Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1706 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (252 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (89 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (53 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1012 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (172 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (1012 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
International and Multidisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Development Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences (IJASOS)     Open Access  
International Journal for Transformative Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Academic Research in Business, Arts & Science     Open Access  
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business and Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue internationale d’études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Cultural and Social Studies (IntJCSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cultural Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Growth and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion     Open Access  
International Journal of Innovative Research and Scientific Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Innovative Research in Social and Natural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Integrated Education and Development     Open Access  
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Korean Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Language and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Management and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Management, Economics and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Qualitative Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social and Allied Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social And Humanities Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
International Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Social Sciences and Education Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Synergy and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of the Sociology of Leisure     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal Pedagogy of Social Studies     Open Access  
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access  
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 215)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
InterSciencePlace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intersticios Sociales     Open Access  
Investigación Valdizana     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
Iztapalapa : Revista de ciencias sociales y humanidades     Open Access  
Izvestia Ural Federal University Journal. Series 3. Social and Political Sciences     Open Access  
J : Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal     Open Access  
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access  
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Burirum Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences Research     Open Access  
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Community Development and Life Quality     Open Access  
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Computational Social Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Geography, Politics and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate School Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Surin Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, Rajapruk University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Multicultural Affairs     Open Access  
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 332, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Review     Open Access  
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access  
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Lakon     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Knowledge Management for Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Korea : Politik, Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft     Open Access  
Korean Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kotuitui : New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Kulttuurintutkimus     Open Access  
Kulturwissenschaftliche Zeitschrift     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
KZfSS Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
L'Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
L'Ordinaire des Amériques     Open Access  
La Tercera Orilla     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Lambda Nordica     Open Access  
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Lavboratorio : Revista de Estudios sobre Cambio Estructural y Desigualdad Social.     Open Access  
Lectio Socialis     Open Access  
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Les Cahiers d’EMAM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Letras Verdes. Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Socioambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science     Open Access  
Lex Social : Revista de Derechos Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Literacy Learning: The Middle Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Local-Global: Identity, Security, Community     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Lucero     Open Access  
Lúdicamente     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lutas Sociais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Macedon Digest, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Majalah Sainstekes / Sainstekes Magazine     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Intercultural Relations
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.732
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0147-1767 - ISSN (Online) 0147-1767
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Games from around the world: Promoting intercultural competence through
           sport education in secondary school students
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 75Author(s): Federico Puente-Maxera, Antonio Méndez-Giménez, Diego Martínez de OjedaAbstractIntercultural competence (IC) is a key competence in individuals’ life. Educational programs carried out to date have been motivated by the presence of culturally diverse students. This situation calls for programs to be implemented in low cultural diversity contexts, considering its repercussion on all students.This study aimed to explore the impact of a Sport Education Model (SEM)-based program about games from around the world on seventh-grade students’ intercultural competence and friendship goals. A quasi-experimental control group design (pre-test, post-test, and retention test measures) was carried out. The experimental group (EG) followed a SEM-based program (18 sessions) about games from around the world, whilst the control group (CG) was not exposed to any specific treatment, continuing with its ordinary syllabus. Data were collected from questionnaires, interviews and field notes.EG obtained significant improvements on reward, help, intercultural understanding and friendship-approach goals; whereas CG had significant diminishment on both intercultural sensitivity and understanding, as well as on friendship goals. Qualitative results conveyed: (a) an approach to new cultural realities; (b) how the teaching content led to cultural reflection; (c) how students created new relationships; (d) greater collaborative relationships; (e) how the model helped to mitigate negative behaviours; and (f) how the intervention provided students with greater opportunities for participation. Games from around the world are shown to be a suitable content for developing IC, suggesting the need for expanding evidence about possible effects of new teaching contents when conjugated with SEM.
       
