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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1568 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (20 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (256 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (18 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (91 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (52 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (871 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (170 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (871 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 52)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Iran Cultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 292, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access  
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Knowledge Management for Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Korean Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kotuitui : New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Kulturwissenschaftliche Zeitschrift     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
KZfSS Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
L'Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
L'Ordinaire des Amériques     Open Access  
La Tercera Orilla     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Lavboratorio : Revista de Estudios sobre Cambio Estructural y Desigualdad Social.     Open Access  
Lectio Socialis     Open Access  
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d’EMAM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Letras Verdes. Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Socioambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science     Open Access  
Lex Social : Revista de Derechos Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Literacy Learning: The Middle Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Local-Global: Identity, Security, Community     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Lucero     Open Access  
Lúdicamente     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lutas Sociais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Macedon Digest, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Maskana     Open Access  
Mathématiques et sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mayéutica Revista Científica de Humanidades y Artes     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meanjin Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Media Information Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Media International Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Melbourne Journal of Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mémoire(s), identité(s), marginalité(s) dans le monde occidental contemporain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Memorias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meridional : Revista Chilena de Estudios Latinoamericanos     Open Access  
methaodos.revista de ciencias sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Methodological Innovations     Open Access  
Methods, Data, Analyses     Open Access  
México y la Cuenca del Pacífico     Open Access  
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mikarimin. Revista Científica Multidisciplinaria     Open Access  
Miscelánea Comillas. Revista de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales     Open Access  
Misión Jurídica     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Módulo Arquitectura - CUC     Open Access  
Monthly, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Moving the Social : Journal of Social History and the History of Social Movements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mukaddime     Open Access  
Mütefekkir     Open Access  
Müvészettörténeti Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
National Academy Science Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
National Observer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Navigations : A First-Year College Composite     Open Access  
New Left Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
New Perspectives on Turkey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand International Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Newsletter of the Gypsy Lore Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Noesis. Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nómadas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nómadas. Revista Crítica de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of Social Research     Open Access  
Northeast African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nouvelles perspectives en sciences sociales : revue internationale de systémique complexe et d'études relationnelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Novos Estudos - CEBRAP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Observatorio Latinoamericano y Caribeño     Open Access  
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
OGIRISI : a New Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Öneri Dergisi     Open Access  
Opcion     Open Access  
Open Cultural Studies     Open Access  
Open Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Opticon1826     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Orbis. Revista Cientifica Ciencias Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Orbith : Majalah Ilmiah Pengembangan Rekayasa dan Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oregon Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Österreichische Zeitschrift für Soziologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Outlines. Critical Practice Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pacific Northwest Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access  
Pacific Science Review B: Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Palgrave Communications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Palimpsesto : Revista Científica de Estudios Sociales Iberoamericanos     Open Access  
Pandora's Box     Full-text available via subscription  
Panggung     Open Access  
Panorama     Open Access  
Papeles de Europa     Open Access  
Papeles de Trabajo     Open Access  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Pecvnia : Revista de la Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de León     Open Access  
Península     Open Access  
Pensamento & Realidade. Revista do Programa de Estudos Pós-Graduados em Administração     Open Access  
People and Place     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
People and Society (Mens & Maatschappij)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Percurso Acadêmico     Open Access  
Perfiles Latinoamericanos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Periférica. Revista para el análisis de la cultura y el territorio     Open Access  
Periodica Polytechnica Social and Management Sciences     Open Access  
Persona y Bioetica     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Journal Cover
Journal of Social Studies Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.379
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 14  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 0885-985X
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3161 journals]
  • Unofficial and unconventional social studies spaces for students of color
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 March 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): LaGarrett J. King In the editor's notes, King explains students of color desire for social studies education that speaks to their humanity. He introduces the articles in this special issue and defines unofficial and unconventional social studies spaces. He also argues for a more complete social studies education that helps the field understand other places where social studies is performed.
       
  • The pre-service practicum experience and inquiry-oriented pedagogy:
           Evidence from student teachers׳ lesson planning
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 March 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Michael P. Marino, Margaret S. Crocco This paper addresses whether, how, and to what extent social studies student teachers who have been introduced to inquiry-oriented teaching (as manifest in the National Council for the Social Studies C3 Framework) in their secondary social studies methods course incorporate this approach into the planning for their practicum experience. Based on analysis of lesson plans used in the practicum and follow-up interviews with a small subset of student teachers, this paper analyzes the factors that promote or inhibit use of this approach to teaching in their practicum experience. Results indicate the C3-oriented teaching approach, as taught in the methods course, did appear in the student teachers’ lesson plans. A small subset of student teachers used the framework competently while two smaller subsets were less adept in their application. The degree of application was affected by student teachers’ perceptions of their school placements and students’ needs.
       
