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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1647 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (21 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (244 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (88 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (52 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (966 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (170 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (966 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
International Journal of Growth and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion     Open Access  
International Journal of Innovative Research in Social and Natural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Integrated Education and Development     Open Access  
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Korean Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Language and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Management and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Management, Economics and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Qualitative Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social and Allied Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social And Humanities Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
International Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Social Sciences and Education Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Synergy and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal Pedagogy of Social Studies     Open Access  
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access  
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 216)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
InterSciencePlace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigación Valdizana     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
Izvestia Ural Federal University Journal. Series 3. Social and Political Sciences     Open Access  
J : Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal     Open Access  
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Burirum Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences Research     Open Access  
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Community Development and Life Quality     Open Access  
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Geography, Politics and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate School Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Surin Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, Rajapruk University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Multicultural Affairs     Open Access  
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 318, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Review     Open Access  
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access  
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Lakon     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Knowledge Management for Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Korea : Politik, Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft     Open Access  
Korean Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kotuitui : New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Kulttuurintutkimus     Open Access  
Kulturwissenschaftliche Zeitschrift     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
KZfSS Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
L'Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
L'Ordinaire des Amériques     Open Access  
La Tercera Orilla     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Lambda Nordica     Open Access  
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Lavboratorio : Revista de Estudios sobre Cambio Estructural y Desigualdad Social.     Open Access  
Lectio Socialis     Open Access  
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d’EMAM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Letras Verdes. Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Socioambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science     Open Access  
Lex Social : Revista de Derechos Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Literacy Learning: The Middle Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Local-Global: Identity, Security, Community     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Lucero     Open Access  
Lúdicamente     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lutas Sociais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Macedon Digest, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Maskana     Open Access  
Mathématiques et sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mayéutica Revista Científica de Humanidades y Artes     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meanjin Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Media Information Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Media International Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Melbourne Journal of Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mémoire(s), identité(s), marginalité(s) dans le monde occidental contemporain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Memorias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meridional : Revista Chilena de Estudios Latinoamericanos     Open Access  
methaodos.revista de ciencias sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Methodological Innovations     Open Access  
Methods, Data, Analyses     Open Access  
México y la Cuenca del Pacífico     Open Access  
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mikarimin. Revista Científica Multidisciplinaria     Open Access  
Mirai : Estudios Japoneses     Open Access  
Miscelánea Comillas. Revista de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales     Open Access  
Misión Jurídica     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

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Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences
Number of Followers: 2  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Online) 2452-3151
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3183 journals]
  • The moderating effect of love of money on relationship between
           socioeconomic status and happiness

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 October 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Nanthaporn Chitchai, Kalayanee Senasu, Arnond Sakworawich The objective of this research is to determine the moderating effects of Love of Money (LOM) on the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and happiness. This study explores not only the direct relationship between SES and happiness, but also indirect relationships that may exist through life domain satisfaction, such as through job, income and family satisfaction. Additionally, it further studies the moderating roles of LOM on those indirect or mediated relationships. Purposive sampling method was used to collect data from 433 samples drawn from four different target groups with the mix of level of income and LOM. For analysis of data, the structural equation modeling technique was employed. The findings reveal no direct relationship between SES and happiness, but findings did show an indirect, positive relationship between SES and happiness through job, family and income satisfaction. This suggests a multiple mediated relationship between SES and happiness. LOM has a negative effect on happiness as well as on job satisfaction and income satisfaction. In addition, LOM revealed moderating roles on SES-income satisfaction (strengthening) and job satisfaction-happiness (weakening) relationships. The results suggest that low LOM people have a sense of contentment because they are more satisfied with their income, no matter how much they earn, compared with the satisfaction of high LOM people. Also, high LOM people undermine job satisfaction as a source of happiness, therefore lowering their overall happiness or life satisfaction.
       
  • Creative leadership strategies for primary school principals to promote
           teachers’ creativity in Guangxi, China

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 September 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Qingling Zhang, Pruet Siribanpitak, Nuntarat Charoenkul The objectives of this research were 1) to analyze the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the creative leadership of primary school principals to promote teachers' creativity in Guangxi, China and 2) to develop creative leadership strategies for primary school principals to promote teachers' creativity in Guangxi, China. The study was mixed method research and involved a sample of 106 schools and 636 school principals and teachers. The instruments used in this study were a questionnaire and a strategic evaluation form of suitability and feasibility. The data was analyzed by average, standard deviation and PINmodified. The results showed the following: 1) the strength was the facilitating creative potential of every teacher; the weaknesses were the forming and facilitating dynamic creative teacher teams and promoting a school culture of innovation respectively. The political and government policy as the opportunity and the economic, socio-cultural and technological aspects were considered as the threats. 2) Three main strategies were developed including (i) to develop the principals' creative leadership in facilitating the team creativity of teachers to foster students' creativity; (ii) to develop principals' creative leadership in promoting an innovation culture that encourages the individual and team creativity of teachers to foster students' creativity; and (iii) to develop the principals' creative leadership in facilitating the individual creativity of every teacher to foster students’ creativity.
       
  • Joint-liability and dynamic incentive mechanisms in microlending: Evidence
           from lab-in-the-field experiments in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Rawadee Jarungrattanapong The mechanisms of joint liability and dynamic incentive in microfinance institutions are often cited as the key factors that lead to the low default rate in loan repayment in developing countries. The study tested the effects of joint-liability lending and dynamic incentive mechanisms on risk preferences and loan repayment. Through the conduct of microfinance lab-in-the-field experiments with 256 microfinance clients in Thailand, this study found that joint liability without dynamic incentive performs better than individual lending in terms of loan repayment. The dynamic incentive mechanism reduces risk-taking behavior and promotes loan repayment, however, combination of joint-liability and dynamic incentives enhances moral hazard through risk-taking. Further, participants tended to be more risk-taking when they perceived that their partners were risk-lovers.
       
  • Livelihood changes of affected households under resource scarcity: The Son
           La hydropower project in Vietnam

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 September 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Thi Minh Hang Bui, Pepijn Schreinemachers This study analyses changes in livelihoods of resettled and host households affected by the Son La hydropower project in Vietnam. Data come from a questionnaire survey of 52 host and 56 resettled households in five villages affected by the project and refer to the situation before, immediately after and 5-years after the resettlement. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, decomposition analysis and linear regression. Resettled households, and to lesser extent also host households experienced a decline in rice yields, income and an increase in food insecurity. There is a discrepancy between the government resettlement plan and reality. Compensation payments alone appear inadequate to rebuild and maintain livelihoods and a more direct approach is needed to create economic opportunities in the affected communities.
       
  • Thai teachers’ self-assessment and student perceptions on the
           practice of autonomy

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Sumittra Suraratdecha, Chamaipak Tayjasanant This paper aims to share the classroom observation findings from a study that previously revealed positive beliefs of secondary school teachers and learners in Bangkok regarding various aspects of autonomous learning in the Thai culture of learning. The earlier findings disclosed their beliefs in support of an autonomous learning approach regarding the roles of language teachers and learners, willingness to engage in activities and decision-making relevant to language classroom arrangements both in- and outside the classroom. It is thus worth seeing how these beliefs are translated into practice. This study investigates how teachers self-evaluated their application of autonomous learning in classrooms based on the reflective teaching concept, compared to their students' perception. The sample included 19 teachers and 632 students from 19 secondary schools in Bangkok, who volunteered to complete an evaluation form at the end of the observed lessons. The findings suggest an inconsistency between the teachers’ beliefs and practices. Additionally, they rated their implementation relatively higher than their students. The study sheds light on how teacher educators and policy makers can further assist in reducing barriers so that the practice of autonomous learning in secondary education in Bangkok and in Thailand may become achievable.
       
  • Chemical literacy levels of engineering students in Northeastern Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Rungrat Thummathong, Kongsak Thathong The objective of this study was to investigate the chemical literacy levels of undergraduate engineering students in Faculties of Engineering in Northeastern Thailand. The subjects were 391 undergraduate engineering students who were enrolled in a basic chemistry course in the 2nd semester of the 2012 academic year in the Faculty of Engineering at the North-Eastern University and at the Rajamangala University of Technology Isan in KhonKaen province. The instruments were a chemical literacy test (CLT) and semi-structured interviews. The CLT had 3 assessment formats: 1) multiple-choice CLT, 2) written CLT, and 3) test of chemistry related attitudes. The holistic results of the CLT responses of the engineering students showed that the mean of percentage scores was 43.58 and about three-fifths (61.90%) of the engineering students' level of chemical literacy was categorized at the “low level”. In addition, the results of semi-structured interview responses of the engineering students (n = 40) showed that more than half (57.5%) of the engineering students’ chemical literacy level was also categorized at the “low level”. The overall chemical literacy of the engineering students was categorized at the “low level”. Hence, it is necessary for educational institutions to develop learning activities for engineering students to achieve higher chemical literacy and to avoid any impact caused by chemical usage applied with a lack of knowledge and understanding and social responsibility.
       
  • Confirmatory factor analysis of collaboration model in non-formal higher
           education management in southern Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Pornpichet Hanghon, Idsaratt Rinthaisong This study aims to provide exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis of collaboration model between Local Administrative Organizations (LAOs) and Community Learning Centers (CLCs) in non-formal higher education management in southern Thailand. The study was conducted in eighteen CLCs using questionnaires with participants of 450. Those participants divided into 4 groups: LAOs chiefs, teachers, CLCs committees, and students. The confirmatory factor analysis was run. The findings of the factor analysis showed that the components of collaboration was comprised of four main-factors: (1) the standardization main-factor shows the relationship between the organization's standards, (2) the formalization main-factor refers to the relationship of the organization's formality, (3) the reciprocity main-factor showed the exchange of resources with each other for a good organization's relationship, (4) and the intensity main-factor explains the increase in the intensity of the organization's relationship. Therefore, the collaboration between LAOs and CLCs in non-formal higher education management will improve if the four main-factors have been employed.
       
  • Structural equation model to assess the impact of learning organization
           and commitment on the performance of research organizations

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Ardharn Khunsoonthornkit, Vinai Panjakajornsak This study analyzed the impact of learning organization and commitment on the performance of research and development organizations in Thailand. The research used a structural equation model based on an extensive review of relevant literature. The population and samples were drawn from full-time researchers in two science and technology organizations under the Thai Ministry of Science and Technology. A questionnaire survey was used to collect empirical data. The model fit was analyzed using the confirmatory factor analysis technique. The results showed that learning organization had a direct effect on organizational commitment and performance. However, commitment had no direct effect on organizational performance. Based on these results; scientific, and technology and development policy and planning should consider applying learning organization in research organizations.
       
  • Determinants of firms innovation in Nigeria

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Musa Abdu, Adamu Jibir Nowadays with rapid changes in the business world, companies all over the globe are increasingly including innovation as one of their strategies to ensure business expansion and profitability. This study examined the determinants of a firm's innovation in Nigeria. The study utilized enterprise survey data developed by the World Bank, which were analyzed using probit and tobit regression models. The findings showed that investing in research and development (R&D), formal training, a firm's size, exporting status, competitors, location, type and sector, or activity of firms all positively drive the propensity of a firm to innovate. It was however established by the study that the firm's age and employee education negatively affect the chances of innovation. Equally it was found that almost the same factors (investing in R&D, formal training, a firm's size, type, and sector) were the significant determinants of product, process, organizational, or marketing innovation. Thus, the policy implications of the findings are that firms should make the significant factors their top priorities in their quest to boost innovation.
       
