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  Subjects -> SOCIAL SCIENCES (Total: 1605 journals)
    - BIRTH CONTROL (20 journals)
    - CHILDREN AND YOUTH (251 journals)
    - FOLKLORE (30 journals)
    - MATRIMONY (16 journals)
    - MEN'S INTERESTS (17 journals)
    - MEN'S STUDIES (92 journals)
    - SEXUALITY (52 journals)
    - SOCIAL SCIENCES (911 journals)
    - WOMEN'S INTERESTS (44 journals)
    - WOMEN'S STUDIES (172 journals)

SOCIAL SCIENCES (911 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 401 - 136 of 136 Journals sorted alphabetically
International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Synergy and Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal Pedagogy of Social Studies     Open Access  
International Quarterly for Asian Studies     Open Access  
International Review of Qualitative Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
International Review of Social Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Scholarly Research Notices     Open Access   (Followers: 203)
International Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
International Studies. Interdisciplinary Political and Cultural Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Internationale Revue Fur Soziale Sicherheit     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
InterSciencePlace     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigación Valdizana     Open Access  
Investigación y Desarrollo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Investigaciones Geográficas (Esp)     Open Access  
Irish Journal of Applied Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Issues in Social Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ithaca : Viaggio nella Scienza     Open Access  
IULC Working Papers     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access  
JICSA : Journal of Islamic Civilization in Southeast Asia     Open Access  
Journal for New Generation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Semitics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Addiction & Prevention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advanced Academic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Agriculture and Social Research (JASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Agriculture, Forestry and the Social Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
Journal of Applied Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Arabic and Islamic Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Arts and Social Sciences     Open Access  
Journal of ASIAN Behavioural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cognition and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Comparative Social Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Contemporary African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Critical Race inquiry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Cultural Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Cultural Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Development Effectiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Economy Culture and Society     Open Access  
Journal of Educational Social Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Family Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Globalization and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Security     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Humanity     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ilahiyat Researches     Open Access  
Journal of Indian Ocean World Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Interdisciplinary Gender Studies: JIGS     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Iran Cultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Korean Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Language and Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Markets & Morality     Partially Free  
Journal of Mediterranean Knowledge     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Men, Masculinities and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Methods and Measurement in the Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Organisational Transformation & Social Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Pan African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 305, SJR: 4.302, CiteScore: 6)
Journal of Policy Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Poverty and Social Justice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Journal of Progressive Research in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Relationships Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Religion & Spirituality in Social Work: Social Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Research in National Development     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Responsible Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Social Development in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Social Intervention: Theory and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Social Issues     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Social Science Education : JSSE     Open Access  
Journal of Social Science Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Structure     Open Access  
Journal of Social Studies Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Studies in Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Technology in Human Services     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of the Bangladesh Association of Young Researchers     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Polynesian Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the University of Ruhuna     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Transnational American Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Trust Management     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal Sampurasun : Interdisciplinary Studies for Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Abdimas     Open Access  
Jurnal Biometrika dan Kependudukan     Open Access  
Jurnal Ilmiah Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Sosial dan Humaniora     Open Access  
Jurnal Kawistara     Open Access  
Jurnal Lakon     Open Access  
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya     Open Access  
Jurnal Pendidikan Ilmu Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Sosial Humaniora     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Jurnal Teori dan Praksis Pembelajaran IPS     Open Access  
Jurnal Terapan Abdimas     Open Access  
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Kaleidoscope     Open Access  
Kasetsart Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Kervan. International Journal of Afro-Asiatic Studies     Open Access  
Kimün. Revista Interdisciplinaria de Formación Docente     Open Access  
Kırklareli Üniversitesi Sosyal Bilimler Dergisi     Open Access  
Knowledge Management for Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Kontext : Zeitschrift für Systemische Therapie und Familientherapie     Hybrid Journal  
Korea : Politik, Wirtschaft, Gesellschaft     Open Access  