  • The mint julep consensus: An analysis of late 19th century Southern and
           Northern textbooks and their Impact on the history curriculum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Chara Haeussler Bohan, Lauren Yarnell Bradshaw, Wade Hampton Morris In the decades after the Civil War, Southerners wrote and published their own history textbooks for secondary schools. These “mint julep textbooks,” as the Southern all-white editions were called by the 1960s, reinforced a Lost Cause narrative of the war for Southern audiences while competing with Northern versions of events. In this study, we employ both historical narrative and content analysis of six textbooks’ portrayals of John Brown, John Wilkes Booth, and Nathan Bedford Forrest. The textbooks that are compared– three Southern and three Northern – were written from the 1870s through the 1910s. While subtle but important differences emerge between the Northern and Southern depiction of these three figures, an even more important trend developed when analyzing change over time. In this article we conclude that, as time progressed, Southern versions of events increasingly impacted Northern textbooks. By the 1930s, the mint julep version of these three figures became the national consensus, as reflected in the work of historian David Saville Muzzey. This consensus around events like the raid at Harpers Ferry, the assassination of Lincoln, and the massacre at Fort Pillow lasted for much of the 20th century. By the early 20th century, Northerners appeased Southern interests in the writing of history textbooks.
       
  • Predictors of students׳ achievement on NAEP-Economics: A multilevel
           model
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Tina L. Heafner, Phillip J. VanFossen, Paul G. Fitchett Previous research has examined the role of formal classroom economics education on student learning. However, few studies have examined the role of both in school and out of school economics education exposure on student learning. Using data from the 2006 National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP)-Economics 12th grade assessment, we conducted an analysis using multilevel modeling to examine both student- and school-level effects on economics content knowledge. We analyzed the relationship among student-level variables including demographics, economics course structure, and instructional exposure. Unlike prior studies, we accounted for the nesting of students in schools and determined significant building-level effects associated with NAEP-E outcomes. We included district and state accountability policies (e.g., required testing and graduation requirements) as well as contextual variables (e.g., percent minority and percent college bound) at the building level. Findings offered a more nuanced interpretation of earlier NAEP-E studies and extended earlier analyses to include instructional exposure and building-level effects.
       
  • Positioning children׳s literature to confront the persistent avoidance of
           LGBTQ topics among elementary preservice teachers
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 February 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Lisa Brown Buchanan, Christina Tschida, Elizabeth Bellows, Sarah B. Shear Using a queer theory and disrupting heteronormativity framework, we applied a model lesson in the elementary methods course to understand preservice teachers’ experiences with LGBTQ individuals and families and their beliefs about utilizing children׳s literature portraying LGBTQ families in the elementary classroom. Participants reported a range of personal experiences with LGBTQ individuals and families and relatively positive responses to the family text set presented but wavered on LGBTQ themed books due to perceived conflict, religious beliefs, and ideas about what is appropriate content for young learners. A discussion of the findings also includes preservice teachers’ intentions for future teaching related to LGBTQ topics. Implications for teacher education and social studies education are explored.
       
  • Role retreatism of social studies teacher-coaches: An unequal balancing
           act
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Caroline J. Conner The current study explores role retreatism in secondary social studies teachers who coach athletics. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which social studies teacher-coaches retreat towards coaching and reasons for such prioritization. A case study relying primarily on interview and document data was conducted which included three secondary social studies teachers who coach football in the southeastern United States. Results indicate that participants prioritized coaching over teaching to cope with role conflict. The study further highlights the unequal rewards system in American schools, which promotes athletics over academics.
       
  • Teaching students to “think like economists” as democratic
           citizenship preparation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Cheryl A. Ayers
       
  • Can we meet our mission' Examining the professional development of
           social studies teachers to support students with disabilities and emergent
           bilingual learners
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Ricky Dale Mullins, Thomas Williams, David Hicks, Sara Brooke Mullins In this paper, we conduct a secondary analysis of The Institute of Educational Sciences’ (IES) 2011-2012 Schools and Staffing Survey (SASS) data, a self-reported, nationally representative database to examine: (a) the average caseload of students with disabilities and emergent bilingual learners within and across social studies content areas, as well how social studies teachers’ caseloads compare with other content area disciplines and (b) the extent and perceived utility of professional development opportunities social studies teachers receive to support both students with disabilities and emergent bilingual learners.
       