  • Identity and linguistic acculturation expectations. The attitudes of
           Western Catalan high-school students towards Moroccans and Romanians
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 75Author(s): Isabel Sáenz- Hernández, Cecilio Lapresta-Rey, Maria Adelina Ianos, Cristina PetreñasAbstractThis study analyzes the influence of identity complexity on the linguistic acculturation expectations that Catalan high-school students hold towards their peers of Moroccan and Romanian origin. It also takes into account social status and cultural proximity, expecting higher expectations of linguistic integration towards Romanians. Using a 5-point Likert scale, 345 autochthonous high-school students were asked about their degree of self-identification with Spain and Catalonia. Then, they responded to several questions concerning linguistic acculturation expectations regarding Romanians and Moroccans. While integration is the most popular profile for all three groups, the bicultural identity group scored the highest, followed by the Catalan identity group and the Spanish identity group ranking last. Bicultural identification was also a significant predictor for all integration measures, as was Catalan identification for ‘integration to Catalan’ and ‘integration to Spanish and Catalan’. However, the distinctions between answers regarding Romanians and Moroccans were scant. We conclude that incorporating the languages of immigration into a bilingual host society is not only possible, this type of community may even be more welcoming. The potential of working with the concept of identity complexity to decrease black and white thinking and foster tolerance is also discussed.
       
  • Does religion matter' Italians’ responses towards Muslim and
           Christian Arab immigrants as a function of their acculturation preferences
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 75Author(s): Camilla Matera, Anna Picchiarini, Maria Olsson, Rupert BrownAbstractA 2 × 2 × 2 experiment examined the role of immigrants’ religion and perceived acculturation strategy on majority members’ attitudes. Acculturation strategies were manipulated along the two dimensions of contact and culture maintenance. Italian majority members (N = 247) read fictitious but seemingly real interviews with Arab immigrants, in which the immigrants’ religion (Muslim vs. Christian) and acculturation preferences (desire for contact and for culture maintenance) were manipulated. MANOVA showed a main effect of contact: majority members associated immigrants who were perceived to favour contact with more positive attitudes, empathy, trust, positive stereotypes and metastereotypes, and lower levels of threat. MANOVA also showed a main effect of culture maintenance: when immigrants were perceived to abandon their culture, majority members reported lower levels of symbolic threat and greater empathy towards them. A significant Religion x Culture maintenance interaction effect emerged on majority members’ stereotypes and contact intentions: Muslim immigrants who were perceived to abandon their heritage culture elicited more favourable responses than Muslim immigrants who were perceived to maintain their heritage culture. Taken together, these findings suggest that desire for intergroup contact amongst immigrants, independently of their religion, can promote harmonious intergroup relations with the majority group.
       
  • Incoming editorial: Advancing intercultural research and standing on the
           shoulders of giants
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Seth J. Schwartz
       
  • Villagers’ acculturation in China’s land expropriation-induced
           resettlement neighborhood: A Shanghai case
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Shuping Zhang, Zhu QianAbstractLand expropriation-induced resettlement (LEIR) is an emerging land phenomenon manifested in Chinese cities to accommodate urban transformation and outward expansion. The resettlement has forced affected rural dwellers to leave their villages and be resettled to high-density urban neighborhoods. By employing surveys with relocated villagers from two different types of LEIR neighborhoods in suburban Shanghai, this paper extends the acculturation discourse to examine villagers’ life transformation in resettlement neighborhoods. Our study addresses three research questions. First, what are the general acculturation patterns manifested among resettled villagers during their life transformation in LEIR neighborhoods' Second, how do individual acculturation outcomes vary by socio-demographic attributes of resettled villagers' Third, how do villagers’ acculturation outcomes influence their current residence preferences' The results indicate villagers’ stronger inclination toward rural village culture than urban neighborhood culture. For the socio-demographic attributes, we find that older villagers are more likely to maintain their original culture; villagers with higher education levels better adapt to urban neighborhood culture; multi-generation living benefits intercultural learning and exchange; and pre-resettlement conditions influence villagers’ acculturation. We further contend that an increase in the probability of a villager’s residence preference for LEIR neighborhoods aligns with an increase in that person’s adherence to urban neighborhood culture and/or a decrease in that individual’s continuity of rural village culture. Comparing the results collected from the two types of resettlement neighborhoods, we posit that socio-spatial mixture and diversity facilitates villagers’ urban integration. Finally, we suggest long-term institutional supports to be continuously provided to resettled villagers for building adaptive resilience.
       