  • Axiom of the relative income hypothesis and household energy choice and
           consumption in developing areas: Empirical evidence using Verme model

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Abubakar Hamid Danlami, Shri-Dewi Applanaidu, Rabiul Islam According to the relative income hypothesis, consumption behavior of households does not depend solely on their absolute income but also relatively on other peoples' income and consumption behavior. Households try to maintain their consumption pattern in such a way to meet the average consumption standard of their community. This study was conducted with the major aim of testing the validity of this axiom in relation to the household energy choice and consumption in the context of developing countries. In total, 540 households were utilized as the samples of the study. The study used both statistical and econometric (Verme model) tools. Both the cooking and lighting aspects of household energy sources were examined separately. The study found that all the various tests methods confirmed the validity of the axiom of relative income hypothesis in relation to household energy choice and consumption. Therefore, if the policy makers of developing areas take this aspect into consideration, it will simplify the process of making and implementing policies for shifting households away from using traditional biomass energy sources to modern, clean sources of energy.
       
  • Indicators for assessing social-ecological resilience: A case study of
           organic rice production in northern Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Chaiteera Panpakdee, Budsara Limnirankul Resilience seems to permeate sustainable development discourse since its concept has been defined as a system's ability to adapt with change of all kinds. However, assessing a specific system's resilience requires a specific index as well, because the nature of resilience greatly relies on temporal and spatial scales. In this paper, the researchers present a set of indicators built using 53 organic farmers in four districts of Chiang Mai province. The farmers were selected using snowball sampling and were interviewed and observed iteratively regarding guidelines of social-ecological resilience in agro-ecosystems and technography, respectively, identifying components and features required to deal with the dynamic changes in organic rice production. The acquired data was then analyzed using qualitative data analysis, verifying the conceptual density, and converting the data into initial sets of codes showing the attributes relevant to the resilient properties. Consequently, 47 social-ecological resilience indicators were identified that are credible for serving as both quantifiable assessment and farmer guidance. These qualifications integrate the farmers' historic, technological, social, and ecological contexts, which are all vital factors for the farm's adaptation and transformation during a period of change.
       
  • Data mining approach for arranging and clustering the agro-tourism
           activities in orchard

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Krittipat Pitchayadejanant, Parinya Nakpathom The paper attains to finding the association among interested activities in orchard that stimulate the tourists to travel. The knowledge obtained in this study is applying data mining techniques to create the association rule in order to find out the pattern of activities for orchard tourism. The evoked set of activities is the most frequent set which travelers would like to do when they visit orchard. The tool of analyzing the association rules is Rapid Miner 7.3. The result shows that the highest recommended activity is reaping and tasting the fruit. Another activities, which also are recommended to be arranged more into orchard, consist of walking, shopping, and feeding animal in the orchard.
       
  • Contribution of disaggregated tourism on Thailand's economic growth

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Wanvilai Chulaphan, Jorge Fidel Barahona The objective of this research was to evaluate whether expansion of the tourism industry has contributed to Thailand's economic growth, and vice versa. This study used international tourist arrivals from different continents in order to pinpoint which of these continents contributes the most to Thailand's economic growth. Time series techniques including cointegration and Granger causality tests were used to test the hypothesis of tourism-led economic growth in Thailand. The results showed that tourists from South Asia led Thailand's economic growth, and Thailand's economic growth also increased the number of tourists from Oceania. The results from this study suggest that in order to promote tourism industry, policy-makers should place emphasis on the Oceania and South Asian markets. Therefore, study on the behavior and preferences of tourists from these continents would help to find ways to increase the numbers of tourists from these regions.
       
  • Does international trade promote international tourism demand'
           Evidence from Thailand's trading partners

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Wipaporn Chaisumpunsakul, Piriya Pholphirul The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between international trade and international tourism demand in Thailand. Using a dataset of 207 trade partnership countries of Thailand, it was found that the degree of trade openness was positively correlated with international tourism demand. A percentage increase in trade share to GDP contributed about 0.046 percent of short-term foreign tourism demand and 0.807 percent of long-term tourism demand in Thailand. The import volume from origin countries' tourists to Thailand also increased the short-term tourism demand by 0.029 percent and the long-term tourism demand by 0.592 percent in Thailand. These results can be supportive of government strategies that aim to enhance the country's trade volume as well as stimulate Thailand's international tourism demand.
       
  • Structural equation modeling of organizational health in the marine
           fisheries management section under the fisheries management bureau

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Kannika Suwanyuha, Idsaratt Rinthaisong The purpose of this study was to develop structural equation modeling of organizational health in the Marine Fisheries Management Section under the Fisheries Management Bureau. The study was conducted with 330 subjects using confirmatory factor analysis. Four latent variables were measured from 22 observed variables. The exogenous latent variable was transformational leadership. The endogenous latent variables were: 1) organizational health 2) organizational climate, and 3) job characteristics. The results showed that the hypothetical causal model was consistent with the empirical data with χ2/df = 1.60, CFI = 0.99, GFI = 0.93, AGFI = 0.90, RMR = 0.04, and RMSEA = 0.04. The transformational leadership variables that had a direct effect were organizational health, job characteristics, and organizational climate, with standardized path coefficients of 0.72, 0.69, and 0.37, respectively. There was an indirect effect from organizational climate and organizational health, with their standardized path coefficients being 0.35 and 0.15, respectively. There was a total effect from organizational health, organizational climate, and job characteristics, with their standardized path coefficients being 0.87, 0.72, and 0.69, respectively. The job characteristics variable had an indirect effect on organizational climate, with a standardized path coefficient of 0.50. There was an indirect effect from organizational health, with a standardized path coefficient of 0.10. There was a total effect from organizational climate and job characteristics, with their standardized path coefficients being 0.50 and 0.10, respectively. Organizational climate had a direct effect on organizational health, with a standardized path coefficient of 0.21. The total effect from organizational health had a standardized path coefficient of 0.21. Organizational health, organizational climate, and job characteristics explained the variance of organizational health variables at 0.85, 0.67, and 0.54, respectively.
       
  • Appropriate participatory food waste management in the World Heritage
           Site, the Historic City of Ayutthaya

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Patranit Srijuntrapun The waste problem in the Historic City of Ayutthaya is so serious that there are concerns it is affecting the image of the ancient city and may result in its deregistration as a World Heritage Site. An appropriate participatory food waste management system at this site was thus studied employing a quantitative method and Participatory Action Research (PAR) in order to create a decent urban environment and a good image for the World Heritage Site.The findings revealed that the primary barriers to participation in waste separation were the attitudes of the citizens concerning waste management and waste separation. The present study found that the majority of the sample group usually separated recyclable garbage (87.2%) but they did not separate food waste before disposing of their garbage (72.2%). In addition, by employing PAR to address the problem of food waste, it was found that the appropriate participatory food waste management strategy was “to produce bio-extract or bio-fertilizer from domestic food waste.” Thus, appropriate waste management and waste separation plans should identify a format for participation in which citizens can contribute to an essential part of the process. Furthermore, participants in the community could apply the process of PAR to solve additional community problems.
       
  • Collaborative triangle for effective community water resource management
           in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Anyanitha Distanont, Orapan Khongmalai, Royboon Rassameethes, Sasipin Distanont Water resource management through community collaboration is a crucial way to bring sustainability to water utilization. This study highlighted the key factors affecting community water resource management. The study was based on the Royal Initiated Project in Thailand's southern region. In this research, qualitative analysis was used and a case study was applied as the research strategy. The data were collected from relevant documents, observations, and in-depth interviews with 30 key informants consisting of 5 water resource management experts, 4 academics, 5 community leaders, 10 members of community water resource management committees, and 6 government organization officials. The data were analyzed using content analysis and accuracy checks were made with relevant people until a common conclusion was achieved. Then, synthesis was used to describe the context relationship linkages. The findings showed the importance of geography, lifestyle, sense of ownership, and modes of practices of people in the area as well as the involvement of a network of government agencies (Hydro and Agro Informatics Institute and local government agencies), Thammasat University, and the Ban Kuan community. The government agencies and Thammasat University played a partnership role in supporting the community in terms of transferring knowledge, helping with analysis of existing situations and problems, and giving guidance in problem-solving, supporting management-related issues, and coordinating with water resource management agencies and other government agencies. These interactions can transform the concept of community water resource management into actual practice and create sustainable development for the community. Moreover, the findings illustrated the key factors in community water resource management according to His Majesty the King's initiatives which include management-oriented, community-oriented, social network-oriented, and technology-oriented factors.
       
  • Community dialogs on the probabilities of community-based mangrove
           institution

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Tassanee Ounvichit, Bencha Yoddumnern-Attig Active community participation is necessary for sustainable mangrove management. This two-year qualitative cum action research immersed into the context of a mangrove community in Krabi, Thailand with a three-fold purpose: (1) to understand the momentum of community roles in mangrove management over the past seven decades, (2) to devise a dialogic learning process for the community to create a community-based institution (CBI) for mangrove management, and (3) to identify the internal factors that influenced the probabilities for the community to realize their desirable CBI choice. The results revealed that the relations of the studied community to the local mangroves were oriented toward utilization, competition, exclusion, incentive-driven participation, and underground management. To empower their self-management capacity, a dialogic process entitled the Learn-to-Institutionalize Commons Management Model (L-ICM) was devised for the community to review their socio-ecological relations, to self-elevate their consciousness of the necessity for collective management, and to expose them to self-organizing experience. The community drafted three village mangrove rules and attempted to integrate them into a tambon mangrove rule. The factors that influenced the probabilities for the community to realize a genuine CBI for mangrove management included both foundation and procedural factors. The community dialogs must be founded on a deep awareness of the socio-ecological relations, high consciousness of the necessity of joint management, and clear understanding of the principles of commons management. They must continue in order to promote the community residents’ deeper and wider recognition of the benefits of institutional changes and adequate background knowledge for a systematic self-organization for pro-active and transparent mangrove management. Dialog facilitators working in lagging parts of the community were recommended to expand from smaller neighborhood dialogs instead of village dialogs.
       
  • Factors influencing achievement of Regional League Division 2 football
           tournament management

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Piyanut Rattanapian, Juta Tingsabhat, Vijit Kanungsukkasem This research studied factors influencing the achievements of Regional League Division 2 football tournament management. There were two groups of participants: 1) 438 people internally involved with football league tournament organization using the theory of non-probability sampling for purposive sampling, and 2) 1,068 participants related to football matches using the accidental sampling approach. This research employed two sets of questionnaires, one for each participant group, presented in the form of Likert scale and Lisrel (Linear Structure Relation) for the analysis of descriptive analysis and inferential statistics. The analysis showed that both internal and external factors of 1) Management, 2) Marketing mix, 3) Sports science, 4) Politics and government policy, 5) Player selection criteria, and 6) Performance evaluation system influenced the achievements of Regional League Division 2 football tournament management, with all at a high degree. The external factors relating to the management of the team which significantly affected the internal success of football match organization were the Performance evaluation system, Coordination, and Player selection criteria, respectively. These factors positively and significantly affected internal factors at the .01 level. The three external factors were found to indicatively determine 76 percent of the success of football match organization. The external factors relating to the team fan clubs which significantly affected the internal success of football match organization were political policies launched by the government and the processes of sports marketing, respectively. These factors positively and significantly affected internal factors at the .01 level. The two external factors could determine 65 percent of the success of football tournament organization.
       
  • Multi-level structural equation modeling for city development based on the
           expectations of the local population in a special border economic zone in
           Western Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Teerapong Teangsompong, Somboon Sirisunhirun In response to the opening of ASEAN and the creation of special border economic zones throughout the ASEAN community, research into the expectations of the local population in such areas is necessary to establish the most efficient policy implementation for Thailand. Employing a mixed methodology, this research assembled a multi-level structural equation model based on a total sample size of 540 people living in 120 local communities. Multi-level structural equation modeling in the Mplus 7.3 software was used for data analysis. The results showed that policy awareness did not have a direct effect on city development expectations, but had indirect effects on public participation and special border economic zone management. Therefore, people in the local community must be approached for successful management and policy implementation in the regional and urban districts of special border economic zones, as was found in this study. Further, the public sector must conduct policy implementation by persuading people in the local area to contribute so that the goal of effective policy for the special border economic zones can be achieved.
       
