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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1404 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (18 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (245 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (32 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (19 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (151 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (40 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (632 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (40 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (211 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (632 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4     

Showing 201 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Future Times     Full-text available via subscription  
Genocide Studies and Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Genocide Studies International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Géographie et cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ghana Journal of Development Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Graduate Journal of Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Grief Matters : The Australian Journal of Grief and Bereavement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Gruppendynamik und Organisationsberatung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
GSTF Journal of Law and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Hacettepe Üniversitesi Edebiyat Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hallazgos     Open Access  
Harmoni Sosial : Jurnal Pendidikan IPS     Open Access  
He Puna Korero: Journal of Maori and Pacific Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Headmark     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Herencia     Open Access  
Heritage & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
História e Cultura     Open Access  
Human Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Huria : Journal of the Open University of Tanzania     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Hydra : Interdisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Iberoforum. Revista de Ciencias Sociales de la Universidad Iberoamericana     Open Access  
Iconos. Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
IdeAs. Idées d'Amérique     Open Access  
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
IDS Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
IEEE Transactions on Computational Social Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Illness, Crisis & Loss     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Informes Científicos - Técnicos UNPA     Open Access  
Infrastructure Complexity     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Inter Faculty     Open Access  
Interações : Cultura e Comunidade     Open Access  
Interim : Interdisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Development Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal for Transformative Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business and Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue internationale d’études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Cultural Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Language and Culture     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Management and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Management, Economics and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Qualitative Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Social and Allied Research     Full-text available via subscription  
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
International Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 167)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal  
InterSciencePlace     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Is ve Insan Dergisi     Open Access  
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
İstanbul Gelişim Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
Journal des Economistes et des Etudes Humaines     Hybrid Journal  
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Family Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 149)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access  
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access  
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access  
Knowledge Management for Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Korean Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Kotuitui : New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online     Open Access  
KZfSS Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
L'Homme Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
L'Ordinaire des Amériques     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription  
Les Cahiers d’EMAM     Open Access  
Letras Verdes. Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Socioambientales     Open Access  
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science     Open Access  
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access  
Literacy Learning: The Middle Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Local-Global: Identity, Security, Community     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal  
Lucero     Open Access  
Lúdicamente     Open Access  
Lutas Sociais     Open Access  
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Macedon Digest, The     Full-text available via subscription  
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mathématiques et sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Media Information Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Media International Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Media International Australia, Incorporating Culture & Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Melbourne Journal of Politics     Full-text available via subscription  
Mémoire(s), identité(s), marginalité(s) dans le monde occidental contemporain     Open Access  
Memorias     Open Access  
methaodos.revista de ciencias sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
México y la Cuenca del Pacífico     Open Access  
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Monthly, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Müvészettörténeti Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription  
National Academy Science Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription  
National Observer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Neo : A Journal of Student Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
New Left Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Perspectives on Turkey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
New Zealand International Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Newsletter of the Gypsy Lore Society     Hybrid Journal  
Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Noesis. Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access  
Nómadas     Open Access  
Nómadas. Revista Crítica de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Northeast African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nouvelles perspectives en sciences sociales : revue internationale de systémique complexe et d'études relationnelles     Full-text available via subscription  
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access  
Novos Estudos - CEBRAP     Open Access  
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)

  First | 1 2 3 4     

Journal Cover International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
  [SJR: 0.139]   [H-I: 2]   [41 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0144-333X
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [312 journals]
  • Exploring human (in-)security from a gender perspective: A case study of
           subcontracted workers in Thailand
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose Using the concept of human security, this paper explores the subjective perception of insecurities experienced by Thai subcontracted workers in industrial value chains and examines how they mitigate these insecurities. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses a qualitative approach and analyses the narratives from in-depth interviews with 23 female subcontracted workers in low-income communities in Bangkok, Thailand. Four male subcontracted workers were also interviewed to compare gender differences. Five key informant interviews with NGOs and academicians were conducted. Findings There are three main findings. First, subcontracted workers’ economic insecurities are influenced by their work and personal trajectories in the labour market. Second, many of their health and care-related insecurities are fuelled by relational rather than individual experience; that is, they are worried they will not be able to provide care for their children, to fulfil their responsibility as mothers, or they are concerned with the effects of their hazardous work environment on their family members. Third, most subcontracted workers mitigate their insecurities using their immediate relational network in the absence of formal protection. Originality/value While earlier literature on subcontracted workers’ vulnerabilities in Thailand discussed the issues from a politico-economic perspective, this paper uses the concept of human security, which enables us to better understand their insecurities as context-specific experiences in their daily lives.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-03-2015-0036
       