  • What it means to be “one of us”: Discourses of national
           identity in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 December 2019Source: International Journal of Intercultural RelationsAuthor(s): Krystal M. Perkins, Tuğçe Kurtiş, Luis VelazquezAbstractIn recent years, the transnational movement of people has resulted in increasing tension and debates about national identity. The present research utilized a discourse analytic approach to examine accounts of national identity in the U.S. among native-born U.S. residents, Mexicans living in Mexico, and Mexicans living in the U.S. Our analysis focused on two sets of diverging accounts of national identity. A first set involved participants' explanations of national identity as natural/essential, “felt”, or conditional, which served to either constrain how “American” immigrants could be or allowed for a more inclusive definition of national identity. A second set of accounts involved participants theorizing the national polity as a multicultural or monocultural space which functioned to construct national boundaries as permeable or reinforced (White) American dominance. These patterns of talk emerged across all interviews, although U.S. participants attended to more flexible and dilemmatic (e.g. inclusionary and exclusionary) accounts of national identity. We discuss the implications for the complexity of national identity.
       
  • Threat to national identity continuity: When affirmation procedures
           increase the acceptance of Muslim immigrants
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2019Source: International Journal of Intercultural RelationsAuthor(s): Constantina Badea, Michael Bender, Helene KordaAbstractEuropean majority group members increasingly perceive threats to national continuity, which in turn leads to defensive reactions, including prejudice against Muslim immigrants. However, according to self-affirmation theory, individuals can respond in a less defensive manner if they have affirmed positive aspects of their self-concept (self-affirmation) or their social identity (group-affirmation). In the present research, we test the potential of affirmation procedures as tools for reducing prejudice towards Muslim immigrants when national continuity is threatened. We examine the impact of personal vs. normative attachment to Christian roots of national identity on the efficacy of affirmation procedures, and the congruence between the threatened and the affirmed domains of the self. Results show that group-affirmation reduced opposition to Muslims’ rights amongst participants personally attached to the idea that national continuity is based on Christian roots. The discussion stresses the importance of non-congruence between the threatened domain of the self and the affirmed domain for the design of affirmation procedures.
       
  • Being tolerated and minority well-being: The role of group identifications
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Sara Cvetkovska, Maykel Verkuyten, Levi AdelmanAbstractIn recent decades, a norm of tolerating group differences has been promoted by laypeople and leaders as a way to manage cultural and religious diversity. But whether such a policy is beneficial for the targets’ sense of group belonging and well-being is unknown. This research investigates how being tolerated differs from being discriminated against and being accepted in its associations with affective well-being and ethnic and national identification of ethnic minorities. We test whether being tolerated is related to well-being through its association with both group identifications. With a sample of ethnic minority group members in the Netherlands (N = 518) we found that being tolerated is related to higher well-being through increased national identification, but not as strongly as being accepted. Being tolerated is different from experiencing discrimination against and being accepted, and its relations to well-being and group belonging often fall between those of discrimination and acceptance. Toleration is associated with higher well-being, but only to the extent that its targets feel included in the overarching national category.
       
  • Understandings of national identity and outgroup attitudes in culturally
           diverse Mauritius
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2019Source: International Journal of Intercultural RelationsAuthor(s): Femke van der Werf, Maykel Verkuyten, Borja Martinovic, Caroline Ng Tseung-WongAbstractThis study investigated understandings of national group belonging in relation to attitudes toward foreign and established outgroups in Mauritius. Representative data were collected among the three numerically largest ethno-cultural groups (Hindus, Muslims, and Creoles; Ntotal = 1770) and results confirmed a distinction between “being,” “doing,” and “feeling” Mauritian among all three groups, with some small differences for Creoles compared to Hindus and Muslims. Furthermore, “being” Mauritian was not significantly related to attitudes toward established and foreign outgroups. In contrast, the “doing” understanding was negatively associated with both attitudes, and the “feeling” understanding showed positive associations with both outgroup attitudes among all three participant groups. The findings make a novel contribution to the literature on how people understand national identity, how these understandings differ between ethno-cultural groups within a nation, and how these relate to attitudes toward foreign as well as established outgroups.
       
