Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1814 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (260 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (96 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (57 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (1090 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (183 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (1090 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
Identities : Journal for Politics, Gender and Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
IDS Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
IEEE Transactions on Computational Social Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Illness, Crisis & Loss     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Im@go. A Journal of the Social Imaginary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
imagonautas : Revista interdisciplinaria sobre imaginarios sociales     Open Access  
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Impact     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
In Situ : Au regard des sciences sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Inclusión y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research     Open Access  
Indonesia Prime     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Infinitum: Revista Multidisciplinar     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informação em Pauta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Informes Científicos - Técnicos UNPA     Open Access  
Infrastructure Complexity     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Inkanyiso : Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
InPsych : The Bulletin of the Australian Psychological Society Ltd     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
INSANCITA : Journal of Islamic Studies in Indonesia and Southeast Asia     Open Access  
Integrated Social Science Journal : Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University     Open Access  
Inter Faculty     Open Access  
Interações : Cultura e Comunidade     Open Access  
Interim : Interdisciplinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International and Multidisciplinary Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Communication of Chinese Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Development Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International E-journal of Advances in Social Sciences (IJASOS)     Open Access  
International Journal for Transformative Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Academic Research in Business, Arts & Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Arab Culture, Management and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Bahamian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Business and Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Canadian Studies / Revue internationale d’études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Conflict and Violence     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
International Journal of Cultural and Social Studies (IntJCSS)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Cultural Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Journal of Growth and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Humanities and Social Science Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion     Open Access  
International Journal of Innovative Research and Scientific Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Innovative Research in Social and Natural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Integrated Education and Development     Open Access  
International Journal of Intercultural Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Korean Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Language and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Management and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Management, Economics and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Qualitative Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social and Allied Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social And Humanities Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 72)
International Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Social Sciences and Education Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Synergy and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of the Sociology of Leisure     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal Pedagogy of Social Studies     Open Access  
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
International Review of Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 226)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
InterSciencePlace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intersticios Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigación Valdizana     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
Iztapalapa : Revista de ciencias sociales y humanidades     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Izvestia Ural Federal University Journal. Series 3. Social and Political Sciences     Open Access  
J : Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal     Open Access  
Janapriya Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
JISIP-UNJA : Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Ilmu Politik Fisipol Universitas Jambi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Burirum Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences Research     Open Access  
Journal of Cape Verdean Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Community Development and Life Quality     Open Access  
Journal of Community Services and Engagement     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Comparative Family Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Computational Social Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Geography, Politics and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate School Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Surin Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, Rajapruk University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of International and Comparative Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of International Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Multicultural Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of New Brunswick Studies / Revue d’études sur le Nouveau-Brunswick     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 353, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Policy Practice and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Population and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Review     Open Access  
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Karya Abdi Masyarakat     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Lakon     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Qualitative Methods
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.367
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 28  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1609-4069 - ISSN (Online) 1609-4069
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1089 journals]
  • Case Study and Narrative Inquiry as Merged Methodologies: A Critical
           Narrative Perspective

    • Authors: Amshuda Sonday, Elelwani Ramugondo, Harsha Kathard
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Case study and narrative inquiry as merged methodological frameworks can make a vital contribution that seeks to understand processes that may explain current realities within professions and broader society. This article offers an explanation of how a critical perspective on case study and narrative inquiry as an embedded methodology unearthed the interplay between structure and agency within storied lives. This case narrative emerged out of a doctoral thesis in occupational therapy, a single instrumental case describing a process of professional role transition within school-level specialized education in the Western Cape, South Africa. This case served as an exemplar in demonstrating how case study recognized the multiple layers to the context within which the process of professional role transition unfolded. The embedded narrative inquiry served to clarify emerging professional identities for occupational therapists within school-level specialized education in postapartheid South Africa.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-07-07T10:00:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920937880
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • The Meaningful Lived Space of the Acute Stroke Unit: Creating Maps to
           Evoke the Experience of Stroke Survivors and Health Care Practitioners

    • Authors: Kitty Maria Suddick, Vinette Cross, Pirjo Vuoskoski, Kathleen T. Galvin, Graham Stew
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Despite advocates for aesthetic forms of presentation in qualitative enquiry, for going beyond thin description, to share evocative forms of representation that resonate with that (Todres, 2008; Todres & Galvin, 2008), qualitative research in the health care field continues to favor conventional methods. This article adds to existing knowledge by articulating the innovative creation and value of aesthetic offerings in the unique form of visual maps to evoke the lived experience of being on an acute stroke unit, drawn from phenomenological interview findings. The maps helped embody the meaningful lived space and conveyed the complexity, spatiality, and holistic understanding being developed. They embodied the researcher’s involvement, position, and place as she imaginatively lived through the space of the acute stroke unit and proceed to invite others to join the dialogue. This article articulates the methodical alignment of creative mapmaking within three stages, for the development of phenomenological understanding, dialogue in-between, and ongoing life of dialogue for future projections toward practice and within the phenomenological project. This article illustrates the underutilized potential of mapmaking for the human sciences, understanding health care spaces, other meaningful lived spaces, and qualitative research methods.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-07-07T09:58:54Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920937145
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Qualitative Data Collection in an Era of Social Distancing

    • Authors: Bojana Lobe, David Morgan, Kim A. Hoffman
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Qualitative researchers face unique opportunities and challenges as a result of the disruption of COVID-19. Although the pandemic represents a unique opportunity to study the crisis itself, social distancing mandates are restricting traditional face-to-face investigations of all kinds. In this article, we describe options and resources for researchers who find themselves needing to alter their study designs from face-to-face qualitative data collection to a “socially distant” method. Although technologies are constantly changing, we review the latest videoconferencing services available to researchers and provide guidance on what services might best suit a project’s needs. We describe options for various platforms and applications including information about enhanced security applications for researchers collecting sensitive patient health information. Concerns about these technologies including security of the platform and logistical needs such as computer equipment are also discussed. Special attention is given to ethical issues when transitioning research efforts to online venues.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-07-07T09:36:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920937875
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Extending Youth Voices in a Participatory Thematic Analysis Approach

    • Authors: Linda Liebenberg, Aliya Jamal, Janice Ikeda
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Recent decades have seen a more thoughtful discussion regarding the inclusion of children and youth in research and decision making, challenging how we conduct child and youth-focused studies. Included is a focus on Youth Participatory Action Research approaches and how they facilitate engagement of child and youth voice. Similarly, there is a smaller yet equally important questioning of how we understand “voice,” drawing attention to the conceptualization of “voice,” and the need to account for its social positioning and construction. Despite these various advances, current discussions focus predominantly on research design and data gathering, with an emerging focus on the dissemination of findings. Discussions focused specifically on data analysis remain limited. This omission seems important, given the bridge analysis forms between data gathering and dissemination of findings, and how this impacts youth engagement in the research process overall. By not considering more thoughtfully the ways in which children do or do not engage in the analysis of their data, how are we impacting the positioning of their “voice” in the findings' Similarly, how does our analysis unintentionally strengthen or undermine the platform from which youth share their findings, especially with those in positions of power' In response to these questions, we use this article to consider data analysis in relation to voice and subsequent knowledge production. We also share our approach to participatory thematic analysis in the Spaces & Places research project, a participatory action research program with Indigenous youth in three communities of Atlantic Canada. Through the discussion and exemplar, we hope to contribute to how researchers consider “voice,” ours and those of child and youth collaborators, and the ways in which we can account for both in the analysis process, and enhance the voices of children and youth as knowledge brokers in the dissemination that follows.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-30T09:10:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920934614
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Learning From Vulnerable Populations: Methodological Implications of
           Interviewing Individuals With Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

    • Authors: Brenda S. Dow, Brandon M. Boylan
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Scholars face methodological challenges when conducting research about vulnerable populations, such as individuals living with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). They often struggle to identify, sample, and interview individuals in order to learn about their life experiences and perspectives. Although some scholarship provides methodological guidance on researching vulnerable populations, scant literature addresses accessing and collecting perceptions from individuals with FASD. Based on work with adults with FASD, we offer procedures for sampling and interviewing. Our suggestions include working with agencies and gatekeepers involved with the population; ensuring voluntary and informed consent throughout the interview process; establishing rapport with interviewees and providing a comfortable interview environment for them; and adjusting interview questions according to individuals’ cognitive abilities. By following these procedures, researchers can learn from these individuals while reducing the risk of harm to them.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-30T08:44:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920931254
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Theater Translation Research Methodologies