  • Children for sale? The blurred boundary between intercountry adoption
           and sale of children in the United States
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose Intercountry adoptions (hereafter ICAs) in the United States are a form of sale of children. According to international policy, sale of children is an illicit social practice that involves improper financial gains by at least one party. Sale of children is a threat to legitimate ICA. This study’s analysis of policy and practice of ICAs in the United States, including pricing arrangements, demonstrate that U.S. ICAs, which can have humanitarian aims and be legitimate forms of family development, comprise sale of children. Design/methodology/approach Internet searches and email inquiries were used to obtain ICA cost data for a randomised sample of 10% of the agencies in the United States that facilitate ICAs. Findings Cost information was obtained from only 25% of the sample, suggesting lack of transparency in and available information about monetary costs of U.S. ICAs. A range of $12,000 USD to $40,000 USD suggests that U.S. ICAs are expensive and costs vary. Large, undisclosed fees in the form of ‘required donations’, agency fees, and extensive foreign travel requirements imply third party economic gains are made through U.S. ICA transactions. Practical implications U.S. ICA agencies should disclose costs and employ transparent practices. U.S. policies regulating ICAs should be clarified and strengthened. The U.S. government should ratify, implement, and enforce major children’s rights international policy standards. Originality/value No study has offered systematic analysis of monetary costs of U.S. ICAs and linked this analysis to policy and legitimacy of social practices.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-03-2015-0034
       
  • Paradoxes of European free movement in times of austerity: The role of
           social movement actors in framing the plight of Roma berry pickers in
           Sweden
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to provide insight into the capacities of social movement actors and interest groups to negotiate responsibility, heighten issues of accountability and earn legitimacy from authorities and the wider public for the plight of dis-privileged Roma migrant berry pickers in the Swedish labour market. Design/methodology/approach The objective is guided by a multi-sited ethnographical approach to data collection and analysis, which theoretically anchors in social movement frame analysis. Findings The article proposes that social movement actors, in the face of incapacities of state and industry parties, generate the potentiality to leverage immediate humanitarian distress experienced by the workers and to accentuate their political and public visibility. Research limitations/implications Delimited by the internal organisational structure of a berry industry, partly operating behind informal employment schemes, future studies should devote closer attention in localizing/identifying possible ‘back-stage’ data-gathering settings. Practical implications Policy-makers and special-interest organisations concerned with internal EU labour migration, labour standards and living condition issues, may consider the social and humanitarian implications of persistent responsibility ambiguities. Originality/value The article provides deeper insight into the societal nexus in which a ‘hard to reach group’ of seasonal workers faces potential and actual exploitation.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2015-0057
       
  • A longitudinal study of deprivation in European countries
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose Poverty is one of the most significant economic and social problems that European countries have to face. In recent years, it has become widely accepted that poverty is a multidimensional concept and now many studies use indicators of deprivation to examine the phenomenon. The focus on financial resources alone does not capture people’s quality of life as being poor means a lack of access to resources enabling a minimum standard of living and participation in the society within which one belongs. Design/methodology/approach Using a longitudinal component (2006–2010) of EU-SILC data on 26 European countries, I apply a second-order confirmatory factor analysis to estimate deprivation. To describe the patterns of change over time and to evaluate the role of household characteristics in deprivation level, I employ a set of multilevel growth curve models. Findings Three findings clearly stand out from my analysis. First, there is great variability in deprivation between European countries. Second, European countries show various patterns of change in deprivation over time. Third, households with different characteristics have quite different deprivation levels; moreover, the impact of household characteristics on deprivation can vary over time and between countries. Originality/value This paper sheds light on the importance of analysing deprivation from a longitudinal perspective and that financial resources alone does not capture people’s quality of life.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2015-0058
       
