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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1652 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (22 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (245 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (16 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (88 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (53 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (968 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (170 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (968 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
International Journal of Growth and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Information, Diversity, & Inclusion     Open Access  
International Journal of Innovative Research in Social and Natural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Integrated Education and Development     Open Access  
International Journal of Knowledge-Based Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Korean Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Language and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Management and Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Management, Economics and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Multidisciplinary Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Qualitative Methods     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Social and Allied Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Social and Humanistic Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Social And Humanities Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in IT     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Social Research Methodology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 71)
International Journal of Social Science Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Social Sciences and Education Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Social Sciences and Humanity Studies     Open Access  
International Journal of Synergy and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal Pedagogy of Social Studies     Open Access  
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access  
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 215)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
InterSciencePlace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigación Valdizana     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
Izvestia Ural Federal University Journal. Series 3. Social and Political Sciences     Open Access  
J : Multidisciplinary Scientific Journal     Open Access  
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Burirum Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Business and Social Sciences Research     Open Access  
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Community Development and Life Quality     Open Access  
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Computational Social Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Geography, Politics and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate School Sakon Nakhon Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies in Northern Rajabhat Universities     Open Access  
Journal of Graduate Studies Valaya Alongkorn Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences Surin Rajabhat University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences, Rajapruk University     Open Access  
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Multicultural Affairs     Open Access  
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 319, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities Review     Open Access  
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Lakon     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Knowledge Management for Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Korea : Politik, Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft     Open Access  
Korean Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kotuitui : New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Kulttuurintutkimus     Open Access  
Kulturwissenschaftliche Zeitschrift     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
KZfSS Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
L'Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
L'Ordinaire des Amériques     Open Access  
La Tercera Orilla     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Lambda Nordica     Open Access  
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Lavboratorio : Revista de Estudios sobre Cambio Estructural y Desigualdad Social.     Open Access  
Lectio Socialis     Open Access  
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d’EMAM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Letras Verdes. Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Socioambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science     Open Access  
Lex Social : Revista de Derechos Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Literacy Learning: The Middle Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Local-Global: Identity, Security, Community     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Lucero     Open Access  
Lúdicamente     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lutas Sociais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Macedon Digest, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Maskana     Open Access  
Mathématiques et sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mayéutica Revista Científica de Humanidades y Artes     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meanjin Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Media Information Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Media International Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Melbourne Journal of Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mémoire(s), identité(s), marginalité(s) dans le monde occidental contemporain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Memorias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meridional : Revista Chilena de Estudios Latinoamericanos     Open Access  
methaodos.revista de ciencias sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Methodological Innovations     Open Access  
Methods, Data, Analyses     Open Access  
México y la Cuenca del Pacífico     Open Access  
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mikarimin. Revista Científica Multidisciplinaria     Open Access  
Mirai : Estudios Japoneses     Open Access  
Miscelánea Comillas. Revista de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
International Journal of Qualitative Methods
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.367
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 28  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1609-4069 - ISSN (Online) 1609-4069
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1087 journals]
  • The Value of Groupwork Knowledge and Skills in Focus Group Research: A
           Focus Group Approach With Marginalized Teens Regarding Access to
           Third-Level Education

    • Authors: Hilary Jenkinson, Pat Leahy, Margaret Scanlon, Fred Powell, Olive Byrne
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article explores the value of applying groupwork expertise and skills in conducting focus group research. It identifies and provides an analysis of comparisons between the arenas of focus group moderation and social groupwork facilitation drawing from literature from both fields. In addition, the article discusses key skills needed by focus group moderators highlighting how these are also foundational social groupwork competencies. The article draws from the authors’ experiences of designing and facilitating focus groups with teenagers as part of a 2-year research study examining the perceptions and experiences of young people from marginalized communities in relation to accessing third-level education. In light of this analysis, the authors assert that some developments in focus group research methodology have resulted in a greater degree of alignment between these two spheres and that focus group moderation is enhanced and rendered increasingly effective when groupwork skills, knowledge, and insights are employed.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-10-17T07:09:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919881853
       
  • Looking Inside the Out-of-Hours Primary Care Consultation: General
           Practitioners’ and Researchers’ Experiences of Using Video
           Observations as a Method

    • Authors: Annelies Colliers, Samuel Coenen, Roy Remmen, Hilde Philips, Sibyl Anthierens
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Video recording primary care consultations is a promising and valuable method to provide rich data on actual patient–doctor interactions. Video recording for research purposes has not yet been used in out-of-hours (OOH) primary care. To obtain a high grade of participation of general practitioners (GPs), a good understanding on how to organize such a study is essential. We performed qualitative research to explore in what way it would be acceptable to GPs to video record their consultations in OOH. We used semistructured interviews with 17 GPs before setting up video observations. Using this input, we then conducted video observations with an evaluation afterward. We reflected back on the video recordings through a written open-ended questionnaire and during face-to-face elicitation interviews with the 21 participating GPs in the video observations. In addition, we share our experiences from a researchers’ view, by describing experiences, advantages, and disadvantages of choices made during the video observations. The stakeholders were involved from the beginning of the setup of the study and it was codesigned with them. Taking into account, their suggestions and concerns led to a high level of participation and successful data collection. We learned that most GPs are willing to participate in a video observation study as they think it could be educational for themselves and research. Nevertheless, because their personal identity is often intertwined with their job as a GP, they feel a bit exposed to criticism but at the same time they are willing to overcome this fear for the purpose of the study. There is also a fear of being judged against a standard way of consulting. GPs describe certain conditions that must be addressed in order for them to participate such as no extra burden to the workload, discrete camera position, and a safe environment for themselves and patients.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-30T09:31:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919879341
       
  • Conducting the Pilot Study: A Neglected Part of the Research Process'
           Methodological Findings Supporting the Importance of Piloting in
           Qualitative Research Studies

    • Authors: Johan Malmqvist, Kristina Hellberg, Gunvie Möllås, Richard Rose, Michael Shevlin
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      During the development of research to compare the processes and impact of inclusive education in Sweden with results obtained from a study undertaken in Ireland, a pilot study was conducted and documented. The pilot study had three aims: (1) to gather data to provide guidance for a substantive study adapted to Swedish conditions through modification of Irish research procedures and instruments, (2) to critically interrogate how we as researchers could most effectively conduct a pilot study utilizing observational and video-recorded data, and (3) to use the Irish theoretical model as a tool of analysis for studying inclusion in two Swedish schools. Although pilot studies are frequently conducted to assess the efficacy of research instruments for use in qualitative research projects, few publications have drawn upon empirical findings related to such studies. Additionally, while methodological texts recommend the use of pilot studies in qualitative research, there is a lack of reported research focusing on how to conduct such pilot studies. We argue that our methodological findings may contribute to greater awareness of the important role that a pilot study may have for full-scale qualitative research projects, for example, in case study research where semi-structured qualitative interviews are used. This argument is based on the assumption that researchers, and especially novice researchers, having conducted a pilot study will be better informed and prepared to face the challenges that are likely to arise in the substantive study and more confident in the instruments to be used for data collection. A proper analysis of the procedures and results from the pilot study facilitates the identification of weaknesses that may be addressed. A carefully organized and managed pilot study has the potential to increase the quality of the research as results from such studies can inform subsequent parts of the research process.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-25T11:48:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919878341
       
  • Biographical Collage as a Tool in Inuit Community-Based Participatory
           Research and Capacity Development

    • Authors: S. Dutton, C. M. Davison, M. Malla, S. Bartels, K. Collier, K. Plamondon, E. Purkey
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      As a method in arts-based qualitative research, the collage technique has been previously utilized for data generation, elicitation, analysis, and presentation of results. Collage has also been used as a self-reflective, development exercise within community-based research due to its abstract and creative self-exploratory style. Although previously used in research with a variety of populations, there is limited evidence of applying the collage technique with First Nation, Inuit, or Métis peoples, even though many other arts-based methods, such as photovoice, have been used. This article describes the use of biographical collage as part of a community-based research project in a northern Canadian Inuit community. The technique was used as an exercise for building leadership capacity, as an elicitation technique in cross-cultural qualitative interviews, and as a decolonizing process in community-based participatory research. With the description of an in-depth example, this article showcases many benefits of using the collage technique when engaging in cross-cultural community-based research with Inuit.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-25T11:43:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919877307
       
  • Blending Video-Reflexive Ethnography With Solution-Focused Approach: A
           Strengths-Based Approach to Practice Improvement in Health Care

