarités     Full-text available via subscription  
Educación y Territorio     Open Access  
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Égypte - Monde arabe     Open Access   (3 followers)
Éire-Ireland     Full-text available via subscription   (6 followers)
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (16 followers)
Electronic Journal of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Elementos: Ciencia y Cultura     Open Access   (1 follower)
EMPIRIA. Revista de Metodología de las Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (1 follower)
Enfoques     Open Access  
Enseñanza de las Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Entramado     Open Access  
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (9 followers)
Espace populations sociétés     Open Access   (1 follower)
EspacesTemps.net     Open Access  
Estudios Avanzados     Open Access  
Estudios del Desarrollo Social : Cuba y América Latina     Open Access   (1 follower)
Estudios Fronterizos     Open Access  
Estudios Sociales     Open Access   (1 follower)
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (12 followers)
Ethnic and Racial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (17 followers)
Ethnobotany Research & Applications : a journal of plants, people and applied research     Open Access   (5 followers)
Études rurales     Open Access   (2 followers)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
European Journal of Futures Research     Open Access   (1 follower)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (20 followers)
European Online Journal of Natural and Social Sciences     Open Access   (10 followers)
European Review     Hybrid Journal   (13 followers)
European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Revista Europea de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe     Open Access   (2 followers)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
European View     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
ExT : Revista de Extensión de la UNC     Open Access  
Families, Relationships and Societies     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (12 followers)
Family Process     Partially Free   (1 follower)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (5 followers)
Family Science     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Fijian Studies: A Journal of Contemporary Fiji     Full-text available via subscription  
FIVE : The Claremont Colleges Journal of Undergraduate Academic Writing     Open Access   (2 followers)
Flaubert     Open Access  
Formation emploi     Open Access   (1 follower)
FORO. Revista de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, Nueva Época     Open Access   (1 follower)
Forum Qualitative Sozialforschung / Forum: Qualitative Social Research     Open Access   (6 followers)
Fourth World Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Géographie et cultures     Open Access  
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Global Journal of Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Graduate Journal of Social Science     Open Access   (3 followers)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (7 followers)
Gruppendynamik und Organisationsberatung     Hybrid Journal  
Hallazgos     Open Access  
He Puna Korero: Journal of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (12 followers)
História e Cultura     Open Access   (1 follower)
Human Affairs     Open Access   (1 follower)
Huria : Journal of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription  
Hydra : Interdisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
IAMURE International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research     Open Access   (5 followers)
IAMURE International Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (3 followers)
Iberoforum. Revista de Ciencias Sociales de la Universidad Iberoamericana     Open Access  
Iconos. Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (2 followers)
IdeAs. Idées d'Amérique     Open Access  
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (11 followers)
IDS Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
Illness, Crisis, & Loss     Full-text available via subscription   (5 followers)
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Inter Faculty     Open Access  
INTERAÇÕES - Cultura e Comunidade     Open Access  
Interim : Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
International Development Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (1 follower)
International Journal of Business and Social Research     Open Access   (1 follower)
International Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue internationale d’études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6     

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy    [32 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0144-333X
     Published by Emerald Homepage  [306 journals]
  • Animating “bottom-up” sustainable strategies in village
           settings
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Ivan Annibal; Joyce Liddle, Gerard McElwee)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – The key purpose of the paper is to consider the challenges facing local authorities in supporting sustainable rural settlements in their efforts to be enterprising and sustainable in confronted with increasingly severe downward pressure on local authority finances due to the recession; the long-term trend of increased adult social care costs linked to a challenging demographic profile across rural England; and increasing expectations around service delivery arising from more discerning “e-enabled” users of public services. Design/methodology/approach – This paper offers a structured reflection on the responses of a qualitative study of village sustainability, based on case studies of the inhabitants of three villages in Lincolnshire, England. The paper draws on responses by 70 voices to a series of workshops held in village halls and pubs. Findings – Significant work needs to be done at the local level, to support the transition from long-standing, organic practice within communities to the creation of an infrastructure which can support the delivery of more services by communities themselves. Research limitations/implications – Workshop-based approaches to gathering responses can allow for biased responses, and this study is limited to the views of self-selecting actors in three villages. Originality/value – The paper examines the barriers and opportunities facing local communities and introduces the concept of community to community learning.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Risk factors for suicide among rural men: are farmers more socially
           isolated?