  • Social support perceptions, network characteristics, and international
           student adjustment
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Frank Shu, Shujaat F. Ahmed, Meghan L. Pickett, Roya Ayman, Samuel T. McAbeeAbstractTwo hundred seventy-six international students reported their perceptions of social support from multiple sources (i.e., friends, family, institution, and significant other) as predictors of three facets of cross-cultural adjustment (i.e., general, interaction, and school-related adjustment). In addition, this study explored the incremental effects of cultural diversity and social network size on adjustment by asking international students to report members of their social network that they rely on for instrumental (i.e., task-oriented) and socio-emotional (i.e., relationship-oriented) support. Findings showed that certain sources of social support (i.e., friends and institution) were more strongly related to adjustment than others. Moreover, cultural diversity and the presence of host-nationals in student’s socio-emotional support network were significant predictors of cross-cultural adjustment. This demonstrates the importance of promoting initiatives that encourage host-national and sojourner interactions and diverse relationships within higher education to benefit cross-cultural adjustment.
       
  • Acculturation and academic achievement of rural to urban migrant youth:
           The role of school satisfaction and family closeness
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Lue FangAbstractChina's 'tidal wave' of rural to urban migration has had a tremendous impact on the educational outcomes of its children. It remains unexplored how and when do migrant children’s experience of acculturation following arrival in the place of settlement influence their academic achievement. This study used a stratified cross-sectional sample of 2412 Chinese migrant children and adolescents aged 10–18 (Mean = 14, 45 % female) to investigate the role of school satisfaction and family closeness in the relationship between acculturation patterns and academic achievement. Acculturation patterns are derived from the bidimensional model proposed by Berry (2005). The results indicated that integration had a positive association with concurrent academic achievement. School satisfaction was a mediator between integration and academic achievement. Furthermore, the full mediation of school satisfaction was only supported when there was a high level of family closeness. Findings from this study underline the usefulness of the bi-dimensional model in understanding the individual differences in academic achievement and suggest greater attention to the cultural variations in interpersonal functioning at the family and school context.
       
  • What does it mean to be American' Perceptions of national identity
           amongst adults and children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 November 2019Source: International Journal of Intercultural RelationsAuthor(s): Amy E. Violante, Kathleen M. Cain, Sahana MukherjeeAbstractAcross two studies we examined whether conformity (vs. not) to primordial, assimilationist, and civic constructions impacted adults’ and preschoolers’ conceptions of national identity. Adults (N = 151) and preschoolers (N = 42) in the U.S. viewed photos of White faces accompanied by descriptive information, including whether or not the individual was born in the U.S. (i.e., primordial construction), spoke English (i.e., assimilationist construction), and loved the U.S. (i.e., civic construction). Participants rated each target’s “American-ness.” Adults considered targets born in the U.S. as most American, followed by targets loving the U.S. However, interactions with assimilationist constructions qualified these effects. Speaking English bolstered the effects of being born in the U.S. or loving the U.S. Preschool aged children solely drew upon civic constructions of identity, evaluating targets loving the U.S. as more American than targets not loving the U.S. Discussion focuses on the implications of these divergent conceptualizations of national identity.
       
  • Coming home from a stay abroad: Associations between young people’s
           reentry problems and their cultural identity formation
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Dirk Kranz, Alexandra GoedderzAbstractCombining a variable- and person-centered approach, the present study explores associations between cross-cultural reentry problems and cultural identity formation (processes and statuses) in late adolescence and young adulthood. The study sample consisted of 510 participants between 16 and 29 years of age who had spent 6–60 months abroad, mainly for educational reasons. Referring to a neo-Eriksonian identity model, three processes of home-culture related identity formation were differentiated: commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration of commitment. At the variable-centered level, reentry problems were negatively related to commitment with home culture and positively to exploration and, most strongly, to reconsideration. This pattern was corroborated at the person-centered level. Participants in the moratorium status (low commitment, high exploration, high reconsideration) reported most problems with reentry, whereas participants in the closure status (a pattern inverse to that of moratorium) reported fewest. Participants in the achievement and diffusion statuses ranked in the middle. In all analyses, person-related variables (gender, age, big five personality traits) and sojourn-related variables (length of sojourn, time since return) were controlled for. Implications of the findings for our understanding of (cross-) cultural mobility and identity are discussed and suggestions for future research are outlined.
       