    • Authors: Dominic Glynn
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Theater translation is an emerging area of research. However, to date, there has been no detailed consideration of the type of methodologies required to conduct such research. This article examines methods and practices in both theater and translation studies in order to discuss their applicability to study theater translation specifically. It categorizes existing research into output-oriented and process-oriented elaborating the specificities of each. The methods include comparative analysis of the translated texts with their source texts and production reviews. This article also outlines ethical issues in conducting research into theater translation.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T11:50:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920937146
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Elderly Well-Being and Alcohol: A Tricky Cocktail

    • Authors: Søren Harnow Klausen, Søren Engelsen, Regina Christiansen, Jakob Emiliussen
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This interdisciplinary study is concerned with the well-being of older adults and how this relates to alcohol. Older adults’ use of alcohol in nursing homes is a rising challenge in Western societies, expected to increase in the coming 10–15 years. Alcohol use has consequences that go beyond mere health concerns and stretch into social, personal, and institutionalized life. The present study aims to develop procedures and guidelines for handling alcohol in elderly care, assist in handling value conflicts, ease the work of care workers, and more generally ensure a better quality of life for older adults. The study has four phases: (1) exploration, (2) interpretation in collaboration with practitioners, (3) developing practice-oriented product, and 4) implementation. Phase 1 was conducted in 2018. In this phase, observations were carried out in five care institutions in a Danish Municipality for a total of 25 days. These observations led to the development of interview guides. Based on the interview guides, 31 participants (residents, care workers, relatives and managers) were interviewed for 30–60 min at the five institutions. In Phase 2, data will be analyzed and interpreted by the researchers in collaboration with representatives from the five institutions. Phases 3 and 4 are forthcoming, and the study is scheduled to terminate in 2021.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-29T11:30:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920931687
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Wuity as a Philosophical Lens for Qualitative Data Analysis

    • Authors: Charmaine Williamson, Annelien Van Rooyen, Christina Shuttleworth, Carol Binnekade, Deon Scott
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Qualitative researchers place value on taking a closer, insider look at data as well as the subsequent data analysis and interpretation. On one end of the interpretive spectrum, researchers should be fully imbued with the coding-to-theorizing process by attending closely to the coding that leads to their analysis. On the opposite end, are those researchers positioned in the positivist paradigm, who vividly question the “researcher-as-data” analysis and its explicit subjectivity. As a middle ground, qualitative researchers have worked collectively in broader teams and/or used independent, practiced coders to add rigor to the coding process. These approaches clearly reflect the philosophical positions researchers adopt in following a research process. For the current study, the authors used the framework of Wuity thinking, which prompts exploratory learning and draws on Eastern-based wisdom. By using Wuity as both a method and a theory, an independent coder with prior knowledge of the coding process oriented a team into the epistemic practices of qualitative coding. The study found that the subtleties of a Wuity lens show delicate and enabling thresholds for expanding mindsets and practices within epistemic communities. The authors concluded that a coding team, working in a different manner, may well advance novel points of departure for qualitative analysis.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-23T09:20:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920926885
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Unraveling the Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications of Neurobiobanking
           and Stroke Genomic Research in Africa: A Study Protocol of the African
           Neurobiobank for Precision Stroke Medicine ELSI Project

    • Authors: Rufus O. Akinyemi, Carolyn Jenkins, Michelle Nichols, Arti Singh, Kolawole Wahab, Albert Akpalu, Fred S. Sarfo, Lukman F. Owolabi, Reginald Obiako, Joshua Akinyemi, Babatunde Ojebuyi, Muyiwa Adigun, Rabiu Musbahu, Abiodun Bello, Musibau Titiloye, Benedict Calys-Tagoe, Mayowa Ogunronbi, Ezinne Uvere, Ruth Laryea, Adekunle Fakunle, Osi Adeleye, Olorunyomi Olorunsogbon, Adebayo Ojo, Deborah Adesina, Nathaniel Mensah, Wisdom Oguike, Nathaniel Coleman, Aliyu Mande, Muhammed Uthman, Rajesh N. Kalaria, Ayodele Jegede, Mayowa Owolabi, Bruce Ovbiagele, Oyedunni Arulogun
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      The ethical, legal, and social implications (ELSI) of emerging neurobiobanks and data resources are unclear in an African scientific landscape with unique cultural, linguistic, and belief systems. The overarching goal of the African Neurobiobank for Precision Stroke Medicine–—ELSI Project is to identify, examine, and develop novel approaches to address ELSI issues of biobanking and stroke genomic research in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). To accomplish the goal we will (1) explore knowledge, attitude, perceptions, barriers, and facilitators influencing ELSI issues related to biobanking and stroke genomic research; (2) use information obtained to craft a community intervention program focused on ELSI issues; and (3) build capacity and careers related to genomics and biobanking for effective client/community engagement while enhancing regulatory, governance, and implementation competences in biobanking science in SSA. A community-based participatory research and mixed-methodological approach, focused on various levels of the social ecological model, will be used to identify and examine relevant ELSI issues. Contextual intervention tools, platforms, and practices will be developed to enhance community understanding and participation in stroke biobanking and genomics research activities while facilitating enduring trust, and equitable and fair utilization of biobanking resources for genetic and trans-omics research. A concurrent capacity building program related to genetic counseling and biobanking will be implemented for early career researchers. The huge potential for neurobiobanking and genomics research in Africa to advance precision medicine applicable to stroke and other neurological disorders requires addressing ELSI challenges while building sustainable research, career, and regulatory capacities in trans-omics and biobanking science.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-23T09:13:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920923194
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • A “Thick” Conception of Children’s Voices: A Hermeneutical Framework
           for Childhood Research

    • Authors: Franco A. Carnevale
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      “Listening to children’s voices” can help foster respectful regard for their experiences and concerns and promote the recognition of children as active agents; that is, persons who have interests and capacities to participate in discussions and decisions that affect them and other people. However, “listening to children’s voices” can have many different forms, and the ways that these voices should be linked to children’s agency can be unclear. I outline several common misconceptions that can impede “listening to children’s voices” as forms of epistemological oppression. I argue for a thick conception of children’s voices, recognizing that children’s expressions are relationally embedded expressions of their agency. Understanding children’s voices and experiences requires hermeneutical approaches that can help discern what is meaningful for a child in a particular situation. I discuss ontological, epistemological, and methodological shifts that are required for hermeneutical inquiry with children and outline specific methods that can be used, oriented by guiding questions. This hermeneutical methodology can help advance our understanding of children’s experiences as well as their aspirations and concerns in research and in professional practice.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-19T09:44:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920933767
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual (LGB) Young Adults’ Relational Well-Being
           Before and After Taiwanese Legalization of Same-Sex Marriage: A
           Qualitative Study Protocol

    • Authors: Yu-Te Huang
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      In 2019, Taiwan became the first country in Asia to legalize same-sex marriage. Such an historic shift in the legal landscape toward marriage equality in Taiwan presents a timely and unique opportunity to investigate the interplay of a lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB)-affirmative policy (i.e., marriage equality) and the well-being of LGB people. Existing quantitative studies on same-sex marriage have yielded compelling evidence about its positive effects on LGB individuals’ psychosocial health. However, no research has examined the relational dimension of the effect associated with same-sex marriage policy. Furthermore, a relational focus requires a researcher to solicit narratives from LGB young adults’ significant others (e.g., parents). This research project seeks to address these gaps by addressing whether legalization of same-sex marriage in Taiwan will improve Taiwanese LGB young adults’ relational well-being. Qualitative data were collected from 30 in-depth, dyadic interviews with 15 LGB young Taiwanese adults aged between 18 and 39 years and their parents. Each participant took part in two interviews conducted before and after the passage of the legalization of same-sex marriage, respectively. Transcribed interviews will be analyzed following an interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) where we seek insight into a social actor’s inner perceptions in a wider context of social relationships. Multiple measures will be undertaken to ensure study rigor. Findings from this study will add to the evaluative endeavors of marriage equality policy enacted in Taiwan by highlighting relational well-being and the perspectives of LGB young adults’ relevant others.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-19T08:55:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920933398
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Working the Limits of “Giving Voice” to Children: A Critical
           Conceptual Review