  • Museums as mentor texts: Preservice teachers analyze informational text
           structures and features present in a historical museum
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Brian Kissel, Erin Miller, Erik Byker, Amy Good, Paul Fitchett The purpose of this study was to examine how elementary preservice teachers (n = 35) experienced museums as potential sites for K-5 students to read museums using two lenses: to learn the history of the place in which they live and examine how museum authors craft texts to tell those stories. Along with exploring historical content, preservice teachers studied the museum as an informational text. Through this experience, preservice teachers discovered: 1) the five informational text structures museum authors used to present information and 2) how museum authors conveyed contemporary and social issues using various forms of writing. Additionally, the museum experience provided a context in which the preservice teachers could engage in critical literacy practices.
       
  • Reasoning with democratic values 2.0: Ethical issues in American history,
           2, David E. Harris, Anne-Lise Halvorsen, Paul F. Dain. Teachers College
           Press, New York (2018), 225, (Vol. 1), 241 pp. (Vol. 2), $29.95 per
           paperback volume. ISBN: 9780807759288
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Brett Bertucio
       
  • Growing democratic citizenship competencies: Fostering social studies
           understandings through inquiry learning in the preschool garden
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 January 2019Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Erin M. Casey, Cynthia F. DiCarlo, Kerry L. Sheldon Essential skills and attitudes necessary for active citizenship need to be cultivated as early as prekindergarten. This exploratory study investigated if three and four-year olds could be actively engaged in social studies practices through inquiry learning in a school garden. Eleven children openly interacted and conducted personally-driven investigations on a daily basis in the school garden located on their playground over nine-months. Three interviews with children, teacher observation notes, and lesson plans were analyzed to discover whether NCSS preK-12 learning themes (2010) for the social studies curriculum could be correlated with garden inquiries. Three prevalent NCSS themes surfaced from data analysis with Civic Ideals and Practices, People, Places, and Environments, and Time, Continuity, and Change being most prevalent. Results imply that working in a school garden through inquiry learning can foster the development of democratic competencies and thus, could be used to design C3 lessons for preschoolers in the garden.
       
  • Middle school geography teachers׳ professional development centered
           around historical photographs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Cory Callahan This paper describes three social studies teachers’ participation in an approximately 50-h, 13-month, Lesson Study-type professional development program called Beyond Words. The program centered around promoting teachers’ understanding of historical domain knowledge through experiences with innovative visual curriculum materials and sustained collaboration. This qualitative investigation answers: To what degree can Beyond Words help in-service geography teachers design and implement powerful instruction centered around historical photographs' Throughout Beyond Words the teachers demonstrated a spirit of open-mindedness and a willingness to experiment with unfamiliar ideas; they planned and implemented a lesson that featured engaging historical photographs, thinking critically about the past, and making claims about a public issue. At the end of the program, however, they demonstrated conventional approaches toward social studies instruction, especially regarding curriculum and assessment. The work shared here suggests that helping teachers craft high-quality questions to anchor student-inquiry and scaffolding teachers’ sensemaking of student-outcome data should be high priorities for professional development providers.
       
  • Counter-narratives as resistance: Creating critical social studies spaces
           with communities
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Tommy Ender Social studies’ explanations of race can marginalize educators of color, due to a lack of focus in the curriculum or conversations in the classroom. This article addresses the problem through composite counter-narratives, created from collaborations between the author and current social studies teachers of color. Two teachers, Charlie Smith and Rosita Hernandez, describe their experiences learning and teaching social studies through the lens of community. Current research positions counter-narratives as a pedagogical tool for pre-service teachers resisting majoritarian narratives or as a curricular tool for elementary social studies teachers challenging mainstream historical texts. However, a gap exists on in-service social studies teachers using community to create counter-narratives. Composite counter-narratives serve as a starting point in addressing this gap. This article aims to provide scholarship space for the voices of teachers of color while situating the community as a significant influence in teaching social studies.
       
  • Students׳ use of data visualizations in historical reasoning: A
           think-aloud investigation with elementary, middle, and high school
           students
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 November 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Tamara L. Shreiner Data literacy – the ability to analyze, interpret, evaluate, and use data and data visualizations – has become increasingly important for understanding and communicating information in the discipline of history. In the United States, curricular standards and standardized assessments already reflect this importance, but educators lack a clear picture of how students use data visualizations when reasoning about the past. How do students use data visualizations when reasoning about a historical question' To what degree does using data visualizations enhance students’ historical reasoning' What challenges do students face when attempting to use data visualizations' This study addresses these questions, investigating how fifth-grade, eighth-grade, and high school students use data visualizations from typical school textbooks. Twenty-seven students were interviewed, surveyed, and asked to think aloud about a historical question while using a textbook entry that included a data visualization. Results from qualitative and quantitative analyses highlight the potential for data visualizations to enhance historical reasoning. However, results also indicate that students are unlikely to read data visualizations on their own, underscoring the importance of providing targeted data literacy instruction.
       