    • Authors: J. Mesman, K. Walsh, L. Kinsman, K. Ford, D. Bywaters
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Professionals seldom discuss those things that go well-rather the focus is often on problems, poor outcomes, and what does not go well. Exnovation is about illuminating the invisible or hidden strengths of existing practices in order to improve practice and is central to the contemporary, qualitative elicitation method: video-reflexive ethnography (VRE). VRE is a method to explore and articulate the taken for granted by means of short video clips of one’s own work practice that provides a basis for sharing experiences, assumptions, questions, and concerns about the way things are done in order to effect practice improvement. Reflexivity is key to the method. The creation of a safe space for this shared reflexivity is essential. Improvement activities frequently draw upon problem-focused approaches that imply blame and fault. Such approaches can serve to close down discussion, give rise to anxiety, and inhibit the very improvements sought. In contrast, a strengths-based, solution-focused approach serves to create the safe place where shared practices, rather than individuals, are the center of attention. By focusing on what works well practitioners are encouraged to identify and build on existing strengths. A solution-focused approach used alongside VRE provides a scaffold for building improvement that is relevant to context. In this article, we discuss exnovation, the elicitation method of video-reflexivity, and the incorporation of a strengths-based solution-focused approach with VRE. We highlight the transformative and complementary qualities of these methods and draw upon practical examples from health care to demonstrate how they serve to strengthen and enhance each other.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-25T11:40:07Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919875277
       
  • Implementation of a Calorie Menu Labeling Policy in Public Hospitals:
           Study Protocol for a Multiple Case Study

    • Authors: Claire Kerins, Catherine Houghton, Sheena McHugh, Fiona Geaney, Elaine Toomey, Catherine Hayes, Ivan J. Perry, Colette Kelly
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Background:Promotion of good nutrition is essential for reducing the risk of chronic disease and premature death. Evidence shows menu labeling interventions should be implemented in workplaces as part of a comprehensive approach to improve employees’ dietary habits; however, implementation challenges have arisen. This article describes a protocol for a multiple case study to explore the factors that impact on implementation of a calorie menu labeling policy in Irish public hospitals.Methods:Using a multiple case study design, comprising four Irish acute public hospitals, this study will draw on multiple perspectives and sources of evidence (observations followed by interviews, focus groups, and documentary analysis) to allow for a comprehensive depth and breadth of inquiry. Data collection and analysis will be guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research, bringing together constructs from implementation theories to understand the complexity of implementing policies. Hospitals will be categorized into high and low implementers of the policy based on quantitative data obtained from structured observations. Using framework analysis, within- and cross-case analyses will be performed to identify factors influencing policy implementation and to identify distinguishing patterns across high and low implementers and across hospital direct and indirect stakeholders. Strategies will be employed to ensure rigorous case study research, for example, triangulation, audit trail, reflexivity, and thick descriptions. An integrated knowledge translation approach, where researchers work with stakeholders throughout the research process, will be adopted to facilitate the translation of research into policy and practice.Discussion:This protocol highlights methodological insights in utilizing case study research to gain a greater understanding of the menu labeling implementation process. Study findings will be relevant to policy makers and other stakeholders involved in the rollout of such interventions and will provide a foundation to select and tailor implementation strategies to assist with scale-up of calorie menu labeling across the health service.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-24T10:31:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919878339
       
  • Lived Experiences of a Community: Merging Interpretive Phenomenology and
           Community-Based Participatory Research

    • Authors: Erin J. Bush, Reshmi L. Singh, Sarah Kooienga
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Community-based participatory research (CBPR) and interpretive phenomenology, when merged, can provide insight into the experiences of a homogenous community. The purpose of this manuscript is 2-fold. First, we aim to provide a conceptual view of merging methodological approaches of phenomenology and CBPR. Principles of interpretive phenomenology, the philosophical stance, and the qualitative analysis methodology, as well as how interpretive phenomenology is complementary to CBPR, are reviewed. Second, the utility, rationale, and feasibility of merging these diverse approaches are explored. For illustrative purposes, exemplars from a Parkinson’s disease stakeholder study are used to discuss aims, methods, and results. Focus group data collection strategies and the use of Template Analysis as an analytic tool are also described. Themes that materialized from the data focused on support group experiences for this rural community. In keeping with interpretive phenomenology, the researchers’ interpretation of these themes led to the understanding of an overall essence, or essential theme, of this community’s lived experiences.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-24T10:26:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919875891
       
  • The Boundaries of Research in an Authoritarian State

    • Authors: Saltanat Janenova
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article provides a reflective analysis of a local scholar on methodological challenges of conducting research in Kazakhstan — a post-Soviet, authoritarian, Central Asian country. It specifically addresses the problems of getting access to government officials and the quality of data, describes the strategies applied by the researcher to mitigate these obstacles, and discusses the impact of the political environment on decisions relating to the research design, ethical integrity, safety of participants and researchers, and publication dilemma. This article will be of interest both for researchers who are doing or planning to conduct research in Kazakhstan and Central Asia and those who are researching in nondemocratic contexts as methodological challenges of an authoritarian regime stretch beyond the geographical boundaries.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-16T09:03:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919876469
       
  • Considering Words and Phrasing in the Way We Write: Furthering the Social
           Justice Agenda Through Relational Practice

    • Authors: Michele Wood, Linda Liebenberg
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-13T11:18:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919877015
       
  • Using Zoom Videoconferencing for Qualitative Data Collection: Perceptions
           and Experiences of Researchers and Participants

    • Authors: Mandy M. Archibald, Rachel C. Ambagtsheer, Mavourneen G. Casey, Michael Lawless
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Advances in communication technologies offer new opportunities for the conduct of qualitative research. Among these, Zoom—an innovative videoconferencing platform—has a number of unique features that enhance its potential appeal to qualitative and mixed-methods researchers. Although studies have explored the use of information and communication technologies for conducting research, few have explored both researcher and participant perspectives on the use of web and videoconferencing platforms. Further, data are lacking on the benefits and challenges of using Zoom as a data collection method. In this study, we explore the feasibility and acceptability of using Zoom to collect qualitative interview data within a health research context in order to better understand its suitability for qualitative and mixed-methods researchers. We asked 16 practice nurses who participated in online qualitative interviews about their experiences of using Zoom and concurrently recorded researcher observations. Although several participants experienced technical difficulties, most described their interview experience as highly satisfactory and generally rated Zoom above alternative interviewing mediums such as face-to-face, telephone, and other videoconferencing services, platforms, and products. Findings suggest the viability of Zoom as a tool for collection of qualitative data because of its relative ease of use, cost-effectiveness, data management features, and security options. Further research exploring the utility of Zoom is recommended in order to critically assess and advance innovations in online methods.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-11T11:56:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919874596
       
  • The Use of Autoscopy From the Epistemological Perspective of Action
           Research for Self-Analysis and Reflection of Teacher Practice

    • Authors: Daniela Maysa de Souza, Vânia Marli Schubert Backes, Marta Lenise do Prado, Jussara Gue Martini, José Luis Medina Moya
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The video recording of lessons allows the analysis results to provide data about the teaching practice. Analyzing the pedagogical practice itself allows the teacher an exercise of self-reflection, as they become aware of their behavior in the classroom, leading to the revitalization of their teaching model. This study aims to present the use of autoscopy as a stimulus to reflection, to a new understanding of the pedagogical practice of teachers, in an action research. This is a case study, with a qualitative and descriptive approach, performed with a new nursing teacher. The data were initially collected through a semistructured biographical interview and subsequent video recording of the classes, characterizing nonparticipant observations. The application of autoscopy followed the proposal of action research, with its phases: exploratory phase, in-depth research, action phase, and evaluation phase. The autoscopy was a useful strategy to stimulate teacher reflection because during the projection of the sketches selected for the video of the autoscopy session, the teacher can see himself or herself in action and self-analyze and discuss the selected pedagogical moments, stimulating reflection and generating a new understanding about his or her teaching practice. In this way, the use of autoscopy under the epistemological perspective of action research stimulates the self-analysis and reflection of the teaching practice.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T06:23:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919873247
       
  • Guidance for Research on Social Isolation, Loneliness, and Participation
           Among Older People: Lessons From a Mixed Methods Study

    • Authors: Julie Dare, Celia Wilkinson, Robert Donovan, Johnny Lo, Marie-Louise McDermott, Helen O’Sullivan, Ruth Marquis
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article provides methodological guidance to researchers wishing to develop collaborative research projects with local governments and other agencies, by describing the process adopted in a mixed methods study conducted in the City of Wanneroo (the City), a local government area in Perth, Western Australia. The study explored factors related to older people’s (60+ years) participation in community-based activities and links between their participation and levels of social isolation, loneliness, and social connectedness. The research incorporated four interrelated stages: (1) an audit of existing programs in the City and program participant characteristics; (2) focus groups with program participants and interviews with nonparticipants; (3) a cross-sectional survey to assess factors associated with participation and links to social isolation, loneliness, and social connectedness; (4) face-to-face interviews with survey respondents screened at risk for loneliness. Methodological recommendations are provided to guide future collaborative research with local authorities, program developers, and administrators, aimed at minimizing social isolation and loneliness among older people. These include the need for clear communication and documentation of mutually agreed research objectives and responsibilities from project initiation to completion, identifying and working with local agencies to maximize recruitment among “hard to reach” groups, understanding the dimensions of loneliness addressed in the selected instrument used to screen for loneliness, and integrating innovative data collection techniques when working with vulnerable groups such as socially isolated older people.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T06:09:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919872914
       