  • Framing emerging behaviors influenced by internet celebrity

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Suwan Juntiwasarakij Arguably, the advent of the Internet and, recently, social media have, to a certain extent, contributed to the global quest for fame and celebritization. Fueled by advanced telecommunication technology and capitalism, the coined Internet celebrity has become a cultural phenomenon that captivates, especially, younger generations struggling for being “liked” or “shared” in the “connected” society. By analyzing the literature on celebrity conceptualization and related topics, this study aimed to explore theoretically the phenomenon and the underlying social cultural influence of this new kind of capital through social construction, mostly based upon Max Weber's fragmentary theory of the modern state, of contemporary celebritization in the modern social media era, including celebrity meaning, celebrity status, celebrity capital, and celebrity culture The parasocial interactions between Internet celebrities and their audiences lead to emerging online behaviors. In addition, the ultimate goal for future research is to investigate the impact of social media celebrity on the younger generations in a consumerist society.
       
  • Problems in promoting Islamic ethics in adherence to the faith among Thai
           Muslim youths of Ban Kha Ling, Pattani province

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Kasetchai Laeheem The objective of this qualitative study was to explore problems in promoting Thai Muslim youths to adopt ethics in adherence to their faith. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with 40 informants who were representatives of four groups: 10 informants from each group of religious leaders, local leaders, youth leaders, and parents. Content analysis was performed using the principles of logic to compare related concepts, theories, and research reports with context. It was found that community leaders promoted Thai Muslim youths to adopt ethics in adherence to the faith through three methods: providing education through the mosque as an Islamic ethics training center, being good role models, and organizing Islamic ethics training camps. However, these activities received cooperation from only some parents and youths while others supported their children to participate in other activities that were popular and modern. As a result, some youths behaved against Islamic ethical principles in adherence to the faith. The findings provide a useful means for seeking guidelines for promoting Islamic ethics in adherence to the faith with new ways that are more interesting and better meet the needs of youth.
       
  • Counterfeit self: A confirmatory factor analysis among Indonesians

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Juneman Abraham, Bagus Takwin, Julia Suleeman It is questionable whether counterfeiting in many areas of life contributes to unethical behavior to a wider extent. If the notion is supported by data, then the moral damage in a society could be prevented by reducing the counterfeit self and behavior to a bare minimum. This study aimed at empirically testing the measurement model of counterfeit self of Wood et al. (2008) among Indonesians as well as theoretically reviewing counterfeit self roles in unethical behavior. The participants of this study were 1,655 high school students (764 males, 891 females; Mage = 15.76 years old; SDage = 1.08 years) recruited through a purposive sampling technique in North Sumatera and West Kalimantan, Indonesia. The data analysis technique used was Confirmatory Factor Analysis. The results showed that the counterfeit self model—comprised of counterfeit self dimensions, namely Self-alienation (ALIEN), Inauthentic Living (LIVE), and Accepting External Influence (EXT)—was supported by the empirical data. However, the dimension of EXT could not be represented by its indicators. The study contributed to the psychological body of knowledge that the EXT dimension might need to be excluded from the measurement of counterfeit self on teenagers, especially in Indonesia and other Eastern countries.
       
  • Perspectives on violence against women in Thai film: The Eternity

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Napat Ruangnapakul, Norhafezah Yusof, Norsiah Abdul Hamid There are many forms of violence in films with regard to culturally unique factors and differences in religion, or ethnic origin, which are expected to influence attitudes towards violence against women. In line with this context, film is a good source to study violence against women. This study examined violence against women in direct, structural, and cultural ways in ‘The Eternity’ (Chua Fa Din Sa Lai), a Thai film by Bhandevanop Dhevakul, a prominent Thai film director. A series of in-depth interviews with respondents was conducted in Thailand. The respondents were three policymakers, five academics, three NGO leaders, two film critics, two film directors, and a newspaper editor in Thailand. The data were analyzed thematically using the NVivo 10 software. This study discovered that violence against women persisted and was embedded in the film, which contained direct violence, structural violence, and cultural violence. Direct violence appeared as raping, slapping, beating, and humiliation, while structural violence included inequality, primitive society, and power structure. Cultural violence was embedded as power acceptance, patriarchy, and marital bondage. The significance of this study is in providing a deeper understanding of the circumstances associated with violence against women in Thai films. This study may benefit the film industry and film classification by drawing attention to violence against women in films and thereafter minimizing it.
       
  • Homeschooling in Southern Thailand: Status and proposed guidelines for
           learning process management

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Rudjanee Engchun, Ekkarin Sungtong, Theera Haruthaithanasan The objectives were: 1) to examine the status of learning process management regarding homeschooling, and 2) to propose guidelines for homeschooling families in Southern Thailand. The research was divided into two phases: Phase 1 involved quantitative data collection from 25 homeschooling families in 10 southern provinces via a questionnaire, and Phase 2 concerned qualitative data gathered from focus group discussions with nine participants using printed handouts as a research instrument. Quantitative data were analyzed using frequency, percentage, mean, and standard deviation, with qualitative data processed for content analysis using constant comparative techniques. The findings revealed that homeschooling families agreed at a high level regarding learning process management. Within each domain, usage of media and learning resources, learning and instructional methods, and learning assessment were at high levels with only curriculum recorded at a neutral level. Qualitative data results suggested four learning process management guidelines: 1) families, homeschooling networks, and Educational Service Area Offices should research, develop the curriculum, and establish independent homeschooling centers; 2) public agencies should create channels to facilitate continuous learning among family communities; 3) families should be assisted and encouraged to access and share the learning resources of educational institutes through a Memorandum of Understanding; and 4) education officers should assess the needs and requirements of homeschooling families and maintain communication via simplified terminologies.
       
  • Current policy and practice concerning multigrade teaching in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Khajornsak Buaraphan, Benjamas Inrit, Wilai Kochasila This study explored current policy and practice concerning multigrade teaching (MGT) and proposed policy options for improving the quality of MGT in Thailand. The study consisted of: 1) a review of policy documents and research about MGT; and 2) a qualitative study collecting data through classroom observations, individual interviews, and focus group discussions in four small schools with best practice in MGT. The qualitative data were analyzed using thematic analysis. The findings revealed that there was no national policy on MGT in Thailand. MGT existed only as one strategy to improve the education quality of small schools. There was some MGT training for in-service teachers, but no MGT course for pre-service teachers. The teachers, school administrators, school boards, parents, and students had a good understanding and awareness of MGT in promoting quality education for students in small schools. They gradually developed positive attitudes toward MGT from their appreciation of the increased quality of school and student learning achievement. The stakeholders’ understanding and awareness of MGT were key factors for the successful implementation of MGT in small schools. A school administrator was regarded as a key person leading to best practice in MGT. Based on the results of this study, continual development is urged regarding MGT and the inclusion of MGT in the national policy and pre-service teacher education of Thailand.
       
  • Effect of 5P model on academic achievement, creative thinking, and
           research characteristics

    • Abstract: Publication date: September–December 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 3Author(s): Sanit Srikoon, Tassanee Bunterm, Teerachai Nethanomsak, Keow Ngang Tang This study examined significant changes on the academic achievement, creative thinking, and research characteristics of Grade 9 students after the intervention of the 5P model and 5E model with an experimental group and control group, respectively. The 5P model is an integrated, research-based, learning instructional design model. In total, 76 out of 324 Grade 9 students were purposively selected from a high school located in Mahasarakham province, Thailand. The experimental group and the control group each comprised 38 samples. Researchers employed a 2 × 2 experimental research design. The findings revealed that the overall academic achievement, creative thinking, and research characteristics were significantly improved after the intervention of the 5P model as well as for the 5E model. However, the effect of the 5P model was found to be greater compared to the 5E model. As a result, the 5P model has been proved to be an innovative, instructional model to enhance students’ learning outcomes in terms of academic achievement, creative thinking, and research characteristics.
       
  • Effects of school policies toward competitive and collaborative approaches
           on teachers' instruction and students’ learning in schools in southern
           Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Theera Haruthaithanasan The benefits were studied of school policies toward competitive and collaborative approaches to enhance student-centered instruction and student achievement. In conceptual models, competition and collaboration at school level affect the teacher level and then the student level, as well as instruction, and finally student achievement. The dataset consisted of survey data collected from a sample of 243 public basic schools in 4 southern provinces, Thailand. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the models and verify cause–effect relationships among the variables. The research findings confirmed the effectiveness of the competition and collaboration on the instruction, but not student achievement. Particular models of competition and collaboration relationships in the Thai context were proposed. The key findings were critically discussed to reflect Thailand's educational issues and their rationales, and then policy implications were proposed to improve Thai education and society toward the global standard.
       
  • The welfare provision model of a homeworker network: A case study of the
           HomeNet Thailand Association

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Wirawan Chantagul, Praphaphan Unob, Narumol Nirathron, Rapeepan Kumhom The objective of this research was to develop a welfare provision model of a homeworker network using a qualitative research method in the form of a case study. The sample unit of the study involved a homeworker network, specifically the HomeNet Thailand Association (HNTA). The target group of 36 people consisted of network leaders, network committee members, network members, representatives from various sectors participating in welfare provision and other experts concerning informal worker welfare. Data were collected using in-depth interviews, group discussions, and observations. These research findings were used to develop a model for the welfare provision of a homeworker network using careful consideration and reliability confirmation by said experts. The derived model showed that the welfare provision of the homeworker network was based on the concept of welfare pluralism derived from the cooperation of homeworker network with other various sectors in a social movement to empower the homeworkers to be able to demand their rights and to develop new forms of welfare appropriate to the challenges faced by homeworkers. The model can be adapted to other informal workers networks by giving importance to creating diverse working partnerships, expanding the membership base in order to be representative of informal workers in making demands and advocating policies, raising awareness and co-responsibility of members in order to participate in welfare provision, and creating new learning processes of members.
       
  • Preservice teachers’ understanding of STEM education

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Pattamaporn Pimthong, John Williams STEM Education is promoted by the government throughout Thailand, but STEM teacher training in the universities is not well developed. This study investigates the understanding of STEM education by 87 preservice teachers from the Faculty of Education in a university in Bangkok, Thailand. The preservice teachers were asked to respond to an online questionnaire about their understanding of STEM Education. Six preservice teachers who had interesting responses were interviewed for more clarification. The results showed that most of the preservice teachers perceived STEM as the integration of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, but did not explain more about the nature of the integration. They did not explain how the four disciplines were integrated but focused on the outcomes of the integration. While the preservice teachers' ideas about the importance of STEM varied based on their majors, most participants perceived STEM as a teaching strategy. The findings of this present study indicate the importance of promoting preservice teachers’ understanding of the integrated nature of STEM and the connections among the disciplines.
       
  • Farmers’ knowledge and perceptions of sustainable soil conservation
           practices in Paklay district, Sayabouly province, Lao PDR

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Oudtanivanh Luangduangsitthideth, Budsara Limnirankul, Prathanthip Kramol In the agricultural areas in northern Lao PDR, maize production has become widespread due to intensive agricultural practices. As a result of intensive agriculture, farmers have been affected by soil degradation and increasing production costs. The farmers' knowledge and perceptions of sustainable soil conservation practices (SSCP) have influenced crop production. Importantly, soil conservation practices result in high soil fertility and decreased production costs. This study assessed the farmers' knowledge and perceptions of SSCP on maize production. A survey was conducted of 161 households in three villages (Palay, Boumlao-Phakeo, and Senphon) to gather primary data. Focus group discussions were also conducted to solicit additional data. Data analysis utilized a Knowledge Index and a five-point Likert scale. The results showed that 63 percent of the farmers interviewed were highly knowledgeable about SSCP while 32 percent and 5 percent had medium and low levels of SSCP knowledge, respectively. Regardless of the level of SSCP knowledge, farmers were conversant with the advantages and disadvantages of SSCP. However, farmers who had low levels of SSCP knowledge lacked practical application of soil conservation practices compared to those farmers with medium to high levels of SSCP knowledge. The survey results also showed there was a high level of perception of SSCP with 61 percent of the farmers interviewed positively agreeing with soil conservation practices. Nonetheless, despite the high perceptions of maize farmers in the study area, our findings showed a low take-up rate for SSCP practices. To improve the farmers’ application of SSCP, the government and non-government organizations should provide a range of projects such as programs on the techniques of maize production and the technical practice of SSCP.
       
