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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1318 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (20 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (240 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (29 journals)
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    - MEN'S INTERESTS (17 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (87 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (50 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (660 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (42 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (157 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (660 journals)                  1 2 3 4     

Showing 1 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
3C Empresa     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
A contrario     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Abant İzzet Baysal Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü Dergisi     Open Access  
Abordajes : Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access  
Aboriginal and Islander Health Worker Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
About Performance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Academicus International Scientific Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Access     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
ACCESS: Critical Perspectives on Communication, Cultural & Policy Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
ACCORD Occasional Paper     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Accountability in Research: Policies and Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Acta Academica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Acta Scientiarum. Human and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Philologica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Adıyaman Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Enstitüsü Dergisi     Open Access  
Administrative Science Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 138)
Administrative Theory & Praxis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Advances in Appreciative Inquiry     Hybrid Journal  
Advocate: Newsletter of the National Tertiary Education Union     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
África     Open Access  
Africa Spectrum     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Research Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
African Social Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Afyon Kocatepe Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Ágora : revista de divulgação científica     Open Access  
Akademik İncelemeler Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Akademika : Journal of Southeast Asia Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Al-Mabsut : Jurnal Studi Islam dan Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alliage     Free  
Alteridade     Open Access  
American Communist History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
ANALES de la Universidad Central del Ecuador     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anales de la Universidad de Chile     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Andamios. Revista de Investigacion Social     Open Access  
Anemon Muş Alparslan Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Annals of Humanities and Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Annuaire de l’EHESS     Open Access  
Anthropocene Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anthurium : A Caribbean Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Approches inductives : Travail intellectuel et construction des connaissances     Full-text available via subscription  
Apuntes : Revista de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Apuntes de Investigación del CECYP     Open Access  
Arbor     Open Access  
Argomenti. Rivista di economia, cultura e ricerca sociale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Argumentos. Revista de crítica social     Open Access  
Around the Globe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos do CMD : Cultura, Memória e Desenvolvimento     Open Access  
Articulo - Journal of Urban Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asia Pacific Journal of Sport and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of Social Sciences and Management Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Astrolabio     Open Access  
Atatürk Dergisi     Open Access  
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Aboriginal Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Journal of Emergency Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal on Volunteering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bandung : Journal of the Global South     Open Access  
BARATARIA. Revista Castellano-Manchega de Ciencias sociales     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Basic Income Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Bayero Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences     Open Access  
Berkeley Undergraduate Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Big Data & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
Bildhaan : An International Journal of Somali Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
BMC Medical Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Bodhi : An Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Body Image     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
BOGA : Basque Studies Consortium Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletín Cultural y Bibliográfico     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Border Crossing : Transnational Working Papers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brain and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Brasiliana - Journal for Brazilian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin de l’Institut Français d’Études Andines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Caderno CRH     Open Access  
California Italian Studies Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
California Journal of Politics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caminho Aberto : Revista de Extensão do IFSC     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Caribbean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Carl Beck Papers in Russian and East European Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Catalan Social Sciences Review     Open Access  
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Catholic Social Science Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
CBU International Conference Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cemoti, Cahiers d'études sur la méditerranée orientale et le monde turco-iranien     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Challenges     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
China Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access  
Ciencia y Sociedad     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia, Cultura y Sociedad     Open Access  
Ciencias Holguin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciências Sociais Unisinos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciencias Sociales y Educación     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CienciaUAT     Open Access  
Citizen Science : Theory and Practice     Open Access  
Citizenship Teaching & Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Ciudad Paz-ando     Open Access  
Civilizar Ciencias Sociales y Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Civitas - Revista de Ciências Sociais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Claroscuro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CLIO América     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cognitive and Behavioral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Colonial Academic Alliance Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Communities, Children and Families Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Compendium     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Comprehensive Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Comuni@cción     Open Access  
Comunitania : Revista Internacional de Trabajo Social y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Confluenze Rivista di Studi Iberoamericani     Open Access  
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Contemporary Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Contribuciones desde Coatepec     Open Access  
Convergencia     Open Access  
Corporate Reputation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
CRDCN Research Highlight / RCCDR en évidence     Open Access  
Creative and Knowledge Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Creative Approaches to Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Critical Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Critical Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Crossing the Border : International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
CTheory     Open Access  
Cuadernos de la Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias Sociales - Universidad Nacional de Jujuy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos Interculturales     Open Access  
Cultural Studies Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Cultural Trends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Culturales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culturas. Revista de Gestión Cultural     Open Access  
Culture Mandala : The Bulletin of the Centre for East-West Cultural and Economic Studies     Open Access  
Culture Scope     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
De Prácticas y Discursos. Cuadernos de Ciencias Sociales     Open Access  
Demographic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Derecho y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desacatos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Desafios     Open Access  
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  
Developing Practice : The Child, Youth and Family Work Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Diálogo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
DIFI Family Research and Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Discourse & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Distinktion : Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Doct-Us Journal     Open Access  
Drustvena istrazivanja     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
e-Gnosis     Open Access  
e-Hum : Revista das Áreas de Humanidade do Centro Universitário de Belo Horizonte     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Économie et Solidarités     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Education, Business and Society : Contemporary Middle Eastern Issues     Hybrid Journal  
Égypte - Monde arabe     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Éire-Ireland     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Electronic Journal of Radical Organisation Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Empiria. Revista de metodología de ciencias sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Encuentros Multidisciplinares     Open Access  
Enseñanza de las Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Entramado     Open Access  
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Equidad y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Espace populations sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
EspacesTemps.net     Open Access  
Estudios Avanzados     Open Access  
Estudios Fronterizos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Estudios Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Estudios Sociales     Open Access  
Ethics and Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Ethiopian Journal of the Social Sciences and Humanities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethnic and Racial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Ethnobotany Research & Applications : a journal of plants, people and applied research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Études canadiennes / Canadian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Études rurales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Eureka Street     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Futures Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
European Online Journal of Natural and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
European Review of Latin American and Caribbean Studies - Revista Europea de Estudios Latinoamericanos y del Caribe     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
European Review of Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
European View     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Exchanges : the Warwick Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ExT : Revista de Extensión de la UNC     Open Access  
Families, Relationships and Societies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Family Matters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Family Process     Partially Free   (Followers: 8)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Family Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 3 4     

Journal Cover Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
  [SJR: 0.859]   [H-I: 41]   [10 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1077-7229
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Updating the Textbook: A Novel Approach to Training Graduate Students in
           Evidence-Based Youth Practices
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Ziv Bell, Ilana Seager, Tiffany Shader, Mary A. Fristad
      Despite the ever-improving base of evidence-based practices (EBPs) for the treatment of childhood disorders, a gap between EBP research and their use in community settings continues to exist. An exciting opportunity to close this gap exists in the form of graduate student training; however, at present, several roadblocks exist. In this paper, we review the current state of graduate training in delivering EBPs and obstacles involved in training future community clinicians (i.e., graduate students) in EBPs. Next, we describe in detail our initiative to develop a curriculum that addresses these challenges. This innovative course empowered graduate students to receive training in the delivery of youth EBPs in community settings through reviews of the research literature, active learning techniques (e.g., discussions of case conceptualizations, role-playing case studies), and a written, publication-quality review of EBPs. Finally, we offer recommendations for other educators of mental health professionals (e.g., psychologists, social workers, counselors) to improve upon this curriculum in their training of graduate students in the theory and application of EBPs for treating childhood disorders.

      PubDate: 2017-05-15T14:46:11Z
       
  • A Brief Alcohol Intervention During Inpatient Psychiatric Hospitalization
           for Suicidal Adolescents
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Kimberly H. McManama O’Brien, Laika D. Aguinaldo, Erina White, Christina M. Sellers, Anthony Spirito
      Alcohol use and suicide-related thoughts and behaviors are common in psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents and each problem can exacerbate the other. Despite knowledge about the functional relationship between alcohol use and suicide-related thoughts and behaviors, inpatient psychiatric units only cursorily address alcohol use because suicide risk is considered primary. In this paper we provide theoretical and empirical rationale for the inclusion of brief motivational interventions for alcohol use in inpatient treatment settings for suicidal adolescents. We give a case example of the brief intervention in practice, including when and how to use specific techniques. Following the case example, we discuss the flexibility of this intervention and how it can be adapted for adolescents with varying risk profiles. We conclude with recommendations for future research, including the development and testing of technology-based boosters following hospital discharge.