  • Working With Photo Installation and Metaphor: Re-Visioning Photovoice
           Research

    • Authors: Sarah Switzer
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The proliferation of participatory visual methods (PVMs) in applied research has highlighted new ways of seeing and thinking about research. A core tenant of PVMs is the situated, collaborative, reflexive, and co-constructed nature of the work and resulting findings. However, as these methods gain popularity, there can be a disparity between how PVMs are theorized, imagined, and facilitated. Although the facilitated and reflexive nature of PVMs is generally understood by practitioners, researchers seldom report on pedagogical design of their projects, even though the facilitation of a method, and a researcher’s own lens and orientation to photography will influence the production and reading of images. To achieve greater congruence between paradigm and practice, it may be important to return to fundamental questions about the role of facilitation and the process of crafting and exhibiting images in photovoice in relation to one’s study aims. In this article, I explore the crafted role of image-making in the context of a photovoice project that asked stakeholders to visualize engagement in the local HIV sector. Participants created and exhibited 63 photographs and narratives that relied heavily on metaphor as a crafted strategy. They also created three site-specific photo installations. Through detailing our facilitated process, I illustrate how certain design elements (influenced by my pedagogical and theoretical orientations toward co-theorizing) created the necessary conditions for participants to visualize their ideas through metaphor and installation. In turn, the exhibited images and associated installations created new opportunities for synthesis, dialogue, and dissemination. I conclude with a theoretical discussion of the possibilities for taking a crafted and reflexive approach to image-making in photovoice studies.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T06:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919872395
       
  • Exploring Qualitative Methods of Historical Ecology and Their Links With
           Qualitative Research

    • Authors: Aarón Moisés Santana-Cordero, Péter Szabó
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      A review of the historical ecology literature led us to the realization that there was an important gap in terms of recognized methodological procedures and techniques. Contributions along these lines are sparse. However, some publications (book chapters and papers), some of them case studies, contain methodological material of great interest. Therefore, all these materials needed to be gathered together and put in a historical ecology methodological context. With this in mind, this article focuses on the methods employed to date in historical ecology when working with qualitative and graphic materials. In addition, it incorporates an exploration of the links between these methods and those used in general in qualitative research. Historical ecology requires source criticism methods (a source critical approach which offers guidelines for both source and source reliability assessment) and time line–based methods for landscape change. Some of the techniques used in historical ecology, but not originate from it, are presented (historical maps, photointerpretation, repeat photography, and oral history). The methodological links between historical ecology and qualitative research are then explored, and, finally, a method for text analysis (thematic networks) is presented.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-30T06:25:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919872112
       
  • When Women Study Men: Gendered Implications for Qualitative Research

    • Authors: Maya Lefkowich
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      As a White cis female researcher, I am often asked about my capacity to conduct meaningful, credible, and safe research with men. Questions often center on my experiences in men’s spaces, ability to understand or represent men’s experiences, and safety protocols to mitigate against looming threats of male-perpetrated violence. I am curious about how my gender continues to be a point of contention in my role as a qualitative researcher. In this meta-analysis and commentary article, I explore my experiences in relation to other female researchers who study men and who have published articles reflecting on gender norms in research practice. With examples taken from the contexts of fieldwork, qualitative interviews, and presentation of findings, this article illustrates the nuanced and often invisible power and gender dynamics that inform how methodological decisions are made, what is found or synthesized from qualitative data, and how problematic social norms are reinforced. I argue that, within the context of research about men and masculinities, researchers must be responsible for reflecting on and confronting gender norms as a part of their intersectional experiences of privilege and oppression. Specifically, researchers can use reflexive practice and field journaling to better understand how gender norms and uneven power dynamics are introduced to, co-constructed within, and generated from qualitative studies. These reflections and concerted efforts to confront broader social injustices imbedded in research practices are necessary for researchers to produce sound data and promote reciprocal research benefits. Without such efforts, researchers may reinforce the same structures of power and stereotypical gender norms that they aim to disrupt in their scholarship.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-29T05:36:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919872388
       
  • “Only Applies to Research Conducted in Sweden…”: Dilemmas in Gaining
           Ethics Approval in Transnational Qualitative Research

    • Authors: Gabriele Griffin, Doris Leibetseder
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Transnational research funders such as the European Commission and NordForsk increasingly require researchers to conduct transnational research. Yet, there is little research on what this means for seeking ethics approval, not least for qualitative researchers. Much work on ethics approval comes from Canada, the United States, and other Anglophone countries, often in a health-related context, and centers on issues between researchers and research ethics boards (REBs), or on inconsistent or inappropriate decision-making by REBs. Ethical conduct within research has, of course, generated a rich literature but not on gaining ethics approval when conducting qualitative transnational research. Rather, the underlying situation usually is that the research is conducted in the same geopolitical space as where the REB is located. Drawing on two cases studies, in which researchers located in one country, Sweden, sought ethics approval to conduct research in other European countries, we explore some of the challenges that we faced in gaining such approval and provide some suggestions how this process might be made both more efficient and more productive for researchers and research funders alike.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-27T08:50:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919869444
       
  • Using Two-Eyed Seeing in Research With Indigenous People: An Integrative
           Review

    • Authors: A. L. Wright, C. Gabel, M. Ballantyne, S. M. Jack, O. Wahoush
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Background:The Two-Eyed Seeing approach has been advocated for use in research with Indigenous people as it creates a space for Western and Indigenous ways of knowing to come together using the best of both worldviews to aid understanding and solve problems. Foundational literature presents its use as a promising way to promote ethical exchanges between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people, but the practical application of its concepts to research remains vague.Method:This integrative review, using the Whittemore and Knafl approach, describes the state of the literature pertaining to the interpretation and application of Two-Eyed Seeing. Following a search of the literature, 37 articles were selected for inclusion, and primary studies (n = 11) were critiqued for quality. Data were extracted, analyzed, and synthesized into themes.Results:Three themes were compiled from the literature including (a) defining characteristics of Two-Eyed Seeing, (b) suggested attributes of those engaging with Two-Eyed Seeing, and (c) the application of Two-Eyed Seeing in research.Conclusions:This review demonstrates inconsistencies in how to date researchers have interpreted and applied Two-Eyed Seeing in research with Indigenous people. The collection of key attributes of researchers and application procedures to research discussed in this review present a new standard for the application of Two-Eyed Seeing to research with Indigenous people. Researchers using Two-Eyed Seeing should thoroughly describe their application of its concepts to promote its maturation into a well-defined framework for research with Indigenous people.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-20T11:21:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919869695
       
  • Social Identity Map: A Reflexivity Tool for Practicing Explicit
           Positionality in Critical Qualitative Research

    • Authors: Danielle Jacobson, Nida Mustafa
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The way that we as researchers view and interpret our social worlds is impacted by where, when, and how we are socially located and in what society. The position from which we see the world around us impacts our research interests, how we approach the research and participants, the questions we ask, and how we interpret the data. In this article, we argue that it is not a straightforward or easy task to conceptualize and practice positionality. We have developed a Social Identity Map that researchers can use to explicitly identify and reflect on their social identity to address the difficulty that many novice critical qualitative researchers experience when trying to conceptualize their social identities and positionality. The Social Identity Map is not meant to be used as a rigid tool but rather as a flexible starting point to guide researchers to reflect and be reflexive about their social location. The map involves three tiers: the identification of social identities (Tier 1), how these positions impact our life (Tier 2), and details that may be tied to the particularities of our social identity (Tier 3). With the use of this map as a guide, we aim for researchers to be able to better identify and understand their social locations and how they may pose challenges and aspects of ease within the qualitative research process. Being explicit about our social identities allows us (as researchers) to produce reflexive research and give our readers the tools to recognize how we produced the data. Being reflexive about our social identities, particularly in comparison to the social position of our participants, helps us better understand the power relations imbued in our research, further providing an opportunity to be reflexive about how to address this in a responsible and respectful way.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-19T09:33:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919870075
       
  • Rigorous and Ethical Qualitative Data Reuse: Potential Perils and
           Promising Practices

    • Authors: Cheryl N. Poth
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-09T08:52:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919868870
       
  • Analytic Methods’ Considerations for the Translation of Sensitive
           Qualitative Data From Mandarin Into English