  • Rosiek, J., Kinslow, K., 2016. Resegregation as curriculum: The meaning of
           the new racial segregation in U.S. public schools. New York: Routledge
           (164 pages, $136 (hardcover), $41.56 (softcover). ISBN 978-1-138-81281-9).
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 November 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Travis L. Seay
       
  • “We didn’t have to go through those barriers”: Culturally affirming
           learning in a high school affinity group
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Ryan Oto, Anita Chikkatur Using data from interviews, student work, and classroom observations in a “History of Race” course at a private predominantly White high school, this article examines the racialized tensions that led the teacher (first author) to create an unofficial affinity group for students of color that met outside of class. The authors argue that the teacher׳s attempt to implement a curriculum that was culturally affirming for students of color by de-centering Whiteness led to White students’ resistance that necessitated the creation of an unofficial “safe space” outside of the classroom for the students of color. The need for such a group demonstrates the difficulties inherent in presenting a more honest account of the role of race and racism in the United States that challenges narratives of historical progress. The article concludes that while students of color ideally should have access to culturally affirming knowledge inside social studies classrooms, this experience demonstrates why that kind of knowledge can only be engaged effectively within learning spaces that challenge the norms of conventional social studies education.
       
  • Narrating loss, anxiety and hope: Immigrant youth׳s narratives of
           belonging and citizenship
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Binaya Subedi The article offers insights into the cultural, historical and political discourses that shape displaced Bhutanese-Nepali youth׳s reading of what citizenship is and what citizenship can be. The article argues for the need to recognize how displaced communities desire to reclaim legal and cultural citizenship in response to the oppressions they have encountered. The article explores the politics that have produced refugee subjects and how displaced communities interpret the meaning of citizenship in response to the anti-immigrant and anti-refugee climate in the United States (and in the world). The research similarly documents how citizenship narratives can speak of anxiety and loss that communities have experienced and how youth resist interpretations of citizenship that privilege national affiliations. The research advocates that social studies researchers engage with how displaced communities conceptualize citizenship in relation to their experiences and histories of displacement. The article also calls for the need to recognize how transnational and cultural aspect of citizenship shapes marginalized people׳s everyday experiences.
       
  • A DBQ in a multiple-choice world: A tale of two assessments in a unit on
           the Byzantine Empire
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Colleen Fitzpatrick, Stephanie van Hover, Ariel Cornett, David Hicks This case study explored how a teacher, Mr. Smith, and his students experienced a mandated performance assessment while simultaneously preparing for an end of the year high-stakes, multiple-choice assessment. We employed qualitative research methods to examine how the teacher enacted a mandated performance assessment during a unit on Byzantium and how students described their learning and classroom experiences from the unit. Drawing on Grant׳s idea of ambitious teaching and learning of history and Ball׳s work on policy realization, analysis of these data indicated that Mr. Smith interpreted and enacted a performance assessment in ways that differed from how district and state policy makers intended. Despite an assessment that the district designed to promote historical thinking skills, students learned primarily factual knowledge.
       
  • Teaching elementary social studies during snack time and other
           unstructured spaces
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Annie McMahon Whitlock, Kristy A. Brugar It is common practice for social studies in the elementary school day to be integrated into other subject areas, especially language arts. Also common in an elementary school day are unstructured spaces such as snack time or recess. In this paper, we present findings from a larger study on social studies integration within various subject areas to explore how two teachers (first and fifth grade) integrated social studies into unstructured spaces. These teachers integrated social studies concepts and experiences into morning work, community building, snack time, and after-lunch reading to varying degrees. This study provides an inroad for conversation among researchers, teacher educators, and practicing teachers about the ideals and reality of elementary social studies with the hope of deepening students’ experiences.
       