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Samara McPhedran; Diego De Leo)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – International evidence demonstrates elevated suicide rates among farming occupations, relative to other occupations. A psychosocial factor commonly argued to contribute to farmer suicide is social isolation and lack of social support, which in turn may indicate a need for policies and programs to support farmers' social participation and connectedness with others. However, there has been very little empirical investigation of perceived levels of social connectedness and social participation among farmers. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – This study used a cross-section of a nationally representative dataset, the Household, Income, and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey. This enabled quantification of Australian farmers' self-reported levels of social connectedness and social participation, relative to rural adult males in other occupations. Findings – Levels of perceived social support and social participation among farmers were approximately equivalent to social support and social participation among rural men in other occupations. Research limitations/implications – Possible mediating variables, such as influences of social support on mental health, were not examined in this study. However, these findings nonetheless suggest the assumption that social isolation is higher among farmers requires careful consideration. Originality/value – This is the first study that quantifies social support and social participation among farmers, using a comparative approach.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Government versus private primary schools in India: An assessment of
           physical infrastructure, schooling costs and performance
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Jitendra Gouda; Kailash Chandra Das, Srinivas Goli, Ladumai Maikho Apollo Pou)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – This paper is an effort to identify the difference between government and private primary schools in terms of physical infrastructure, schooling costs and student's performance. Further, the paper assessed the role of physical infrastructure and schooling costs on the performance of students. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – This study used India Human Development Survey (IHDS) data. Bivariate, trivariate, ?2 and ANOVA test, factor analyses and Theil index are used as methods of analyses. Findings – The results present a distinct picture of government and private primary school education in India in terms of physical infrastructure standards, schooling cost and performance of students. In all the three selected indicators, private primary schools remained a forerunner or outperform the government primary schools in India. Besides this, the physical infrastructure and schooling cost found to have effect on performance of students both in private and public schools. Practical implications – Since government primary schools hold more than 70 percent of total students, there is an urgent need to improve the standards of primary education in these schools. Further, efforts are needed to reduce the gaps between private and public schools in terms of its basic physical facilities and performance of students in the country. Originality/value – The paper used the IHDS to examine the existing differentials between government and private primary schools. The analysis is purely an original work.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Undocumented childhood immigrants, the Dream Act and Deferred Action for
           Childhood Arrivals in the USA
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Carol L. Schmid)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – The purpose of this article is to critically examine two possible solutions to the lack of citizenship rights of children who lack documentation. Many industrialized countries must deal with undocumented children who have resided in the country most of their lives. In the USA, immigrants brought as children by their parents illegally are not eligible to receive financial help in most states for higher education, receive federal health care, or obtain driver's licenses. Even if they are qualified, they cannot legally work. Design/methodology/approach – The article provides an in-depth analysis of the Dream Act and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. The benefit of this study is to critically examine two possible solutions to the problem of undocumented children who have lived most of their lives in the USA. Findings – The two solutions are analyzed in terms of broader conceptions of citizenship and human rights. Citizen rights are contested rights in the USA for undocumented immigrants and their children. It is found that theories of immigration and citizenship do not adequately explain the situation of undocumented childhood arrivals. After compulsory public education, undocumented students’ lives are at the mercy of state and federal administration policies. Citizenship theory is analyzed as it applies to undocumented immigrants brought as children to the USA. Research limitations/implications – This paper is limited to undocumented children in the USA. Practical implications – The results point to the need for universal policies that will ensure young adults will have the critical resources and associated rights. Social implications – As Latinos become a large proportion of the US population, barriers to their continued education will impose significant economic and personal costs for individuals who have “identity without citizenship”. Originality/value – This is among the first academic paper to link undocumented childhood arrivals in the USA, citizenship theory and public policy.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Labour migration and informalisation: East meets West