  • Construction of social space in Thai hill tribe ethnic groups in Kamphaeng
           Phet province

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Ogama Jakae, Prasong Tanpichai, Apichart Jai-aree The main purposes of this research were to study the migration, marginalization and construction of social space of the Thai hill tribe ethnic groups in Kamphaeng Phet province. The key informants were 70 people who were mainly Hmong, Mien, Karen, Lahu, LiSu, and Lua, with five government officers and five from the Thai lowland. The research employed a qualitative methodology, using an interpretation paradigm. Data were obtained from interviews, focus group discussions, and participant observations. A phenomenological presentation was used to conceptualize emigration, marginalized people, and the construction of social space. It was found that the Thai hill tribe ethnic groups emigrated from Yunnan province to Laos, Myanmar, and Thailand. Eventually, the government did not allow them to live in the forests and they were moved to lowlands without proper management. There, they lacked some of basic human needs, had no agricultural land, and their dignity was compromised. However, they joined in the construction of social spaces by using a new dimension by being good citizens. These social spaces include social and cultural, economic, educational, political, and natural resource and environmental dimensions. Despite adversity, the Thai hill tribe ethnic groups could construct their social space by adapting their new identity in the context of Thai society.
       
  • Development of the learning management process to enhance the chemistry
           learning achievement and conceptual comprehension on organic chemistry
           using the Posner's approach with design-based research

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Nontpawit Kaanklao, Ittipaat Suwathanpornkul The research objectives were: 1) to study misconceptions in organic chemistry; 2) to design and develop a learning process to promote learning achievement and conceptual comprehension by applying Posner's approach in accordance with the design-based research method; and 3) to study the results from the implementation of the learning process to promote learning achievement and conceptual comprehension by applying Posner's approach in accordance with the design-based research method. The samples were 52 students in Grade 12 (25 students for the experimental group and 27 students for the control group). The research instruments were: 1) lesson plans based on the Posner approach with design-based research; 2) general lesson plans; 3) an organic chemistry achievement test; and 4) an organic chemistry conceptual comprehension test. The data were analyzed using the mean, standard deviation, skewness, kurtosis, multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA), and HotellingT2. The research findings were: 1) there were nine misconceptions in organic chemistry; 2) the learning process development to enhance organic chemistry achievement and conceptual comprehension based on the Posner approach with design-based research had four conditions: (i) not understanding in terms of learning, (ii) teaching for conceptual understanding, (iii) linking new concepts to the original concept, and (iv) the expansion of concepts to learn to solve new problems or situations. Furthermore, the learning process in classroom should be a competitive situation; 3) organic chemistry achievement and conceptual comprehension scores of the students in the experimental group were significantly higher than for the control group at a level of 0.05. In addition, the organic chemistry achievement and conceptual comprehension post-test scores of students in the experimental group were significantly higher than the pre-test scores at a level of 0.05.
       
  • Designing TPACK-based course for preparing student teachers to teach
           science with technological pedagogical content knowledge

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Akarat Tanak The rapid technological advancement of the twenty-first century has transformed the ways in which we teach and learn. As a result, student teachers should be equipped to integrate technology into classroom practices, especially for specific subject matter. This research examined the effect of a Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)-based course on 15 student teachers' TPACK. The research instruments included a questionnaire that covered the four components of TPACK, as well as lesson plans designed and implemented by the student teachers. Descriptive statistics and inductive analysis were used to analyze the data. The findings indicated that a basic understanding of technological knowledge was observed among the participants, rather than a more integrated knowledge of TPACK. The pedagogical knowledge component had a larger impact on student teachers' TPACK. The student teachers with low levels of PK were not able to make the pedagogy-technology linkage even if they had high TK. Moreover, the student teachers demonstrated a combination of technology, pedagogy, and content knowledge, rather than an integration of the three. Most student teachers used technology as a motivation booster, but no ICT-infused learning activities were used to encourage students to do scientific exploration or concept construction. The course should provide opportunities for student teachers to use technology to incorporate more inquiry experiences and more emphasis on PK revealed as a prerequisite for developing TPACK. Future studies related to science teachers’ TPACK should develop a TPACK-based course that draws upon transformative viewpoints and inquiry-based instruction. Moreover, the technology course in teacher education programs should not only be conceptually integrated but also require enactment of technology-enhanced lessons.
       
  • Factors influencing technology adoption of people with visual impairment:
           Case study of financial transactions through an automatic teller machine
           (ATM)

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Warot Korwatanasakul The objectives of this study were to identify the factors that influence the technology adoption of financial services through a case study of financial transactions made via an automatic teller machine (ATM). This study adopted both qualitative and quantitative research methods, including experiments, observation, questionnaires, and focus group interviews with 40 observations. The results indicated that the factors influencing technology adoption include cooperation from all related parties, social acceptance, ease of use, usefulness in using existing devices such as mobile phones, transaction safety, and security.
       
  • An evaluation of corporate customer need with regard to the use of product
           service systems for the furniture business through environmental marketing
           

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Ornwiriya Namsawat, Yanin Rugwongwan Presently, the entrepreneur and the manufacturing industry are considering a change in their business strategy by putting more emphasis on products and services that place importance on environmental marketing. The idea of a product service system that aligns with environment-friendly furniture is a new concept in developing countries such as Thailand. Entrepreneurs have found it challenging to evaluate whether or not the consumer is willing to pay for environment-friendly products and services that have been carefully designed. The objective of this research was to evaluate 124 companies, in Bangkok. Analysis to measure awareness and environment-friendly consumer behavior was based on consideration of consumers’ behavior in the purchasing and usage of furniture, using statistics, a t-test and ANOVA, with tests at a confidence level of 95%. The research found that consumers from the government sector have awareness of environmental impact and are willing to purchase environment-friendly furniture more than those from the private sector at a statistically significant level, with regard to de-toxification at p = .002, de-energization or de-carbonization at p = .010 and de-waste at p = .003. On average, large organizations are more willing to purchase environment-friendly furniture than organizations of other sizes. Both the government and private sector have similar requirements regarding the characteristics of furniture design. The service requirements of both sectors are also at a high level while furniture is in use post–purchase.
       
  • Karen Education Department's multilingual education for language
           maintenance

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Naw Khu Shee The choice of language of instruction and language policy in schools is a recent issue of concern with the maintenance of linguistic diversity through structured education in Myanmar. When multilingual societies adopt single-language-in-education policies, the trend is to assimilate different language speakers into that dominant language and their languages and cultures gradually decline and are lost. This sociolinguistic problem of the need to protect ethnic languages and cultures by integrating those languages and cultures into the education system is a significant one confronting Myanmar. In this study, the focus was on micro-level practices along with the community-established policies to contribute to the current and ongoing national language in the education policy development process. This study drew on findings from documents review, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, and classroom observations. The study included in its scope those Karen Education Department (KED) schools exclusively functioning in the Karen National Union (KNU)-controlled area in Myanmar. The study concerned the monolingual Sgaw Karen and did not investigate multilingual and multicultural student populations. This study showed that implementing language policies in education and applying strong mother tongue-based multilingual education (MTB-MLE) programs in the communities where there are predominantly ethnic people could result in the enhancement of the maintenance of ethnic languages for ethnic minorities.
       
  • Can proneness to moral emotions detect corruption' The mediating role
           of ethical judgment based on unified ethics

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Juneman Abraham, Amanda Giovani Pea The psychological process of corruption that integrates the role of moral emotions proneness, and ethical judgment remains unclear, as for example in the placement of antecedent, mediator, and outcome variables. This study tested the hypothetical framework that moral emotions proneness can indirectly predict corruption through mediation by ethical judgment. The research participants were 100 public officials who held leadership positions in Central Sulawesi, Indonesia. We used a correlational-predictive design with path analysis. The results showed that most of the hypotheses were supported. This study contributes in providing extensions to the proposition that proneness to moral emotions (guilt-negative behavior evaluation and shame-negative self-evaluation) might detect corruption. It does, the results revealed, but first needs to influence ethical judgment.
       
  • Is there peace within Islamic fundamentalists' When Islamic
           fundamentalism moderates the effect of meta-belief of friendship on
           positive perceptions and trust toward outgroup

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Idhamsyah Eka Putra, Zora A. Sukabdi On the basis that religious fundamentalists have a strong bond to their religion, we hypothesized that Islamic fundamentalism would moderate the effect of ingroup meta-belief of friendship on positive perceptions and trust on Christians. The results of the research involving 147 Muslim participants showed that the effect of ingroup meta-belief of friendship on positive perception and trust was significant among participants with high Islamic fundamentalism. It indicates that Islamic fundamentalists may become the ones who stand at the forefront to build a good relationship with other religions when they think their religion sees a particular outgroup as friendly.
       
  • Structural equation modeling of best practice-based high-performance
           public organizations in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Waranya Jirangkul Due to the expansion of government affairs and the creation of a special agency to implement national policy, studies investigating the proper factors responsible for successful performance in specialist missions are necessary to establish the most efficient high-performance organizational model for public organizations or quasi-government agencies. This study proposes best practices based on a high-performance organizational model with six causal factors. Employing a quantitative methodology, this study constructed a structural equation model based on a sample of 477 people working in two public organizations in Thailand. To analyze the data, structural equation modeling was performed using the LISREL software. The research findings revealed a good fit of the empirical data to the theoretical model. Culture and engagement had indirect effects on people and change management, resulting in strong organizations. High-performance organizations (HPOs) were indirectly affected by employee and design management. Therefore, employee management, which was a crucial mediator variable in the full excellent organizational model, must be approached and established for successful management according to this study. Furthermore, leadership, culture and engagement, and change management that had indirect effects on HPOs via employees, must be developed to achieve excellent agencies with employee management allowing public organizations to provide general public services. This study revealed best practices for implementing a model consisting of the causal-effect factors shown in this study.
       
  • The role of innovation in creating a competitive advantage

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Anyanitha Distanont, Orapan Khongmalai This study examined the innovation that leads to a competitive advantage in the frozen food business in the context of small-sized and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The research process consisted of three parts: 1) a literature study; 2) an empirical research study using questionnaires as a data collection tool; and 3) an analysis and conclusion of the research results using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and structural equation modelling (SEM). The findings showed that innovation enhanced the advantages in competition via external factors. These external factors were divided into two groups: micro-oriented factors and macro-oriented factors. The external factors at the micro level had more influence on the innovation development of the frozen food businesses than those at the macro level. The results showed that entrepreneurs, especially SME entrepreneurs, need to adapt and readily prepare themselves to face upcoming economic changes, which are about to occur not only at the global level but also at the regional and the country levels. In addition to the internal contexts within the organization, external factors are also important, especially those that will lead to the development of innovation. Innovation will become the strategic tool in this important competition for the improvement, creation, and enhancement of business to create competitive advantages equal to or better than those in foreign countries in order to realize sustainable development.
       
  • Factors that contribute to homesickness among students in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Darrin Thomas Homesickness is a problem among students at many universities. Few studies have examined this phenomenon and its relationship with cellphone involvement, resilience, social integration, and academic integration. Employing a cross-sectional survey methodology with stratified sampling at a university in Thailand found that a structural equation model was able to explain 36 percent of the variance of homesickness (n = 220). Through improving academic and social integration, resilience, and decreasing cellphone involvement, steps can be taken to lessen the impact of homesickness upon students.
       