  • Loss of organizational solidarity in three kibbutz factories
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose aim of this article is to study the loss of solidarity in three kibbutz factories as an outcome of the process of privatization in their kibbutz communities. Design/methodology/approach : The research was a qualitative investigation, including interviews in three factories. Findings The research found high a sense of vertical and horizontal solidarity before the privatization. The solidarity stemmed from socialistic principles of the kibbutzim (plural of kibbutz) and their factories functioned as an extension of the kibbutz clan: close interpersonal relationships, a devotion to collective needs and democratic decision making in the kibbutz general assembly directly influencing the factories. After the privatization, the organizational solidarity decreased because of formal and procedural issues: the factory became hierarchical, work conditions deteriorated and the familiar spirit of the clan vanished. Research limitations/implications There are more than 130 kibbutz factories, most of them in privatized kibbutzim. This article presents only three of those factories, so it can only represent preliminary and partial findings. It is important to extend this research to examine other kibbutz factories. Practical implications The research suggests how factories, in kibbutzim and throughout the world, could respond to weak organizational solidarity: to increase trust and cooperation between management, to create flexible working conditions and to achieve higher productivity. Originality/value This is the first study to focus on kibbutz enterprises through the sociological lens of the solidarity theory. Previously, most post-privatization research has focused on economic questions of profitability.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2015-0053
       
  • Public trust in the aftermath of natural and na-technological disasters:
           hurricane Katrina and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear incident
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose This paper analyzes public trust during the aftermath of technological and hybrid natural-technological/natech disasters , –– Hurricane Katrina (2005) and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown in Japan (2011). The work identifies common themes, actions and inactivity that can lead to citizens distrusting the government after disasters. Design/methodology/approach News reports from the two areas leading newspapers formed the body of the Hurricane Katrina and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown case studies. Of key interest were emerging themes of trust and/or distrust during the immediate impact phase of the disaster in addition to government failures and social breakdowns resulting in a loss of trust in government institutions and individual leaders. Findings The series of examples illustrate how specific action or in-action by local and federal governments served as a catalyst for a loss of trust in government institutions and individual leaders in government while proposing potential strategies to help public leaders reduce distrust during times of crisis. Research limitations/implications The two limitations were the use of only newspapers and the passage of a new law in 2013, the “Specially Designated Secrets Protection Law,” designed to limit news reporting of the press in Japan on the issue of nuclear radiation exposure of the general public in Japan, some of the new data is not available. Practical implications The research concludes by offering specific ways to regain trust after a perception of failure during pre and post-disaster management in the age of mega disasters. The article lists several recommendations that can be practically implemented to develop a culture of transparent communication, civic engagement in planning processes and inspire trust among stakeholders. Originality/value While the paper identifies barriers to establishing trust among government agencies, the citizenry and private industry, it seeks to help inform policy frameworks regarding the importance of the government’s ability to sustain a strong sense of trust that engenders civic participation in preserving or regaining trust in the aftermath of disasters.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:18Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2015-0030
       
  • Conceptualizing transformation in the post-merger and incorporation
           environment era: A case of the Durban University of Technology
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose This study gauges the knowledge of the university leaders at the Durban University of Technology (DUT) on transformation. Design/methodology/approach This study uses both quantitative and qualitative approaches guided by a structured survey questionnaire and in-depth interviews with the university leaders. The questionnaires generated the reliability coefficient alpha of 0.947, indicating a high degree of acceptance and consistency of the results. Findings The study findings reveal the highest percentage of 70% regarding the belief that transformation refers to restructuring the institution more than commonly anticipated variables such as race (56%) and redressing the past injustices (59%). Research limitations/implications The limitation of the study was the scarcity of published material on the sub-dimensions of the study of transformation (transformation as referring to attracting qualified employees). Another limitation which was observed included the paucity of data regarding discipline and knowledge of transformation variables. Practical implications This study suggests transformation in higher education institutions is defined through internal (operational and core) and external factors with a direct influence. Originality/value This paper could potentially enrich the meaning of transformation, derived from the context and experience of South Africa.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2015-0037
       