  • The relationship between social capital, acculturative stress and
           depressive symptoms in multicultural adolescents: Verification using
           multivariate latent growth modeling
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Sung Man BaeAbstractThe purpose of this study was to verify the relationship between social capital, acculturation stress, and depressive symptoms in multicultural adolescents. The data from the Multicultural Adolescents Panel Survey (MAPS) study conducted by the National Youth Policy Institute (NYPI) was used for analysis. Participants were 1635 multicultural adolescents (male 805, female 830; Mean age = 10.98 years [SD = .37]) who were followed over five years. We utilized a Multivariate Latent Growth Modeling to test the relationship between the variables and a Bias-corrected bootstrap test was conducted to verify the indirect effects. Findings showed that increases in social capital were related to decreases in depressive symptoms in multicultural adolescents and increases in social capital were associated with decreases in acculturative stress. In addition, increases in acculturative stress were related to increases in depressive symptoms. Finally, social capital indirectly affected depressive symptoms by mediating acculturative stress. The present results suggest that policies for increasing the social capital of multicultural adolescents at the national and community levels are needed to alleviate acculturative stress in multicultural adolescents, which can help decrease their depressive symptoms.
       
  • Through the lens of history: The effects of beliefs about historical
           victimization on responses to refugees
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Zsolt Péter Szabó, Johanna Ray Vollhardt, Noémi Zsuzsanna MészárosAbstractIn societies with collective memories of their group’s historical victimization, perceptions of this victimization are linked to attitudes and behaviors towards present-day victim groups such as refugees. We examine this idea in the Hungarian context, where collective memories of historical victimization include the fate of Hungarian refugees in 1956. In surveys among two Hungarian community samples, we find support for the hypothesis that exclusive regional victim consciousness predicts support for anti-refugee policies, while inclusive regional victim consciousness predicts support for pro-refugee policies. In Study 2, we replicate and extend these findings with a novel measure of event-specific victim consciousness (i.e., historical analogies between the two refugee situations). We show that event-specific victim consciousness mediates the effects of regional victim consciousness on attitudes towards refugees, and predicts prosocial behavior towards refugees.
       
  • Inter-generational transmission of Indigenous culture and children’s
           wellbeing: Evidence from Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Alfred Michael DockeryAbstractA limited body of empirical evidence suggests a strong sense of cultural identity promotes wellbeing and other socio-economic outcomes for First Nations people, including for Indigenous Australians. A challenge to this evidence is potential endogeneity: that Indigenous people who achieve positive outcomes are then more likely to maintain and engage in their traditional culture. Data from Australia’s Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children were used to address that challenge. Indigenous parents’ attitudes and practices with respect to passing on traditional culture to their children in early childhood were related to children’s later health and socio-emotional adjustment. Exploratory factor analysis identified three key elements of parental transmission of Indigenous culture to their children: connection to country, connection to kin and traditional knowledge. Parents fostering a strong kinship connection was found to contribute to positive child development. Positive effects of connection to country and parental desires to pass on traditional knowledge were also identified in some regional contexts, providing further evidence that traditional Indigenous cultures should be seen as a resource for addressing Indigenous disadvantage, not a contributing factor. The research design eliminates the possibility of (the child’s) outcomes ‘causing’ greater cultural identity or engagement, but not the possibility of omitted variables shaping both parents’ practices toward cultural engagement and child outcomes.
       