  • Assessment of land use suitability for natural rubber using GIS in the
           U-tapao River basin, Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Shahid Ali, Kuaanan Techato, Juntakan Taweenkun, Saroj Gyawali The assessment of available land resources for crops is an essential step in achieving sustainability in agricultural development. Thailand has been the world's leading rubber producing country since the 1990s. This research was conducted to assess the land use suitability for rubber trees in the U-tapao River basin. A geographical information system and multi-criteria decision making were used in parallel to establish the suitability of land for use as rubber plantations in accordance with the Food & Agriculture Organization framework. Various bio-physical and socio-economic factors were considered together with expert opinion. The weighting of each factor was conducted using an analytic hierarchy process. This study concluded that 14.46 percent of the basin area was highly suitable for rubber, 84.48 percent was moderately suitable, and the remainder was less suitable or unsuitable for the cultivation of rubber. This research will facilitate designing agriculture policies for sustainable agriculture development of the region.
       
  • Production efficiency of maize farmers under contract farming in Laos PDR

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Yaovarate Chaovanapoonphol, Wirasak Somyana Maize is the second largest commercial crop in Lao PDR, especially in the northern and southern regions. Traditionally, farmers in Lao PDR produced and distributed products in the market on their own. Recently, however, contract farming has gained in popularity and has become more widely accepted, especially after the country entered international collaborations under the Ayeyawady-ChaoPhraya-Mekong Economic Cooperation Strategy (ACMECS) and the Greater Mekong Sub-region (GMS). This study analyzed the technical efficiency of maize production under the contract farming system. Data were collected from the survey responses of 302 contract farmers in Lao PDR's northern and southern regions and were analyzed using stochastic nonparametric envelopment of data (StoNED). Maize production efficiency estimations were calculated using the Tobit model. The results revealed that the efficiency of contract maize farmers in Lao PDR was on average 0.85 and that the main factors affecting maize production efficiency were the age and education level of the farmer and area of planted land. Age and education level had significantly positive impacts, whereas planted land area had negative impacts.
       
  • Contrast in vowel quality in Burmese and Thai Mon varieties: Phonetic
           indicators towards a restructured language

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Narinthorn Sombatnan Behr The Mon language, a register language, has a number of vowels with on-gliding phases that could eventually develop into diphthongs. These have never been acoustically studied. The objective of this study was to clarify the vowel characteristics in order to assess the possibility for change toward a restructured language. The results showed that some F1, F2, and F3 values in Burmese Mon (BM) could be used to differentiate clear from breathy vowels, especially in the on-gliding phase. F3 values as well as a tendency to diphthongization could be crucial factors in how BM vowels differ from Thai Mon (TM) vowels. Nonetheless, it is likely to take some time to justify whether the Mon language will change and whether BM will ultimately become a different language type from TM. These Mon varieties seem to be on the continuum of language change.
       
  • Cultural contacts of the Nordic countries with Soviet Russia and the USSR
           in the 1920s – 1930s

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Vladimir Nikolaevich Baryshnikov, Vladimir Ivanovich Fokin, Sergey Sergeevich Shirin The main characteristics of cultural exchanges between Fennoscandian and Russian peoples in the 1920s–1930s were considered. The methodology of the study contained a combination of different methods of analysis: comparative, institutional, functional, anthropological, as well as socio-cultural, socio-political. These methods were determined by the principle of historicism.
      Authors considered the topic of research as an integral sphere of holistic intellectual life of humanity, as a form of international cooperation, which is an integral part of the system of international relations in the period between the two world wars. The study was based on material from Russian state archives, as well as on published documents of Soviet foreign policy. The authors concluded that a passive attitude to the joint political struggle against the threat of war by many participants of the cultural cooperation with the USSR was determined by the idea of their national culture as a part of Western civilization. Nevertheless, refusal to cooperate with the Soviet Union was then tantamount to being marginalized in world culture. Cultural contacts with the Soviet Union played an important role in the formation of anti-fascist sentiments in the West. However, in the Nordic countries these sentiments were not widespread. Rather, the common idea was the short-sighted public hope that they would manage to stay away from the military disaster in Europe. As a result, they were among the first victims of German aggression.
       
  • Beyond the economy: Education for development

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Hyejin Bak This paper explores the meaning of development and the limitations of economic development which centers on capitalism, and argues that by understanding the role of education in development, we can overcome some of these limitations. The study discusses definitions of development, especially the concept of ‘good change’. Then, the case of South Korea is considered in order to illustrate the links between development and education. This paper puts emphasis on the need for a balance between materialism and humanism when understanding the relationship between development and education.
       
  • Development of conceptual framework and indicators for assessment of power
           development fund in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Pongpoj Putarungsi This study developed a conceptual framework and indicators for evaluating the Power Development Fund (the Fund) in Thailand by collecting information and data from interviews with key informants such as the Energy Regulatory Commission, the Fund Committee, and employees of the Fund. The funds were characterized into two groups namely three Funds in category A and three Funds in category B. The Sustainability Balanced Scorecard concept was selected as a framework and used to produce indicators to evaluate the management of the Fund. The conceptual framework contained six perspectives and each perspective had indicators as follow: 1) Learning and Development (2 indicators); 2) Management Process (5 indicators); 3) Overall Efficiency of operation and management (5 indicators); 4) Stakeholders (3 indicators); 5) Environmental (5 indicators); and 6) Social (4 indicators). There were 23 indicators in total.
       
  • A cross-cultural pragmatic study of the speech act of complaining by
           native Thai and Chinese speakers

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 July 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Li Yang, Anchalee Wannaruk This cross-cultural study investigated the semantic formulae of complaints employed by native Thai speakers speaking Thai (TTs) and native Chinese speakers speaking Chinese (CCs). A sample of 60 native Thai speakers speaking Thai (TTs) and 60 native Chinese speakers speaking Chinese (CCs) responded to a twelve-scenario Discourse Completion Task questionnaire and ranked the severity of the offence in each situation. The complaining data were coded into 12 semantic formulae based on Murphy and Neu’s (1996), Tanck’s (2002) and Gallaher’s (2011) models. The Mann–Whitney U test was employed to find similarities and differences between TTs and CCs in the semantic formulae and a repeated measures test was employed to examine the effects of social distance and social status. The results showed that CCs complained more explicitly than TTs, since CCs perceived the offence as more serious than TTs. Although both TTs and CCs complained explicitly to a stranger of lower status, TTs complained less directly to an acquaintance of lower status than CCs did. Moreover, TTs complained more explicitly to an acquaintance than to an intimate whereas CCs complained more directly to an intimate than to an acquaintance. These findings may facilitate Thai-Chinese cross-cultural communication and even Thai and Chinese English as lingua franca (ELF) language teaching.
       
  • The impact of abundancy of resources and regime type on income inequality:
           The case of less-developed countries

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Fadi Fawaz, Eric Frey This paper examined the effects of natural resource abundance on income inequality for lower-and higher-income earners in less-developed countries, as well as the effect of natural resources and the existence of democracy on the distribution of income. In light of previous studies, this study used panel data and a fixed-effects econometric model, which took into account the individuality of each less-developed country, to examine the effects of natural resource abundance on income inequality in lower- and higher-income brackets in less-developed countries. In the case of less-developed countries with natural resource abundance, we found that democratic countries experienced less income inequality than non-democratic countries. In addition, current economic standing and natural resource abundance had varying, yet significant, results; low-income less-developed countries generally had less income inequality if they lacked an abundance of natural resources. On the other hand, natural resource abundance resulted in less income inequality among high-income, less-developed countries. Regardless of current economic standing, our results showed an abundance of natural resources leads to a more rapid decline in income inequality over time—so long as that country continues on its path of economic growth.
       
  • Implementation effects of incentive policies on Tanzanian wetland
           ecosystems

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 June 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Norbert John Ngowi, Agnes Godfrey Mwakaje Incentive conservation policies are acknowledged to reduce the degradation of natural resources for improved ecosystem services worldwide. However, there have been few studies conducted on the contribution of development programs using such policies in wetlands of local importance. This paper examined the implementation effects of an incentive-based Wetlands Friendly Investments (WFI) strategy in the Ndembera Valley, Tanzania. Data were collected using a survey of 208 households and in-depth interviews, supplemented by Landsat 8 imagery and topographical maps. ERDAS Imagine 15 was used to process land cover changes and water flow using the TREND software. The results indicated: (i) all major wetlands areas had declined; (ii) the differences in land cover (t = −.418, df = 8, p = .687) and water flow (t = −.418, df = 8, p = .9) before and after introduction of the strategy were not significant; (iii) weak correlation was observed between rainfall and water flow (r = .37); and (iv) land conversion was the main driver for the decline in cover. These findings represent a failure of the WFI incentives to improve the ecological effects of wetland cover and water flow. This suggests that application of the strategy alone was not sufficient for substantial improvement of the desired short-term cover and flow effect. Integrating land use and livelihood into incentive policies can improve WFI incentive implementation practices for sustainable land conservation in the study area. The multi-method approach used minimized human behavior-response limitations, therefore it can be replicated elsewhere.
       
  • Practical agricultural communication: Incorporating scientific and
           indigenous knowledge for climate mitigation

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 May 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Sukanya Sereenonchai, Noppol Arunrat Agricultural communication to mitigate climate change enables information dissemination of both scientific knowledge (SCK) and indigenous knowledge (IDK) for practical farming. This research analyzed knowledge utilization and conducted community-based participatory communication to propose a practical agricultural communication framework for climate mitigation. Based on a qualitative method of data collection in Phichit province, the key findings showed that SCK and IDK can be mutually utilized to enhance the good relationship among the people and for the people with nature. The participatory communication processes consisted of planning, interventions, and monitoring and empowerment. The successful farmers employing the farming practices of not burning rice straw, rice straw composting, and alternative wetting and drying technique were the main senders. The messages were related to their farming practices focusing on a practical and understandable message and graphic explanations. Vinyl was selected as a communication material for signage in the most noticeable areas in their communities. This research highlights that participatory communication with group dynamics and communication promotion mechanisms at both local and national levels should be enhanced.
       
  • Exploring the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy for Vietnamese
           adolescents with anger problems

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 May 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Huyen Thi Bui, Lynn Mackie, Phuoc Anh Hoang, Thu Thi Tran The evidence base for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is promising for the treatment of anger in both adults and children in most European and Western countries. The goal of the current study was to explore the effectiveness of this therapeutic approach for anger problems in Vietnam as a non-Western culture and non-English speaking country. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken with 40 adolescents for three months, using different CBT techniques. A medium effect size of .64 (Cohen's d) was found for a CBT intervention. Anger management skills of older adolescents (aged from 14 to 16) improved more than those of younger adolescents (aged from 12 to 13). The findings of the current study replicated previous studies regarding the high cost-effectiveness of CBT intervention for anger problems in children and adolescents. Furthermore, the suitability of the group CBT format for the treatment of anger within this study was consistent with other studies as well. This adds valuable evidence to the paucity of CBT literature on culturally responsive CBT in diverse populations. Despite this, more research is needed to produce evidence-based CBT for other Asian countries as well as other populations.
       
  • Determination of order pattern frequency analysis using the copula method

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 May 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Somkid Naprom, Kullapapruk Piewthongngam, Thanaporn Athipanyakul The frequency and voluminosity of orders play a crucial role in determining the operation and scheduling, as well as the bird weight to be supplied to chicken processors. Due to the variability in frequency and voluminosity of each product, part, and size, orders have stochastic characteristics in nature; hence, the proper means to investigate orders is using probability theory and the stochastic process method. In this study, copula distributions were exploited to incorporate chicken order features into frequency analysis. This approach enabled the elucidation of the complex features of order frequency and voluminosity. These probabilistic properties provide useful information for order assessments and can be used for production/chicken supply planning and further scheduling of the industry.
       