      PubDate: 2017-05-15T14:46:11Z
       
  • Activating Veterans Toward Sources of Reward: A Pilot Report on
           Development, Feasibility, and Clinical Outcomes of a 12-Week Behavioral
           Activation Group Treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Rachel Hershenberg, Rachel Vickers Smith, Jason T. Goodson, Michael E. Thase
      This pilot study evaluates a 12-week group Behavioral Activation protocol adapted to meet the needs of a Veteran population seeking treatment in an outpatient mental health clinic at a Veteran Affairs Medical Center. In a detailed Method we describe the treatment structure. Acceptability and feasibility are addressed by providing data on referral sources, treatment retention, attendance, and patient satisfaction. Initial clinical outcomes are presented, focusing on symptom reduction, improved quality of life, and changes in the hypothesized mechanism of treatment: improving motivated behavior to pursue rewards (decisional anhedonia). Finally, feedback from individual exit interviews is presented. We conclude with implementation tips and challenges in the service of continuing to improve our evidence-based interventions in Veteran Affairs facilities.

      PubDate: 2017-05-10T08:36:55Z
       
  • Enhancing Parent–Child Interaction Therapy With Motivational
           Interviewing Techniques
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Amanda M. N’zi, Ryan E. Lucash, Leah N. Clionsky, Sheila M. Eyber
      Parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) is an evidence-based family intervention for young children with disruptive behavior. Parents and children who complete PCIT show greater immediate and long-term treatment gains than those who discontinue treatment prematurely. PCIT is a time- and effort-intensive treatment, and parents ambivalent about its value for their child or their ability to master the treatment skills may discontinue treatment before engaging sufficiently to experience change. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a client-centered therapeutic method of increasing motivation for change through the resolution of ambivalence. This paper describes how clinicians may incorporate MI strategies into PCIT to enhance parental motivation when signs of ambivalence arise. Vignettes and scripted therapy exchanges illustrate use of the strategies to decrease ambivalence in PCIT, improve homework adherence, increase parenting self-efficacy, and reduce attrition, thereby improving outcomes for young children with disruptive behaviors and their families.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Summer Camp Program for Children With Obsessive–Compulsive Disorder:
           Description and Preliminary Observations
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Timothy R. Rice, Natasha Toralba Kostek, Shannon L. Gair, Ariz Rojas
      Summer camp programming has a rich history of promoting childhood development. In the care of children with specific childhood psychiatric disorders, the incorporation of targeted cognitive-behavioral principles provides an opportunity to marry targeted evidence-based practices with broader development, in particular social, emotional, and fine- and gross-motor development. This union is synergistic, providing the practitioner with an opportunity to employ cognitive-behavioral practices in an environment that may overcome common barriers to effective interventions outside the scope of the targeted illness. In this paper, the authors describe the preliminary findings concerning a weeklong, 25-hour summer camp program targeting childhood obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD). Nine children ages 9–12 years participated in this pilot program. Child and parent feedback alike suggested strong treatment acceptability and efficacy in targeting both core symptoms of OCD as well as associated developmental deficits. The camp’s implementation of exposure and response prevention enables an opportunity to report on the capability of employing these strategies in a summer camp setting. In conjunction with an evidence-based treatment program for childhood OCD, a summer camp program specifically targeted for children with OCD presents a valuable tool for improving child welfare and reducing functional impairments.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
           in College Students: A Review of the Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): J. Allison He, Kevin M. Antshel
      The current review presents a theory-guided review of the existing cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in college students. Across the eight studies that investigated this topic, moderate reductions were shown in inattentive symptoms but little to no change was reported in hyperactive/impulsive symptoms. Results indicated a moderate treatment effect on self-reported quality of life and school/work functioning, yet less of an impact on GPA, response inhibition, social functioning, and executive functioning. Methodological and statistical problems and inconsistencies were noted. Since college students are emerging adults, it is likely that the optimum CBT intervention for college students with ADHD lies somewhere in between the existing clinic-based adult ADHD CBT interventions as well as the school-based adolescent ADHD psychosocial interventions. Directions for future research and recommendations for clinicians in university settings are provided in an attempt to further develop the existing college students CBT clinical research evidence base.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Development, Acceptability, and Effectiveness of an Acceptance-Based
           Behavioral Stress/Anxiety Management Workshop for University Students
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Elizabeth H. Eustis, Sarah Krill Williston, Lucas P. Morgan, Jessica R. Graham, Sarah A. Hayes-Skelton, Lizabeth Roemer
      College is a critical time in which individuals experience transition and stress, and may experience subthreshold or clinical symptoms of anxiety and depression. In addition, educational contexts offer a unique opportunity to serve the needs of a diverse group of students who may experience additional stressors related to experiences with discrimination; acculturative stress; financial strain; and balancing family, work, and school demands. Therefore, college appears to be an ideal time for students to learn about evidence-based skills to use in response to anxiety and depression. However, there are multiple barriers that may make it less likely that evidence-based skills and services are available to or utilized by students, including lack of funding and services available on campus, as well as concerns about mental health stigma. This study examines the preliminary acceptability and effectiveness of an acceptance-based behavioral stress/anxiety management workshop for university students on a diverse urban campus. Results indicate that participants found the workshop to be acceptable and helpful. Mixed-effect regression models examining symptom and impairment measures at preworkshop, 1-week follow-up, and 4-week follow-up showed a significant effect for time on anxious arousal, general anxiety symptoms, and social anxiety, but no significant effect for time on impairment. Implications and future directions for mindfulness and acceptance-based approaches in educational contexts are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in
           Early Psychosis: A Case Series
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Jens Einar Jansen, Eric M.J. Morris
      Persons with psychosis often report high levels of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which render them more vulnerable to relapse, symptom exacerbation, and reduced well-being. However, less is known about how to adequately accommodate the needs of persons recovering from a first episode of psychosis, presenting with PTSD. Further, the existing evidence-based interventions for PTSD seem less equipped to deal with serious mental disorder and comorbid conditions. This study aimed to assess the efficacy, acceptability, and safety of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for persons suffering from PTSD with comorbid trauma and psychosis. Three consecutively referred participants meeting ICD-10 criteria for PTSD and a first-episode nonaffective psychotic disorder were treated in an outpatient service within a case-series analysis. A manual-guided ACT intervention of 12 sessions showed clinically relevant improvement on self-report measures of PTSD symptoms and emotional distress. These initial findings are promising and appear to justify a more controlled evaluation of this brief intervention.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Demonstration of an Integrated Treatment for Smoking Cessation and Anxiety
           Symptoms in People With HIV: A Clinical Case Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Allison K. Labbe, Julianne G. Wilner, Jesse D. Kosiba, Adam Gonzalez, Jasper A. Smits, Michael J. Zvolensky, Peter J. Norton, Conall O’Cleirigh
      Despite high rates of co-occurring tobacco use and anxiety symptoms and disorders among persons with HIV, evidence-based interventions for these individuals are not yet available. The present study sought to evaluate an integrated treatment model addressing smoking cessation and anxiety sypmtoms among HIV-positive smokers. Treatment was an 8-week intervention integrating a standard smoking cessation protocol (i.e., cognitive-behavioral therapy [CBT], nicotine replacement therapy) with CBT for anxiety. Inclusion criteria were 18–65years of age, ≥10 cigarettes/day, State–Trait Anxiety Inventory [STAI-T] score of >39, and moderate motivation (i.e., ≥5 out of 10 on a 10-point Likert scale) to quit smoking. Primary outcomes included scores on the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and cigarettes smoked per day. Self-reported abstinence was biochemically verified by carbon monoxide breath analysis. Three male participants (mean age 49.3, SD =9.1) completed through 2-month follow-up. At baseline all participants reported smoking an average of 20 cigarettes per day. Two participants quit smoking and maintained abstinence by the 2-month follow-up, and demonstrated a reduction in ASI scores. Participant 3 continued to smoke but at a reduced rate. Participants’ response to cognitive and behavioral strategies (e.g., creating balanced thoughts, interoceptive exposures) will be discussed. Clinical lessons learned include use of a flexible approach to cognitive restructuring, use of imaginal and in vivo exposures in session to better prepare patients for homework practice, and flexibility in delivering the treatment in an individual or group format. This clinical presentation provides preliminary support for the feasibility and initial effectiveness of an integrated treatment to reduce anxiety symptoms and aid in smoking cessation in anxious, HIV-positive smokers.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Cognitive Behavioral Mobile Applications: Clinical Studies, Marketplace