    • Authors: Szu-Szu Ho, Aisha Holloway, Rosie Stenhouse
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Background:In non-English or cross-cultural qualitative research, scholars have long debated the impact of involving translators on the transfer of meanings during the process of translation between languages. The management of sensitive data can even further complicate the research process when translators outside the research team are involved in the translation.Purpose:To discuss a translation method, which is drawn from a qualitative study, for managing sensitive qualitative data and enhancing research transparency.Method:Translation approach in qualitative research.Findings:The use of this translation method was revealed in this study to (1) enhance the researcher’s prolonged engagement with the data and intimate understanding of the meanings underlying participants’ experience, (2) to increase the transparency of qualitative data interpretation and analysis, (3) to facilitate sensitizing cultural nuances and finding meaning and concept equivalence during the process of data translation and analysis, and (4) to handle data more sensitively.Implications:This article has implications for the understanding of how researchers can work as an analyst and translator to develop research findings without the loss of meaning, to enhance transparency during the translation process, and to manage data more sensitively.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-09T08:50:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919868354
       
  • An Application of Two-Eyed Seeing to Community-Engaged Research With
           Indigenous Mothers

    • Authors: A. L. Wright, C. Gabel, R. Bomberry, O. Wahoush
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The Two-Eyed Seeing framework advocates viewing the world with one eye grounded in Indigenous knowledges while the other eye is grounded in Westernized knowledges. Research funding bodies have recently advocated for its use in research with Indigenous peoples, yet its interpretation and application in the literature has been inconsistent. To contribute to its maturation as a framework, this article describes the application of Two-Eyed Seeing to a community-engaged study aimed at understanding how Indigenous mothers experience using health care to meet the health needs of their infants in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. Two-Eyed Seeing was applied to the research while applying the four R’s as suggested by Kirkness and Barnhardt’s: relevance, respect, responsibility, and reciprocity. While providing practical applications of this framework to research with Indigenous mothers and infants in an urban off-reserve setting, this article also contributes an approach to data analysis that incorporates Indigenous and Western knowledges within interpretive description methodology.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-07T11:48:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919866565
       
  • Using Archival Data to Examine Interview Methods: The Case of the Former
           Slave Project

    • Authors: Kathryn Roulston
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Unlike historians, qualitative researchers’ engagement in studies in which archival sources form the core data corpus is less common than the exploration of newly generated data. Following scholars who have argued for secondary analysis of qualitative data, in this article, I illustrate how qualitative researchers might explore archival data methodologically. Examinations of archival records help us think about how research methods change over time and compare approaches to current practice. This article draws on records from the Federal Writers’ Project (FWP), one of the New Deal initiatives launched by President F. D. Roosevelt in the United States. The FWP was a work relief program administered during the Depression years in the 1930s that employed 6,500 white-collar workers as fieldworkers, writers, and editors to solicit stories from 1,000s of men and women across the country, including stories of over 4,000 former slaves. This article focuses on the role of interviewing in the Former Slave Project, examining methodological issues of concern observed by administrators and critics of the project, along with what we might learn and how we might think about these issues in contemporary interview research.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-06T11:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919867003
       
  • An Innovative Three-Step Method for Identifying Exemplars

    • Authors: Rebecca S. Etz, Martha M. Gonzalez, Benjamin F. Crabtree, Sarah R. Reves, Kurt C. Stange
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Purpose:To improve practices in rapidly changing environments, it is helpful to learn from relevant innovators. This article describes a well-defined and adaptable method for discovering innovative cases that inform best practices or positive/negative deviant research.Methods:As part of a national study of innovation in primary care settings, we developed a three-step method for identifying exemplar practices and applied that method to finding a sample of relevant innovators for in-depth case studies from which to draw transportable lessons about improving primary care practice.Results:Relevant, information-rich cases are uncovered using cycles of identification, sampling, and assessment. This cycle is repeated at each step of the defined three-step method. Step 1, a scan of the published literature, assesses both the state-of-the-art and the baseline characteristics of relevant cases; Step 2, a scan of practice settings, draws upon the expert knowledge of key informants to identify additional potentially relevant cases; and Step 3, sample refinement, evaluates potential cases for eligibility, purposeful diversity, and information-rich expressions of defined key domains. Using this three-step method, we identified a national cohort of primary care practice innovators. We found the method to be feasible, practical, and highly successful at identifying information-rich practices from which to draw transportable lessons about practice innovation.Conclusions:The three-step method outlines an effective sampling strategy for identifying innovation exemplars and information-rich cases that exceed measures of central tendency. By leveraging the collective knowledge of innovators, this method can support dynamic research and foster rapid cycle learning.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-05T06:25:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919867794
       
  • Local Positionality in the Production of Knowledge in Northern Uganda

    • Authors: David Mwambari
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article examines the positionality of local stakeholders in the production of knowledge through fieldwork in qualitative research in Northern Uganda. While scholarly literature has evolved on the positionality and experiences of researchers from the Global North in (post)conflict environments, little is known about the positionality and experiences of local stakeholders in the production of knowledge. This article is based on interviews and focus groups with research assistants and respondents in Northern Uganda. Using a phenomenological approach, this article analyzes the positionality and experiences of these research associates and respondents during fieldwork. Three themes emerged from these interviews and are explored in this article: power, fatigue, and safety. This article emphasizes that researchers need to be reflexive in their practices and highlights the need to reexamine how researchers are trained in qualitative methods before going into the field. This article is further critical of the behavior of researchers and how research agendas impact local stakeholders during and after fieldwork.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-08-01T07:39:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919864845
       
  • Explicitation Interview: A Method for Collecting First Person Perspectives
           on Living Alone in Old Age

    • Authors: Maria Grazia Bedin, Fabien Capelli, Marion Droz-Mendelzweig
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      How can older adults (OAs) live at home alone when they have health problems' Growing numbers of OAs live with chronic health problems and yet are determined to remain in their homes as long as possible. The risks associated with living alone are a source of grave concern not only for OAs but also for those around them. Knowing how OAs cope with the risks they face is a central issue for home care and support services. The present article describes the advantages of coupling an existential anthropology approach with an explicitation interview (EI) methodology as a means of understanding the details of how OAs manage their lives at home alone. Using this introspective methodology, we encouraged 20 participants aged 80 years or older to share very detailed elements of their subjective daily life experiences of coping with the risks inherent to their solitary lifestyles. Different types of risk coexisted with one another; some risks were physical, while others were existential. Physical risks appeared to be subordinate to other major fears: loss of identity, disintegration of one’s internal coherence, lack of autonomy and control over one’s personal situation, and decline in self-esteem and self-image. These fears acted as incentives for developing various practical coping mechanisms for their daily lives, including measures that involved taking risks with regard to their physical safety. Using our existential anthropology approach, supported by the EI methodology, we closely examined the details of interviewees’ realities.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-30T11:56:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919865840
       
  • The Nominal Group Technique (NGT) as a Tool for Facilitating
           Pan-Disability Focus Groups and as a New Method for Quantifying Changes in
           Qualitative Data

    • Authors: Jason Olsen
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article reaffirms the value and flexibility of the nominal group technique (NGT) when conducting qualitative focus groups (QFGs). In the project that will be discussed, the methods used expanded the application of the NGT into the realm of pan-disability (i.e., individuals with differing impairments) research. It provides requirements and recommendations for the full inclusion and participation of disabled people into projects where the pertinent source of qualitative data is obtained from QFGs. Furthermore, this article describes innovative additional steps to the NGT that are beneficial to researchers. This includes a method of evaluating the data that is often lost between the NGTs’ stages of initial and final rankings. These new methods ensure pertinent data are not overlooked.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-26T08:50:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919866049
       
  • Episodic Narrative Interview: Capturing Stories of Experience With a
           Methods Fusion

    • Authors: Robin Alison Mueller
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Episodic narrative interview is an innovative, phenomenon-driven research method that was developed by integrating elements from several qualitative approaches in a methods fusion. Episodic narrative interview draws on critically oriented theoretical foundations and principles of experience-centered narrative and includes features from narrative inquiry, semistructured interview, and episodic interview. The purpose of episodic narrative interview is to better understand a phenomenon by generating individual stories of experience about that phenomenon. As such, an episodic narrative interview participant provides nested narrative accounts of their experiences with a social phenomenon, within the context of a bounded situation or episode. In this article, the author details the foundations of the episodic narrative interview approach and describes how the method is designed and implemented. The significance of episodic narrative interview is also explored, especially in terms of the ways in which it produces tightly focused, phenomenon-centered narratives that are reflective of particular bounded circumstances.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-26T08:49:59Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919866044
       
  • Barriers to and Facilitators of Implementing DEPENAS Biopsychosocial
           Intervention in Primary Care: A Study Protocol