  • A cross-sectional study on understanding and attitude of peri-urban
           Malaysians towards monosodium glutamate use

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Kingston Rajiah, Shazia Qasim Jamshed, Jeleine Tee, Kar Mun Yong, Yusra Ahmad Zahdi, Wong Ia Ling The aim of this research was to explore the understanding of peri-urban Malaysians toward monosodium glutamate (MSG) use and their attitude toward its use and whether there were any correlations among the respondents' understanding, attitude, and their demographic profile. This was a cross-sectional study which involved 600 respondents. The respondents were conveniently approached and recruited from Gurun and Jitra, in Kedah region and Kampung Lemal, Kampung Cherang Hangus, Pasir Mas, and Rantau Panjang, in Kelantan region. Information about the understanding and attitude of peri-urban Malaysians toward MSG use were collected using an interview-administered structured questionnaire. The study incorporated an interviewer so that the uneducated were not left out and also to reduce the non-response rate. Slightly more than half of the respondents (53%) were aware that there are only a few unwanted effects attributed to the consumption of MSG. This showed a significant association with the age of respondents (p = .014), with 41.5 percent (out of 53%) from the age group above 35 years. A significant association was also noted between income and the bad effects caused by MSG consumption (p = .016) with a high propensity among those earning below MYR 2,000. This study revealed a relatively high percentage of respondents who were using or had previously used MSG. Significant associations were found between respondent's income and their understanding of MSG, with the higher income respondents having a better understanding.
       
  • Factors contributing to disadoption of conservation agriculture among
           smallholder farmers in Petauke, Zambia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Estone Jiji Habanyati, Progress Hazwida Nyanga, Bridget Bwalya Umar This study identified factors that contribute to the disadoption of conservation agriculture (CA) among smallholder farmers in Petauke, Zambia. Data were collected through interviews with 92 randomly selected smallholder CA households, seven key informants, and four focus group discussions. The results showed that 29 percent of the sampled households disadopted CA. The four most commonly cited factors leading to disadoption of CA were lack of transport for manure (31%), high labor demands (25%), inadequate knowledge on CA (16%), and lack of material incentives (16%). The study recommends that CA promoters should stop inducing CA adoption through the provision of material incentives to adopters.
       
  • Place attachment in an old commercial district: A case study in Ubon
           Ratchathani, Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 May 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Nopadon Thungsakul, Danai Nilsakul This article explored place attachment for historical places in an old commercial district in Ubon Ratchathani where a variety of groups of people (both insiders and outsiders) are connected with places in the district. The research methodology was an integration of quantitative and qualitative research including the measurement of people's experience using structured questionnaires and interview forms and the interpretation of the quantitative method results. The results indicated that people are attached to historical places socially and physically as a result of cultural, memories, experiences, and physical factors. The study area appeared to have cultural prominence, a variety of living spaces that people can experience, including a physical environment that reflects the past of the district, a memorable symbol, and contributes to social activities.
       
  • Youth perceptions toward corruption and integrity: Indonesian context

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Sabrina O. Sihombing Corruption is a crime against humanity—it destroys the country and infects every level of government. Country development is inhibited and poverty increases. Youth, which is the hope of the nation, plays an important role in the fight against corruption. Attitudes towards the fight against corruption and the importance of understanding integrity need to be instilled from a young age. However, not many researchers have investigated or tried to understand the perceptions of young people against corruption and integrity, especially in the Indonesian context. Thus, this research identified youth perceptions toward corruption and integrity. This paper describes the first stage (item generation) in developing a scale for corruption and integrity. Data were collected among Indonesian youth through an open-ended questionnaire and in-depth interviews. The results showed that Indonesian youth are not really familiar with the word integrity. More than half of the respondents could not define the word. From those who could, honesty was perceived as a main characteristic of integrity. Indonesian youth defined corruption as taking away the rights of others. They pointed out that taking away others money is an example of corruption. All the research findings combined with the literature review on corruption and integrity will become indicators to measure corruption and integrity in the next steps of the scale development.
       
  • Relationships between Islamic ethical behavior and Islamic factors among
           Muslim youths in the three southern border provinces of Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Kasetchai Laeheem This research investigated the relationships between Islamic ethical behavior and Islamic factors (Islamic way of upbringing, knowledge of the religion, participation in Islamic activities, and practicing Islamic principles) among Muslim youths in the three southern border provinces, Thailand. A cross-sectional study was conducted in which 2,160 Muslim youths were surveyed and relevant data collected. They were recruited using multi-stage sampling methods. The data were analyzed with the R program to calculate Pearson's product–moment correlation coefficients and multiple linear correlation coefficients. The study found that there were statistically significant correlations between Islamic ethical behavior and the Islamic way of upbringing, knowledge of the religion, participation in Islamic activities, and practicing Islamic principles (R2 = .474, p 
       
  • Weight control specific compensatory health beliefs: Hypothetical testing
           and model extension

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Sittichai Thongworn, Veena Sirisuk Compensatory health beliefs (CHBs) refers to the beliefs that unhealthy behavior can be compensated for by activating healthy behavior. The purposes of this study were to investigate various theoretical hypotheses in the CHB model and to present a model whose concept expands from the original CHB model. A cross-sectional survey was designed for the present study. The sample consisted of 788 undergraduate students (mean age 19 years). All participants were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding weight control specific CHBs, self-efficacy, self-concordance, motivational conflict responses, compensatory behavior intentions, and actual behavioral control. Path modeling showed that the degree of desirability influenced resolving motivational conflict by resisting desire and adapting risk perception/outcome expectancy when implementing tempting behavior. Identified self-concordance had an influence on resolving conflict by resisting desire. Weight control self-efficacy had an influence on resolving motivational conflict by resisting desire and adapting risk perception/outcome expectancy when implementing tempting behavior. Weight control self-efficacy had an influence on identified self-concordance. Compensatory behavior self-efficacy had an influence on compensatory behavior intention. Actual behavioral control had an influence on compensatory behavior intention and compensatory behavioral self-efficacy. Further work is required to explore all of the processes of the model.
       
  • Identifying factors affecting the success of rail infrastructure
           development projects contributing to a logistics platform: A Thailand
           case study

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Waralee Peetawan, Kamonchanok Suthiwartnarueput This research identified factors affecting the success of rail infrastructure development projects contributing to Thailand's logistics platform. Projects included in this research were double tracking the existing railways and the construction of new routes. Most projects were in the preparatory stage. The researchers extracted 24 factors from the literature review and categorized them into five dimensions. AHP and fuzzy AHP were deployed and leading success factors were identified. It was found that a rail development master plan has the highest influence on a project's success. The researchers recommend that the Thai government should establish a large-scale, long-term, integrative rail master plan for not only freight transport but also passenger services, since both cannot be solely developed. Along with the initiation of the rail master plan; stimulation should proceed in parallel on: a transit-oriented development scheme; promotion of local market development for a rail parts and assembly industry; implementation of public-private partnerships; and the institution of a new rail regulative agency.
       
  • Iranian advertisements: A postcolonial semiotic reading

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Azra Ghandeharion, Leili Badrlou This paper is a postcolonial reading of a number of Iranian brands and logos to discover the influence of Western hegemony on the design of Iranian advertisements. The advertising's pivotal role in supporting the brands has made producers employ creative strategies. Benefiting from the tenets of semiotics, we aim to uncover the hidden meanings within different advertisements, brand names, and logos as the paragons of the products' identity and image. The brands and logos discussed in this study belong to different companies and categories (food, cosmetics, airline, clothing, and bank). The measures of their Westernization level is analyzed according to Homi K. Bhabha's definition of mimicry which signifies imitating some famous Western brands (iconic mimicry), using English language (linguistic mimicry), utilizing Western-looking models or celebrities, and displaying female bodies (visual mimicry), and resistance. The results show the effect of Western supremacy, the negotiations of Iranian and Western culture, and cases of resistance in Iranian advertisements.
       
  • Reconstruction of social ideology through the power of music: Case study
           of Suntaraporn band, Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Kammales Photikanit, Patcharin Sirasoonthorn During 1939–1942 (2482–2485 BE), Thailand was governed by a junta led by Field Marshal Plaek Phibunsongkhram. Numerous traditional cultures were redefined based on the “Thai-ness” policy. Suntaraporn was the most outstanding band sponsored by the Thai government. On one hand, the band was used as a State apparatus for instilling the “Thai-ness” ideology. On the other hand, it created development discourses of civilization, modernity, and cultural discrimination. This article: 1) investigated the discourse of Suntaraporn's music and the establishment of social stratification in Thai society, and 2) illustrated the cultural power of music as a social-ideological mechanism to increase State power over the Thai people.Documentary research was applied to identify the historical development, forms, and values appreciated in Suntaraporn's music. Social exclusion leading to a new form of social stratification was investigated. The author adopted semiotic analysis by focusing on the aesthetic level. To identify perception, cognition, interpretation, and reception history, the socio-cultural roles of Suntaraporn's music were highlighted as: 1) the establishment of modern Thai music as a symbol of new class differentiation, and 2) the role of music as a social mechanism to increase State power over the life of commoners.
       
  • First-generation immigrant entrepreneurship in Malaysia: What do we know
           so far'

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Aissa Mosbah, Rochdi Debili, Hachemi Merazga Research on entrepreneurship in Malaysia has grown timidly in recent years. In fact, immigrant entrepreneurship, as a globally growing avenue of research, has not captured much interest among scholars in developing countries. What is abnormal is that the lack of interest over immigrant entrepreneurship research comes despite the strong presence of immigrants in the country and their large involvement in and contribution to the economy of the country. This paper reviewed the few studies found in the literature that take in their essence first generation businesses in Malaysia and discussed their scope of interest, findings, strengths, and weaknesses in light of the findings available in the literature. Ultimately, the paper aimed to further our understanding on how the link between migration (especially the migration of workers) and entrepreneurship in Malaysia is shaped, to invigorate our understanding on what characterizes the behavior of immigrant businesses, and to provide guidelines for future research in this discipline in the country. We found that the research is limited, but rich in topics where it focuses on immigrants from South and Central Asia.
       
  • A conceptual model of corporate social responsibility dimensions, brand
           image, and customer satisfaction in Malaysian hotel industry

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Abdulalem Mohammed, Basri Rashid Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a core concept in the context of the hotel industry where it is considered as a significant factor in competition and a firms' survival, primarily because CSR influences customer satisfaction. However, there are still few studies examining the relationship between the dimensions of CSR (economic, philanthropic, legal, and ethical) and customer satisfaction, particularly in the Malaysian hotel sector. Additionally, some studies have contended that CSR activities may indirectly affect customer satisfaction, and some factors may potentially mediate the effects of CSR activities on satisfaction. Hence, the present study developed a conceptual model to explain the relationship between the dimensions of CSR, brand image and customer satisfaction. According to the proposed model, CSR dimensions may positively influence customer satisfaction, with brand image mediating the relationship.
       
  • The roles of parents in cultivating children's interest towards science
           learning and careers

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Lilia Halim, Norshariani Abd Rahman, Ria Zamri, Lilia Mohtar This research investigated the opportunities provided by parents to their children with the aim of facilitating science learning and promoting careers related to science. This exploratory qualitative research used the semi-structured interview method with seven parents who were purposively sampled for the study. Their children (16 years old) had just enrolled to study pure science subjects (science stream) such as Physics at the upper secondary level of a rural school. The interview data were transcribed, coded, and categorized based on identified themes. An overall finding was that the parents had positive values toward science. Six themes were identified and were further categorized into two major factors a) parental support and b) parental academic expectations. The parental support factor included being supportive in i) their children choosing the science stream at the upper secondary level, ii) providing assistance in increasing the children's achievement in science subjects, iii) involvement in increasing interest in science iv) involvement in science-related activities, and v) supportive in science-related career choices. The parental academic expectation factor identified the sixth theme, namely the parents' continuous profound interest in their children's achievements in science. These identified factors can help the stakeholders to plan effective educational intervention involving parents' collaboration in increasing the interest of children toward science learning and careers.
       