           Overview, and Research Agenda
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): John Torous, Michael E. Levin, David K. Ahern, Megan L. Oser
      Objective To review the current literature for evidence regarding the feasibility and efficacy of smartphone-based cognitive-behavioral intervention mobile applications, compare such to the number of applications on the commercial marketplaces, and explore potential steps forward for research in the field. Methods A literature search was conducted for papers published before February 2015 featuring quantitative results on clinical outcomes regarding the use of a smartphone for cognitive behavioral therapy, dialectical behavioral therapy, behavioral activation, and acceptance and commitment therapy. A search for the number of related applications available to consumers on the Apple and Google Play commercial marketplaces was also conducted. Results Nine studies, described in 11 articles, were identified that featured the use of smartphones in cognitive-behavioral interventions. The majority of studies presented pilot results suggesting the potential feasibility/efficacy of such apps. Four hundred and forty-seven related applications were found to be available on the commercial marketplaces. Conclusions The research base for smartphone-based cognitive-behavioral intervention mobile applications is preliminary at this point although results are encouraging. There is a discrepancy between the published literature and commercial applications available to consumers. We suggest potential steps forward in research to advance clinical use and research on this topic.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Enhancing Stress Management Coping Skills Using Induced Affect and
           Collaborative Daily Assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Jessica A. Chen, Amanda K. Gilmore, Nicole L. Wilson, Ronald E. Smith, Kevin Quinn, A. Paige Peterson, Eliot Fearey, Yuichi Shoda
      The purpose of this paper is to highlight the use of induced affect (IA) and collaborative (therapeutic) assessment (CA) as components of Cognitive-Affective Stress Management Training (CASMT). IA is a technique for rehearsing cognitive and physical relaxation coping skills under conditions of high affective arousal, which has been shown to result in high levels of coping self-efficacy. CA provides diary-based feedback to clients about the processes underlying their stress experiences and helps identify affect-arousing experiences to be targeted by IA. We include descriptions of the IA technique and an online stress and coping daily diary, as well as sample transcripts illustrating how CA is integrated into CASMT and how IA evokes high affective arousal and skills rehearsal. To illustrate idiographic assessment, we also describe three treatment cases involving female clients between the ages of 20 and 35 with anxiety symptoms who participated in 6 weeks of CASMT and reported their daily stress and coping experiences (before, during, and following the intervention) for a total of 10 weeks. The resulting time series data, analyzed using Simulation Modeling Analysis (SMA), revealed that all clients reported improved negative affect regulation over the course of treatment, yet they exhibited idiographic patterns of change on other outcome and coping skills variables. These results illustrate how IA and CA may be used to enhance emotional self-regulation and how time-series analyses can identify idiographic aspects of treatment response that would not be evident in group data.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Seeing Is Believing: Using Video Feedback in Cognitive Therapy for Social
           Anxiety Disorder
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Emma Warnock-Parkes, Jennifer Wild, Richard Stott, Nick Grey, Anke Ehlers, David M. Clark
      Distorted negative self-images and impressions appear to play a key role in maintaining Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). In previous research, McManus et al. (2009) found that video feedback can help people undergoing cognitive therapy for SAD (CT-SAD) to develop a more realistic impression of how they appear to others, and this was associated with significant improvement in their social anxiety. In this paper we first present new data from 47 patients that confirms the value of video feedback. Ninety-eighty percent of the patients indicated that they came across more favorably than they had predicted after viewing a video of their social interactions. Significant reductions in social anxiety were observed during the following week and these reductions were larger than those observed after control periods. Comparison with our earlier data (McManus et al., 2009) suggests we may have improved the effectiveness of video feedback by refining and developing our procedures over time. The second part of the paper outlines our current strategies for maximizing the impact of video feedback. The strategies have evolved in order to help patients with SAD overcome a range of processing biases that could otherwise make it difficult for them to spot discrepancies between their negative self-imagery and the way they appear on video.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • In-Session Stuck Points and Pitfalls of Community Clinicians Learning CBT:
           Qualitative Investigation
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 2
      Author(s): Scott Waltman, Brittany C. Hall, Lynn M. McFarr, Aaron T. Beck, Torrey A. Creed
      Given the preponderance of evidence supporting the efficacy of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), there has been an increased emphasis on dissemination to community mental health systems (CMH). Trainers from two large-scale dissemination initiatives (n =27) were surveyed regarding the common pitfalls and difficulties encountered by CMH clinicians learning CBT. Common pitfalls were organized according to the items of the Cognitive Therapy Rating Scale (CTRS; Young & Beck, 1980) and reviewed. Guided discovery was reported to be the most challenging CBT competency to learn. Qualitative methods were used to construct a grounded theory; trainer responses indicated they viewed the practice of CBT as not only a set of discrete skills, but also a way of thinking. Efforts may be needed to provide support, assistance, and resources to these CMH clinicians as they continue to build CBT competency.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • A Single-Subject Evaluation of the Treatment of Morphing Fear
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Eva Zysk, Roz Shafran, Tim I. Williams
      We present a single-subject prospective outcome study of a man with severe morphing fear and long history of OCD who was not helped by previous interventions, and who received an adapted form of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) as part of this study. Treatment consisted of a cognitively focused approach tailored to address his fear of morphing and included developing a stronger sense of self-stability. We describe the details of the case, the treatment protocol, and the therapeutic outcomes as assessed over 36 weeks by questionnaires, rating scales, and semistructured interviews. The intervention was effective in eradicating the patient’s morphing fears and reducing other symptoms of OCD, anxiety, and depression. The presented case illustrates the need to appropriately conceptualize, assess, and address the specific nature of morphing fear symptoms in treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • When Self-Blame Is Rational and Appropriate: The Limited Utility of
           Socratic Questioning in the Context of Moral Injury: Commentary on Wachen
           et al. (2016)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 April 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Matt J. Gray, William P. Nash, Brett T. Litz
      In this commentary, we argue that a generally sound therapeutic technique—Socratic questioning—is ill-suited to address a common variant of combat-related emotional and psychological distress. Specifically, moral injury is a term used to describe a syndrome of shame, self-handicapping, anger, and demoralization that occurs when deeply held beliefs and expectations about moral and ethical conduct are transgressed. Importantly, moral injury can and often does result from instances of intentional perpetration. We contend that challenging the accuracy of self-blame in such cases is conceptually problematic and potentially harmful. Such an approach is based on a questionable premise—i.e., that self-blame and resulting guilt are inherently illogical or inaccurate. Though this is often the case, it is not invariably so. We briefly describe an alternate approach—Adaptive Disclosure—that allows for accurate and legitimate self-blame when warranted but also promotes the possibilities of self-forgiveness, compassion, and moral reparation.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • Implementing Group CBT for Depression Among Latinos in a Primary Care
           Clinic
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 April 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Adrian Aguilera, Emma Bruehlman-Senecal, Nancy Liu, Julia Bravin
      Depression in low-income Latino populations can be treated using group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT). However, effective delivery of GCBT for depression in primary care settings is often impeded by high dropout rates and poor homework adherence. In this study, we describe the structure, processes, and outcomes (including attendance, homework completion, and symptom measures) of GCBT for Spanish-speaking Latino patients with depression in an urban public sector primary care setting. For this study, 96 Latino patients in a primary care clinic participated in at least 1 session of GCBT. Although depressive symptoms among these patients, as measured by the PHQ-9, significantly decreased during treatment, attendance and homework completion were limited. Even with a strategy in place to allow patients to continue in treatment after missing several sessions, 23% of patients dropped out of therapy following their initial session, and approximately half of all patients completed less than 50% (or 8) therapy sessions. Homework was only completed 23% of the time it was checked. Greater session attendance prospectively predicted lower depressive symptoms over time. We discuss potential strategies to increase engagement, treatment effects, and symptom reduction for depression in primary care settings.