    • Authors: Danica Facca, Brenda Gladstone, Gail Teachman
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Although claims to “give voice” to children through qualitative inquiry seem morally just and have been largely framed by good intentions, critical scholarship has called for reflexive reconsiderations of such claims. Re/presentations of voice permeate published accounts of qualitative research with children; similarly, voice is a term invoked frequently in qualitative research with informants of all ages. In this article, we follow Spyrou’s notion of “troubling” to review, critique, and synthesize key works by critical child-focused scholars who have reflexively queried and worked with the epistemological and methodological limits of “giving voice” to children through qualitative inquiry. Building on the reviewed literature, as well as poststructural approaches to framing voice in research more generally, we briefly discuss how we have built on these critiques in our own research. In so doing, we join ongoing dialogues aimed at generating alternative approaches to theorizing and re/presenting children’s perspectives in qualitative inquiry more justly.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-19T06:07:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920933391
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Utility of Focus Groups in Retrospective Analysis of Conflict Contexts

    • Authors: Şule Yaylacı
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This article addresses the challenges of conducting retrospective qualitative research in conflict contexts, particularly those stemming from the susceptibility of retrospective accounts to present narratives and contextual variations in the experience and interpretations of war. This article shows how focus groups combined with in-depth interviews can be used as a strategy to overcome these challenges. Drawing on empirical examples from research conducted in conflict settings, the article shows how focus groups can be instrumental in culturally anchoring the researcher and accessing the most reliable accounts of the past via unearthing the locally relevant wartime events and war-induced dynamics.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-18T10:22:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920922735
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Applications of Two-Eyed Seeing in Primary Research Focused on Indigenous
           Health: A Scoping Review

    • Authors: Andrew Forbes, Stephen Ritchie, Jennifer Walker, Nancy Young
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Mi’kmaq Elder Albert Marshall coined “Two-Eyed Seeing” in 2004, an Indigenous concept that emphasizes integrating the strengths of multiple perspectives to address complex challenges in ways that benefit all. In 2011, Two-Eyed Seeing became a policy of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)–Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health, as a part of its 5-year plan, and in 2012, CIHR funding was directed toward supporting efforts that apply the concept of Two-Eyed Seeing to research. However, little is known about how Two-Eyed Seeing has been operationalized in research. To address this ambiguity, a scoping review was conducted to map the key concepts involved when researchers intend to follow Two-Eyed Seeing guiding principles to study Indigenous health topics. Three research questions guided this scoping review: (1) What are the general characteristics (e.g., location of study, health topic studied) of primary research that has attempted to apply Two-Eyed Seeing when studying Indigenous health topics' (2) How did researchers operationalize the concept of Two-Eyed Seeing when they applied it to primary studies regarding Indigenous health topics' and (3) What process-related elements were present in Two-Eyed Seeing studies that accomplished their objectives' The results of this scoping review indicate there is an increasing trend in Two-Eyed Seeing–related peer-reviewed publications since its formal introduction by Mi’kmaq Elder Albert Marshall. The selected Two-Eyed Seeing–related projects were predominately conducted in Canada and published between 2011 and 2019. Projects predominately incorporated a community-based (participatory) research approach and qualitative/Indigenous methods, and six core process–related themes/elements were identified: (i) power was shared, (ii) culturally safe spaces were fostered, (iii) institutional and community ethics were followed, (iv) research projects were transformative, (v) rigor was maintained, and (vi) the structure of Western academia and traditional policy decision-making processes provided challenges for research teams and community partners, respectively.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-12T09:35:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920929110
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • How to Capture Motivation in Pictures' Visual Methods in Research on
           Young People’s School Life and Motivation

    • Authors: Mette Pless, Noemi Katznelson
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Voicing and exploring young pupils’ motivation for learning is a central ambition within the field of education research, which can be strengthened through the use of visual methods. Based on a specific research project on motivation for learning and participation in and outside of school, this article explores both analytical opportunities and challenges concerning the use of visual material, such as everyday-life snapshots, as starting points for individual qualitative interviews focusing on perspectives, experiences, and everyday practices of secondary school pupils. The article shows that visual methods (participant-directed photo elicitation) in educational studies can provide access to situated narratives about both motivation and motives for (non)participation that can supplement methodological approaches such as observations and traditional qualitative interviews.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-09T08:31:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920927549
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Beyond the Paradigm Conflicts: A Four-Step Coding Instrument for Grounded
           Theory

    • Authors: Henna A. Qureshi, Züleyha Ünlü
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Grounded theory (GT) has established itself as a rigorous process that allows in-depth analysis. The popularity of GT demands that implementation process be made easy to understand and adopt especially for novice grounded theorists. This article, therefore, introduces an analytic instrument to enable grounded theorists to organize handling of data and coding in a sophisticated manner with productive results. The Ünlü-Qureshi instrument, an analytic tool for grounded theorists, comprises four steps: code, concept, category, and theme. Each step helps in understanding, interpreting, and organizing the data in a way that leads toward theory emerging from the data. The Ünlü-Qureshi instrument was used in two studies using GT: one where students’ feedback was examined and other where mentoring patterns were studied. Both studies found the Ünlü-Qureshi instrument a useful tool. This article explains the GT steps and implementation of Ünlü-Qureshi instrument for grounded theorists, especially novice researchers.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-02T07:30:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920928188
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Organizational Ethnographic Case Studies: Toward a New Generative In-Depth
           Qualitative Methodology for Health Care Research'

    • Authors: Élizabeth Côté-Boileau, Isabelle Gaboury, Mylaine Breton, Jean-Louis Denis
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      A growing body of literature suggests combining organizational ethnography and case study design as a new methodology for investigating complex organizational phenomena in health care contexts. However, the arguments supporting the potential of organizational ethnographic case studies to improve the process and increase the impact of qualitative research in health care is currently underdeveloped. In this article, we aim to explore the methodological potentialities and limitations of combining organizational ethnography and case study to conduct in-depth empirical health care research. We conducted a scoping review, systematically investigating seven bibliographic databases to search, screen, and select empirical articles that employed organizational ethnographic case study to explore organizational phenomena in health care contexts. We screened 573 papers, then completed full-text review of 74 papers identified as relevant based on title and abstract. A total of 18 papers were retained for analysis. Data were extracted and synthesized using a two-phase descriptive and inductive thematic analysis. We then developed a methodological matrix that positions how the impact, contextualization, credibility, and depth of this combined methodology interact to increase the generative power of in-depth qualitative empirical research in health care. Our review reveals that organizational ethnographic case studies have their own distinct methodological identity in the wider domain of qualitative health care research. We argue that by accelerating the research process, enabling various sources of reflexivity, and spreading the depth and contextualization possibilities of empirical investigation of complex organizational phenomena, this combined methodology may stimulate greater academic dynamism and increase the impact of research. Organizational ethnographic case studies appear as a new in-depth qualitative methodology that both challenges and improves the conventional ways we study the lives of organizations and the experiences of actors within the interconnected realms of health care.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-06-01T08:49:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920926904
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Should Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) be Used With Focus
           Groups' Navigating the Bumpy Road of “Iterative Loops,”
           Idiographic Journeys, and “Phenomenological Bridges”

    • Authors: Beverly Love, Arlene Vetere, Paul Davis
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) is a qualitative thematic approach developed within psychology underpinned by an idiographic philosophy, thereby focusing on the subjective lived experiences of individuals. However, it has been used in focus groups of which some have been critical because of the difficulties of extrapolating the individual voice which is more embedded within the group dynamics and the added complexity of multiple hermeneutics occurring. Some have adapted IPA for use with focus groups, while others provide scant regard to these philosophical tensions. This raises the question whether IPA should be used with focus group data. To address these concerns, this article will set out a step-by-step guide of how IPA was adapted for use with focus groups involving drug using offenders (including illustrative examples with participants’ quotes). A rationale of why it was important to use both focus groups and an IPA approach will be covered including the value, merits, and challenges this presented. An overview of how participants’ idiographic accounts of their drug use, relapse, and recovery were developed will be provided. This article will conclude with a suggested way forward to satisfy the theoretical tensions and address the question raised in the title.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-05-28T08:09:31Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920921600
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Evaluation of a Codesign Method Used to Support the Inclusion of Children
           With Disability in Mainstream Schools