  • Flow experience in computer game playing among Thai university students

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Supat Sanjamsai, Darunee Phukao This study was based on the flow theory of Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi. A cross sectional study was performed to examine flow experience in computer game playing among university students and to identify behavior that led to positive consequences and addictive behavior. Multi-stage sampling was conducted to select a sample of 478 university students aged 18–24 years who usually played computer games. Data were collected using the assessment instruments of computer game addictive behavior and perception of the consequences from game playing.Based on exploratory factor analysis, the construct of flow experience could be divided into two dimensions: 1) cognitive flow which was composed of challenge-skill balance, clear goals, and unambiguous feedback, and 2) emotional flow which was composed of action-awareness merging, concentration on the task at hand, sense of control, loss of consciousness, and time transformation. Based on structural equation modeling, cognitive flow was positively correlated to perception of utility from the game (β = .85) and emotional flow was positively correlated to physical and psychological impacts from the game (β = .52). Moreover, males were more likely to spend time on computer games than females. This study found that time duration was not a key indicator of game-playing consequences. However, the state of flow in computer game playing was indeed a key factor that could perpetrate positive or negative outcomes.The findings of this study suggested that flow experience in computer game playing has both benefits and drawbacks. It is recommended that youth-related organizations should promote cognitive flow experiences to develop the self-improvement of computer game players rather than emotional flow experiences.
       
  • An investigation of learning stressors among secondary school students: A
           case study in northeast Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Supatida Sripongwiwat, Tassanee Bunterm, Keow Ngang Tang This study explored the influences of learning stressors among secondary school students in a school in northeast Thailand. It identified six different learning stressors—academic-related, interpersonal-related, intrapersonal-related, learning and teaching, teacher-related, and group social-related—and their influences on different groups of students. A series of cross-sectional surveys was administered to 925 students consisting of four student groups (177 male lower secondary, 276 female lower secondary, 105 male higher secondary, and 367 female higher secondary). Descriptive statistics (mean score and percentage) and inferential statistics (MANOVA and ANOVA) were used to examine the differences between the groups. The results indicated that there were significant differences in all six learning stressors between the lower secondary and higher secondary groups of students. Only the academic-related stressor had a significant difference between males and females. The results contribute significantly to the body of knowledge and have implications for designing appropriate instructional plans and strategies while dealing with students learning stressors.
       
  • Construct validity of Thai lifelong learning inventory: Evidence from
           high-school students in Phrae, Kalasin, Prachin Buri, and Pangnga
           provinces

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Saksit Rittilun, Nuttaporn Lawthong, Sirichai Kanjanawasee This study aimed to assess the construct validity of Thai lifelong learning inventory: evidence from high-school students in Phrae, Kalasin, Prachinburi, and Pang-nga provinces. The participants in this study were 1,939 high-school students and were selected through multi-stage sampling. The tools were two sets of an inventory to determine the students of lifelong learning, each of which contained 70 items. The first set was a 5-scale Likert inventory and the second was a situational inventory with 4 choices for each item. The data were validated using second order confirmatory factor analysis followed by the LISREL 8.72. The results indicated that the models fitted to the empirical data found in the former inventory, χ2 = 125.79, df = 106, p = .09, GFI = 1.00, AGFI = 0.98 and RMSEA = 0.01, and those found in the latter,χ2 = 149.96, df = 127, p = .08, GFI = 0.99, AGFI = 0.98, RMSEA = 0.01.
       
  • Development of digital literacy indicators for Thai undergraduate students
           using mixed method research

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Wawta Techataweewan, Ujsara Prasertsin Digital transformation and the Internet strongly affect students' integration of technologies and their acquisition of more skills supporting their education and preparation for the workplace. This research paper developed digital literacy indicators for Thai undergraduate students using mixed method research. The purpose was to identify the actual definition, factors, and indicators of digital literacy in Thai society. The key informants were five experts in ICT, HR, and education. The second phase was to develop the measurement of digital literacy indicators using the confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) approach with a sample consisting of 1,183 undergraduate students. Data collection was conducted through a questionnaire with 54 questions. The results revealed that digital literacy criteria for Thai undergraduate students consisted of four factors containing 12 indicators. The first factor and its related operation skills consisted of cognition, invention, and presentation. The second factor was thinking skills consisting of analysis, evaluation, and creativity. The third factor was collaboration skills consisting of teamwork, networking, and sharing. The fourth factor was awareness skills consisting of ethics, law literacy, and safeguarding self. CFA was employed to test the construct validity of the research latent variables that revealed the harmony correlation of empirical data contained in this research model (chi-square = 25.007 with 21 degrees of freedom; p = 0.247; RMSEA = 0.0127; RMR = 0.00658; GFI = 0.996; and AGFI = 0.987). The weight factors of latent variables were 0.802, 0.897, 0.894, and 0.536, respectively. The value of reliability according to Cronbach's alpha coefficient of correlation was 0.644, 0.804, 0.799, and 0.288, respectively. Moreover the correlation matrix of the 12 observed variables showed correlation among latent variables with a significant level of statistic correlation at 0.01; the correlation values ranged between 0.031 and 0.612. These results were employed to develop a digital literacy test for undergraduate students to assess their skills and promote their study lives.
       
  • Relationship between perceived directors' leadership and classroom quality
           of primary schools in Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Dawruwan Thawinkarn, Keow Ngang Tang, Wallapha Ariratana This study explored the relationship between the perceptions of creative leadership and classroom quality of schools under the Office of Khon Kaen Primary Educational Service Area 1, Thailand. A survey design was employed to obtain 437 samples consisting of 127 directors and 310 teachers from 163 primary schools to collect information on creative leadership practices and the classroom quality level. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the perceptions of creative leadership and the classroom quality level while inferential statistics (correlation coefficient and stepwise multiple regression) were used to examine relationships between the two main variables. The findings revealed that school directors had a high level of practicing creative leadership, particularly from a positive cultural aspect. The classroom quality was found to be high too. Classroom quality was significantly related to the five aspects of creative leadership practice at a significance level of .05. The significant predictors were the vision, initiation, and management of creative leadership. These three creative leadership aspects were successfully contributing 71.3 percent of the variance towards the classroom quality level. The results contribute significantly to knowledge proposing creative leadership which can guide school directors in promoting classroom quality.
       
  • Analysis of moves, rhetorical patterns and linguistic features in New
           Scientist
    articles

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Pornsiri Muangsamai This paper investigated the moves, rhetorical patterns based on Swales' genre analysis, and common linguistic features in health and medical science reports in the New Scientist journal. Twenty-four articles, one from each weekly issue, were randomly selected from the articles with a length between 350 and 600 words published online in New Scientist between July and December 2012. They were analyzed according to the content, categorized and coded with corresponding descriptions. The findings revealed seven obligatory and two optional moves. The key linguistic features common in the articles were modals and voice.
       
  • Language endangerment and community empowerment: Experience form community
           training in the Moken language documentation and preservation project

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Sarawut Kraisame Language endangerment and extinction is currently a critical issue among linguists around the world. It is known that language attrition and loss dramatically progress, work on documentation and preservation should be done prior to the last speaker of such language passing away. It is found that there are at least fifteen languages in Thailand which suffer from language decline and will be extinct very soon. Moken language (ISO 693-3 code mwt) is one of language which is regarded as the dying languages. Like other endangered languages, Moken language and local heritage knowledge gradually decline without any transmission to younger generations. Thus, the Moken language documentation and preservation project (MLDPP) was initiated with an attempt to document and preserve Moken language and its oral literature before its extinction. As a part of MLDPP, this paper describes about how the community-training program is maneuvered. This contributes to collaborative language documentation and preservation project. As participatory action research, a grounded-theoretical approach together with on-the-job-training was adopted for contributing to the most benefit of community members. Based on almost-three-month training, the native researchers were able to initiate documenting their local knowledge and to manage the fieldwork without the researcher. They were able to document over 100 video records of Moken place names in Surin Islands with 27 min long and over 50 video records of traditional ecological knowledge with 20 min long without the linguist's supervision.
       
  • Damnoen Saduak Floating Market: The construction of floating market
           community identity from agricultural society to tourism community

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Teeraporn Thongpanya This qualitative research aimed to investigate the construction of a floating market's community identity and its impact on the people of Damnoen Saduak community. Data were collected using in-depth interviews, informal conversations, and participatory and non-participatory observations of the interactions and activities in daily life at the Damnoen Saduak Floating Market. The 52 key informants were Damnoen Saduak Floating Market stakeholders: 1) 20 entrepreneurs, members of community and government officers, selected using a snowball technique, and 2) 32 tourists selected using an accidental sampling technique. The findings of this study indicated that the construction of the floating market's community identity contained many meanings. The meanings of three eras were: 1) the community of the local agriculturists' waterways roaming, 1868–1967, 2) the community of the local way of life floating market for tourism, 1967–1977, and 3) the community of floating market for intensive tourism, 1977–present. The impact of the floating market community identity on the people of Damnoen Saduak community was to form both positive and negative characteristics. The positive impacts included the occurrence of a floating market which became known to outsiders and the employment and monetization of community members. The negative impacts included the changes to the traditional lifestyle such as the change from a barter system to a trading system and the change in the types of relationship from generosity to competition.
       
  • Factors determining subsistence farmers' access to agricultural credit in
           flood-prone areas of Pakistan

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Shahab E. Saqib, John K.M. Kuwornu, Sanaullah Panezia, Ubaid Ali This paper examines the factors influencing farmers' access to agricultural credit in a flood disaster risk-prone area in Pakistan. Multistage sampling through a structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 168 subsistence landholders in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. The empirical results of the heteroscedasticity corrected and weighted least squares regression with robust standard errors revealed that education, farming experience, total landholding, monthly income, family size, and proportion of owned land were significant factors in farmers' access to credit. The findings of this study reveal that socio-economic factors play a key role in farmers' access to agricultural credit in flood-hit areas in Pakistan. Hence, there is a need for credit policy to address the issues of farmers living in risk-prone areas. Moreover, the existing credit policy could be amended to protect the interest of tenant farmers, who lack collateral security.
       
  • Key success factors of disaster management policy: A case study of the
           Asian cities climate change resilience network in Hat Yai city, Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Somporn Siriporananon, Parichart Visuthismajarn The objective of this research was to study the key success factors of public policy in disaster management in Songkhla province, based on a case study of the Hat Yai Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) in order to propose guidelines for sustainable disaster management in the area. The methodologies applied in this research were both quantitative and qualitative. In the quantitative approach, the researcher used a questionnaire with 400 samples from three representative communities in Hat Yai city. The qualitative approach used the focus group technique with the stakeholders of policy implementation. The results of the survey regarding the problems within some communities affected by flooding indicated that most of the respondents had faced flooding in their community. Moreover, these respondents had participated in the policy and were aware of information about ACCCRN from different media, as well as having participated disaster management activities and had meetings with the organizations or personnel involved with disaster management. Moreover, the results showed a relationship between the individual factors and the information awareness of ACCCRN at the 95% confidence level. Additionally, the results using the qualitative method showed that the model of disaster management in Hat Yai, Songkhla province, involved three key success factors of disaster management policy: (1) there is a balance between self-interest and the public interest; (2) private participation is required; (3) addressing obstacles to policy implementation and its effective implementation. The benefits from this research are enormous in terms of successfully implementing disaster management policy and this policy can be applied to other contexts in Thailand as well.
       