      PubDate: 2017-05-06T13:54:02Z
       
  • A Couple-Based Psychological Treatment for Chronic Pain and Relationship
           Distress
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Annmarie Cano, Angelia M. Corley, Shannon M. Clark, Sarah C. Martinez
      Chronic pain impacts individuals with pain as well as their loved ones. Yet, there has been little attention to the social context in individual psychological treatment approaches to chronic pain management. With this need in mind, we developed a couple-based treatment, “Mindful Living and Relating,” aimed at alleviating pain and suffering by promoting couples’ psychological and relational flexibility skills. Currently, there is no integrative treatment that fully harnesses the power of the couple, treating both the individual with chronic pain and the spouse as two individuals who are each in need of developing greater psychological and relational flexibility to improve their own and their partners’ health. Mindfulness, acceptance, and values-based action exercises were used to promote psychological flexibility. The intervention also targets relational flexibility, which we define as the ability to interact with one’s partner, fully attending to the present moment, and responding empathically in a way that serves one’s own and one’s partner’s values. To this end, the intervention also included exercises aimed at applying psychological flexibility skills to social interactions as well as emotional disclosure and empathic responding exercises to enhance relational flexibility. The case presented demonstrates that healthy coping with pain and stress may be most successful and sustainable when one is involved in a supportive relationship with someone who also practices psychological flexibility skills and when both partners use relational flexibility skills during their interactions.

      PubDate: 2017-03-26T15:33:08Z
       
  • Delivering Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Weight Self-Stigma
           Through Guided Self-Help: Results From an Open Pilot Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 March 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Michael E. Levin, Sarah Potts, Jack Haeger, Jason Lillis
      Weight self-stigma is a promising target for innovative interventions seeking to improve outcomes among overweight/obese individuals. Preliminary research suggests acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) may be an effective approach for reducing weight self-stigma, but a guided self-help version of this intervention may improve broad dissemination. This pilot open trial sought to evaluate the potential acceptability and efficacy of a guided self-help ACT intervention, included coaching and a self-help book, with a sample of 13 overweight/obese individuals high in weight self-stigma. Results indicated a high degree of program engagement (77% completed the intervention) and satisfaction. Participants improved on outcomes over time including weight self-stigma, emotional eating, weight management behaviors, health-related quality of life, and depression. Although not a directly targeted outcome, participants improved on objectively measured weight, with an average of 4.18 pounds lost over 7 weeks, but did not improve on self-reported weight at 3-month follow-up. Processes of change improved over time, including psychological inflexibility, valued action and reasons to lose weight. Coaching effects indicated greater retention and improvements over time with one coach vs. the other, suggesting characteristics of coaching can affect outcomes. Overall, these results provide preliminary support for the acceptability and efficacy of a guided self-help ACT program for weight self-stigma. Implications of these results and how to address clinical challenges with guided self-help are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-03-15T15:15:17Z
       
  • Stopping the Nonadherence Cycle: The Clinical and Theoretical Basis for
           Dialectical Behavior Therapy Adapted for Adolescents With Chronic Medical
           Illness (DBT-CMI)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Becky H. Lois, Alec L. Miller
      Most adolescents with chronic illness do not adhere to their regimen. A novel transdiagnostic adaptation of dialectical behavior therapy (dialectical behavior therapy for chronic medical conditions; DBT-CMI) is presented to improve medical adherence in adolescents. The authors describe the approach of DBT-CMI and the model's conceptualization of nonadherence, with specific focus on the core concepts of non-adherence across illness in adolescence. DBT-CMI has been piloted in two disease groups with preliminary benefit. DBT-CMI lends itself theoretically as a transdiagnostic approach due to specific skills that target core concepts of nonadherence in adolescence. Future research is warranted on the applicability of DBT-CMI across other pediatric medical conditions to replicate findings and examine long-term outcomes.

      PubDate: 2017-03-08T15:06:14Z
       
  • Adapting Parent–Child Interaction Therapy for Deaf Families That
           Communicate via American Sign Language: A Formal Adaptation Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Lori A. Day, Elizabeth Adams Costa, Danielle Previ, Colleen Caverly
      While our field has made positive strides in adapting psychotherapeutic interventions for diverse groups of people, considerable work is still needed in this area. We present our formal adaptation procedure for parent–child interaction therapy (PCIT) with Deaf persons. This includes a review of the cultural adaptation process for psychological interventions, including PCIT, as well as an introduction to Deaf culture. Details regarding the specific adaptation of PCIT for Deaf persons are outlined. We found that the utilization of a clear framework to guide the cultural adaptation process facilitated careful consideration of the numerous linguistic and cultural variables involved, while maintaining integrity of the treatment model. While the current focus was on adapting PCIT for Deaf families who communicate via American Sign Language, this framework can also be applied to other populations and/or interventions.

      PubDate: 2017-03-08T15:06:14Z
       
  • Intensive Outpatient Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics: A
           Clinical Replication Series
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Tabatha H. Blount, Jeslina J. Raj, Alan L. Peterson
      Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT) is an efficacious behavioral treatment for Tourette’s disorder. In its standard format, CBIT is completed in 8 sessions over a 10-week period. Unfortunately, significant obstacles (e.g., not having a provider nearby; inability to attend weekly sessions) prevent many individuals from participating in standard outpatient CBIT. An intensive outpatient program that compresses CBIT into a week may help overcome many of these barriers. The present clinical replication series examines treatment outcomes in 5 individuals with Tourette's disorder. Importantly, 4 out of the 5 participants reported clinically meaningful tic reductions on the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) at the posttreatment assessment, with an average decrease of 11.5 points across those 4 participants. This represents a 28% decrease in the average posttreatment YGTSS score from the average baseline YGTSS score. Of the 3 participants who completed the 1-month follow-up assessment, 2 participants continued to endorse reductions in their baseline tic severity on the YGTSS and were rated as having a positive response on the Clinician Global Impressions–Improvement subscale. Clinical implications are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T20:30:07Z
       
  • A Novel Integrated Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety and Medication
           Adherence Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Charles P. Brandt, Daniel J. Paulus, Monica Garza, Chad Lemaire, Peter J. Norton, Michael J. Zvolensky
      Persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV) are able to live full lifespans after infection, however, rates of anxiety disorders among this population are elevated compared to national samples. Importantly, these anxiety symptoms and disorders have a negative effect on medication adherence, quality of life and other psychological disorders, such as depression. In order to reduce the impact of anxiety among PLHIV, a six-session transdiagnostic CBT-based treatment manual for anxiety among PLHIV named the HIV/Anxiety Management-Reduction Treatment (HAMRT) was developed and implemented. The current manuscript discusses the content of this manual as well as results from three cases examining the impact of HAMRT. Results indicated that HAMRT was effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, depression, and negative affect among our sample. Additionally, results indicated that HAMRT was effective in increasing HIV medication adherence as well as quality of life. Results are discussed in terms of the potential utility of an anxiety-reduction therapy program aimed at increasing medication adherence among PLHIV.