    • Authors: Jose María Aiarzaguena Sarriugarte, Maite Espinosa Cifuentes, Idoia Gaminde Inda, Leticia Isla Baranda, Juan Eduardo PedreroJocano, Enrique de la peña Varona, Juan Ignacio del Pozo Garicano, Javier González Lavado, Susana Martinez Vallejo
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Background:Our team has developed a biopsychosocial intervention called DEPENAS that has shown to be effective in primary health care in improving health and quality of life of patients with medically unexplained symptoms. We also found that general practitioners participating in the clinical trial do not use the intervention systematically because of barriers related to psychological determinants among professionals themselves. Based on the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) of Susan Michie, our study aims (1) to identify psychological determinants among professionals who are perceived to be facilitators of or barriers to the systematic and generalized use of the intervention in the consultation room and (2) to design an implementation strategy that considers these determinants and helps us to address them with a series of predesigned and validated techniques.Method:A qualitative exploratory study has been designed based on semistructured individual interviews conducted following a script based on the 14 TDF domains and analyzed in a deductive way. Participants will be doctors and nurses previously trained in the intervention that was put into practice under real-world conditions, from different health centers. Results of the analysis of the interviews will be used as the basis for designing the implementation strategy.Discussion:The implementation of the DEPENAS intervention in primary care to achieve its sustained and widespread use among primary care professionals involves changes in the model of patient care and the model of the health system, toward models that are more in tune with the needs of modern society. Investigating psychological determinants in professionals and addressing them with validated techniques, as part of the strategy for implementing a given intervention, is a novel approach that has the potential to help change the way in which we tackle change in healthcare organizations.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-24T09:10:35Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919865359
       
  • Positionality and Power: Reflexivity in Negotiating the Relationship
           Between Land-Lost Farmers and the Local Government in China

    • Authors: Hongping Lian
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Reflexivity has gained a vital role in qualitative research. Distinct from the extant global literature that explores reflexivity conceptually or practically, gaps are found in China studies and the Chinese literature, where the discussion of reflexivity remains in the conceptual realm while falling short of practical terms. Doing reflexivity entails the self-reflection of the researcher as well as the reflection of the research participants. This article aims to deal with the following questions: What are the respective positions of the researcher and the research participants, and how do they relate to each other' How do such positions and their relatedness affect the research processes and products' Such are the issues of positionality and power. There are studies that focus on either positionality or power, respectively. What remains underdiscussed is the complexities incurred by the combination of positionality and power when the relationship between two distinct actors is concerned, especially in the Chinese context. To fill these gaps, this article focuses on the practice of reflexivity in a case study on the relationship between land-lost farmers and the local government in China. Specifically, the core questions regarding positionality and power—of myself and of the research participants—are discussed in terms of how to manage the role of the researcher, how to treat participants’ utterances, and how to manage the power relation between the researcher and the researched as well as the power relations in the field. A key finding is that being reflexive about positionality and power not only substantiates an understanding of China studies for global researchers but also situates the understanding of reflexivity, positionality, and power in a wider global framework, while highlighting the distinctiveness of the interrelated positionality and power in the Chinese context.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-24T09:02:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919864508
       
  • Case Study Method: A Step-by-Step Guide for Business Researchers

    • Authors: Yasir Rashid, Ammar Rashid, Muhammad Akib Warraich, Sana Sameen Sabir, Ansar Waseem
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Qualitative case study methodology enables researchers to conduct an in-depth exploration of intricate phenomena within some specific context. By keeping in mind research students, this article presents a systematic step-by-step guide to conduct a case study in the business discipline. Research students belonging to said discipline face issues in terms of clarity, selection, and operationalization of qualitative case study while doing their final dissertation. These issues often lead to confusion, wastage of valuable time, and wrong decisions that affect the overall outcome of the research. This article presents a checklist comprised of four phases, that is, foundation phase, prefield phase, field phase, and reporting phase. The objective of this article is to provide novice researchers with practical application of this checklist by linking all its four phases with the authors’ experiences and learning from recently conducted in-depth multiple case studies in the organizations of New Zealand. Rather than discussing case study in general, a targeted step-by-step plan with real-time research examples to conduct a case study is given.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-24T08:45:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919862424
       
  • “A Space Where People Get It”: A Methodological Reflection of
           

    • Authors: Ellis Furman, Amandeep K. Singh, Ciann Wilson, Fil D’Alessandro, Zev Miller
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article is a methodological reflection of Bye Bye Binary, a community-based participatory research project (CBPR) that explored nonbinary youths’ experiences of identity development, engagement in activism, discrimination, and mental health in Ontario, Canada. The arts-informed method of body mapping was employed in a workshop format to garner the experiences of 10 nonbinary youth (aged 16–25), in conjunction with additional qualitative methods (i.e., individual interviews and reflective notes). Findings suggest that the body-mapping workshop fostered a safe environment that promoted idea generation, affirmation, self-exploration, and connections through a shared identity, thus creating “a space where people get it.” Methodological challenges that arose throughout the process are discussed, including engagement in art as “awkward,” barriers of limited time and funding, participant recruitment, and collaboration and integration. Lastly, the authors reflect on their learnings engaging in CBPR and provide insights into how researchers can move forward and apply these methods and processes into their own work engaging in arts-informed research or with nonbinary individuals.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-22T09:41:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919858530
       
  • The Opportunities and Challenges of Using Photo-Elicitation in
           Child-Centered Constructivist Grounded Theory Research

    • Authors: Brenda Agyeiwaa Poku, Ann-Louise Caress, Susan Kirk
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      In the last three decades, there has been a growing interest in listening to children’s voices in child health research. Ensuring an appropriate level of dialogical engagement with children calls for participatory methods. Auto-driven photo-elicitation interviews (PEIs) are a powerful approach to obtain rich data from children. This article discusses the opportunities and challenges of using auto-driven PEIs in a health-related child-centered constructivist grounded theory study conducted in a poor-resourced country. Our experience shows that while the approach is effective for facilitating co-construction of data with children and for addressing the ethical and methodological issues associated with child-centered research in the context of a developing country, it is narrow on its own. Broadening the term to “picture-elicitation interviews” to allow for the inclusion of other forms of images would make the method more adaptable and inclusive. This would give children the flexibility of choosing pictorial options that best suit them and also help child participants and researchers address the practical and cultural challenges associated with the use of auto-driven PEI in a poor-resourced country.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-22T09:36:08Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919851627
       
  • Why Me' Challenges Associated With Recruiting Participants for a Study
           Focusing on “Wealthy Men”: Reflections From Fieldwork Conducted in
           Tanzania

    • Authors: Kevin Deane, Joyce Wamoyi, Samwel Mgunga, John Changalucha
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      It is well-known that conducting research with elite groups presents a range of unique methodological challenges including gaining access to and recruiting a demographic group that is underrepresented if not entirely absent from most research. This issue is particularly pronounced when the research topic is sensitive or potentially politicized and conducted in low-income settings in which large wealth inequalities are apparent. Drawing on recent experiences from fieldwork conducted in Tanzania that aimed to explore attitudes toward HIV testing among wealthy men, we reflect on significant challenges in the recruitment process. These included the framing of the research project, the (often unspoken) politicized subtext of the (sensitive) research, the socioeconomic climate, and the navigation of time requirements. Our experiences suggest that a careful consideration of these methodological issues will help researchers recruit elite participants and ensure that data are collected from appropriate samples.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-22T09:31:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919849318
       
  • Words, Camera, Music, Action: A Methodology of Digital Storytelling in a
           Health Care Setting

    • Authors: Michael Lang, Catherine Laing, Nancy Moules, Andrew Estefan
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      In this technological age, storytelling is moving from oral and written to digital formats, creating many methodological opportunities for researchers and practitioners. This article explores a specific genre of participatory media production, digital storytelling (DST), which could be a valuable research tool to describe, analyze, and understand the experiences of research participants. Digital stories (DS) are short movies that use images, videos, a voice-over, and various video editing techniques to share an important story from the participant’s life. In a health care setting, DS can be used as knowledge translation tools for education and advocacy, as data to be analyzed in the research process, or as a therapeutic intervention, in any combination, depending on the intent of the project. Although an increasing number of health-related research studies indicate using DST, or some variation of it, there is a glaring paucity of methodologically focused manuscripts in the health care literature. This article delineates and describes four primary phases of DST in a health care context as finding the story, telling the story, crafting the story, and sharing the story. Both the creative and technical considerations of DST facilitation are elucidated through specific examples and practical concepts. By drawing from diverse literature such as narratology, film, and psychotherapy, and exploring new creative tools and ideas to help research participants convey meaning, this article provides a starting point for qualitative researchers to explore the use of DST in their own contexts.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-19T07:02:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919863241
       
  • Patient-Oriented Research and Grounded Theory: A Case Study of How an Old
           Method Can Inform Cutting-Edge Research