  • Farmers' perceptions of impacts of climate variability on agriculture and
           adaptation strategies in Songkhla Lake basin

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Buncha Somboonsuke, Purawich Phitthayaphinant, Sayan Sdoodee, Chaiya Kongmanee In the past decade, there have been signs of climate variability that might have already affected certain aspects of the Songkhla Lake basin. This research was conducted to 1) identify the key problems of climate variability on the agricultural activities of farmers, 2) assess farmers' perceptions of the negative impacts of climate variability on agricultural activities, and 3) propose a set of adaptation strategies for agricultural development in the Songkhla Lake basin. Data were collected using structured interviews from a total sample of 271 farmers selected using the purposive and snowball techniques. The arithmetic mean was applied for data analysis. It was found that the key problem of climate variability on the agricultural activities of farmers in the Songkhla Lake basin was a reduction in crop yields. Farmers involved in fruit production, and fisheries suffered the most negative impacts of climate variability. The negative impacts of climate variability on para-rubber production, rice production, and oil palm production were at a high level. Five adaptation strategies for agricultural development were identified: 1) enhancement of capacity in impact assessment, 2) prevention and avoidance of negative impacts, 3) mitigation of negative impacts, 4) reduction of loss from negative impacts, and 5) rehabilitation of devastated areas and other losses. Furthermore, relevant agencies should campaign to raise awareness and understanding by farmers in terms of climate variability.
       
  • Blogging, civic engagement, and coverage of political conflict in Nigeria:
           A study of nairaland.com

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Okorie Nelson, Grace Loto, Oladokun Omojola This study was undertaken to analyze and ascertain several aspects of the coverage of issues of political conflict covered by the weblog, Nairaland, as well as gauge the level of civic engagement on the part of Nairaland users. The method used by the researchers was content analysis and four research questions were raised and answered to ascertain certain aspects of the coverage of issues of political conflict as well as the level of participation of the audience which consisted of Nairaland users. The results found that issues of political conflict were prominently placed, usually on the front page of Nairaland. It was also observed that the subject matter with the highest amount of coverage, as well as participation, was the conduct, comportment, and activities of elected political officials in Nigeria. Furthermore, the level of civic engagement was affected by the prominence given by the moderators of the Nairaland blog site to the stories that were published and this was measured by examining the number of views in relation to the prominence of the stories published. The study recommends that prominence be given to other aspects of Nigerian society as opposed to focusing inordinately on political officials. The study also suggests that inasmuch as misdemeanors, misappropriations, and questionable activities must be addressed by the media, it is equally important to acknowledge and commend the activities and events that are undertaken or embarked on to engender social change and development in Nigerian society.
       
  • Effects of Facebook usage on English learning behavior of Thai English
           teachers

    • Abstract: Publication date: May–August 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences, Volume 39, Issue 2Author(s): Phiyapa Sirivedin, Weerachat Soopunyo, Sunti Srisuantang, Achara Wongsothorn This research investigated the use of Facebook to enhance the effectiveness of English writing and learning among English language teachers. English language learning through Facebook design was evaluated using the results from data collected from 403 completed copies of a questionnaire. The questionnaire sought responses on the problems, needs, readiness, and suggestions of the respondents—Thai teachers of English in 437 Bangkok Metropolitan Administration (BMA) schools. Seventeen BMA teachers who exhibited a keen interest in using Facebook over other social media were selected as test subjects. One facilitator was included. All participants used the English language to interact on Facebook every day for six weeks. A mixed method consisting of qualitative and quantitative approaches was employed to analyze the collected data. The frequency, percentage, and content analysis were used to analyze the qualitative data consisting of the survey questionnaires, observations on interaction through Facebook sites, in-depth interviews, participants' reflections, and self-notes. A t-test was used to analyze quantitative pre- and post-test data. The findings of this study indicated that Facebook could significantly help improve writing skills, namely accuracy, meaningfulness, clarity, and relevance. It also effectively enhanced teachers' English learning attributes, namely fluency, confidence, satisfaction, value, and self-efficacy belief.
       
  • Self-regulating blood sugar control in women with uncontrolled diabetes
           mellitus

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Yauvarade Visutyothin, Pimpawan Boonmongkon The purpose of this study was to examine self-regulation of blood sugar control using the governmentality concept. Key informants were eight diabetic women with uncontrolled blood sugar levels in a community hospital. Semi-structured in-depth interviews and participatory observation techniques were used. Narrative analysis using Foucault's governmentality concept was applied for data analysis.The findings showed that the power of medical knowledge dominated the diabetic women's thoughts and directed their health practices. This had become the diabetic women's power for self-regulation. There were four patterns of self-regulation. 1) Surrendering and accepting: they accepted medical knowledge to manage their lives intensively, they surrendered their thoughts, and their bodies became docile; 2) Negotiation: disciplinary power was exercised more to control their bodies when the diabetes treatments were uncertain. They would be fearful, nervous and vague. Their health seeking process became a negotiation for managing their bodies without medical technology, for example, selecting alternative treatment. 3) Resistance: they sometimes resisted the diabetes regulations because of their lifestyles and their cultural limitations in the role of housewives. They had to go through a process of trial and error until attaining a desirable blood sugar level that harmonized with their life-styles. 4) A conduct of conduct: the diabetic women were learning and sharing amongst themselves ways to control their blood sugar level and live their usual lives. The methods were experimental and applied without disclosure to the medical experts. Lay knowledge was created and transferred to others.Recommendations are that health care services should implement collaborative treatment which balances the power of medical knowledge and the power of the patient's self. Understanding self-regulation would enhance the patient's ability to control the blood sugar level and attain effective treatment.
       
  • Motivation and challenge: Working for international nongovernmental
           organizations in Cambodia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Dick Pratt, Sekson Yongvanit The factors that motivate Cambodians working for International Nonprofit Organizations (INGOs) were explored and compared to perceived challenges to their ability to be effective. It was based on interviews conducted with individuals working for INGOs in the Cambodian capital of Phnom Penh and the regional city of Battambang. For most, the primary motivations were not pragmatic, but about learning, having an impact, and making a difference. The external environment, rather than personal or organizational issues, brought the primary challenges. The balance between motivation and challenge among these “idealistic” individuals may be important in shaping their future commitments and impact on society.
       
  • Cultural intercourse of the Lao Vieng ethnic groups that reflects on the
           architectural style and the use of space in the Korat house

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Karun Suphamityotin, Warunee Wang Lao Vieng ethnic groups were taken as prisoners of war to Nakhon Ratchasima in 1778, resulting in a continuous cultural intercourse with the Thai Korat people, especially in the construction of Korat house styles. Recent research has investigated residential housing and the use of space by the two groups of Lao Vieng—Laos Vieng Taku and Laos Vieng Japoh—who settled either close to or away from the center of administration. This article focuses on the comparison of the cultural intercourse of these two groups against the main cultural group which is reflected in the development of housing and the use of interior space. A study of architectural history is applied along with anthropology and sociology. The methodology includes housing surveys, case studies, and interviews with residents. Comparative analysis between the two groups aimed at studying the phenomena of cultural intercourse, including its contributing factors. The study findings show that in a historical context, both groups have maintained to some extent, aspects according to traditional Lao culture. However, the housing patterns of the Lao Vieng Japoh reflect more the adoption of the Korat house than the other, as the location of their community is closer to the administrative center and trade routes, and is surrounded by different cultural groups, especially the Thai Korat group, resulting in social interactions, cultural intercourse, and blending in with the mainstream culture at a greater level.
       
  • Causal relationship model of factors affecting collaboration between local
           administrative organizations in early childhood education management in
           Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Khemapat Yenpiam, Somboon Sirisunhirun, Wisut Wichitputchrapron The purpose of this research was to study the consistency between the causal relationship model of factors affecting collaboration between local administrative organizations in early childhood education management in Thailand and the empirical data, and to examine the factors which directly and indirectly affect collaboration between local administrative organizations in early-childhood education management in Thailand. The methodology in the research was quantitative, using questionnaires as a research tool. The sample based on simple random sampling and drawing lots consisted of 62 child development centers and 372 participants. The findings of this study showed that the casual relationship model was inconsistent with the empirical data and therefore had to be adjusted. It was also discovered that only the law, and financial and budget limitations have direct effects on collaboration between local administration organizations in early childhood education management in Thailand.
       
  • Reflections on learning experience for self-management: The concepts and
           practices of Sanam Chai Khet Organic Agricultural Group, Chachoengsao
           province, Thailand

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Aphinya Udomwech, Apichart Jai-Aree, Sunti Srisuantang This qualitative research examined the background and synthesized the concepts and practices of the Sanam Chai Khet Organic Agricultural Group, Chachoengsao province which have led to self-management. Data were collected from the analysis of documents and evidence, a survey of farmers' plots, participatory and non-participatory observation, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussion. The informants were randomly selected using purposive and snowball sampling methods and consisted of 45 leaders and farmers in the organic farmer group, community scholars, representatives of farmers in sustainable agriculture systems, independent organizations and government officials. Data were analyzed based on content analysis and verification of data used a triangulation technique. The results revealed that there were five main aspects driving the Sanam Chai Khet Organic Agricultural Group in the development of farmer potential in a group system with learning and participation based on community capital strengthening, leading to self-management to create food security and exercising the principles of self-reliance, sufficiency, and organic agriculture to manage community resources that are reflected from practices. These aspects were: 1) management of the group system to create power and development, 2) learning to establish organic agricultural sources and ways of distributing safe food from the family to society, 3) creating a balance among life, nature, and the ecosystem, 4) maintaining the resources base and plants and inheriting local wisdom and culture, and 5) self-adaptation, protection of rights, and network creation for sustainable development.
       
  • Determinants of maize farmers' performance in Benin, West Africa

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Cocou Jaurès Amegnaglo Increased agricultural productivity is the primary aim of all agricultural policies undertaken in developing countries. Increased agricultural productivity involves not only the analysis of factors limiting productivity but also efficiency because improved efficiency leads to productivity improvement. This paper investigated the factors limiting maize productivity in Benin based on a survey of 354 maize farmers. The mean maize yield was 1,347 kg/ha. The low level of maize yield in Benin is due to the lack of access to inputs, capital, and the weak institutional environment in which farmers operate. Furthermore, the efficiency model revealed that an increase in maize output of about 25 percent can be achieved in the short run by adopting the best farming practices and by addressing socio-economic and structural constraints. Policy should be encouraged that would facilitate access to inputs, capital, and training, and promote the development of infrastructure in farming areas.
       
  • The effects of perspective-taking on prejudice reduction among Thais: The
           moderating role of relational self-esteem

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Narut Pornprasit, Watcharaporn Boonyasiriwat Perspective-taking has successfully been used to reduce prejudice, especially when perspective takers have high self-esteem. However, only a few studies have been conducted to explore the effects of perspective-taking on reducing prejudice in Asian countries. This study investigated the moderating role of relational self-esteem on the effects of perspective-taking on prejudice reduction. In this study, high or low relational self-esteem was activated, and participants were either allocated in the perspective-taking manipulation group or the control group. The results showed that using perspective-taking techniques when individuals have high relational self-esteem increased, instead of decreased, prejudice toward homosexuality. This study showed that manipulating perspective-taking may present different results in different cultures.
       
  • Monetary penalties: An empirical study on the enforcement of Thai
           insider trading sanctions

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2018Source: Kasetsart Journal of Social SciencesAuthor(s): Sakda Thanitcul, Tir Srinopnikom A monetary penalty, as one type of regulatory enforcement tool, can provide a more effective enforcement outcome compared to a conventional criminal prosecution concerning the enforcement of an insider trading penalty. An empirical study of cases and interviews showed that a monetary penalty can result in a greater number of people receiving sanctions, greater success of cases, and more flexible enforcement actions, thereby cutting off certain hindrances existing in the conventional criminal prosecution process. Therefore, monetary penalties should be increasingly introduced and incorporated as an alternative enforcement mechanism into other financial and economic laws, for instance, insurance and banking legislation, in order to provide a robust enforcement action.
       
 
 
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