  • Is civics enough' High school civics education and young adult voter
           turnout
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Kelly Siegel-Stechler Research on civic development in schools has identified a number of promising practices for increasing civic knowledge and interest among youth. This study examines the relationship between the most promising practices and increased political engagement as a young adult, using the likelihood of voting as a proxy. By assessing nationally representative survey data using a linear probability model, I explore whether youth who take civics in high school are more likely to vote as young adults. Results show a significant positive association between taking a civics course and extracurricular participation in high school, and likelihood of voting as a young adult, even after adjusting for other determinants of civics education and voter turnout. This paper explains the significance of these findings and makes the case for the importance of high school civic education and for further exploration of the factors involved in the process.
       
  • Toward what justice: Describing diverse dreams of justice in education, E.
           Tuck, K.W. Yang (Eds.). Routledge, New York, NY (2018), 157, $42.95
           softcover. ISBN 978-1-138-20571-0
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Ryan Oto
       
  • Critically civic teacher perception, posture and pedagogy: Negating civic
           archetypes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Kevin Russel Magill Critical pedagogy is an optimistic approach for achieving transformative agency, which remains an elusive and vital aspect of civic education. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the pedagogical approach of three critically identifying teachers. Specifically, this study was interested in understanding participant teacher critically civic ontological postures. The posture implies an understanding of the power inherent to civic relation and pedagogy. Participant teachers uniquely demonstrated postures that allowed them to address conceptual, personal, and material aspects of civics education. Participants achieved this first by making clear temporal connections between citizenship and disciplines; second, by incorporating student experiences; and lastly by utilizing a range of instructional approaches to negate traditional civic archetypes. Findings suggest that critical civic ontological postures are dynamic, contextual, and disciplinarily situated. Authentically critically civic ontological postures include developing intellectual solidarity with students and those in educational communities.
       
  • Undocumented, unafraid, and precarious: Thinking through conceptions of
           civics by undocumented activists
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Jesús A. Tirado With concerns about political apathy, it might be worth turning to a group that is challenging the political discourse and confronting institutions and policies head on. This article explores the ideas of two undocumented activists who are working to change the laws and politics that affect them. Using their work and dedication, this article discusses their dedication and their ideas for creating a new basis for a civics curriculum that goes beyond information and instead places other values at the center of education.
       
  • Rethinking social studies: Critical pedagogy in pursuit of dangerous
           citizenship, E.W. Ross. Information Age Publishing, Charlotte, NC (2017),
           235, Paperback $45.99, Hardcover $85.99. ISBN 978-1-68123-755-8
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 September 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Jesus A. Tirado
       
  • Difficult discourses: How the distances and contours of identities shape
           challenging moments in political discussions
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies Research, Volume 42, Issue 4Author(s): Andrew L. Hostetler, Michael A. Neel The purpose of this study was to investigate the ways novice social studies teachers perceived difficult discourses in their classrooms. Specifically, we sought to understand what social studies teachers think is difficult about navigating political discourses, and how they describe the nature of those discourses in order to draw conclusions about why some teachers choose to avoid or engage in political or social issues discussions with students. We used a collective case study and a grounded theory analysis of video recorded class sessions and video guided debriefings with teachers to explore this phenomena. We found that the degree to which teachers thought the discourse to be difficult to navigate was shaped by: emotional safety of students, teacher's own ideologies, and the distances of students’ identities from the discourse.
       
  • Civic media literacy as 21st century source work: Future social studies
           teachers examine web sources about climate change
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies Research, Volume 42, Issue 4Author(s): James S. Damico, Alexandra Panos Civic media literacy entails understanding complex topics and events that are increasingly mediated by digital sources of information and where it can be challenging to evaluate the reliability merits of these sources. The goal of this study was to discern the ways undergraduate preservice social studies teachers with different climate change beliefs read and evaluated the reliability of four diverse Web sources about the complex socioscientific topic of climate change. Findings highlight clear alignment between most participants with climate change beliefs at either end of a beliefs continuum with less alignment for participants with climate change beliefs toward the middle of a continuum. Findings also point to the benefits of whole group deliberation to help participants more critically evaluate a Web source that opposed the scientific consensus about climate change. In an age of “alternative facts,” this study points to the importance of students and educators having opportunities to evaluate, discuss, and determine the credibility of a range of online sources.
       