    • Authors: Nerida Hyett, Kerryn Bagley, Teresa Iacono, Carol McKinstry, Jo Spong, Oriane Landry
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Codesign is increasingly used for health research and service improvement. Codesign combines generative and exploratory methods, enabling collaboration between service end users and researchers as equal partners. The aim of this study was to evaluate a codesign method used to design an online education package about inclusive education for children with disability in mainstream schools. The study design was a multiple methods evaluation informed by participatory and transformative research paradigms, incorporating design sciences and public service approaches. A governance committee supported the process. The codesigners (n = 12) included teachers, teacher assistants, parents, and allied health professionals. Process and outcome evaluation data were used; data collected were from verbatim transcripts of codesign workshop discussions (n = 11), documents, Self-Report Level of Participation Surveys, and individual interviews (n = 11). Thematic and descriptive analysis methods were used to describe the codesign processes, experiences, and outcomes. The key processes were identifying the issues through storytelling, voicing frustrations, being vulnerable, sharing insider knowledge, challenging other people’s roles, and deliberation and decision-making. Codesigners’ experiences and outcomes identified strengths and challenges in the method. A conceptual model is presented demonstrating interrelationships between processes, subprocesses, and codesigners’ experiences and outcomes. Codesign involves multiple, interrelated processes that support deliberation and creative design. Skills and resources are required to effectively facilitate what can be a meaningful, creative, and social process.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-05-18T09:05:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920924982
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Qualitative Methods Without Borders: Adapting Photovoice: From a U.S. to
           South African Setting

    • Authors: Michelle Teti, Brian van Wyk
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-05-18T09:01:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920927253
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Applying Qualitative Research to Develop a Guide for Parents of Newborns
           With Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy

    • Authors: Nuria Herranz-Rubia, Verónica Violant, Albert Balaguer, Ana Noreña-Peña
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Moderate-to-severe hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is a significant cause of neonatal mortality and permanent disability in surviving newborns. Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is the only effective intervention to reduce these outcomes. Being a parent of these babies is a traumatic and strenuous event. To address these difficulties, parents need information and support. The aim of this article is to describe a qualitative methodological process followed to develop a guide for parents of a newborn with HIE receiving TH as an addendum to clinical practice guidelines. The guide based on the experience of parents of newborns with HIE is presented as 16 meaningful questions and a glossary. It provides information to parents about HIE, treatment and care, future outcomes, and coping strategies. The final version, in Spanish and English, has a didactic format with simple wording, parents’ verbatim queries, and illustrations made expressly for the guide. Furthermore, we think showing the methodological process we followed to develop the guide, detailing the difficulties that arose in doing so, and making the reflexivity of the researchers explicit may provide support for other teams undertaking similar projects. Likewise, this article illustrates in a practical way how the perspective of family can be incorporated into clinical practice guidelines.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-05-08T05:52:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920923426
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • School Bullying Through Graphic Vignettes: Developing a New Arts-Based
           Method to Study a Sensitive Topic

    • Authors: Daria Khanolainen, Elena Semenova
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      The purpose of this study was to develop a new arts-based measure assessing school bullying and to test it within a pilot study involving 19 schoolchildren (mean age = 15.4; range = 1.00). The researchers designed the new methodological tool (referred to as graphic vignettes) as a set of incomplete comic strips, which participants were asked to complete in a creative way. Researchers then invited participants to engage in follow-up interviews using completed comic strips as individualized interview prompts. The authors detail the design and administration of the graphic vignettes and discuss their efficacy, limitations, and potential applications. The researchers argue that studies on sensitive topics can benefit from a wider dissemination of this arts-based research method. They also assert that the use of creatively co-constructed interview prompts individualizes participant–researcher interactions, placing the power in the hands of participants. The article aims to inspire further development of graphic vignettes.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-05-04T10:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920922765
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Ethics in Photovoice: A Response to Teti

    • Authors: Marie-Anne S. Rosemberg, Robin Evans-Agnew
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Much has been written about the Photovoice method. With the pervasive uptake of this method, debates about its use and ethical considerations will continue to permeate qualitative researchers’ work. Thus, the timeliness of Teti’s 2019 paper about ethical considerations for Photovoice methods. We concur with Teti’s take on the method. We also further had the discussion on Photovoice ethics by emphasizing that (1) as Photovoice methods evolve, so too should ethical considerations, (2) though processes may vary, there are standard ethical considerations that must be adhered to in Photovoice research, and (3) researcher intentionality is important in considering the digital image as a driver of social change. The potential for Photovoice to contribute to social change remains appealing, especially given the current disparaging economic, political, social, and environmental climate.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-05-01T05:43:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920922734
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Politico-Critical Analysis: A New Research Framework Applied to Psychiatry

    • Authors: Paulann Grech, Reuben Grech
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Background:This article presents a new framework called politico-critical analysis based on the contentions of Foucauldian discourse analysis. The framework was developed to address a number of shortcomings and assess further aspects of importance to fields such as mental health and psychiatry.Aim:To present the main principles and steps of the politico-critical analysis framework and, subsequently, to demonstrate its application to a study on the therapeutic alliance in psychiatry.Method:The rationale and main principles of politico-critical analysis are described and applied to a study, the aim of which was to explore the knowledge and power interface in the therapeutic alliance in a psychiatric hospital in Malta. Data were collected during two phases; in the first phase, 10 care receivers, who were selected through purposeful random sampling in a psychiatric hospital in Malta, were interviewed to explore their perception of the knowledge–power balance in the psychiatric therapeutic alliance. The second phase consisted of collecting data from and analyzing a 60-page sample of medical records pertaining to the study participants interviewed in Phase 1.Results:Four themes emerged from the politico-critical analysis of care receivers’ interviews, depicting the knowledge–power interface within therapeutic alliances. From the analysis of medical records, three themes emerged, which shed light on the knowledge–power matrix within the alliances under study.Conclusions:The politico-critical analytical framework was regarded as a helpful agent in facilitating the exploration of the knowledge–power matrix within the psychiatric therapeutic alliance. Strengths and limitations were acknowledged, and the framework might help guide similar potential research.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-28T07:40:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920922002
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • The “World Café” as a Participatory Method for Collecting
           Qualitative Data

    • Authors: Katharina Löhr, Michael Weinhardt, Stefan Sieber
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      We introduce and discuss “World Café” (WC), a participatory assessment tool widely used in community development and organizational change processes, as additional qualitative research method. We propose WC as a participatory method of data collection for a large group of participants, discussing its strengths and weaknesses in comparison to semistructured interviews and focus groups, two well-established methods in qualitative research. As a research method, we find that WC complements other methods in important ways. When there are many participants, it helps guide the exploration and verification of themes. Integrating the method into the research design may help increase both the reference sample and the level of participation. Furthermore, as a participatory method, it not only produces data for the researchers but also has the potential to benefit the participants, as it facilitates dialogue and mutual learning, thus motivating their participation and responses.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-24T08:05:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920916976
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Methods in the Time of COVID-19: The Vital Role of Qualitative Inquiries

    • Authors: Michelle Teti, Enid Schatz, Linda Liebenberg
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-24T06:32:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920920962
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Developing Action Plans in Youth Photovoice to Address Community-Level HIV
           Risk in Rural Malawi