      PubDate: 2017-03-02T20:30:07Z
       
  • Use of Internet Resources to Support Prolonged Exposure for Combat-Related
           PTSD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Peter D. Yeomans
      In vivo exposure as part of Prolonged Exposure (PE) requires the patient and therapist to generate a list of cues that are reminiscent of the trauma and generative of distress. In contrast to civilian trauma, it can be more challenging to build a robust in vivo hierarchy for a combat-related index trauma. Internet resources such as databases that list casualties from different wars, memorial pages of those who died in theater, and lists of unit association memberships and reunions are useful sources for in vivo hierarchies. These materials can provide opportunities for exposure to additional cues reminiscent of the traumatic event, provide information about the traumatic event that the veteran had been unable to recall, and create opportunities for veterans to reestablish relationships with veteran peers. Case illustrations are provided and reasons for caution are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-02-10T10:18:00Z
       
  • A Cultural Adaptation of Dialectical Behavior Therapy in Nepal
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Megan K. Ramaiya, Devika Fiorillo, Upasana Regmi, Clive J. Robins, Brandon A. Kohrt
      Growing evidence exists on the potential for adapting evidence-based interventions for low- and-middle-income countries (LMIC). One opportunity that has received limited attention is the adaptation of psychotherapies developed in high-income countries (HIC) based on principles from LMIC cultural groups. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is one such treatment with significant potential for acceptability in South Asian settings with high suicide rates. We describe a tri-phasic approach to adapt DBT in Nepal that consists of qualitative interviews with major Nepali mental health stakeholders (Study 1), an adaptation workshop with 15 Nepali counselors (Study 2), and a small-scale treatment pilot with eligible clients in one rural district (Study 3). Due to low literacy levels, distinct conceptualizations of mind and body, and program adherence barriers, numerous adaptations were required. DBT concepts attributable to Asian belief systems were least comprehensible to clients. However, the 82% program completion rate suggests utility of a structured, skills-based treatment. This adaptation process informs future research regarding the effectiveness of culturally adapted DBT in South Asia.

      PubDate: 2017-02-10T10:18:00Z
       
  • Culturally Adapted Psychosocial Interventions for Schizophrenia: A Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Jessica Maura, Amy Weisman de Mamani
      Recent research examining the potential efficacy of culturally adapted interventions for various mental disorders illustrates increasing interest in the integration of cultural perspectives into mental health systems. Despite recent evidence demonstrating that culturally adapted interventions may be more effective than a one-size-fits-all approach, few psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia consider cultural factors that may enhance their efficacy with diverse populations. The aim of this review is to discuss the empirical evidence examining the potential utility of culturally adapted group interventions for schizophrenia, as a means to encourage further work and expansion in this area. Specifically, this article provides an in-depth review of the empirical literature on culturally adapted psychosocial interventions for individuals with schizophrenia and their family members, with a focus on group-based interventions. This review is followed by a discussion of a few cultural constructs that may impact patient and family member functioning, and therefore may be important to address in psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia. Finally, we end this review with a broad discussion of research limitations and potential areas for additional research, clinical implications for adapting EBTs to better address cultural concerns, and a case vignette to illustrate how cultural considerations can be integrated into a traditional multifamily group therapy approach.

      PubDate: 2017-02-10T10:18:00Z
       
  • Multi-Media Field Test: Tic Treatment Goes Tech: A Review of TicHelper.com
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Christine A. Conelea, Brianna C.M. Wellen
      TicHelper.com (“TicHelper”) is an interactive online treatment program for youth with chronic tic disorders (CTDs) or Tourette Syndrome (TS) and their parents. It is based on Comprehensive Behavioral Intervention for Tics (CBIT), an individual, outpatient therapy protocol shown to effectively reduce tics in randomized controlled trials. The TicHelper website offers a user-friendly dashboard that is effective in making it easy to navigate through different treatment modules. Modules parallel core CBIT procedures and consist of interactive exercises, informational videos, and self-report ratings. TicHelper has some weaknesses (e.g., no outcomes research specific to the program has been published to date); however, its strengths (easily navigable, clear instructions, appropriate content) outweigh its weaknesses, making it a potentially useful dissemination tool to make CBIT more accessible to families and youth with tics.