  • “From a Vibrant City to a Warzone”: Shostakovich’s 7th Symphony as a
           means to foster historical understanding through empathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies Research, Volume 42, Issue 4Author(s): Anthony M. Pellegrino, Alex d'Erizans, Joseph L. Adragna Scholars have long pointed to the power of music as a primary source in instruction for bringing past actors into sharper view and engender deeper connections with the past. By employing Dimitri Shostakovich's 7th Symphony, composed amidst the Nazi siege of Leningrad during the Second World War, we sought to explore, more precisely, the nature of how music, as a primary source, enhances the study of history among students. Through the formulation, execution, and assessment of a two-day lesson with students in five secondary history classes, three of which listened to the symphony and two of which did not, we found that the incorporation of the symphony resulted in students’ enhanced empathetic understanding of the past. Implications include details regarding profound opportunities for, as well as challenges to, cultivating historical empathy through the use of music as a primary source.
       
  • “It is definitely not the priority”: A postcolonial inquiry of social
           studies education in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies Research, Volume 42, Issue 4Author(s): Thomas Misco This study employs a postcolonial lens to explore social studies education curriculum in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). By using a web-based open-ended questionnaire and an exhaustive recruitment strategy, every middle and high school social studies teacher in the CNMI had an opportunity to participate in this study. Questionnaire responses and follow-up interviews reveal the ways in which social studies education in the CNMI is convergent and divergent with mainland iterations of social studies and the complexity of continual normative renegotiation of education given its colonial relationship with the United States.
       
  • The struggle for the soul of teacher education, 275, K.M. Zeichner.
           Routledge, New York (2018), $47.95 paperback, $160.00 hardcover. ISBN
           978-1-138-06409-6
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 September 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Melissa Mitchem
       
  • The Digital Storywork Partnership: Community-centered social studies to
           revitalize Indigenous histories and cultural knowledges
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Christine Rogers Stanton, Brad Hall, Jioanna Carjuzaa Indigenous communities have always cultivated social studies learning that is interactive, dynamic, and integrated with traditional knowledges. To confront the assimilative and deculturalizing education that accompanied European settlement of the Americas, Montana has adopted Indian Education for All (IEFA). This case study evaluates the Digital Storywork Partnership (DSP), which strives to advance the goals of IEFA within and beyond the social studies classroom through community-centered research and filmmaking. Results demonstrate the potential for DSP projects to advance culturally revitalizing education, community connectedness, and identity-development. The DSP offers a model for social studies education that is not only culturally affirming and revitalizing for Indigenous communities, but also holds potential for use in all communities. We conclude with recommendations for educators, scholars, and community members engaged in similar efforts.
       
  • The Lego Movie [3D computer-animated adventure comedy], D. Lin, R. Lee, P.
           Lord, C. Miller. Warner Bros, USA (2014)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Heath Robinson
       
  • Critical multicultural perspectives on whiteness: Views from the past and
           present, V. Lea, D.E. Lund, P.R. Carr (Eds.). Peter Lang Publishing, Inc.,
           New York (2018), 374, hardcover $83.56 softcover $52.95. 978-1-4331-4401-1
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Van Anh Tran
       
  • Education for sustainable peace and conflict resilient societies, B.
           Manojlovic. Palgrave Macmillan, Cham, Switzerland (2018), 177
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 September 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Phillip L. Henderson
       
  • Teaching U.S. history thematically: Document-based lessons for the
           secondary classroom, R. Metro. Teachers College Press, New York (2018),
           pages, $34.95 (soft cover only). ISBN 978-0-8077-5868-7 (paper). ISBN
           978-0-8077-7663-6 (ebook)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 August 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Sean Loomis
       
  • An elementary social studies teacher׳s quest to develop democratic
           citizens: The boundaries of ambitious teaching
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 August 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Tina L. Heafner, Jessica Norwood Developing informed and participatory citizens is one of the aims of the National Council for the Social Studies’ (NCSS) vision of civic education. However, when aspiring to meet the call for meaningful civic education, teachers may find themselves at odds with other goals of accountability-driven school environments, creating contexts in which ambitious teaching becomes the answer to instilling democratic citizenship in students. The purpose of this study is to document the experience of such an ambitious teacher, chronicling a fifth-grade teacher׳s quest for ensuring her students’ access to civic education in an urban, highly-structured, and accountability-based school environment. Through describing her teaching philosophy, instructional strategies, and experience with administration hampering her ability to promote civic education, a pattern of ambitious social studies teaching commensurate with existing literature is supported and questioned.
       