    • Authors: Saria Lofton, Kathleen F. Norr, Diana Jere, Crystal Patil, Chimwemwe Banda
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Youth-driven approaches to HIV prevention can engage youth and improve health outcomes. Photovoice has been used to engage youth in identifying the assets and challenges in their communities. In sub-Saharan Africa, youth remain vulnerable to HIV infection. This article describes a photovoice project, named Youth Photovoice, conducted in rural Malawi, which focused on community places and situations relating to risky sexual behaviors that place youth at risk of HIV infection. Twenty-four youth, ages 13–17 (12 males and 12 females), participated in Youth Photovoice. During the photovoice process, youth identified five community situations and places that put them at risk of unsafe sex and thus HIV infection: initiation ceremonies, isolated places, community celebrations, local businesses such as bars and rest houses, and church-sponsored activities. Youth used a systematic action planning process to develop action plans. They presented their action plans to local leaders and parents. Parents and leaders responded positively and agreed to help the youth carry out their plans. If their plans to address community situations that put them at risk of unsafe sex succeed, there will be a direct impact on reducing the risk of HIV infection among youth. Youth Photovoice provided the opportunity for youth to obtain new skills, build new partnerships, and present their ideas to community leaders. Integrating this action planning process into photovoice helped to guide the youth toward actualizing their HIV prevention plans in their community. This process can increase the effectiveness of photovoice initiatives to address other community issues in a wide variety of settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-24T06:30:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920920139
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • The Changing Face of Qualitative Inquiry

    • Authors: Janice Morse
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      When examining the changes in society and the concomitant changes in research methods in the last century, unquestionably qualitative inquiry has been superseded by quantitative methods and had to work to find its niche in the social sciences. Here, I explore the push factors that have made space for the establishment and legitimization of qualitative inquiry. I discuss what we are doing well in qualitative methods, then examine the status quo—present worries, concerns, and future trends. I present three major problems that need attention, critique, and resolution in qualitative methods to further strengthen our foothold as we move forward. Methodological development is one of the primary purposes of the International Institute of Qualitative Methods (IIQM). In closing, I examine the role of the IIQM in the global development of qualitative methods.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-21T06:18:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920909938
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Walking Interviews and Wandering Behavior: Ethical Insights and
           Methodological Outcomes While Exploring the Perspectives of Older Adults
           Living With Dementia

    • Authors: Adebusola A. Adekoya, Lorna Guse
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      While the use of walking interviews is not new in health care research, this method has not been used to study the wandering behavior of older adults living with dementia in long-term care (LTC) homes. The aim of this article is to describe ethical insights and consequential methodological outcomes when walking interviews were used as a means of exploring the perspectives of older adults living with mild to moderate dementia. We suggest that our use of walking interviews with older adults who presented with wandering behavior respected participants’ agency and, at times, placed the first author in the situation of “ethical vulnerability” in the roles of researcher and clinician. The first author, an experienced nurse clinician, walked with eight participants while interviewing them about why they walk and their intended destinations. Walking interviews provided the opportunity not only to interview participants but also to observe their walking behavior and interaction with others in the LTC home. Walking interviews with older adults living with dementia who are highly mobile in the LTC home acknowledge the primacy of the research participant and the researcher as learner.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-21T05:58:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920920135
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Toward a More Comprehensive Type of Analysis in Photovoice Research: The
           Development and Illustration of Supportive Question Matrices for Research
           Teams

    • Authors: Qingchun Wang, Karin Hannes
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      In this article, we present a comprehensive approach to analysis to assist researchers in conducting and analyzing photovoice studies. A screening of primary studies in four systematic reviews focusing on photovoice research revealed that the focus of analysis of researchers is the narrative provided with the photos from the participants, which undermines the potential of the photos themselves to provide meaning. In addition, the analytical effort of photovoice researchers is often limited to the interpretive phase in their projects. The question matrices we developed facilitate photovoice researchers who aim to give more weight to photos as an interpretive medium and wish to extend their analytical lens to different phases of a research cycle. They focus our analytical attention on three different sites—site of production, site of photo, and site of audiencing, and three different modalities—technological modality, compositional modality, and social modality. The matrices are designed to present an overview of the important dimensions that researchers might need to take into account when conducting photovoice research studies. We provide relevant examples to illustrate the potential risks and benefits of the analytical choices we make. Photovoice researchers should increase their awareness of the impact of our choices on the analytical process and avoid the analytical strategies that may disempower participants and reproduce existing power relationships.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-14T10:13:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920914712
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Applying Thematic Analysis to Education: A Hybrid Approach to Interpreting
           Data in Practitioner Research

    • Authors: Wen Xu, Katina Zammit
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Thematic analysis (TA), as a qualitative analytic method, is widely used in health care, psychology, and beyond. However, scant details are often given to demonstrate the process of data analysis, especially in the field of education. This article describes how a hybrid approach of TA was applied to interpret multiple data sources in a practitioner inquiry. Particular attention is given to the inductive and deductive coding and theme development process of TA. Underpinned by the constructivist epistemology, codes were driven by both data per se and theories, through a “bottom-up” and “top-down” approach to identify themes. A detailed example of six steps of data analysis is presented, which evidences the systematic analysis of raw data from observation and research journals, students’ focus groups, and a classroom teacher’s semistructured interviews. This example demonstrates how classroom practice was unpacked and how insiders’ insights were interpreted through the theoretical lens while also allowing the participants to express themselves. By providing step-by-step guidelines in data coding and identification of themes, this article contributes to informing qualitative researchers, especially teacher-researchers who undertake their research in the classroom setting.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-14T10:04:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920918810
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Action Research as a Meta-Methodology in the Management Field

    • Authors: Amaya Erro-Garcés, José A. Alfaro-Tanco
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Although it was first developed in the field of psychology, action research is a methodology of growing importance in business and management contexts. In this research article, we focus on a significant aspect of action research: the variety of methodologies that can be used jointly in an action research study and its relationships. More specifically, the aim of this study is to underscore the definition of action research as a meta-methodology that encompasses different ways of carrying out empirical research. To this end, we perform a meta-analysis of articles discussing empirical research that used an action research methodology. The meta-analysis is based on a systematic review of articles published between 2000 and 2018. The main findings suggest that action research may be regarded as a multidisciplinary method and that it can be implemented jointly with other methodologies; not just qualitative methods but also quantitative research. Consequently, action research may now be defined as a meta-methodology or an umbrella process. In this way, action research is a tool whose implementation ought to be promoted in the business/management field as a way of enhancing relevant, rigorous empirical studies and serving as a framework reference in projects based on research and practice contribution as well as active collaboration between researchers and practitioners.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-08T07:47:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920917489
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Research Methodological Challenges and Recommendations for Conducting a
           Comparative Qualitative Longitudinal Study Across Two Countries on
           Different Continents

    • Authors: Suhaila Sanip
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      A qualitative longitudinal study has become the preferred methodology for many researchers who are interested in documenting changes as the focus of analysis. Debates on appropriate qualitative longitudinal designs and methodological models are actively ongoing. The choice of methodological models to fit into a qualitative longitudinal design will depend on the objectives of the study. Many researchers have also reported on the use of qualitative longitudinal study, in particular on the challenges in study design, data collection, and data analysis. In the researcher’s review of the relevant literature, however, the researcher was unable to locate the use of a qualitative longitudinal methodology to study the same phenomenon comparatively across two countries on different continents. This article, therefore, adds to the current understanding of qualitative longitudinal study through the discussion of methods and recommendations for conducting a comparative qualitative longitudinal study across two countries on different continents. This article discusses the research methodological challenges and recommendations, as well as lessons learned, upon completion of a doctoral study in 2016. As not many researchers have undertaken a comparative qualitative longitudinal approach in a doctoral study, it is worth sharing with researchers who are planning a similar methodology what they could expect and should be prepared for.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-07T05:54:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920917493
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Developing an Initial Program Theory to Explain How Patient-Reported
           Outcomes Are Used in Health Care Settings: Methodological Process and
           Lessons Learned