  • Explicating anomie in refugee women’s integration narratives: A
           qualitative research study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Jonix Owino, Christina D. WeberAbstractRefugee women flee from their home countries due to civil unrest, war, persecution and migrate to Western countries such as the United States in search of a safe haven. This research study conducted in an Upper Midwest community in the US unveils integrations experiences of refugee women from their standpoint. The integration narratives obtained through in-depth interviews with 16 refugee women aged 40 years and above depicted traits of anomie as described by Emile Durkheim and Robert Merton. Excerpts from the integration narratives conveyed anomic traits such as feelings of, loneliness and sadness, lack of purpose/meaning, unmet expectations, feeling isolated, and retreatism mode of adaptation. Using these themes, the study explored how such experiences reinforce anomie among the refugee women. Although this research study does not claim universal representation of refugee women experiences, the discussion provided serves to help communities understand the women’s integration experiences and implement structures and practical guidelines for successful integration.
       
  • Proactive personality and cross-cultural adjustment: Roles of social media
           usage and cultural intelligence
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Shangui Hu, Hefu Liu, Shuqin Zhang, Guoyin WangAbstractProactive personality has been theoretically defined as a natural disposition that determines the manner in which an individual responds to social environmental changes. However, in cross-cultural context, knowledge about the role of proactive personality and its boundary conditions in expatriate cross-cultural adjustment remains limited. To address the gaps, this study aims to investigate whether and how proactive personality accounts for variance phenomena in expatriate cross-cultural adjustment with intervention of boundary conditions. A survey was conducted in three public universities in China, and 247 informative responses were obtained for hypothesis testing analysis. Results reveal that proactive personality contributes to expatriate cross-cultural adjustment. This contribution occurs through the conduit of cultural intelligence (CQ). CQ partially mediates the relationship between proactive personality and academic adjustment but fully mediates that between proactive personality and social adjustment. Moreover, social media usage for gathering information negatively influences the relationship between proactive personality and CQ. Implications and future research directions are discussed as well.
       
  • Retesting integrated model of intercultural communication competence
           (IMICC) on international students from the Asian context of Malaysia
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Muhamad Umar Nadeem, Rosli Mohammed, Syarizan DalibAbstractIntercultural communication competence (ICC) is a need of today, for those who live in multicultural societies and have frequent interactions with culturally different individuals. It is strongly recommended to retest the integrated model of intercultural communication competence (IMICC) among multiple cultural perspectives. For this reason, this study adopted IMICC, retested it on the Asian context of Malaysia. The research employed a survey technique and collected data from 300 international students of a public university. The theoretical model of the research was analyzed using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). Most of the established paths of IMICC were supported. The findings show sensation seeking and attitude toward other culture (ATOC) directly influenced ICC. The mediating effect of ATOC was empirically justified through the findings. Nevertheless, the mediating effect of motivation to engage in intercultural communication (MTEIIC) towards sensation seeking and ethnocentrism with ICC was not established. The results are promising; however, it is the initial step toward the validation of IMICC on the Asian context. The research practically contributes usage of the model to the policymakers in order to develop future strategies/policies for international students. Further refinement and retesting of the model are necessary for future studies.
       
  • So close and yet so far' Predictors of international students’
           socialization with host nationals
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Wendy J. QuintonAbstractSocialization with members of the host culture (host nationals) is a persistent challenge for international students, especially those from East/Southeast Asian countries. The present study investigated three theoretically grounded predictors of international students’ socialization with host-national students—self-esteem, university identity, and perceived discrimination—in a sample (N = 256) of East/Southeast Asian international undergraduate students in the U.S. Socialization with other internationals was assessed to enable a direct comparison of socialization with international students’ two primary peer groups. Across analyses, self-esteem predicted greater socialization with host nationals but not other internationals. Although support was qualified, university identity tended to predict greater socialization with both host nationals and other internationals. Perceived discrimination was unrelated to socialization with either group. Mixed model analyses confirmed the differential pattern of relations between self-esteem and socialization with host nationals versus other internationals, as well as the similar pattern for university identity and socialization target. Results suggest that self-esteem may be a particularly important resource for East/Southeast Asian international students striving to forge relationships with host nationals. Further, boosting university identity may foster better relationships for international students with both host national and other international students on campus.
       