  • Cultural dimensions and moral reasoning: a comparative study
    • Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 5/6, June 2016.
      Purpose Moral reasoning research in Western cultures is grounded primarily in Kohlberian cognitive moral theory. Enumerable investigations about the psychological determinants and cultural dimensions of moral reasoning have provided significant insights about Western decision-making and contributed to Western organizational behavioral theory. However, inquiry about these same constructs and how they may interact with moral reasoning in non-Western Southeast Asian trading partner countries has not provided comparable insights. The present study attempts to remedy that by comparing predominant cultural dimensions to levels of moral reasoning in student and graduate populations in Thailand and the United States. Design/methodology/approach The Defining Issues Test measurement of moral reasoning (Rest et al., 1999) and the Values Survey Module 2013 (Hofstede & Minkov, 2013) were translated for the first time into Thai, pilot tested, and used to gather cultural and moral reasoning data in Thailand. The same English version instruments were used to gather comparable data among similarly matched USA samples. Comparisons are presented in this article, and differences in approaches to moral decision making are discussed. Findings Findings indicate that there are both significant psychological and cultural differences between the two nations that affect moral reasoning. Predominant status-quo moral reasoning predominates in Thailand, while a polarity between self-interest moral reasoning and higher level abstract idealistic moral reasoning predominates in the United States. Potential cultural influences on these moral reasoning tendencies are discussed. Research limitations/implications While findings can be generalized to the sample populations of Thai and U.S.A. undergraduate students and graduate students who are in the workplace, the considerable time required to complete the two survey instruments precluded inclusion of higher-level, veteran managers and public policy administrators in the study. Alternative survey methods need to be developed for investigating these subjects in order to make the combined findings more robust and widely generalizable. Practical implications Careful attention to cultural and linguistic variables provided for thorough and effective first-time translations of the Defining Issues Test and the Values Survey Module 2013 from English into the Thai language. These two instruments are now available to other researchers who wish to investigate cultural dimensions and moral reasoning through other research designs. The Thai-version Defining Issues Test can be obtained from the copyright holder, Center for the Study of Ethical Development (http://ethicaldevelopment.ua.edu/). The Thai-version of the Values Survey Module can be obtained through the Geert Hofstede website (http://www.geerthofstede.nl/). Originality/value This is the first research study comparing cultural dimensions identified by Geert Hofstede and Michael Minkov as measured by the Values Survey Module 2013 to moral reasoning as measured by the Defining Issues Test.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-04-29T11:53:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-05-2015-0047
       
  • Exploring political skill and deception
    • Authors: Jeffrey A. Clements, Randy Boyle, Jeffrey G. Proudfoot
      First page: 138
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose Purpose- The purpose of this study was to explore and develop a model which examines the effects of political skill on an individual’s intent to deceive. Design/methodology/approach Design/methodology/approach- Data were obtained through a survey research design (n=273). The sample consisted of college students. A covariance based Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) approach was used to analyze the data. Findings Findings- Individual’s with high levels of political skill had more deception confidence and less deception guilt. Increased deception confidence was shown to be positively related to perceptions of deception success which is turn is positively associated with deception intent. The factors duping delight and deception guilt were also found to be related to deception intent. Research limitations/implications Implications- This research furthers deception research by using a strong behavioral framework to determine the motivational influences on an individual’s politically motivated intent to deceive. In doing so, this research identifies factors which contribute to our general understanding of politically motivated deception intent. However, caution must be applied when making external generalizations outside of the sample of college students. Practical implications There are practical applications to this research as well. In general those who are highly politically skilled seem to have a stronger intention to deceive. At best, these findings can begin to contribute to our understanding of who we can trust and who we should be wary of. At worst, these findings can help us know who we should turn to when we need to deceive and manipulate others without them catching on. Perhaps this is why we love the rock-star politicians on our side of the isle but loathe the rock-star politicians on the other side of the isle. If we are able to assess the level of political skill in our friends, co-workers, bosses, politicians (et cetera), we may be keener in picking up on the signals of deception. Originality/value Originality/value- This research extends research on political skill as it explores the effect of political skill in a new context. This research identifies an important facet of why some individuals are better able than others to successfully deceive and may help explain some of the variability in our inability to consistently detect deception efforts.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-09-2014-0063
       
  • Between rights and obligations – rethinking youth participation at
           the margins
    • First page: 157
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose The paper offers a critical view of participatory policies and measures by highlighting that participation is not only a right for young people, but also an obligation for many. This obligated participation is studied conceptually and empirically. Design/methodology/approach The paper introduces a novel typology of youth participation that demonstrates the dimensions of institutional framing and a degree of choice in participation. The typology is applied in an empirical study on how the participation rights and obligations are formed and handled within an educational programme, aiming to support young people at the margins. Findings Young people are controlled by their participation obligations, and are guided to reach maturity and claim personal responsibility for their choices. The acceptance of an obligation to participate has to be negotiated with young people in services; otherwise they may opt out of supportive measures. Research limitations/implications More research is needed on how youth participation terminology is used in political programmes and professional practices. Originality/value The typology diversifies understanding of youth participation and enables the analysis of participation types. It can be applied in youth studies, policy-making and practices.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-09-2014-0066
       