Korean Social Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Kotuitui : New Zealand Journal of Social Sciences Online     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Kulttuurintutkimus     Open Access  
Kulturwissenschaftliche Zeitschrift     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
KZfSS Kölner Zeitschrift für Soziologie und Sozialpsychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
L'Homme. Europäische Zeitschrift für Feministische Geschichtswissenschaft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
L'Ordinaire des Amériques     Open Access  
La Tercera Orilla     Open Access  
Labyrinthe     Open Access  
Language and Intercultural Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Language Resources and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Lavboratorio : Revista de Estudios sobre Cambio Estructural y Desigualdad Social.     Open Access  
Lectio Socialis     Open Access  
Les Cahiers des dix     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Les Cahiers d’EMAM     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Letras Verdes. Revista Latinoamericana de Estudios Socioambientales     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Letters on Evolutionary Behavioral Science     Open Access  
Lex Social : Revista de Derechos Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lilith: A Feminist History Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Liminar. Estudios Sociales y Humanisticos     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Literacy Learning: The Middle Years     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Local-Global: Identity, Security, Community     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Loisir et Société / Society and Leisure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Lucero     Open Access  
Lúdicamente     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lutas Sociais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Lwati : A Journal of Contemporary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Macedon Digest, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Maine Policy Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Maskana     Open Access  
Mathématiques et sciences humaines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Mayéutica Revista Científica de Humanidades y Artes     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
McNair Scholars Research Journal     Open Access  
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Meanjin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Meanjin Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Media Information Australia     Full-text available via subscription  
Media International Australia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Media International Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Melbourne Journal of Politics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Mémoire(s), identité(s), marginalité(s) dans le monde occidental contemporain     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Memorias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Meridional : Revista Chilena de Estudios Latinoamericanos     Open Access  
methaodos.revista de ciencias sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Methodological Innovations     Open Access  
Methods, Data, Analyses     Open Access  
México y la Cuenca del Pacífico     Open Access  
Middle East Journal of Culture and Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Mikarimin. Revista Científica Multidisciplinaria     Open Access  
Mirai : Estudios Japoneses     Open Access  
Miscelánea Comillas. Revista de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales     Open Access  
Misión Jurídica     Open Access  
Mitologicas     Open Access  
Módulo Arquitectura - CUC     Open Access  
Monthly, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Moving the Social : Journal of Social History and the History of Social Movements     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mukaddime     Open Access  
Mütefekkir     Open Access  
Müvészettörténeti Értesitö     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
National Academy Science Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
National Observer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Navigations : A First-Year College Composite     Open Access  
New Left Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
New Perspectives on Turkey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
New Zealand International Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Newsletter of the Gypsy Lore Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Nineteenth-Century Contexts: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Noesis. Revista de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nómadas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nómadas. Revista Crítica de Ciencias Sociales y Jurídicas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Nordic Journal of Social Research     Open Access  
Nordisk kulturpolitisk tidsskrift     Open Access  
Northeast African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Nouvelles perspectives en sciences sociales : revue internationale de systémique complexe et d'études relationnelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Novos Cadernos NAEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Novos Estudos - CEBRAP     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nytt Norsk Tidsskrift     Full-text available via subscription  
Observatorio Latinoamericano y Caribeño     Open Access  
Occasional Series in Criminal Justice and International Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Oceania     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
OGIRISI : a New Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Öneri Dergisi     Open Access  
Opcion     Open Access  
Open Cultural Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Family Studies Journal     Open Access  
Open Journal of Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Orbis. Revista Cientifica Ciencias Humanas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Orbith : Majalah Ilmiah Pengembangan Rekayasa dan Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oregon Undergraduate Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Parity
Number of Followers: 4  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1032-6170
Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [398 journals]
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - The Geelong project: 'Collective impact' - a new
           paradigm
    • Abstract: MacKenzie, David
      The Need for Reform: A Geelong Perspective The problems in Geelong are much the same as in many communities. Too many young people experience homelessness due to family dysfunction and family conflict. In Geelong, between 200 and 250 school aged adolescents sought help for homelessness issues every year and some 900 teenagers and young adults (up to the age of 25 years) experienced homelessness. Most of these young people entering the Specialist Homelessness Services (SHS) system were not engaged in education, training or employment. Only a tiny number (two per cent) ever returned home after accessing short-term accommodation in the homelessness service system.