  • Influence of sensation seeking on intercultural communication competence
           of international students in a Malaysian university: Attitude as a
           mediator
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Muhamad Umar Nadeem, Rosli Mohammed, Syarizan DalibAbstractThe present study aims to retest the relationship between sensation seeking, attitude towards other cultures (ATOC), and intercultural communication competence (ICC) introduced by the Western researchers. It was proposed that sensation seeking and ATOC have a direct impact on ICC, and ATOC mediates the relationship between sensation seeking and ICC in the Malaysian context. Survey technique was considered and structural equation modeling was performed in the study. The participants (N = 336) included international students of a Malaysian public university and were randomly selected for data collection. Findings revealed that sensation seeking is a predictor of ATOC and ICC. In addition, ATOC appeared as the mediating variable. The results reconfirmed the findings of Western studies and validated the culture-general nature of variables in the Malaysian context. Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE) Malaysia can predict the accomplishment of their existing plans and further develop a policy for making Malaysia a hub of international students by considering the findings of this study.
       
  • The mediating role of moral exclusion between authoritarianism and
           outgroup discrimination
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2020Source: International Journal of Intercultural Relations, Volume 74Author(s): Hadi Sam Nariman, Márton Hadarics, Ali Mohammad Soufizadeh, Anna KendeAbstractIt has been well-documented that right wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation as two facets of the authoritarian personality differentially account for a variety of negative intergroup behaviors. Integrating the Dual Process Model (Duckitt, 2001), with the literature on “Moral exclusion” (e.g., Opotow, 1990; Tileagă, 2007) we investigated whether or not moral exclusion would mediate such a relationship. Employing survey data (N = 1015), collected from a representative Hungarian sample, we found that moral exclusion mediated the effects of both RWA and SDO on the negative behavioral intentions against Roma as well as Jewish minorities in Hungary. Moreover, we argued that the concept of moral exclusion should be interpreted not as a generalized tendency, but as a mechanism which can be stemmed from distinct social cognitive motivations.
       
  • Positive and negative intergroup contact and willingness to engage in
           intergroup interactions among majority (Han) and minority (Uyghur) group
           members in China: The moderating role of social dominance orientation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 October 2019Source: International Journal of Intercultural RelationsAuthor(s): Changcheng Wang, Fei Huang, Sofia Stathi, Loris VezzaliAbstractThe present study investigated whether the associations of positive and negative intergroup contact with behavioral intentions (intentions to have contact with the outgroup in the future) are moderated by social dominance orientation (SDO), by considering the perspective of both majority and minority group members in China. Participants were 325 Han (majority) and 373 Uyghur (minority) members, who completed a self-report questionnaire. Results indicated that positive contact was associated with more positive behavioral intentions among high-SDO majority group members, whereas SDO did not moderate the association between positive contact and behavioral intentions among minority group members. In addition, negative contact was associated with lower behavioral intentions among high-SDO majority group members, and among low-SDO minority group members. This study suggests that attention should be placed simultaneously on positive and negative contact and on individual difference variables relevant to social ideologies, such as SDO.
       
  • Becoming Canadian: Immigrant narratives of professional attainment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 July 2019Source: International Journal of Intercultural RelationsAuthor(s): Ursula E. Moffitt, Luciara Nardon, Hui ZhangAbstractWe investigate how economic immigrants in Canada negotiate their identity in the process of “becoming Canadian” through an analysis of public texts. Drawing on the master narrative framework, we examine the interplay between individual and societal narratives as immigrants grapple with the tension between notions of “desirable” immigrants as those that are well integrated professionally and the reality of facing career related barriers. Among those whose success stories align with the master narrative of professional attainment there was little questioning of this expectation, thereby allowing it to remain invisible. Among those who had not (yet) achieved work related success in the receiving country, they tended to engage alternative narratives elaborating on the antecedents, outcomes, and barriers to labor market participation. Despite the countering nature of these alternative narratives, they strengthen the societal expectation of professional success as a key pathway to inclusion, thereby reinforcing the rigidity of this narrative. We contribute to literature on the social construction of national identity by examining the process of becoming national and the role of labor market participation in immigrants’ perceptions of inclusion in their new society. Our study highlights the importance of including immigrants’ voices in the construction of a more inclusive society, which may aid in breaking down exclusionary narratives of national identity.
       
 
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