  • “Why is studying hard a violation of human rights'”: Tensions and
           contradictions in Korean students’ reasoning about human rights
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 July 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Geena Kim This study investigated how Korean students apply principles of human rights to social issues in Korean and international contexts and how they differentiate between human rights and other values. Open-ended, task-based interviews were conducted with 22 high school students in Korea. Korean students were aware of human rights violations involved in any given social issues, but their explanations focused only on the principle of political and economic equality. However, Korean students showed contradictory reasoning when they pointed to human rights issues in international or Korean settings; whereas they pointed to structural oppression as the cause of human rights violations and applied universal principles of human rights in the international context, they considered individual choices and traditional values in the Korean context. This study indicates that Korean students’ understanding of human rights is influenced by a variety of contextual factors in and out of school, and it suggests that social studies educators must challenge students’ prior experiences with and ideas about human rights issues in settings outside of school.
       
  • Barracoon: The story of the last black “cargo”, Z.N. Hurston, D.G.
           Plant (Ed.). Harper Collins Publishers, New York (2018), 171, $24.99 (hard
           cover), ISBN 978-0-06-274820-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Katherine Perrotta
       
  • Black Panther [Motion Picture], K. Fiege, R. Coogler. Marvel Studios;
           United States Media review (2018)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 July 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Delandrea Hall
       
  • Troublemakers: Lessons in freedom from young children at school, C.S.
           Shalaby. New Press, New York (2017), 187 pages, $25. ISBN
           978-1-62097-236-6 (Troublemaking is a verb)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 July 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Erin C. Adams, Margaret Fordham, Marahya Maiden, Renee Sandberg, Emily Webb
       
  • Turning pragmatism into practice: A vision for social studies teachers,
           D.W. Stuckart, M.D.: Rowman Lanham, Littlefield, (Eds.). Hardcover $66.00,
           Paperback $33.00 (2018), 158, ISBN 978-1-4758-3770-4, ISBN,
           978-1-4758-3771-1
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Christopher Spinale
       
  • Teaching politics in secondary education, W. Journell. State University of
           New York Press, Albany, Albany, NY (2017), 234 pages, US$90.00 Hardcover;
           US$29.95, paperback. ISBN 978-1-4384-6770-2
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 May 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Tommy Ender
       
  • K-6 pre-service teachers’ emerging professional identities as social
           studies educators
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 May 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Janie Hubbard It is vital that social studies be an integral part of the elementary (Kindergarten-6) curriculum to prepare all children to participate in increasingly diverse democracies. This study's purpose was to investigate how nine planned and implemented social studies professional development activities, outside traditional classrooms, could impact five volunteer K-6 pre-service teachers’ beliefs about their emergent professional identities as social studies educators. This case study explored research questions primarily through qualitative methods. Research implications contribute to possible solutions for (1) helping pre-service teachers understand how professional educators, outside their local areas, create and learn public scholarship to educate diverse democracies, (2) helping pre-service teachers recognize relationships between high quality professional development, networking, organization membership, and professional identity, and (3) sense of belonging as one treatment for U.S. novice teacher attrition rates.
       
  • Holocaust education as a path to prepare preservice social studies
           teachers to be social justice educators
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Shanedra D. Nowell, Naomi K. Poindexter What lessons does Holocaust education hold for preservice teachers and how does Holocaust education aid their growth as social justice educators' In this qualitative teacher research study we attempt to answer these questions by analyzing the coursework and reflections of 16 social studies preservice teachers (PSTs) as they completed an in-depth study of the Holocaust through historical research, field trips, and reading young adult literature, and designed creative and engaging lessons to teach the Holocaust to secondary social studies students (grades 6-12). Findings reveal “blind spots” in the PSTs Holocaust-related content knowledge, pedagogy, ability to make connections between the historical event and their students’ lives, and their acceptance the role of social justice education (Bazerman & Tenbrunsel, 2011). Over the course of the study, the PSTs improved their content and pedagogical knowledge, and took their first steps towards becoming social justice educators. We also found that for PSTs, taking on the role of Holocaust educators and social justice educators takes time and practice This study broadens scholarship on many common concerns in teacher education, such as dispositions, multicultural education, and teaching for social justice. The findings inform teacher educators, teacher candidates, and practicing teachers on the connections between Holocaust and social justice education, and provide a model for teaching social studies for social justice.
       
  • “Let's try and grapple all of this”: A snapshot of racial identity
           development and racial pedagogical decision making in an elective social
           studies course
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Andrea M. Hawkman This case study chronicles the pedagogical decision making of one high school teacher, Mr. Diego de la Vega, a pseudonym, as he teaches about race and racism in his elective social studies class, Race, Gender, and Ethnicity. De la Vega draws upon his own racial biography and experiences with race/ism to engage with high school students around racialized content. A conceptual framework grounded in racial identity development theory is used. This snapshot of racial pedagogical decision making, or RPDM, features a discussion of implications for social studies pedagogy to promote racial identity development in the classroom.
       