      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 13:06:48 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Victorian homelessness and housing reform: Launch
           sites; the experience so far
    • Abstract: Morgan, Lisa
      How We Have Made it to the Launch Sites.

      Consultations with Victoria's community sector highlighted the need for an integrated service system that provides a holistic response to vulnerable Victorians, when and how they need it.

      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 13:06:32 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Opening speech
    • Abstract: Foley, Martin
      To begin, I would like to acknowledge the first peoples and traditional owners of this land, the people of the Kulin Nation.

      I pay my respects to their Elders past and present, and to all Elders from other communities who may be here today, representatives of the world's longest continuing culture.

      PubDate: Tue, 15 May 2018 13:04:14 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Breaking the cycle of homelessness in Northgate
    • Abstract: Holdstock, Laura
      Youth homelessness services have an unparalleled opportunity to engage with clients during a pivotal period of growth and personal development. The type of contact young people have with support services during this time can significantly impact whether or not a young person is equipped to successfully transition into independent living. This is the belief of The Lodge Youth Support Service Inc, a youth shelter in Northgate, Queensland.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - 'Now it's my time' of being an expert in one's own
           life
    • Abstract: Wood, Leanne; Birrell, Carol
      Among the responses in a recent Anglicare survey of 'youth voices' was a blunt comment from a young woman called 'Jess'.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Intimate partner violence and homelessness: Young
           women lost in the intersectionality
    • Abstract: Vichta, Rhianon; Husband, Ashleigh
      While considerable attention has been paid to domestic violence (DV) as a primary cause of homelessness, there has been a historic lack of discourse and awareness across community services systems about the intersectionality of intimate partner violence and homelessness. The commonly used term 'domestic violence' defines intimate partner violence by its occurrence within a 'home' context, rather than situating it within interpersonal relationships, whereas the term 'Intimate Partner Violence' (IPV) is arguably more inclusive of violent experiences that occur outside of the domestic space.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - 'Homelessness is not who I am, it doesn't define me as
           a person or a mother, it is not my identity'
    • Abstract:
      Supporting women who have experienced domestic and family violence is complex, not only because of the impact violence and trauma has on someone, but because the supports needed often involve timely and responsive access to a wide range of agencies and systems.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Digital story project, council to homeless persons
           Queensland
    • Abstract: Blakeney, Deborah
      The Council to Homeless Persons Queensland launched the state Homelessness Week in August 2017, to coincide with Homelessness Week co-ordinated nationally by Homelessness Australia. The purpose of the week was to raise awareness of the experiences of people experiencing homelessness, as well as highlighting the many ways in which communities are actively innovating to address the core structural drivers of homelessness.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Supporting homeless and vulnerably housed patients:
           Royal Brisbane and women's hospital service model
    • Abstract: Reid, Christen
      The Hospital Emergency Department Homeless Liaison Officer (HEDLO) role is an innovative service model which, since December 2009, has been funded under the Australian National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH). HEDLO funding is provided to four South East Queensland hospitals. At each hospital, the HEDLO role implementation is reflective of assessed individual patient and area need. At Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), the HEDLO role is an identified social work position which targets individuals experiencing homelessness or who are at risk of homelessness. These patients commonly present with complex psychosocial needs that may not be recognised by medical staff. The role of the HEDLO social worker is to identify and respond to these patients' psychosocial needs and provide support during their Emergency Department presentation.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Integrated mental health approach sustains tenancies
    • Abstract:
      The Mental Health Demonstration Project A prevention and early intervention approach, being tested in North Brisbane, is having remarkable success assisting public housing tenants, with mental health concerns, to sustain their tenancies.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Working outside of the box: Community Clozapine
           commencement for the homeless using assertive outreach
    • Abstract: Baumgartner, Barbara; Erskine, Deanna
      The Homeless Health Outreach Team (HHOT), part of the Metro North Mental Health service in Brisbane, began in 2006 as Queensland Health recognised the need for specialist mental health teams for the homeless population. HHOTs exist in six areas of Queensland and operate from a model of assertive outreach. HHOTs share a Model of Service but vary in implementation. Brisbane HHOT is a multidisciplinary team (nursing, allied health, medical, and Indigenous health workers) that work across extended hours, seven days a week in a five-kilometre radius of the GPO.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Leone Crayden
    • Abstract: Crayden, Leone
      It's time to ensure there is synergy between supply and support strategies and reposition homelessness as a one of the major housing issues in Queensland.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - The recovery orientation model in action: How
           meaningful change can, and does, happen for homeless young people
    • Abstract: de la Rue, Jacqui
      A wide set of sector reports (for example, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare National Reports 2013,1 2014 2) all suggest that mental health has become a central health issue for Australians, aged 12 to 25. Much of these reports do not address homelessness, but the following points from the 2013 National Mental Health Report,3 are important to the current discussion about how homeless young people access services.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - On the road to independence
    • Abstract: Dodds, Kylie
      What happens to a young person who has become homeless because they are escaping family and domestic violence and family and relationship breakdown' What happens to youth ageing out of foster care'