    • Authors: Lorraine Smith-MacDonald, Gudrun Reay, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal, Shane Sinclair
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Creating evidence that is both scientifically rigorous and patient oriented in addressing patients’ needs is essential to informing health-care professionals’ practice and meeting patient needs. Patient-oriented research (POR) aims to address this 2-fold mandate by engaging and incorporating patients’ voices throughout the research process through a variety of techniques. Currently, there is little methodological rigor or guidance to help qualitative patient-oriented researchers design, collect, and analyze patient data. Classical grounded theory (GT) is arguably one of the most rigorous qualitative research methods, focusing on the development of theory from data grounded in participants’ voices. As such, classical GT is an ideal methodological approach for conducting POR due to its rigor, patient-oriented focus, and generation of an empirical model focused on the topic of interest. The purpose of this article is to describe the convergence and divergence between classical GT and POR, based on the current literature and pragmatically through an ongoing classical GT study focused on combat veterans’ perspective on Operational Stress Injuries (OSIs). By describing the methodological principles and their implementation in a POR study, we provide readers with both substantive and practical knowledge to utilize classical GT in POR studies, particularly within study populations that may be averse to or experience challenges in participating in research. Classical GT therefore provides patient-oriented researchers with a pragmatic methodological framework for engaging patients and generating rigorous evidence.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T07:08:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919863172
       
  • Negotiations Between Chinese Gay Men and Lesbians and Their Parents About
           Marriage

    • Authors: Ning Xuan, Cheung Chau Kiu, Guo Sijia
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article aims to demonstrate how critical discourse analysis (CDA) can be used for studying and analyzing self-identified gay men’s and lesbians’ (simplified as gays and lesbians in the following) marriage challenges. Chinese gay men and lesbians face many challenges, among which marriage is conceivably their top concern. The majority of these individuals must negotiate this issue with their parents. Discourses woven by gays and lesbians to influence their parents are crucial for understanding how they negotiate this issue. Such an understanding is the focus of the present study of 20 participants including 10 lesbians and 10 gay men in China. This study applies CDA to unveil the functions, linguistic techniques, and ideological bases of gay men’s and lesbians’ discourses in negotiation. The application demonstrates the strength of CDA in analyzing how people use language to produce and construct identities and activities. The current research advances the use of CDA not only by taking the initiative of using it to study this emerging issue but also by incorporating the analysis of inherent discursive ideologies.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-17T07:02:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919862732
       
  • Six Insights to Make Better Academic Conference Posters

    • Authors: Bailey J. Sousa, Alexander M. Clark
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-11T07:07:52Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919862370
       
  • Challenges and Negotiations of a Young, Female, and Unmarried Researcher:
           Reflections on Fieldwork in South Korea

    • Authors: YoonKyung Kwak
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article presents my personal reflections on the process of conducting fieldwork as part of my PhD research into participant recruitment in South Korea. I discuss the challenges and negotiations I faced during my PhD fieldwork. The aim is to examine the following three issues: (1) obstacles faced in gaining entry to the fieldwork sample when conducting research in my own country, (2) the influence of my personal identity (i.e., my gender, race, class, religion, nationality, and age) on my fieldwork experiences, and (3) the research process itself and the strategies I used to overcome my vulnerability and marginality. I conclude by raising several ethical considerations and dilemmas, followed by a discussion of the significant implications of the study topic in terms of researcher safety and well-being when undertaking fieldwork and how this can be ameliorated.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-05T09:25:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919860388
       
  • Handling “Hot Potatoes”: Ethical, Legal, Safeguarding, and Political
           Quandaries of Researching Drug-Using Offenders

    • Authors: Beverly Love, Arlene Vetere, Paul Davis
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Conducting qualitative field research involving drug users within a politicized criminal justice setting presents a unique set of ethical, legal, and safeguarding concerns and quandaries for researchers. There is a paucity of qualitative research with community-based drug-using offenders who form part of the UK Government (England and Wales) criminal justice strategies (Senker and Green; Hucklesby and Wincup). Hodgson, Parker, and Seddon highlighted this group as an emerging study population. This article aims to provide a more recent contribution covering the difficulties of accessing and researching with a hard to reach and politicized criminal justice drug-using population, such as risks of re-traumatization, risk assessment, safeguarding, criminal disclosure, and personal safety. The first author reflects on her research from her own unique political position as a policy advisor to the UK Government on criminal justice drug policy, with a view to providing recommendations for research with a hard to reach and hidden population who represent a marginalized group. The combination of reflexivity in research and the use of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis as a research methodology proved helpful in addressing and overcoming some of these ethical, political, and other quandaries.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-05T08:55:23Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919859713
       
  • Data Analysis and Synthesis Within a Realist Evaluation: Toward More
           Transparent Methodological Approaches

    • Authors: Brynne Gilmore, Eilish McAuliffe, Jessica Power, Frédérique Vallières
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Realist evaluations are increasingly used in the study of complex health interventions. The methodological procedures applied within realist evaluations however are often inexplicit, prompting scholars to call for increased transparency and more detailed description within realist studies. This publication details the data analysis and synthesis process used within two realist evaluation studies of community health interventions taking place across Uganda, Tanzania, and Kenya. Using data from several case studies across all three countries and the data analysis software NVivo, we describe in detail how data were analyzed and subsequently synthesized to refine middle-range theories. We conclude by discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the approach taken, providing novel methodological recommendations. The aim of providing this detailed descriptive account of the analysis and synthesis in these two studies is to promote transparency and contribute to the advancement of realist evaluation methodologies.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-03T09:39:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919859754
       
  • Reflections on Life Design Narrative Inquiry as a Methodology for Research
           With Child Sex Trafficking Survivors

    • Authors: Anja Visser, Petro du Preez, Shan Simmonds
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      At present, there is a dearth of primary data on the experiences of the child survivors of trafficking for sexual exploitation. Qualitative research methodologies are needed to help researchers and practitioners from a variety of disciplines to understand the complex issues associated with child sex trafficking (CST), to gain greater insight into the nature of this problem, and to devise strategies to combat this form of trafficking. In this article, we report on our use of a synthesized methodology, life design narrative inquiry (LDNI), as a way to generate primary data on the experiences of the survivors. This methodology enables researchers to do research with CST survivors to gain a deeper insight into the nature of trafficking to devise strategies in different disciplines to combat this form of trafficking. Reflections on employing LDNI with child trafficking survivors revealed that this methodology is context sensitive, takes on an individualistic perspective, and leads to rich descriptions of CST survivors’ experiences. Reflections on ethical challenges revealed that gaining access to CST survivors is a complex process, protecting both the participants and the researchers against harm is challenging and that keeping confidentiality of participants is extremely important.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-07-01T09:32:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919857553
       
  • A Student and Postqualitative Inquiry Walk Into a Bar: Syncretistic
           Methodology and Practices of Becoming-Researcher

    • Authors: Zachary T. Smith
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      In this essay, I playfully engage the reflections of scholars pursuing postqualitative inquiry by presenting how I employed methodological syncretism as a practice of figuration. I show how I enacted a “groping experimentation” with postqualitative research in the leisure context of a brewery, combining the conventional humanistic qualitative method of ethnographic observation with the new materialist and posthumanist sensibilities of postqualitative inquiry. I share how I engaged my body to join in the affective sociomateriality of a drinking establishment, attending to the object materiality and performativity of beer as it sluiced its way through tap lines, synced up with the sonic waves of background music, and danced its way around the silicate of pint glasses before sliding down esophagi, into capillaries, and slipping between the cracks of conversation. Ruminating on this syncretistic practice, I grapple with the multiple subjectivities of the researcher-literature-field assemblage, the possibility of “observing” material actors, and the incommensurability of methodological syncretism. I speculate that (1) methodological syncretism, while ontologically and epistemologically unintelligible, may work as a strategy of researcher-becoming and (2) a fallibilistic attitude fosters freedom to play with methodological knowledge/practice, recognizing the possibility that such play might produce different ways of knowing, being, and doing (research).
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-26T08:52:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919852001
       
  • Studying Problematic Online Behavior of Adolescents With Mild Intellectual
           Disabilities and Borderline Intellectual Functioning: Methodological and
           Ethical Considerations for Data Collection

    • Authors: Rogier de Groot, Hendrien L. Kaal, Wouter Ph Stol
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      The aim of this study is to find a research method that results in capturing lived experiences of problematic online behavior of adolescents with mild intellectual disabilities and borderline intellectual functioning within four risk domains: commercial interests, aggression, sexuality, and values/ideology. Three research methods were examined and field-tested in small sample pilot studies: an online questionnaire (N = 16), two focus group interviews (N = 6 and N = 14), and a combination of participatory observations and visual elicitation (N = 2). Both the questionnaire and the focus group studies were not able to generate sufficient knowledge to capture lived experiences. Key issues that arose were the respondents’ comprehension of the research questions, their tendency to give socially desirable answers, the influence of group dynamics, and a lack of rapport between researcher and respondent. Results generated from the third pilot study were more promising. Participatory observations in the form of deep hanging out combined with conversational interviewing and elements of visual elicitation mended these issues and helped to create an authentic research environment, build real relationships, and level the playing field between researcher and respondents. Additionally, it invited the respondents to voice their opinions and feelings about their online experiences. Finally, the study inspires to use different communicational means with the adolescents to increase the understanding of their virtual world. Some important ethical and methodological limitations to these findings are discussed.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-25T05:42:18Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919857978
       