  • Feminist social studies teachers: The role of teachers’ backgrounds and
           beliefs in shaping gender-equitable practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Kaylene M. Stevens, Christopher C. Martell Gender inequity is a persistent problem in the United States. While the high school social studies classroom should be an important space for addressing gender inequity, there is significant underrepresentation of women in the curriculum. Thus, it is crucial that we understand how self-described feminist social studies teachers present women and gender-equity in their classrooms. In this mixed-methods study, the researchers examined the beliefs and practices of six feminist-identifying teachers. The results reveal commonalities across teachers related to classroom discourses, curricular modifications, and professional practice, yet there were compelling differences based on whether or not the teacher subscribed to a critical feminist perspective or a liberal feminist perspective. While all the teachers in the study saw themselves as change agents, teachers who operated from a critical feminist lens focused more on structural gender inequity as a means to eliminate sexism, whereas teachers who operated from a liberal lens focused more on individual acts of sexism and greater inclusion of women—often individual women—in the curriculum. This study contributes to the scarce research on feminism in social studies and provides tools for practitioners who want practices that are more inclusive.
       
  • Social studies curriculum integration in elementary classrooms: A case
           study on a Pennsylvania Rural School
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Julie Ollila, Marisa Macy Since the advent of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, classrooms in the U.S. have experienced a steady decline in the amount of time teachers spend on social studies, with the elementary grades suffering the highest level of decline. There is currently a need to understand how teachers perceive the problem of insufficient social studies instruction time and gain their perceptions of curriculum integration as a solution. The purpose of the qualitative case study was to explore how 14 elementary social studies teachers in Grades 3 to 5 integrate social studies throughout the curriculum. In addition, another aim was to evaluate the outcomes of employing an integrated social studies curriculum on teaching civic competence to students. This qualitative case study included interviews and focus group discussions; data were then analyzed using a thematic analysis. It was discovered that teachers believed that by increasing instructional time for social studies, students' understanding of the subject and its concepts should also increase; however, the key disadvantage was the need to have adequate time and planning to integrate the subject. The interviewed teachers shared that the best method of integration is by incorporating social studies concepts in classroom projects and activities. From the results, it is then recommended for the integrated curriculum theory to be strongly considered by the key educational decisions makers in the country. The results can help the schools determine how to best increase social studies instructional time, improve quality of social studies education, and the positive effects of instilling civic competence among their students.
       
  • Troubled belonging: Lived experience and the responsibility of citizenship
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Elizabeth Kenyon Using data from course artifacts and interviews with three pre-service social studies teachers, I first look at how experiences from their past both reveal and shape their sense of citizenship, and then I explore how the participants hoped to use their social studies teaching to foster a particular type of citizenship.
       
  • “Calling Out” in class: Degrees of candor in addressing social
           injustices in racially homogenous and heterogeneous U.S. history
           classrooms
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Hillary Parkhouse, Virginia R. Massaro Teaching for social justice requires an ability to address sensitive issues such as racism and sexism so that students can gain critical consciousness of these pervasive social realities. However, the empirical literature thus far provides minimal exploration of the factors teachers consider in deciding how to address these issues. This study explores this question through ethnographic case studies of two urban, 11th grade U.S. History classrooms. Differing classroom racial demographics and teacher instructional goals resulted in two distinct pedagogical approaches to social justice teaching. Despite differences in class makeup and teaching approach, students in both classrooms developed intellectual confidence and critical citizenship skills related to their growing sociopolitical awareness.
       
  • Reifying common sense: Writing the 6–12 Missouri social studies
           content standards
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2018Source: The Journal of Social Studies ResearchAuthor(s): Alexander Cuenca, Andrea M. Hawkman The construction of content standards has become one of the most politicized processes in K-12 public education as those who determine the value of knowledge(s) also shape who retains or gains political power (Placier, Walker, & Foster, 2002; Sleeter, 2002; Heilig, Brown, & Brown, 2012). In this study, authors examine the process of crafting secondary social studies standards in the state of Missouri. Findings indicate that common sense was deployed in three areas: committee selection, standards writing, and committee decorum. As a result, the standards generated through this process served to reify the neoconservative/neoliberal status quo and failed to include reference to content beyond the scope of traditional knowledge, values, and intentions of conservative social studies.
      Authors also call for the adoption of a critical common sense which insists that the status quo of old-fashioned common sense is challenged.
       
 
 
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