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Creating digital pathways out of homelessness: Digital
           
    • Abstract: Vichta, Rhianon; Gwinner, Karleen
      Improving young people's engagement with, and pathways through, the homelessness service systems is apriority for the Queensland Youth and Homelessness sectors. Young people accessing homelessness services are often highly transient and their engagement with support is commonly unpredictable, opportunistic, sporadic and crisis-driven. This can negatively impact homelessness service providers' capacity to provide consistent support to enable young people to achieve sustainable longer term change. With the ever-increasing migration of contemporary culture into the digital space, there is a growing need to better understand the potential role that online technologies such as interactive apps and websites can play in both enhancing young people's engagement with support and promoting better wellbeing outcomes for highly vulnerable homeless young people.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - The ethical dimension of fundraising in the
           homelessness sector
    • Abstract: Watson, Laura
      Is there ever truly an ethical way of presenting someone's suffering and misfortunes'

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Creating community: Developing a group work model for
           young women with an experience of homelessness
    • Abstract: Christie, Laura
      In response to a lack of safe spaces for young women to both connect and access supports, Brisbane Youth Service Centre for Young Women has developed a unique group program open to women aged 12 to 25 years who have had an experience of homelessness. With the goal of creating a 'community of intent' this model draws from perspectives, frameworks and approaches such as community cultural development, intersectionality and trauma-informed practice.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Using art therapy as a tool for relationship
           management in supported residential settings for homeless young people
    • Abstract: Penhaligon, Kristin; Harriden, Tara
      A large proportion of the work in a residential supported accommodation program, is working with young people to get them ready to live independently. The young people have spent varying amounts of time in different stages of homelessness and many have a history of trauma, abuse, neglect, mental health issues (either theirs or their parents'), substance use (theirs or their parents') etc. As we cater for young people of all genders between 15 and 18 years, there are different levels of emotional/ mental maturity, communication skills, intellectual abilities etc. Having to meet new people, make friends and integrate into an unfamiliar living environment can be quite a daunting prospect for some young people.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Youth to work: Opportunities to break the cycle of
           intergenerational dependency
    • Abstract:
      The Queensland Government is looking at ways of breaking the cycle of intergenerational welfare dependency by ensuring the public housing system encourages young people to engage in education, training or employment when they finish school.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Social bonds for youth homelessness
    • Abstract: Queensland Treasury, The
      The Queensland Government has contracted with Churches of Christ in Queensland to address youth homelessness through the Youth CONNECT Social Benefit Bond (SBB). An SBB (or SIB: social impact bond) is an innovative approach to resolve intractable social problems, involving government, non-government organisations, and private sector investors. At the time of writing, Social Finance reports that 89 social impact bonds have launched internationally, with a further 70 in development.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Youth homelessness in Queensland
    • Abstract: Young, Darren
      Homelessness can be an isolating, destabilising and often traumatic experience. For children and young people, whose development is not yet complete, homelessness can be particularly devastating and its effects long lasting.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Youth connect: Building resilience to homelessness in
           young people
    • Abstract: Rutherford, Leanne
      Young people leaving statutory care and transitioning to independence are among the most vulnerable and disadvantaged groups in our society. This is evidenced through national and international research that concludes that this group are significantly more likely to experience housing instability or homelessness, be unemployed and earn lower wages, have poorer educational outcomes (including early school leaving), be involved in the criminal justice system, experience poor physical and mental health, and have issues with substance abuse. While the high vulnerability of young care leavers is clearly documented and understood, the critical resources and supports needed to significantly improve life outcomes and change the trajectory for this particular group of young people are historically limited and somewhat disjointed.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Sustaining young tenancies: An innovative program to
           prevent homelessness
    • Abstract: Brackertz, Nicola
      How can we better sustain the tenancies of young people living in social housing'