  • Corrigendum

    • Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-21T08:47:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919861178
       
  • Corrigendum

    • Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-21T08:42:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919861163
       
  • A Feminist and “Outsider” in the Field: Negotiating the Challenges of
           Researching Young Men

    • Authors: Christina Vogels
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      For a number of years, women scholars have documented the difficulties faced when conducting research with male participants. This article contributes to this scholarship by reflecting on fieldwork I conducted with young men from a rural high school in Aotearoa/New Zealand. While the primary aim of this project was to collect moments of young men’s talk that spoke to their understandings of gendered norms within (hetero)romantic relationships, I also ended up gathering other data in the form of how they interacted with me and each other during our discussions. What resulted were a range of challenges that appeared connected to my “outsider” status. This article exposes these challenges and offers my reflections on why they occurred, how I managed them at the time, and what I learnt in the process.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-14T08:46:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919855907
       
  • Transforming Transcripts Into Stories: A Multimethod Approach to Narrative
           Analysis

    • Authors: Aishath Nasheeda, Haslinda Binti Abdullah, Steven Eric Krauss, Nobaya Binti Ahmed
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      Stories are essential realities from our past and present. As the primary sources of data in narrative research, interview transcripts play an essential role in giving meaning to the personal stories of research participants. The pragmatic narratives found in transcripts represent human experience as it unfolds. Analyzing the narratives found in interview transcripts thus moves beyond providing descriptions and thematic developments as found in most qualitative studies. Crafting stories from interview transcripts involves a complex set of analytic processes. Building on the first author's personal experience in working on a doctoral thesis employing narrative inquiry, this article presents a multimethod restorying framework to narrative analysis. A step-by-step progression within the framework includes choosing interview participants, transcribing interviews, familiarizing oneself with the transcripts (elements of holistic-content reading), chronologically plotting (elements of the story), use of follow-up interviews as a way to collaborate (an important procedure in narrative inquiry), and developing the story through structural analysis. It is hoped that this article will encourage other researchers embarking on narrative analysis to become creative in presenting participants’ lived experiences through meaningful, collaborative strategies. This article demonstrates the fluidity of narrative analysis and emphasizes that there is no single procedure to be followed in attempting to create stories from interview transcripts.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T10:01:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919856797
       
  • A Cohesive Research Approach to Assess Care-Related Quality of Life:
           Lessons Learned From Adapting an Easy Read Survey With Older Service Users
           With Cognitive Impairment

    • Authors: Lyn Phillipson, Louisa Smith, James Caiels, Ann-Marie Towers, Susan Jenkins
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      New or adapted methods and tools are needed to ensure the voices of older people with cognitive impairment and dementia are included in evaluations of care services which aim to support their quality of life (QoL). In this study, cognitive interviewing practices were used with a group of 26 older service users with cognitive impairment from two service providers in New South Wales, Australia, to test and modify the Adult Social Care Outcomes Toolkit Easy Read (ER) survey to improve its suitability for this cohort. We used Antonovsky’s “sense of coherence” framework to describe our research approach and how it was adapted to provide a manageable, meaningful, and comprehensible experience for our participants. While the modified ER format made the survey more comprehensible and meaningful, it was the techniques of cognitive interviewing that made the research approach manageable. We argue that while ER does support the research process for older service users with cognitive impairment, combining ER pictorials with the qualitative interactions with the researcher, in particular cognitive interviewing strategies, is needed to support a cohesive approach to assess care-related QoL in this vulnerable group.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T09:59:30Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919854961
       
  • Conducting Ethnographic Research in Low Literate, Economically Weak
           Underserved Spaces: An Introduction to Iconic Legisigns-Guided
           Interviewing (ILGI)

    • Authors: Uttaran Dutta
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      This article introduces a methodology, “Iconic Legisigns-Guided Interviewing,” which aims at understanding and addressing communicative, cultural, and contextual gaps at the margins that have historically muted underserved populations. Grounded in the theories of visual and sensory research, this new method aims at overcoming the limitations of technology-dependent video-/photograph-elicitation research in geographically isolated regions and seeks to create an open and enabling dialogic environment for illiterate (and low-literate) politicoeconomically marginalized people. This method was developed with active participation of low-literate community members and iteratively tested in underserved spaces of rural Bengal. In this approach, organically cocreated images, more specifically iconic legisigns, were employed as prompts to make interview processes focused and inclusive and to complement conventional semistructured in-depth interviewing. This local-centric method helps research participants to cocreate knowledge, decide discussion pointers, and come up with respondent-generated questions/probes and also seeks to ensure inclusivity and discursive control of participants over the research.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-13T09:56:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919855279
       
  • Plotting Directionality on Positional Maps: A Methodological Consideration
           for Situational Analysis

    • Authors: Megan Meszaros, Desneige Meyer, Lindsey Vold, Wanda Martin
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.
      In this article, we aim to expand situational analysis (SA), oriented by complex adaptive systems (CAS), by adding the dimension of directionality over time to positional maps. This addition furthers the analytic utility of SA and can aid researchers in identifying areas for transformative action regarding social justice and health equity issues. Adding directionality over time to positional maps pushes researchers to explore how positions move, evolve, and how they could continue to develop. Analyzing these elements expands the analytic utility of positional maps as researchers abductively analyze explicit connections between theorized antecedents, current conditions, and potential futures within a CAS to understand positional movements. The purpose of this analysis is not as a predictive tool but as a tool in identifying potential actionable areas for interventions while further grounding SA in its Foucauldian and Straussian theoretical roots. We use an ongoing public health project in the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, Tanzania, to demonstrate how a researcher can apply directionality over time to positional maps.
      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-11T12:26:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919855280
       
  • The Unsayable in Arts-Based Research: On the Praxis of Life Itself

    • Authors: Merel Visse, Finn Hansen, Carlo Leget
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-06T11:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919851392
       
  • Methodological Awareness in Feminist Research: Reclaiming Experiences of
           Hostility in Workplace Studies

    • Authors: Tamika Alana Perrott
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-06T10:15:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919854836
       
  • “Those songs were the ones that made me, nobody asked me this question
           before”: Music Elicitation with ex-gang involved men about their
           experiences of childhood domestic violence and abuse

    • Authors: Jade Levell
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-06-04T09:10:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919852010
       
  • Spiritual Exchange: A Methodology for a Living Inquiry With All Our
           Relations

    • Authors: Victoria Bouvier, Jennifer MacDonald
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T07:02:47Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919851636
       
  • The Gaataa’aabing Visual Research Method: A Culturally Safe Anishinaabek
           Transformation of Photovoice

    • Authors: Beaudin Bennett, Marion Maar, Darrel Manitowabi, Taima Moeke-Pickering, Doreen Trudeau-Peltier, Sheila Trudeau
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-30T06:57:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919851635
       
  • Making Children’s Nursing Practices Visible: Using Visual and
           Participatory Techniques to Describe Family Involvement in the Care of
           Hospitalized Children in Southern African Settings

    • Authors: Natasha North, Stephanie Sieberhagen, Angela Leonard, Candice Bonaconsa, Minette Coetzee
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-29T09:00:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919849324
       
  • Researching Professional Footballers: Reflections and Lessons Learned

    • Authors: Graeme Law
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-28T10:18:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919849328
       
  • Doing Science Differently: A Framework for Assessing the Careers of
           Qualitative Scholars in the Health Sciences

    • Authors: Fiona Webster, Denise Gastaldo, Steve Durant, Joan Eakin, Brenda Gladstone, Janet Parsons, Elizabeth Peter, James Shaw
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-27T05:39:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919838676
       
  • Understanding the Complexity of Diabetes and Urinary Incontinence in Older
           Adults Receiving Home Care Services: Protocol for a Mixed Methods Study

    • Authors: Melissa Northwood, Jenny Ploeg, Maureen Markle-Reid, Diana Sherifali
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-22T09:58:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919852000
       
  • Researching Sensitive Topics in Sensitive Zones: Exploring Silences,
           “The Normal,” and Tolerance in Chile

    • Authors: Marcela Cornejo, Gabriela Rubilar, Pamela Zapata-Sepúlveda
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T10:03:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919849355
       
  • Spaces & Places: Understanding Sense of Belonging and Cultural
           Engagement Among Indigenous Youth

    • Authors: Linda Liebenberg, Darlene Wall, Michele Wood, Daphne Hutt-MacLeod
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T09:59:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919840547
       
  • Abstracts, Oral, and Symposia Presentation for Qualitative Methods
           Conference, 2018

    • Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-16T09:35:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919847040
       