      PubDate: 2017-02-10T10:18:00Z
       
  • The Impact of Cumulative Minority Stress on Cognitive Behavioral Treatment
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Nicholas S. Perry, Shannon D. Chaplo, Katherine J.W. Baucom
      For sexual minority individuals (i.e., lesbian, gay, and bisexual [LGB] persons), minority stress includes experiences of discrimination, expectations of rejection, internalized negativity, and concealment of identity. Sexual minority stress has been linked to various negative mental health outcomes (e.g., depression, anxiety), and levels of psychiatric comorbidity are high among LGB people. However, little is known about the extension of minority stress models to gender minority individuals (i.e., transgender and gender nonconforming persons) and its impact on mental health in this particular group. Further, the influence of gender minority stress on the delivery and outcome of traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) approaches is unclear. A case study of CBT for chronic depression with a young, transgender individual is presented. This case study highlights potential barriers that may arise with gender minority clients when implementing evidence-based clinical interventions in the context of an individual’s minority stress history. Implications for cognitive-behavioral treatments with gender minority individuals and recommendations for clinicians and researchers are discussed.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Interoceptive Exposure: An Overlooked Modality in the Cognitive-Behavioral
           Treatment of OCD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Shannon M. Blakey, Jonathan S. Abramowitz
      Accumulated research implicates anxiety sensitivity (AS) as a transdiagnostic construct important to the maintenance of OCD. Yet despite the clinical implications of targeting fears of body-related sensations during treatment, interoceptive exposure (IE) is an often-overlooked therapeutic procedure in the cognitive-behavioral treatment of OCD. In this article, we discuss the rationale for—and procedures of—addressing AS during treatment for OCD. We provide two case examples, illustrating how a clinician might approach clinical assessment, case formulation, and treatment planning with each of these patients. We conclude by discussing future research directions to better understand if (and how) targeting AS during therapy might enhance OCD treatment outcome.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Developing an Acceptance-Based Behavioral Treatment for Binge Eating
           Disorder: Rationale and Challenges
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Adrienne S. Juarascio, Stephanie M. Manasse, Leah Schumacher, Hallie Espel, Evan M. Forman
      Binge eating disorder (BED), characterized by recurrent eating episodes in which individuals eat an objectively large amount of food within a short time period accompanied by a sense of loss of control, is the most common eating disorder. While existing treatments, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), produce remission in a large percentage of individuals with BED, room for improvement in outcomes remains. Two reasons some patients may continue to experience binge eating after a course of treatment are: (a) Difficulty complying with the prescribed behavioral components of CBT due to the discomfort of implementing such strategies; and (b) a lack of focus in current treatments on strategies for coping with high levels of negative affect that often drive binge eating. To optimize treatment outcomes, it is therefore crucial to provide patients with strategies to overcome these issues. A small but growing body of research suggests that acceptance-based treatment approaches may be effective for the treatment of binge eating. The goal of the current paper is to describe the development of an acceptance-based group treatment for BED, discuss the structure of the manual and the rationale and challenges associated with integrating acceptance-based strategies into a CBT protocol, and to discuss clinical strategies for successfully implementing the intervention.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Concurrent Treatment of Depression in Parents and Adolescents: A Case
           Example
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jennifer C. Wolff, Barbara Jandasek, Bethany D. Michel, Sara J. Becker, Anthony Spirito
      The detrimental influence of parent psychopathology—and depression, in particular—on adolescent mental health has been well documented. Routes of transmission include both direct and indirect factors, such as poor parent–adolescent communication, ineffective parenting practices, modeling ineffective coping skills, increased family discord and stress, inadvertent reinforcement of adolescent depressed mood and suicidal ideation and behavior, and decreased treatment adherence. This paper introduces a novel treatment to concurrently treat both a depressed adolescent as well as a depressed parent. This approach improves upon traditional cognitive-behavioral therapy by targeting relational factors of each adolescent–parent dyad while simultaneously addressing each individual’s depression. Principles of case conceptualization and treatment planning using this novel approach are illustrated using a case example.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • An Open Trial of Web-Based Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy for
           Perinatal Women at Risk for Depressive Relapse
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Jennifer N. Felder, Zindel Segal, Arne Beck, Nancy E. Sherwood, Sherryl H. Goodman, Jennifer Boggs, Elizabeth Lemon, Sona Dimidjian
      Depression occurring during pregnancy and postpartum (i.e., the perinatal period) is common and associated with adverse outcomes for women and their offspring. Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has been shown to reduce risk for depressive relapse among at-risk individuals generally, and recent adaptations document the efficacy of MBCT among perinatal women specifically. In addition, MBCT, when delivered using a web-based format (Mindful Mood Balance [MMB] program), has demonstrated acceptability and feasibility for at-risk individuals generally. The aim of the present open trial study was to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and preliminary outcomes of MMB for use with pregnant women at risk for depressive relapse (N =37). We predicted that MMB would be feasible and acceptable as assessed by session completion and participation in phone coaching calls, home practice completion, and self-reported satisfaction via questionnaire and interview. We also predicted that women would not demonstrate significant worsening of depression symptom severity during MMB, consistent with our focus on prevention. A brief case example based on a composite of participants is presented to illustrate the MMB structure and content and the phone coaching protocol. Participants demonstrated engagement with the program, reported perceiving benefits in the intended depression prevention targets of MMB, and sustained minimal to mild depressive symptom severity over the course of the program. Given these promising results and the potential benefits of averting depression for women and their families, further development and rigorous testing of MMB among at-risk pregnant women is warranted.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • “Life-Steps” for PrEP Adherence: Demonstration of a CBT-Based
           Intervention to Increase Adherence to Preexposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
           Medication Among Sexual-Minority Men at High Risk for HIV Acquisition
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): S. Wade Taylor, Christina Psaros, David W. Pantalone, Jake Tinsley, Steven A. Elsesser, Kenneth H. Mayer, Steven A. Safren
      One dramatic advance in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention efforts has been the prescription of medications typically used for HIV treatment as prophylaxis against acquiring HIV. As a preventative agent, this practice is referred to as “preexposure prophylaxis” (PrEP). The U.S. Federal Drug Administration approved daily PrEP for adults at risk for HIV who do not consistently use condoms during sex with HIV-infected or unknown-status partners. In this paper, we describe a cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) PrEP adherence intervention developed for use in high-risk sexual-minority men in the United States, adapted from “Life-Steps,” an evidence-based CBT intervention to promote adherence to HIV treatment. Modules include creating a PrEP dosing schedule, adhering to daily PrEP, problem solving barriers to adherence, and sexual risk-reduction techniques. Supplemented with practical video vignettes, this novel intervention may help to enhance the clinical practice of health care providers in outpatient settings to increase PrEP adherence in sexual-minority men.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • “It’s Worth It in the End”: Veterans’ Experiences in Prolonged
           Exposure and Cognitive Processing Therapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Natalie E. Hundt, Terri L. Barrera, Jennifer Arney, Melinda A. Stanley
      Despite the efficacy of evidence-based psychotherapies (EBP) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and efforts to disseminate them, only 6–13% of veterans seeking care through the Veterans Affairs health care system receive these treatments. EBPs such as prolonged exposure (PE) and cognitive processing therapy (CPT) are exposure-based treatments. Provider and patient fears regarding the tolerability of exposure-based treatments likely impede their delivery and completion. The present study utilized qualitative interviews with 23 veterans who completed at least eight sessions of either PE or CPT to elicit firsthand accounts of veterans’ experiences in these EBPs. Results suggest that while a minority of veterans reported initial symptom worsening, the majority of veterans reported positive experiences and felt that, despite being stressful, these EBPs were “worth it.” Most veterans discussed thoughts of discontinuing treatment prematurely, but stated that adherence was encouraged by their commitment to finishing, desperation for relief, therapist/group support, and family support. Veterans believed exposure made an important contribution to symptom improvement, as did greater self-understanding and changing negative or unhelpful beliefs. These findings indicate veteran satisfaction with PE and CPT, and may assist providers to develop strategies to increase adherence and treatment completion.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Adaptation of CBT for Traumatized Egyptians: Examples from Culturally
           Adapted CBT (CA-CBT)
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Baland Jalal, Sherine W. Samir, Devon E. Hinton
      In this article we illustrate how CBT can be adapted to a traumatized Egyptian population with Islamic beliefs, giving examples from our adaptation of Culturally Adapted–CBT (CA-CBT) for this cultural group. We discuss a culturally sensitive assessment measure of local somatic complaints and cultural syndromes that was devised based on clinical experience with traumatized Egyptians. We also demonstrate how to normalize symptoms, create positive expectancy about the treatment, and educate about trauma. We give examples of how mindfulness can be adapted for an Egyptian Islamic population, and we describe local religious strategies, such as dhikr (religious chanting), salah (ritualistic prayer), and dua (supplication), that may be used to promote attentional shift from rumination topics and to teach attentional control. We describe how “loving kindness” can be adapted for this group. We outline how to modify culturally generated catastrophic cognitions and how to conduct interoceptive exposure and to create positive re-associations in a culturally sensitive manner. We describe how worry themes are explored and addressed based on a heuristic panic attack–PTSD model; how to teach anger management in a culturally sensitive way; and how to address sleep-related problems in this population. We suggest using cultural transitional “rituals” at the end of the treatment to give patients a sense of closure and a positive feeling of transformation. A case example is presented to illustrate cultural challenges associated with delivering CA-CBT to an Egyptian population. We introduce certain concepts such as cultural grounding and explanatory model bridging, both therapeutic techniques that increase adherence, positive expectancy, and cultural consonance.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • A Cognitive-Behavioral Model of Persistent Postural-Perceptual Dizziness
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Matthew G. Whalley, Debbie A. Cane
      Persistent postural-perceptual dizziness (PPPD; previously termed “chronic subjective dizziness”) is a frequently observed disorder in patients who present with dizziness to audiology; ear, nose, and throat; or neurology clinics. The primary symptoms are persistent nonvertiginous dizziness, and hypersensitivity to motion and visual stimuli. These occur either in the absence of any active neuro-otologic illness or, where an episodic vestibular disorder exists, symptoms cannot be fully explained by the disorder alone. Diagnosis is necessarily multidisciplinary and proceeds by identification of primary symptoms and exclusion of other neurological or active medical disorders requiring treatment. Psychological processes are implicated in the development and maintenance of PPPD, with similarities to cognitive models of health anxiety and panic disorder, and there is evidence that cognitive-behavioral therapy is an effective treatment. A cognitive-behavioral model of PPPD is presented along with a case example. It is suggested that dizziness becomes persistent when it is processed as a threat, and that it is maintained by (a) unhelpful appraisals, (b) avoidance and safety behaviors, and (c) attentional strategies including selective attention to body sensations associated with dizziness. Once PPPD is identified techniques for its effective treatment fall within the skills mix of qualified cognitive-behavioral therapists or vestibular clinical scientists who have received additional training in cognitive and behavioral treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Incorporating Imagery Into Thought Records: Increasing Engagement in
           Balanced Thoughts
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Nina Josefowitz
      Thought records are one of the most effective CBT interventions. However, clients can find them overly intellectual. While clients may logically understand that their balanced thought is accurate, they may not be emotionally convinced, thus reducing the thought record’s effectiveness. In the present paper we describe how imagery can be used throughout the thought record process to enhance clients’ emotional engagement. We describe how imagery can be used to identify negative automatic thoughts, to increase the believability of evidence against negative automatic thoughts, and to increase emotional engagement with balanced thoughts.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Development of a Behavioral Activation–Based Intervention for
           Cigarette-Smoking Young Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1
      Author(s): Laura MacPherson, Anahi Collado, Andrew Ninnemann, Elana Hoffman
      Quitting smoking during young adulthood can substantially reduce tobacco-related morbidity and mortality later in life. Depressive symptomatology is prevalent among smokers and increases risk for poor smoking cessation outcomes. However, few integrated behavioral interventions simultaneously target smoking and depressive symptoms and rarely have young smokers been included in the development of these interventions. In this paper we describe an 8-session behavioral activation–based treatment for smoking (BATS; MacPherson et al., 2010) adapted for youth. We conducted a series of focus groups with young adult smokers with depressive symptoms in order to modify treatment manuals to be developmentally appropriate. Subsequently, we completed a small pilot group (n =5) of the intervention to provide preliminary data on feasibility, acceptability, and outcomes. We provide a case series of the participants in order to provide clinical illustrations of how the modified BATS treatment was implemented among young adults. Most pilot study participants exhibited smoking abstinence and smoking reductions at the end of treatment, as well as improvement in depressive symptoms and maintenance of levels of activation and environmental reward. Participants provided positive qualitative constructive feedback regarding the intervention.