  • Shame and institutional stability – or – change in healthcare
    • Authors: Lee Charles Jarvis
      First page: 173
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose The aim of this paper is to help introduce the empirical study of emotion within an institutional framework by examining shame and shaming as drivers of institutional stability and change, respectively. Design/methodology/approach The author conducted a qualitative study of 101 U.S. print media articles generated by major U.S. news publications and trade magazines from 1999 to 2011 in the wake of the Institute of Medicine’s 1999 report To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System. Findings This study resulted in two major findings. First, this research found that the institutions constituting the collective professional identity of physicians persisted via institutionalized shame inculcated in physicians during their extensive socialization into the medical profession. Potential shame over medical error served to reinforce institutionalized cultures which exacerbated medicine’s problems with error reporting. Second, this study reveals that field level actors engage in shaming to affect institutional change. This research suggests that the IOM report was in effect a shaming effort directed at physicians and the institutions constituting their collective identity. Research limitations/implications This study provides some verification of recent theoretical works incorporating emotion into institutional theory and also illustrates how shame can be incorporated into collective identity as an institutional imperative. Originality/value This study provides a rare empirical investigation of emotion within an institutional framework, and illuminates ways in which the emotion of shame interacts with institutional processes. This research also focuses on collective identity and institutional stability, two topics which are largely ignored by contemporary institutional researchers but are integral aspects of social life.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:17Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-02-2015-0015
       
  • Improved critical thinking in students using current events journaling
    • Authors: Sahar Bahmani
      First page: 190
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose When students relate current events to the concepts studied in the classroom by writing and presenting a series of analyses in the form of regular journaling, their learning and critical thinking improves as they regularly connect theory, presented in our lessons and textbooks, to real world applications. Design/methodology/approach A rubric used to assess the progress of student critical thinking showed that all three categories that display critical thinking through reflective reasoning improved: analysis, comprehension and application. Findings This paper establishes the positive impact of current event journaling on critical thinking and student interest in courses by monitoring courses where current event journaling was incorporated. One of the key findings of this study is that the critical thinking skills of students evolved and became more advanced as the semester progressed, as did their ability to identify links in research and studies to class content. Research limitations/implications As students become more engaged, this helps them to better absorb and understand the material being taught. Practical implications Completing these analyses and presenting them to the class helps students succeed in seeing the connection between theory presented in textbooks and its real world applications. Originality/value Critical thinking falls into three different categories that can be displayed as reflective reasoning: analysis, comprehension and application.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2015-0038
       
  • From whence cometh this Welfare consensus? US welfare policy discourse
           as class warfare in the 1980s and 1990s
    • Authors: Darren Barany
      First page: 203
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose This article addresses the ideological narratives which came to comprise a new welfare consensus in the US and subsequently a welfare state which was more fiscally austere, demeaning, and coercive. It also explores the role of the political and financial restructuring which facilitated the implementation of retrogressive reforms. Design/methodology/approach Macro-level historical forces are investigated through various texts such as policy statements, journal articles, press releases, political addresses, congressional transcripts and testimony, archived papers, newspaper articles, and occasional sound bites and popular culture references pertaining to what we call welfare and which have come to construct our common understanding of it. Findings The formation of this consensus was due in part to three factors: (1) the growth of and increased influence of an elite policy planning network, (2) welfare program administration and financing had been decentralized which allowed greater autonomy of state and local governments to implement their own retrogressive reforms, and (3) there emerged an overarching discourse and paradigm for structuring policy and explaining the causes of poverty which emphasized individual behavior. Originality/value This article focuses on the materialization of the contemporary welfare consensus during the 1980s and 1990s in terms of its ideological and political history and on its persistence which has affected the ensuing policy culture and which continues to constrain anti-poverty policy discourse as well as what can be accomplished legislatively. The paper is of value for for readers, fields, courses with work that encompasses an examination of political and social theory, ideology, social policy, power/ hegemony, poverty, inequality, families, gender, race, and meaning making institutions.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2015-0039
       