    • Authors: Rachel Flynn, Kara Schick-Makaroff, Adrienne Levay, Joanne Greenhalgh
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      A central aspect of any theory-driven realist investigation (synthesis or evaluation) is to develop an initial program theory (IPT). An IPT can be used to frame and understand how, for whom, why, and under what contexts complex interventions work or not. Despite well-established evidence that IPTs are a central aspect to any realist investigation, there is wide variation and a lack of methodological discussion on how to develop an IPT. In this article, we present the approach that we used to develop an IPT of how patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are used in health care settings. Specifically, we completed a systematic review to extract tacit theories reported in the literature. The benefit of this approach was that it provided a rigorous review of the literature in the development of IPTs. The challenges included (1) rediscovering what is already well established in the theoretical literature, (2) generating an overabundance of partial candidate theories, and (3) extensive use of time and resources for what was the first stage to our larger funded research study. Our recommendations to other scholars considering this approach are to ensure that they (1) live within their means and (2) narrow the scope of the research question and/or develop a conceptual framework using middle-range theories. These methodological insights are highly relevant to researchers embarking on a realist investigation, tasked with developing an IPT.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-07T05:46:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920916299
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Positionality and Research: “Two-Eyed Seeing” With a Rural Ktaqmkuk
           Mi’kmaw Community

    • Authors: Brady Reid
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      As evident from the original proposals for self-negotiation from the Federation of Newfoundland Indians, the formation of the Qalipu Mi’kmaq First Nation represented a small victory for Ktaqmkuk Mi’kmaq: recognition. Validation of the existence of Ktaqmkuk Mi’kmaq outside of Miawpukek was a small step toward decolonization yet cannot be a panacea for reconciliation. This study was a collaborative project in the Mi’kmaw community of Ewipkek through the No’kmaq Village Band and Elder Calvin White, a known champion of Mi’kmaw rights in the province. This project emerged from a collaborative research effort between the community of Ewipkek and Grenfell Campus, Memorial University. This article presents current approaches, principles, and considerations for researchers working with Indigenous communities, drawing from both academic literature and the collaborative experience working with the community of Ewipkek. This collaborative project describes the different characteristics of a Western research paradigm versus an Indigenous research paradigm that can support the application of the Two-Eyed Seeing framework.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-06T05:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920910841
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • How Do We Work as Researchers in the Real World' Mapping the
           Trajectory of Methodological Decision Making in Health Services Research

    • Authors: Bróna Nic Giolla Easpaig, Yvonne Tran, Gaston Arnolda, Robyn Clay-Williams, Geoff P. Delaney, Winston Liauw, Jeffrey Braithwaite
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      To the disbenefit of qualitative health services research, the generation of study design is too often implied as a logical consequence of aims or questions. Limited space is afforded to describing the critical processes we go through to devise our research for the ever-complex services we seek to understand. This article offers an in-depth examination of qualitative health services research design and the considerations inherent in the process. To illustrate, we present a worked example of our experience developing an investigation to characterize and explore multidisciplinary cancer service provision in hospital outpatient clinics. We map the development of our investigation from the a priori conceptualization of the phenomena of inquiry through to the detailed research plan, explicating the design choices made along the way. We engage with key issues for qualitative health researchers, which include how we make sense of and account for context; address multisite research considerations; design with and for stakeholder engagement; ensure epistemological, ontological, and methodological coherence; and select analytical and interpretative strategies. We arrive at a complex staged investigation that employs mixed and multi-methods to be conducted across a range of settings. Our purpose is to stimulate thinking about many of the contemporary design challenges researchers negotiate.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-03T12:14:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920913678
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Digital Storytelling and Validity Criteria

    • Authors: Kathleen C. Sitter, Natalie Beausoleil, Erin McGowan
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      The authors explore the validity criteria of digital storytelling when applied as a research method in Participatory Health Research. The article begins with an overview of digital storytelling as a participatory visual research method. To demonstrate the validity criteria of digital storytelling, what follows is a reflexive account of a 2-year Participatory Health Research study that used digital storytelling as a research method to investigate treatment experiences among breast cancer patients. The authors offer a suggested summary of validity criteria for digital storytelling when applied to Participatory Health Research and describe the application of participatory, intersubjective, catalytic, contextual, empathic, and ethical validity. The article concludes with a discussion about resources and distribution.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-04-01T06:17:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920910656
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Understanding the Experiences of Young Children on the Autism Spectrum as
           They Navigate the Irish Early Years’ Education System: Valuing Voices in
           Child-Centered Narratives

    • Authors: Sarah O’Leary, Mary Moloney
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This article, which focuses upon narrative inquiry as a means of including the voice and experience of children on the autism spectrum, draws upon a doctoral study that explores the experiences of young children as they and their families navigate the Irish Early Years’ Education System (both preschool and primary school). It focuses, in particular, on the need to acknowledge and appreciate the experiences of these children within their homes and educational settings, their immediate microsystem. It also urges an increased awareness of how the development of these children’s voices is heavily impacted by the roles and actions of others. Six parents shared stories of navigating the Irish Early Years’ Education System with their young child on the autism spectrum. Their children’s voices were incorporated into these narratives using visual storytelling methods. This research adopted an ecological or intercontextual interpretive stance, thus providing valuable insight into the coconstructed experiences of those who identify as “different” or “other,” in this instance, young children on the autism spectrum and their families. In terms of the present article, this ecological stance encompasses the central aim of the overarching study; the critical restorying of parents’ lived experiences of navigating the Irish Early Years’ Education System with their child on the autism spectrum which is thus, underpinned by narrative inquiry and voice.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T05:58:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920914696
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Using Visual Timelines in Telephone Interviews: Reflections and Lessons
           Learned From the Star Family Study

    • Authors: Bethan Pell, Denitza Williams, Rhiannon Phillips, Julia Sanders, Adrian Edwards, Ernest Choy, Aimee Grant
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Visual timeline methods have been used as part of face-to-face qualitative interviewing with vulnerable populations to uncover the intricacies of lived experiences, but little is known about whether visual timelines can be effectively used in telephone interviews. In this article, we reflect on the process of using visual timelines in 16 telephone interviews with women as part of the “STarting a family when you have an Autoimmune Rheumatic disease” study (STAR Family Study). The visual timeline method was used to empower women to organize and share their narratives about the sensitive and complex topic of starting a family. We conducted a thematic analysis of the audio-recorded interview data, using researchers’ field notes and reflections to provide context for our understanding of the benefits of using timelines and to understand the process of using visual timelines during telephone interviews. Resource packs were sent to women before study participation; 11 of the 16 women completed a version of the timeline activity. Six themes were identified in the methodological data analysis: (1) use and adaptation of the timeline tool, (2) timeline exchange, (3) framing the interview: emphasizing that women are in control, (4) jumping straight in, (5) taking a lead, and (6) disclosing personal and sensitive experiences. The use of visual timelines facilitated interviewee control and elicited rich narratives of participants’ experiences in telephone interviews. Women created their visual timelines autonomously and retained ownership of their timeline data; these features of the data generation process need to be considered when using visual timelines in telephone rather than face-to-face interviews. Use of visual methods within telephone interviews is feasible, can generate rich data, and should be further explored in a wider range of settings.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T05:54:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920913675
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Alternative, Oral, Poster and Symposia Abstracts for QHR, 2019

    • Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-31T05:50:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920909934
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Find Out A New Method to Study Abductive Reasoning in Empirical Research

    • Authors: Dorota Żelechowska, Natalia Żyluk, Mariusz Urbański
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This article presents a new tool that provides a methodological context to observe and analyze, both qualitatively and quantitatively, manifestations of abductive reasoning in empirical research. Abduction is a form of a complex reasoning carried out to make sense of surprising or ambiguous phenomena or fill the gaps in our beliefs. Despite the ubiquity of abduction in professional and everyday problem-solving processes, little empirical research was dedicated to investigate this type of reasoning, and most of them focused on products of abduction—abductive hypotheses. Our instrument, Find Out, catches abduction as a real-life form of reasoning consisting of two phases—generation and evaluation of hypotheses. It offers the possibility to account on abduction from both product and process perspective and enables both qualitative and quantitative analyses on gathered data to be conducted. In this article, the task and examples of qualitative analyses of the data are presented.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-26T05:02:56Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920909674
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Digital Stories as Data: An Etymological and Philosophical Exploration of
           Cocreated Data in Philosophical Hermeneutic Health Research