      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Acknowledgment to 2016 Reviewers
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 24, Issue 1


      PubDate: 2017-02-05T10:14:41Z
       
  • Culturally Sensitive Adaptations to Evidence-Based Cognitive Behavioral
           Treatment for Social Anxiety Disorder: A Case Paper
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Jessica R. Graham-LoPresti, Speshal Walker Gautier, Shannon Sorenson, Sarah A. Hayes-Skelton
      Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy (CBGT), which involves restructuring maladaptive thoughts and exposures in social contexts in a group format, is an empirically supported treatment for social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, research on applying these skills to experiences of discrimination that may contribute to social anxiety in marginalized populations is limited. A case description is presented to demonstrate the ways in which culturally sensitive adaptations of CBGT were applied to treat social anxiety related to issues of discrimination. The case example includes outcome data from one individual diagnosed with SAD who experienced clinical improvement in symptoms of SAD after receiving CBGT as a part of a larger treatment trial for SAD. Specifically, this paper focuses on the way in which SAD manifested for a Latina woman based on a history, and current context of race-based and gender-based discrimination. We present strategies to address SAD related to experiences of discrimination within the context of CBGT as well as clinical implications related to the integration of multicultural principles and traditional cognitive behavioral therapies for SAD more generally.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T14:44:44Z
       
  • Usability of a Smartphone Application to Support the Prevention and Early
           Intervention of Anxiety in Youth
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Ryan D. Stoll, Armando A. Pina, Kevin Gary, Ashish Amresh
      Mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders are common in youth with anxiety problems being among the most prevalent, typically failing to spontaneously remit, and placing some youth at risk for additional difficulties. Mobile health (mHealth) might be a novel avenue to strengthen prevention efforts for child anxiety, since program effects are generally small. However, although a significant number of mHealth tools have been developed, few have been evaluated in terms of usability (or even clinical effectiveness). Usability testing is the first level of evaluation in responsible mHealth efforts as it is one of the main barriers to usage and adoption. As such, the objective of this research was to evaluate the usability of a smartphone application (app) corresponding to an indicated prevention and early intervention targeting youth anxiety. To accomplish this, 132 children (M age = 9.65, 63% girls) and 45 service providers (M age = 29.13, 87% female) rated our app along five established dimensions of usability (ease of use, ease of learning, quality of support information, satisfaction, and stigma). Findings showed that the app was highly and positively rated by youth and providers, with some variations (lower ratings when errors occurred). Path analyses also showed that system understanding was significantly related to greater system satisfaction, but that such relation occurred through the quality of support information offered by the app. Together, this has research and clinical implications as it highlights avenues for advancing youth care via mHealth usability evaluation, including prior to establishing effectiveness.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T14:44:44Z
       
  • Development and Refinement of a Targeted Sexual Risk Reduction
           Intervention for Women With a History of Childhood Sexual Abuse
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Theresa E. Senn, Amy Braksmajer, Heidi Hutchins, Michael P. Carey
      Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) is associated with sexual risk behavior in adulthood. Traditional sexual risk reduction interventions do not meet the unique needs of women who have been sexually abused. In the current paper, we describe the four-stage process we followed to develop and refine a targeted sexual risk reduction intervention for this population. First, initial quantitative work revealed that the intervention should address how maladaptive thoughts related to traumatic sexualization, trust, powerlessness, and guilt/shame (traumagenic dynamics constructs) influence current sexual behavior. Second, qualitative interviews with 10 women who reported a history of CSA (M age=34years; 90% African American) as well as current sexual risk behavior provided support for targeting maladaptive thoughts associated with these traumagenic dynamics constructs. Third, based on the qualitative and quantitative results, we developed a 5-session, group-delivered intervention to address the maladaptive thoughts that occurred as a result of CSA, as well as the cognitive-behavioral determinants of sexual risk behavior. This intervention drew heavily on cognitive behavioral techniques to address cognitions associated with CSA and the links between these cognitions and current sexual risk behavior. Techniques from trauma-based therapies, as well as motivational techniques, were also incorporated into the intervention. Finally, we refined the intervention with 24 women (M age=33years; 79% African American), and assessed feasibility and acceptability. These women reported high levels of satisfaction with the intervention. The resultant intervention is currently being evaluated in a small, randomized controlled trial.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T14:44:44Z
       
  • Treating Depression Among Adolescent Perinatal Women With a Dialectical
           Behavior Therapy–Informed Skills Group
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 January 2017
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Blair Vinson Kleiber, Jennifer N. Felder, Bethany Ashby, Stephen Scott, Janet Dean, Sona Dimidjian
      Depression is a prevalent and impairing problem affecting both women and offspring during the perinatal (pregnancy and the postpartum) period. Despite this, few studies have examined treatments for perinatal adolescents with depressive symptoms. The present study examined the feasibility and preliminary outcomes of a Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) informed skills group among depressed adolescent perinatal women (N = 25) recruited from both a public health parent education program and an adolescent obstetric clinic. A brief composite case example is included to illustrate how DBT skills were taught, practiced, and applied. Findings suggest the intervention was credible, acceptable, and associated with improvement in depression. Challenges with feasibility of enrolling and retaining adolescent perinatal women were evident, as approximately half of the enrolled participants did not complete the study. This study provides preliminary evidence that a DBT-informed skills group may be a promising intervention for depressed adolescent perinatal women and points to important directions for clinical practice and research, including treatment engagement and retention.

      PubDate: 2017-01-15T14:44:44Z
       
  • Introduction to ABCT's 50th Anniversary Special Series of Commentaries by
           Selected Past Presidents of the Association
    • Authors: Steven A. Safren; Katharina Kircanski; Michelle G. Craske
      Pages: 413 - 414
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 August 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Steven A. Safren, Katharina Kircanski, Michelle G. Craske
      Welcome to a special series in Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, brought to you by the Committee for the 50th Anniversary of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT). Comprised of commentary articles, a subset of luminary past presidents present their views of the history of cognitive and behavioral therapies and their ideas on where the field will go next, using the backdrop of their own careers as a point of departure.

      PubDate: 2016-08-07T18:31:06Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.07.001
       
  • Paradigm Clashes and Progress: A Personal Reflection on a 50-Year
           Association With ABCT
    • Authors: David H. Barlow
      Pages: 415 - 419
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): David H. Barlow
      Why is ABCT a successful, vibrant, and growing association when most other professional associations are withering on the vine' Since the first annual meeting of the organization, which I was privileged to attend, I have witnessed repeated changes in direction as new paradigms were introduced and debated. The clashing of ideas in these debates in our Association over the years centered on such things as classical versus operant learning principles, cognitive versus behavioral modes of intervention, the introduction of a focus on modifying affect and emotion, and “third wave” approaches. Indeed the very founding of the organization was based on a fundamental paradigm clash with the prevailing psychoanalytic approaches in the 1960s. The fact that through it all the organization continues to thrive reflects the secret to our success and our fundamental strength, a reliance on the slow but inexorable progress of science.

      PubDate: 2016-06-18T20:19:42Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.cbpra.2016.05.006
       
  • Multimedia Field Test Thinking About Exposures? There’s an App
           for That!
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 December 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Matthew M. Carper
      Anxiety Coach is a smartphone application (“app”) for iOS devices that is billed as a self-help program for anxiety in youth and adults. The app is currently available in the iTunes store for a one-time fee of $4.99. Anxiety Coach is organized around three related content areas: (a) self-monitoring of anxiety symptoms, (b) learning about anxiety and its treatment, and (c) guiding users through the development of a fear hierarchy and completion of exposure tasks. Although the app includes psychoeducation about anxiety as well as information regarding specific skills individuals can use to cope with anxiety (e.g., cognitive restructuring), the primary focus of the app is on exposure tasks. As such, the app includes a large library of potential exposure tasks that are relevant to treating common fears and worries, making Anxiety Coach useful to clients and clinicians alike. Additionally, Anxiety Coach prompts users to provide fear ratings while they are carrying out an exposure task and displays a message instructing users to stop the exposure once fear ratings drop by half. These features work together to create an app that has the potential to greatly increase the reach of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy for anxiety.