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Branka Likic-Brboric; Zoran Slavnic, Charles Woolfson)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – Against a theoretical discussion of informalisation, the purpose of this paper is to trace wider commonalities and migratory interconnections that are leading to informalised or deteriorated employment conditions both East and West in the enlarged Europe. Design/methodology/approach – The paper examines the ways in which informalisation has come increasingly to typify employment relations both East and West via contrastive case studies from Sweden and Latvia. Findings – The paper illustrates how a growing tendency towards informalisation of work and economy comes about as a consequence of dual tendencies towards informalisation both “from above” and “from below”. Migrant labour has a part in this process, especially in the post-EU enlargement period, increasingly enabling free movement of labour from the former socialist countries to the West. Research limitations/implications – The implications of the paper are that the harmonisation of labour standards in the enlarged EU is not necessarily in an upward direction and that wider EU labour markets may be increasingly segmented as processes of informalisation grow in scope. Practical implications – Policy-makers concerned with preserving labour standards and norms of decent work may consider the implications of the interconnected processes of informalisation and migration, in particular, with regard to “undeclared work”. Social implications – The paper raises issues concerning the European social model and its viability. Originality/value – The paper bridges research on informalisation of the economy and labour migration in the context of EU enlargement.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Financial inclusion and social financialisation: Britain in a European
           context
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Stephen Sinclair)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – The article aims to discuss findings from a knowledge exchange review of financial inclusion in Britain and compare these to key features of financial exclusion evident from European analyses. Design/methodology/approach – This paper is based on an innovative knowledge exchange project. Rapid research reviews analysed evidence on financial exclusion in Britain in relation to access to banking services; to credit; to household insurance; personal savings and assets; money advice provision; and financial capability. The findings from these reviews were discussed by stakeholders representing the private, government, community and civil society sectors in a series of evidence review forums. The results of these discussions were summarised and reconsidered at a national knowledge exchange conference. Throughout the project, stakeholders exchange opinions about the state of financial exclusion knowledge through an online discussion forum. Findings – The research identified agreement among British stakeholders over several aspects of financial exclusion, in particular continuing problems of access to mainstream banking services for low income customers and a lack of appropriate and affordable credit provision. Areas of controversy included whether banks denied services to lower income customers or were withdrawing from deprived communities, and the necessity for further regulation of mainstream financial services. Originality/value – Comparing these findings to research from other European countries raises questions about how financial inclusion should be defined, and whether existing indicators capture this adequately across contrasting social, institutional and regulatory contexts. The research raises challenges for policy transfer between countries.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • “New capitalism”, colonisation and the neo-philanthropic turn
           in social policy: Applying Luhmann's systems theory to the Big Society
           project
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (John Jackson Rodger)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – Drawing on the functional structural systems theory of Niklas Luhmann and the theory of colonisation of the social lifeworld advanced by Jurgen Habermas, it is argued that the Big Society project in the UK is about the creation of an alternative non-state welfare infrastructure by the linking of wealthy donors with opportunities to engage in venture philanthropy in the third sector. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach – The paper outlines key features of Luhmann's theory relating to autopoiesis and structural coupling to illustrate its conceptual strength in making the colonisation process visible. Findings – The paper illustrates the ways in which system imperatives underpinning the colonisation process absorb and subordinate public activism to narrow market principles forcing the third sector to communicate in the language of the market rather than caritas. Social implications – The real implication of these developments for the character of the voluntary sector requires further critical examination not only because the state's enduring commitment to welfare may be in question but also for the growing significance of entrepreneurial philanthropy in shaping the character of volunteering and charitable activities and welfare relationships. Originality/value – The paper applies Luhmann's theory relating to autopoiesis and structural coupling to make key features of government colonisation of the third sector visible.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
  • Are more equal societies the most cohesive?
    • Authors: literatinetwork@emeraldinsight.com (Daniel Sage)
      Abstract: Abstract

      Purpose – In recent decades, research across the social sciences has linked higher income inequality to poorer health and social outcomes in advanced market democracies. According to general theories, this relationship is mediated by social cohesion; an absence of which is said to be the cause behind such poor outcomes. This article aims to examine the first step in this theory by exploring whether there is an empirical relationship between income inequality and social cohesion. Design/methodology/approach – To achieve this, social cohesion is operationalized as 18 variables across six unique dimensions of social cohesion. Subsequently, the relationship between each variable and inequality is tested in a range of statistical models that include two measures of income inequality, numerous control variables and a range of different country samples. Findings – The relationship between inequality and social cohesion is found to be problematic, with significant associations for some dimensions but not for others. Further, the relationship between social cohesion and inequality is dependent on the measure of inequality used, whether other variables are controlled for and the number of countries in the sample. To explain this paradox, a distinction is made between “horizontal” and “vertical” social relations. Originality/value – This article argues that research into the health and social effects of income inequality has thus far largely failed to address the causal mechanisms by which negative outcomes are purportedly produced. By empirically examining the links between inequality and one of these hypothesized mechanisms, social cohesion, it is shown that there are relationships between inequality and some dimensions of social cohesion, but not between others. This suggests that the income inequality-social cohesion hypothesis is more complex than has hitherto been implied.
      PubDate: Fri, 18 Oct 2013 00:00:00 +010
       
 
 
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