    • Authors: Michael Lang, Catherine Laing, Carol Ewashen, Nancy Moules
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Many research methods emphasize procedures to minimize potential bias introduced by measurement tools, environmental factors, and researchers themselves. Using the example of digital storytelling, in which short films are cocreated between a researcher and participant, we examine the possibility of cocreated stories as data in philosophical hermeneutic (PH) health research. The etymological explication of the words “data” and “story” brings the meaning of these words closer together while an exploration of the ontological and epistemological assumptions of PH indicate that cocreated digital stories can be viewed as data in a similar way to traditional verbatim interview transcripts used in other types of qualitative health research. Using digital storytelling as a data generation tool in PH health research may help provide a deeper understanding of health-related phenomena by cultivating understanding through genuine conversation, addressing the challenges of language, and apprehending the immediacy of understanding.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-25T06:05:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920913673
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Qualitative Interviewing in Ethnic-Chinese Contexts: Reflections From
           Researching Taiwanese Immigrants in the United States

    • Authors: Chien-Juh Gu
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Qualitative interviewing is a broadly used method of data collection, but its discussions have rarely been situated in ethnic-Chinese contexts and immigrant communities. What factors are crucial for conducting effective interviews with ethnic-Chinese subjects' In what contexts do general principles not apply, thereby needing adjustments, and how' Reflecting on the experience of interviewing approximately 100 Taiwanese immigrants in the United States, I discuss the importance of mindfulness, cultural sensitivity, and triangulation. I argue that researchers need to be mindful of the potential effects of interviewers’ and interviewees’ structural positions on the interview process, quality, and outcomes. Cultural understanding is necessary when assessing ethical issues and designing interview questions. However, researchers also need to set aside their knowledge of ethnic-Chinese culture from time to time in order to capture the nuanced cultural meanings. Finally, conducting ethnographic observations helps researchers understand the lived contexts of subjects’ experiences and their varied interpretations. Using examples from two research projects, I illustrate significant factors that facilitate or hinder the proceeding of qualitative interviewing with ethnic-Chinese subjects. These reflections foster researchers’ understanding and practice of reflexivity at the crossroads of methods and ethnic culture.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-13T11:21:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920910319
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Paradigmatic Shifts in Doctoral Research: Reflections Using Uncomfortable
           Reflexivity and Pragmatism

    • Authors: Helen Woodley, Laura Mazzoli Smith
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This article discusses a doctoral study, completed by a then full-time teacher in a Pupil Referral Unit in the north of England, which shifted from a mixed-methods action research project to one that was largely autoethnographic in approach. This incorporated the use of fictionalized data. The aim of the project, both at conception and after the change of focus, was to inform the ongoing practice specifically related to the context of the setting. The former doctoral student and supervisor reflect upon the paradigmatic shift that this entailed, drawing upon a complex conceptualization of reflexivity, and pragmatism, to account for the underlying rationale and affordances of this shift. The uncomfortable realities that were experienced during the doctoral study as a result have given way to a different orientation on the project in the light of subsequent reflection. Consideration of a pragmatist understanding of language in relation to research ends has repositioned the nature of the paradigmatic shift. The confidence to change methodological approaches during a doctoral thesis is explored.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-02T10:28:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920907533
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Problematizing Sound Methods Through Music Research-Creation: Oblique
           Curiosities

    • Authors: David Ben Shannon, Sarah E. Truman
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      In this article, we take up feminist new materialist thought in relation to our music research-creation practice to problematize the white, en/abled, cis-masculine, and Euro-Western methodological orientation often inherited with sound methods. We think with our music research-creation practice to activate a feminist new materialist politics of approach, unsettling sound studies’ inheritances that seek to separate, essentialize, naturalize/neutralize, capture, decontextualize, and re-present. We unsettle these inheritances with six propositions: imbricate, stratify, provoke, inject, contextualize, and more-than-represent. These propositions, and this article’s uptake of research-creation, hold implications for scholars interested in critically enacting sound studies research as well as qualitative and post qualitative research in general.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-03-02T10:24:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920903224
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Beyond Forecasting: Using a Modified Delphi Method to Build Upon
           Participatory Action Research in Developing Principles for a Just and
           Inclusive Energy Transition

    • Authors: Alexandra Revez, Niall Dunphy, Clodagh Harris, Gerard Mullally, Breffní Lennon, Christine Gaffney
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Energy transition debates have been characterized by a strong emphasis on the technical implications of shifting away from fossil fuels to renewable energy sources, with little consideration of social contexts. This is now changing, with a growing emphasis on reconfiguring the social aspects of energy, particularly in terms of introducing more democratic processes into behavior change and energy practice engagements. This article situates itself within these debates and demonstrates the transformative potential of combining participatory action research (PAR) approaches with a modified Delphi method for understanding energy transition issues, particularly beyond forecasting instruments. There remains a dearth in literature combining the Delphi method with PAR; its application in the field of energy transitions is very innovative. PAR draws from grassroots and local-based knowledge, Delphi panels typically focus on the insights from a panel of professional experts. In combining these two approaches, to develop principles for an inclusive and just energy transition, a reflexive form of dialogue emerges that gives voice to what are often considered dissonant or mismatched perspectives. Furthermore, the experimental use of a modified Delphi panel, combined with PAR, offers a strategy to promote knowledge sharing between different groups and to counter potential communication barriers among different actors in society. This article shows how a modified Delphi panel approach is considerably enhanced by combining elements of PAR, raising the potential of Delphi panels beyond forecasting instruments, which often seek to determine the way the future “will be,” toward an envisioning tool that collaboratively seeks to explore the way a low-carbon system “could be,” or perhaps “should be.” The development of energy transition principles, endorsed through the modified Delphi panel, offers a concrete way to enact practices of energy justice within a more democratized energy system.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-02-27T12:20:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920903218
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Capturing Lived Experience: Methodological Considerations for Interpretive
           Phenomenological Inquiry

    • Authors: Julie Frechette, Vasiliki Bitzas, Monique Aubry, Kelley Kilpatrick, Mélanie Lavoie-Tremblay
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Interpretive phenomenology presents a unique methodology for inquiring into lived experience, yet few scholarly articles provide methodological guidelines for researchers, and many studies lack coherence with the methodology’s philosophical foundations. This article contributes to filling these gaps in qualitative research by examining the following question: What are the key methodological and philosophical considerations of leading an interpretive phenomenological study' An exploration of interpretive phenomenology’s foundations, including Heideggerian philosophy and Benner’s applications in health care, will show how the philosophical tradition can guide research methodology. The interpretive phenomenological concepts of Dasein, lived experience, existentialia, authenticity are at the core of the discussion while relevant methodological concerns include research paradigm, researcher’s stance, objective and research question, sampling and recruitment, data collection, and data analysis. A study of pediatric intensive care unit nurses’ lived experience of a major hospital transformation project will illustrate these research considerations. This methodological article is innovative in that it explicitly describes the ties between the operational elements of an interpretive phenomenological study and the philosophical tradition. This endeavor is particularly warranted, as the essence of phenomenology is to bring to light what is taken for granted, and yet phenomenological research paradoxically makes frequent assumptions concerning the philosophical underpinnings.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-02-20T09:41:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920907254
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Using Illustrations to Make Decisions on the Most Appropriate Qualitative
           Research Methodology: The Industry 4.0 Scenario

    • Authors: Ilyana Janis, Maizam Alias, Muhammad Zulkipli, Firdaus Muhammad-Sukki
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Industry 4.0 is viewed as a complex scenario. This complex scenario could be interpreted using illustrations such as sketches or drawings. Ideally, sketches and drawings are useful in illustrating complexity and multiple abstracts from observed social reality. The use of illustrations allows novice qualitative researchers to explore observed social reality in depth with less linear insight. However, few scholars mention the use of illustrations at the research planning stage because most sketches and drawings have been used as tools during data collection merely to understand an interviewee’s perspective. Therefore, this article aims to demonstrate the use of illustrations as a tool to facilitate the research process from problem identification to the selection of the qualitative research methodology. Five specific purposes of illustration that significantly contribute to the body of knowledge for effective decision making and are useful tools in delivering information are demonstrated in this article. Based on the illustrations demonstrated in this article, the most appropriate qualitative research methodology is the case study. Overall, the proposed use of illustrations can assist a novice qualitative researcher in determining the appropriate epistemological and ontological stances, as well as their methodology and method, more effectively.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-02-19T06:19:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920907247
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Lessons Learned From the Recruitment of Undocumented African Immigrant
           Women for a Qualitative Study