      PubDate: 2016-12-29T16:41:02Z
       
  • Multimedia Field Test: Evaluating the Creative Ambitions of SuperBetter
           and Its Quest to Gamify Mental Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 December 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice
      Author(s): Tommy Chou, Laura J. Bry, Jonathan S. Comer
      SuperBetter is a family of interfaces including a browser-based game, an online forum, and a companion mobile application that collectively seek to “gamify” resilience, wellness, motivation, and mental health. Players register and use “gamified” components and content to address mental and physical health challenges and to pursue identified goals. The primary strength of the SuperBetter ecosystem is its innovative approach, drawing on gaming metaphors and the use of evidence-based strategies in both its design and provided content. Efforts in creating an engaging, playable system incentivizing users’ incremental steps towards larger goals are constrained by SuperBetter’s relative lack of structure and direction, limits to meaningful progress monitoring, its largely static content regardless of varied user goals, and broad concerns regarding the utility of the overall system. The program presents a potential model for the application of gaming techniques and design to the dissemination of clinically effective concepts to a larger consumer market, but presently lacks sufficient empirical support for claims of evidence-based effectiveness.

      PubDate: 2016-12-22T16:12:37Z
       
  • Some Reflections on the Evolution of Behavior Therapy During ABCT’s
           First 50 Years
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 23, Issue 4
      Author(s): Gerald C. Davison
      In this retrospective on behavior therapy on the occasion of ABCT’s 50th anniversary, I describe my role in several developments that I believe have been important for the field. First, behavior therapy has moved from advancing a predetermined set of theories and techniques (“the conditioning therapies”) to a more general and stronger focus on studying the most scientifically sound and useful conceptions of psychopathology, assessment, and intervention, with less emphasis on preconceived ideas about where the best answers would lie. In other words, I have tried throughout my career to promote a conceptualization of behavior therapy in terms more of an epistemology than an accepted corpus of techniques, theories, and data. Next, I review the brouhaha about behavior therapy during the U.S. Senate hearings in the mid-1970s on extreme behavior control measures at the federal prison in Springfield, MO, where reasonable, important, but misdirected criticisms were being made against measures such as ECT and lobotomy in the name of behavior therapy. Next I review the formal introduction of cognitive factors into the mainstream of behavior therapy, leading to a broader and more sophisticated conceptualization that came to be known as cognitive behavior therapy. These developments have begun to bring our scientific study of the human condition more in line with contemporary theory and research in cognitive psychology and have expanded the applicability and effectiveness of our science-based assessment and intervention. Next, I discuss the intricate and mutually enriching interplay between science and application, with special attention to the underappreciated role of clinical observation and innovation in setting a worthwhile scientific agenda for understanding and alleviating human distress and enhancing human potential. Further, I explore the sometimes controversial effort to look to nonbehavioral theory, data, and clinical observations for ideas to enhance our effectiveness as clinicians. Clinically nuanced and hard-headed analysis of psychological problems need not be inconsistent with a consideration of other paradigms such as the many variants of psychoanalysis and humanistic-existential theories. Finally I recount the events surrounding my 1974 AABT presidential address, in which I argued on ethical and political grounds against sexual reorientation treatment for homosexuality. My original argument has been expanded to the proposition that clinical assessment is inherently constructive and that therapy goals are determined primarily by clinicians in a manner that reflects both their theoretical and moral biases.

      PubDate: 2016-12-22T16:12:37Z
       
  • Some Reflections on the Evolution of Behavior Therapy During ABCT’s
           First 50 Years
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 23, Issue 4
      Author(s): Gerald C. Davison
      In this retrospective on behavior therapy on the occasion of ABCT’s 50th anniversary, I describe my role in several developments that I believe have been important for the field. First, behavior therapy has moved from advancing a predetermined set of theories and techniques (“the conditioning therapies”) to a more general and stronger focus on studying the most scientifically sound and useful conceptions of psychopathology, assessment, and intervention, with less emphasis on preconceived ideas about where the best answers would lie. In other words, I have tried throughout my career to promote a conceptualization of behavior therapy in terms more of an epistemology than an accepted corpus of techniques, theories, and data. Next, I review the brouhaha about behavior therapy during the U.S. Senate hearings in the mid-1970s on extreme behavior control measures at the federal prison in Springfield, MO, where reasonable, important, but misdirected criticisms were being made against measures such as ECT and lobotomy in the name of behavior therapy. Next I review the formal introduction of cognitive factors into the mainstream of behavior therapy, leading to a broader and more sophisticated conceptualization that came to be known as cognitive behavior therapy. These developments have begun to bring our scientific study of the human condition more in line with contemporary theory and research in cognitive psychology and have expanded the applicability and effectiveness of our science-based assessment and intervention. Next, I discuss the intricate and mutually enriching interplay between science and application, with special attention to the underappreciated role of clinical observation and innovation in setting a worthwhile scientific agenda for understanding and alleviating human distress and enhancing human potential. Further, I explore the sometimes controversial effort to look to nonbehavioral theory, data, and clinical observations for ideas to enhance our effectiveness as clinicians. Clinically nuanced and hard-headed analysis of psychological problems need not be inconsistent with a consideration of other paradigms such as the many variants of psychoanalysis and humanistic-existential theories. Finally I recount the events surrounding my 1974 AABT presidential address, in which I argued on ethical and political grounds against sexual reorientation treatment for homosexuality. My original argument has been expanded to the proposition that clinical assessment is inherently constructive and that therapy goals are determined primarily by clinicians in a manner that reflects both their theoretical and moral biases.

      PubDate: 2016-12-22T16:12:37Z
       
  • Some Reflections on the Evolution of Behavior Therapy During ABCT’s
           First 50 Years
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2016
      Source:Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, Volume 23, Issue 4
      Author(s): Gerald C. Davison
      In this retrospective on behavior therapy on the occasion of ABCT’s 50th anniversary, I describe my role in several developments that I believe have been important for the field. First, behavior therapy has moved from advancing a predetermined set of theories and techniques (“the conditioning therapies”) to a more general and stronger focus on studying the most scientifically sound and useful conceptions of psychopathology, assessment, and intervention, with less emphasis on preconceived ideas about where the best answers would lie. In other words, I have tried throughout my career to promote a conceptualization of behavior therapy in terms more of an epistemology than an accepted corpus of techniques, theories, and data. Next, I review the brouhaha about behavior therapy during the U.S. Senate hearings in the mid-1970s on extreme behavior control measures at the federal prison in Springfield, MO, where reasonable, important, but misdirected criticisms were being made against measures such as ECT and lobotomy in the name of behavior therapy. Next I review the formal introduction of cognitive factors into the mainstream of behavior therapy, leading to a broader and more sophisticated conceptualization that came to be known as cognitive behavior therapy. These developments have begun to bring our scientific study of the human condition more in line with contemporary theory and research in cognitive psychology and have expanded the applicability and effectiveness of our science-based assessment and intervention. Next, I discuss the intricate and mutually enriching interplay between science and application, with special attention to the underappreciated role of clinical observation and innovation in setting a worthwhile scientific agenda for understanding and alleviating human distress and enhancing human potential. Further, I explore the sometimes controversial effort to look to nonbehavioral theory, data, and clinical observations for ideas to enhance our effectiveness as clinicians. Clinically nuanced and hard-headed analysis of psychological problems need not be inconsistent with a consideration of other paradigms such as the many variants of psychoanalysis and humanistic-existential theories. Finally I recount the events surrounding my 1974 AABT presidential address, in which I argued on ethical and political grounds against sexual reorientation treatment for homosexuality. My original argument has been expanded to the proposition that clinical assessment is inherently constructive and that therapy goals are determined primarily by clinicians in a manner that reflects both their theoretical and moral biases.

      PubDate: 2016-12-22T16:12:37Z
       
 
 
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