  • Lessons of a Failed Study: Lone Research, Media Analysis, and the
           Limitations of Bracketing

    • Authors: Katherine Gregory
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-15T09:36:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919842450
       
  • The Image of Ethnography—Making Sense of the Social Through Images:
           A Structured Method

    • Authors: Ricardo A. Ayala, Tomas F. Koch
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-10T06:43:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919843014
       
  • The Visualization of Migration

    • Authors: Jeannine Wintzer
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-10T06:24:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919844100
       
  • Getting at Equality: Research Methods Informed by the Lessons of
           Intersectionality

    • Authors: Jane Bailey, Valerie Steeves, Jacquelyn Burkell, Leslie Regan Shade, Rakhi Ruparelia, Priscilla Regan
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-10T06:11:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919846753
       
  • Methodological Challenges Faced in Doing Research With Vulnerable Women:
           Reflections From Fieldwork Experiences

    • Authors: Onouma Thummapol, Tanya Park, Margot Jackson, Sylvia Barton
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-06T09:23:39Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919843022
       
  • Insider and Outsider Analysis: Constructing, Deconstructing, and
           Reconstructing Narratives of Seychelles’ Geography Education

    • Authors: Indra Persaud
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-05-06T09:18:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919842436
       
  • Developing Methods That Facilitate Coding and Analysis of Synchronous
           Conversations via Virtual Environments

    • Authors: Allison A. Lewinski, Ruth A. Anderson, Allison A. Vorderstrasse, Constance M. Johnson
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-24T09:37:45Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919842443
       
  • Introducing Phenomenological Research Methodology in Sustainable
           Consumption Literature: Illustrations From India

    • Authors: Soumyajit Bhar
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-24T09:32:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919840559
       
  • When “Normal” Becomes Normative: A Case Study of Researchers’
           Quotation Errors When Referring to a Focus Group Sample Size Study

    • Authors: Claire Glenton, Benedicte Carlsen
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-23T09:18:01Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919841251
       
  • A Qualitative Interview With Young Children: What Encourages or Inhibits
           Young Children’s Participation'

    • Authors: Yael Ponizovsky-Bergelson, Yael Dayan, Nira Wahle, Dorit Roer-Strier
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-22T11:08:43Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919840516
       
  • The Ubiquity and Invisibility of Research Failures: A Call to Share More

    • Authors: Bailey J. Sousa, Alexander M. Clark
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-22T09:19:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919846977
       
  • A Protocol Paper on the Preservation of Identity: Understanding the
           Technology Adoption Patterns of Older Adults With Age-Related Vision Loss
           (ARVL)

    • Authors: Colleen McGrath, Monica L. Molinaro, Elena J. Sheldrake, Debbie Laliberte Rudman, Arlene Astell
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-18T12:12:58Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919831833
       
  • Method Sequence and Dominance in Mixed Methods Research: A Case Study of
           the Social Acceptance of Wind Energy Literature

    • Authors: Chad Walker, Jamie Baxter
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-12T08:47:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919834379
       
  • “I’ve Been Silenced for so Long”: Relational Engagement and
           Empowerment in a Digital Storytelling Project With Young Women Exposed to
           Dating Violence

    • Authors: Stephanie L. Martin, Jessica McLean, Carolyn Brooks, Karen Wood
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-04-02T11:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919825932
       
  • Comparing Three Methods to Capture Multidimensional Service Experience in
           Children’s Health Care: Video Diaries, Narratives, and Semistructured
           Interviews

    • Authors: Lauri Litovuo, Nina Karisalmi, Leena Aarikka-Stenroos, Johanna Kaipio
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-28T11:57:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919835112
       
  • Elicitation as a Mind-Set: Why Visual Data Matter'

    • Authors: Kerstin Stieber Roger, Constance Blomgren
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-28T10:51:40Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919835378
       
  • When Madness Meets Madness: Insider Reflections on Doing Mental Health
           Research

    • Authors: Matthew S. Johnston
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-27T11:37:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919835356
       
  • Writing Field Notes and Using Them to Prompt Scholarly Writing

    • Authors: Raul Pacheco-Vega
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-22T09:05:24Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919840093
       
  • Mask-Making and Drawing as Method: Arts-Based Approaches to Data
           Collection With War-Affected Children

    • Authors: Amber Green, Myriam Denov
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-22T08:55:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919832479
       
  • Connecting With Clinicians: Developing the 5-Min Digital Download to
           Advance Interpretive Description in Health-Care Research

    • Authors: Tracie L. Risling, Katie Nussbaum, Juan Martinez, Derek Risling
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-06T05:34:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919833482
       
  • Continuing the Conversation: A Second Take on Innovative Elicitation
           Methods

    • Authors: Linda Liebenberg
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-03-01T03:50:41Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919835991
       
  • Taking Policy for Granted in the Context of Scientific Innovation

    • Authors: Torbjörn Friberg, Magnus Englander
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-22T11:48:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919831588
       
  • Unveiling the Unspeakable: Integrating Video Elicitation Focus Group
           Interviews and Participatory Video in an Action Research Project on
           Dementia Care Development

    • Authors: Bing Yu Li, Rainbow Tin Hung Ho
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-22T11:45:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406919830561
       
  • Co-designing Services for Youth With Mental Health Issues: Novel
           Elicitation Approaches

    • Authors: Gillian Mulvale, Sandra Moll, Ashleigh Miatello, Louise Murray-Leung, Karlie Rogerson, Roberto B. Sassi
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-21T11:54:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918816244
       
  • Draw(Me) and Tell: Use of Children’s Drawings as Elicitation Tools to
           Explore Embodiment in the Very Young

    • Authors: Gillian M. Martin
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-21T11:52:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918816230
       
  • Creating a Vocabulary About School-Age Childcare Using Photography

    • Authors: Kevin Bell, Jennifer Cartmel
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-21T11:51:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918811488
       
  • Drawing Careers: The Value of a Biographical Mapping Method in Qualitative
           Health Research

    • Authors: Astrid Schubring, Jochen Mayer, Ansgar Thiel
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-21T11:50:33Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918809303
       
  • Malleable Methodologies: Sculpting and Imagination in Embodied Health
           Research

    • Authors: Debra Kriger
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-02-21T11:49:13Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918804955
       
  • Emerging Researcher Perspectives: Finding Your People: My Challenge of
           Developing a Creative Research Methods Network

    • Authors: Nicole Brown
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-24T07:58:12Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918818644
       
  • Decolonizing Research Paradigms in the Context of Settler Colonialism: An
           Unsettling, Mutual, and Collaborative Effort

    • Authors: Mirjam B. E. Held
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-24T05:41:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918821574
       
  • Abstracts, Oral Presentations for Qualitative Health Research Conference,
           2018

    • Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:46:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918819362
       
  • Arts-Based Engagement Ethnography: An Approach for Making Research
           Engaging and Knowledge Transferable When Working With Harder-to-Reach
           Communities

    • Authors: Suzanne Goopy, Anusha Kassan
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:46:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918820424
       
  • Abstracts, Poster Presentation, Qualitative Health Research Conference,
           2018

    • Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:46:34Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918819364
       
  • Youth as Navigators: A Study Protocol to Incorporate Narrative and Visual
           Methods Into Research on Adolescent Sexual and Gender Development Among
           Syrian and Jordanian Youth

    • Authors: Jewel Gausman, Areej Othman, Maysoon Otoom, Abeer Shaheen, Ana Langer
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:46:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918822220
       
  • Smartphones at Work: A Qualitative Exploration of Psychological
           Antecedents and Impacts of Work-Related Smartphone Dependency

    • Authors: Li Li, Trisha T. C. Lin
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:46:16Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918822240
       
  • Drawing as a Facilitating Approach When Conducting Research Among Children

    • Authors: Elisabeth Søndergaard, Susanne Reventlow
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:46:06Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918822558
       
  • Open Data in Qualitative Research

    • Authors: Amelia Chauvette, Kara Schick-Makaroff, Anita E. Molzahn
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:45:51Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918823863
       
  • Using Reflexive Interviewing to Foster Deep Understanding of Research
           Participants’ Perspectives

    • Authors: Alex Sandro Gomes Pessoa, Erin Harper, Isabela Samogim Santos, Marina Carvalho da Silva Gracino
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-23T05:45:28Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918825026
       
  • Reenvisioning Gifted Education in British Columbia: A Qualitative Research
           Protocol of Policy Analysis in the Context of a Redesigned Curriculum

    • Authors: C. Owen Lo, Yuen Sze Michelle Tan, Megan Chrostowski, Shun-Fu Hu, Diana Chan, Deanna M. Sue, I-Chen Wu, Wei Li
      Abstract: International Journal of Qualitative Methods, Volume 18, Issue , January-December 2019.

      Citation: International Journal of Qualitative Methods
      PubDate: 2019-01-11T06:16:29Z
      DOI: 10.1177/1609406918822233
       
 
 
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