  • Israel’s failed experiment with American-style welfare reform
    • Authors: Orit Fisher-Shalem, Jill Quadagno
      First page: 226
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose According to convergence theory, over time societies form similar social structures, political processes and public policies. In 2001 Israel adopted a welfare reform plan that rejected the traditional strategy of passive income support and instead endorsed the concept of activation. The plan was modeled on the Wisconsin Welfare to Work program (WTW) and was designed to put the long-term unemployed to work. The program began operating in four regions in 2004 but was abruptly terminated six years later. This paper analyzes why Israel’s welfare reform failed to follow the smooth path predicted by convergence theory and elucidates the factors in the Israeli environment that made the implementation of a program borrowed from the U.S. unsustainable. Design/methodology/approach A multi-method approach including interviews with key informants, content analysis of media materials and government documents and a quantitative comparative values analysis of four nations. Findings The failure of U.S. style welfare reform in Israel was due to four main factors: a more diverse recipient population, a lack of understanding of Israeli cultural values, a welfare population that included a substantial number of ethnic minorities whose customs conflicted with program regulations and a social movement against the program by non-profit organizations. Originality/value This paper demonstrates the limitations of convergence theory and highlights the salience of cultural values in the transmission of activation policies across nations. Specifically, it shows that outcomes vary when policies that are superficially similar are implanted in nations with fundamentally different cultures.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-03-2015-0031
       
  • A Sociology for Other Animals: Analysis, advocacy, intervention
    • Authors: Erika Cudworth
      First page: 242
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose This paper maps the field of sociological animal studies through some examples of critical and mainstream approaches and considers their relation to advocacy. It makes the argument that while all these initiatives have made important contributions to the project of 'animalizing sociology' and suggest a need for change in species relations, the link between analysis and political strategy is uncertain. Design/methodology/approach The paper develops its argument by using secondary sources, reviewing sociological positions and offering illustrations of possible interventions. Findings Sociological interventions in the field of animal studies have been informed by critical perspectives, such as feminism and Marxism, or taken less critical routes deploying actor-network theory and symbolic interactionism. Whilst those working in critical traditions may appear to have a more certain political agenda, an analysis of 'how things are' does not always lead to a clear position on 'what is to be done' in terms of social movement agendas or policy intervention. In addition, concepts deployed in advocacy such as 'liberation', ‘quality of life’ or ‘care’ are problematic when applied beyond the human. Despite this, there are possibilities for coalition and solidarity around certain claims for change. Research limitations/implications If the central argument of the paper were taken seriously by general sociologists, then sociology may be more open to 'animal studies'. In implications for exisitng sociological animal studies scholarship is to trouble some of the certainties around advocacy. Practical implications If the central argument of the paper were taken seriously by advocacy groups, then the hiatus between ‘welfarism’ and ‘liberation’ might be overcome. Originality/value There have been recent attempts to map the field of scholarship in animal studies, but surprisingly little consideration of how different emergent positions inform questions of advocacy and the possibilities for political intervention.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-04-2015-0040
       
  • The contribution of subjective measures to the quantification of social
           progress: evidence from Europe and Israel
    • Authors: Wolfgang Messner
      First page: 258
      Abstract: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, Volume 36, Issue 3/4, April 2016.
      Purpose Statistical indicators, such as human health, are important for designing government policies, as well as for influencing the functioning of economic markets. However, there is often a discrepancy between statistical measures and the citizens’ prevalent feelings. In order to produce more relevant indicators of social progress, governments are currently shifting their measurement emphasis from objective to subjective measures. While the philosophical tradition of hedonic psychology views individuals as the best judges of their own conditions, little empirical evidence shows that individually reported health scores provide accurate information about a population’s health status. We aim to evaluate if subjective health questions contain genuine information about the status of human health, and are meaningful at an aggregated level. Design/methodology/approach Subjective health data is extracted from the 2012/13 European Social Survey (28 European countries plus Israel, N=54,427). Objective health data is based on the 2012 World Bank statistics for life expectancy at birth. We check if aggregated subjective health correlates with life expectancy at country level, and can reliably be compared across countries. Findings Our findings support the idea of including subjective data into country statistics of social progress. Because of substantial between-country differences, social development programs should be devised individually for each country. Originality/value By showing that subjective health measures can reliably contribute to the quantification of social progress, we offer a bridge between objective neoclassical economics and subjective hedonic psychology.
      Citation: International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy
      PubDate: 2016-02-26T12:54:29Z
      DOI: 10.1108/IJSSP-06-2015-0060
       
 
 
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