    • Authors: Oluwatoyin Olukotun, Lucy Mkandawire-Valhmu
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Although undocumented immigrants represent a particularly vulnerable population, they are underrepresented in health research. To facilitate the engagement of undocumented immigrants in health research, in this article, we describe the methodological issues encountered while conducting a qualitative study where we sought to understand the health care–seeking experiences of undocumented African immigrant women in the United States. Strategies employed in addressing methodological challenges and recommendation for future studies will also be discussed.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-02-05T06:08:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406920904575
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Telling My Tale: Reflections on the Process of Visual Storytelling for
           Children and Youth Living With Cystic Fibrosis and Muscular Dystrophy in
           Canada

    • Authors: Fiona J. Moola, Nivatha Moothathamby, Laura McAdam, Melinda Solomon, Robert Varadi, Diana Elizabeth Tullis, Joe Reisman
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Storytelling is perennial to the human condition. We all tell stories and we all bear witness to the stories of others. According to narrative scholars, only certain stories are valorized in contemporary culture, while others go unrecognized. The inability to recognize ourselves and identities in contemporary cultural narratives can contribute to the silencing and muting of certain lives and voices. Young people with life-shortening conditions, such as cystic fibrosis (CF) and muscular dystrophy (MD), are rarely afforded the opportunity to have their stories heard and affirmed in contemporary cultural spaces. In this article, we reflect on the methodological process of engaging in a study known as “Telling My Tale,” that is, a storybook study featuring narratives and artwork by young people with CF and MD. Funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, we critically reflect upon the methodological lessons, advances, and innovations we have learned, including theoretical musings, the process of exhibiting some of the artwork in a public art gallery, challenges faced along the way, analytical conundrums, and the role of technology in artistic creation for participants with limited hand function. In so doing, we hope to further methodological and theoretical development and innovation in narrative and artistic traditions to better center the voices, lives, tales, and experiences of young people with life-shortening conditions.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919898917
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Using a Vignette in Qualitative Research to Explore Police Perspectives of
           a Sensitive Topic: “Honor”-Based Crimes and Forced Marriages

    • Authors: Wendy Aujla
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      This article examines how a vignette presented to participants during qualitative research interviews was successful in gathering information on the perceptions of 32 police officers and 14 civilians regarding “honor”-based crimes and forced marriages within the context of domestic violence. To my knowledge, this is one of the first methodological papers that presents the process of using a vignette with police on such a sensitive topic. This article offers a reflexive account of some of the methodological considerations I made when constructing the vignette that likely impacted its success. I describe the vignette, discuss how participants reacted to it, and present the themes that emerged to show how it was understood. I then emphasize how first responders engaged in the interview process with the vignette material and how this allowed for a rich, in-depth discussion on an understudied topic. Finally, I discuss the strengths and limitations of this method and make recommendations for future research.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919898352
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Intercoder Reliability in Qualitative Research: Debates and Practical
           Guidelines

    • Authors: Cliodhna O’Connor, Helene Joffe
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Evaluating the intercoder reliability (ICR) of a coding frame is frequently recommended as good practice in qualitative analysis. ICR is a somewhat controversial topic in the qualitative research community, with some arguing that it is an inappropriate or unnecessary step within the goals of qualitative analysis. Yet ICR assessment can yield numerous benefits for qualitative studies, which include improving the systematicity, communicability, and transparency of the coding process; promoting reflexivity and dialogue within research teams; and helping convince diverse audiences of the trustworthiness of the analysis. Few guidelines exist to help researchers negotiate the assessment of ICR in qualitative analysis. The current article explains what ICR is, reviews common arguments for and against its incorporation in qualitative analysis and offers guidance on the practical elements of performing an ICR assessment.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919899220
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Applying Intersectionality With Constructive Grounded Theory as an
           Innovative Research Approach for Studying Complex Populations:
           Demonstrating Congruency

    • Authors: Shahin Kassam, Lenora Marcellus, Nancy Clark, Joyce O’Mahony
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      One goal of qualitative health research is to fully capture and understand stories of people who experience inequities shaped by complex interlocking structural and social determinants. With this social justice–oriented goal in mind, it is critical to use a methodological approach that appreciates prevailing inequities and oppression. In this article, we propose an innovative approach that joins qualitative health research methodology with critical inquiry. Specifically, we propose advancing constructive grounded theory (CGT) through applying intersectionality as an emergent critical social theory and an analytical tool. With our proposed approach being novel, minimal attempts to conceptualize and operationalize CGT with intersectionality exist. This article focuses on initiating theoretical conceptualization through focusing on demonstrating congruency. We are guided by this focus to seek connectedness and fit through analyzing historical and philosophical assumptions of CGT and intersectionality. In our article, we demonstrate congruency within four units of analysis: reflexivity, complexity, variability, and social justice. Through these units, we offer implications to applying intersectionality within CGT methodology. These include a foundation that guides researchers toward further conceptualizing and operationalizing this novel research approach. Implications also include innovatively exploring complex population groups who face structural inequities that shape their lived vulnerabilities. Our proposed research approach supports critical reflection on the research process to consider what shapes the researcher–participant relationship. This includes reflecting on analysis of power dynamics, underlying ideologies, and intermingling social locations. Thus, our conceptual paper addresses the call for evolving social justice methodologies toward inquiring into complex populations and generating knowledge that challenges and resists inequity.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919898921
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • The View From the Inside: Positionality and Insider Research

    • Authors: Danielle Berkovic, Darshini Ayton, Andrew M. Briggs, Ilana N. Ackerman
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919900828
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Approach to Sexuality From Occupational Therapy in People With Acquired
           Brain Injury in Subacute Stage: Study Protocol

    • Authors: Nuria Rico, Pablo Cantero, Javier Pereira, Betania Groba, Laura Nieto, Thais Pousada
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      Project title:Occupational Therapy Approach to Sexuality in People with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI) in Subacute Stage.Design:Qualitative study with a phenomenological approach.Context of Study:The relevance of the occupational therapy approach to sexuality regarding people with acquired brain injury in the subacute stage.Objectives: General objective: Explore the perceptions of people with ABI, who are in a subacute situation, and their relatives and partners, about their assessment of the relevance of the approach toward sexuality during their occupational therapy intervention. Specific objectives: Describe and analyze the perspectives of users, family members, and partners about the importance of this activity and its relevance in daily life; what is included in the approach to sexuality; the differences that may arise between the perspectives of the participants according to gender; and the differences that may arise between the perspectives on the subject by age groups.Study Population and the Total Number of Participants:The study population is made up of people with ABI in the subacute stage who attend occupational therapy at the physical rehabilitation unit of a hospital in Spain, and their families and partners. The size of the sample is conditioned by the qualitative study’s design. The number of participants will be established when theoretical saturation of the data is reached. First results are now available.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919899221
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
  • Misfitting the Research Process: Shaping Qualitative Research “in the
           Field” to Fit People Living With Dementia

    • Authors: Joseph Webb, Val Williams, Marina Gall, Sandra Dowling
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 19, Issue , January-December 2020.
      It is increasingly recognized that people living with dementia should be included in qualitative research that foregrounds their voices, but traditional research approaches can leave less room for flexibility than is necessary. This article builds on others who have examined the challenges and rewards of the qualitative research process with people living with dementia. With reference to a specific project on communication and dementia, the research design adaptations needed at each step to turn a “misfit” into a “fit” are examined. Misfitting, as a concept related to social practice theories, is used to argue the need for a coproduced and flexible approach to research design and data collection. Recommendations include being willing to adapt research methods, data collection locations, and aims of the project to fit participants’ competencies, preferences, and realities; spending sufficient time getting to get to know staff and potential participants to build relationships; working round care practices and routines to minimize disruption; and using observational/visual methods can help include people living with dementia at each stage. People with dementia require researchers in the field to be creative in their methods, reflexive in their approach, and person-centered in their goals. Those adaptations can fundamentally change the ways in which the social practice of research is shaped.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2020-01-01T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919895926
      Issue No: Vol. 19 (2020)
       
 
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