      This was the question posed by Brisbane Youth Service (BYS), and social housing providers from the Under 1 Roof consortium in 2015. Housing providers were clear that there was a gap in the service system regarding support for young tenants in social housing. They believed young people's tenancies were at greater risk of failure than other cohorts overall, putting young people at increased risk of homelessness, and suggested that the perceived likelihood of tenancy failure negatively affected allocation of available properties to young people.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Creating brighter futures: The role of youth foyers in
           providing pathways to independence for young vulnerable Queenslanders
    • Abstract:
      Youth Homelessness: The Queensland Context: Access to safe, secure and affordable housing, and support to develop skills to sustain housing, continues to be a major challenge for young Australians. According to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare in 2017, 43,165 young people aged 15 to 24, approached a specialist homelessness service alone in Australia in 2015-16, of which 5,225 were living in Queensland. Most of these young people were assisted by specialist homelessness services that provided more traditional, temporary, supported accommodation responses, which have achieved mixed outcomes for young people.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - More than housing: More than a home: Once I was
           homeless...
    • Abstract: Crothers, Kaitlyn
      For many people, being homeless can mean a lot more than not having a roof over your head. Homelessness, and the threat of homelessness, not only disrupts how you live day to day, but also an individual's goals and dreams. When you do not have secure housing, necessities like eating a warm meal, finding somewhere to sleep, or even managing existing health issues are the daily priority. Finding work, giving back to the community or just achieving personal goals can easily become out of reach.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Housing is a human right, not simply a human service
    • Abstract: Westoby, Ross; Walsh, Karyn
      People's lives change by being housed. Having a roof over one's head, a key to your own door, and stable tenure is more than just housing; it is a home. It provides a foundation for opportunity and stability, and enables people to establish and rebuild their lives. Without housing, people cannot find safety, privacy and dignity.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Housing and homelessness in rural communities
    • Abstract: Prosser, Cheryl
      For over three years, Horizon Housing's Roma office has managed a total 250 social and affordable housing properties spread across the Maranoa Region (population 13,000) and the Western Downs Region (population 32,500), as part of our 2,400-property portfolio in Queensland. This office is located a four-hour drive from the closest Department of Housing Service Centre in Toowoomba.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - The role of neighbourhood centres in housing
    • Abstract: Delgado, Siobhan
      The Australian Neighbourhood Housing and Communities Association (ANHCA) describes neighbourhood centres as:

      'Neighbourhood Houses and Centres (NH and Cs) are not-for-profit, community organisations. They share a community development and socially inclusive approach to the delivery and provision of services, as well as activities for socially isolated and disadvantaged local communities.'

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing pathways
    • Abstract:
      A look at the complex challenges that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people face when it comes to housing, and what the Queensland Government is doing to address this through the 'Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Housing Action Plan'.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Systematic improvement of housing in the aboriginal
           community of Cherbourg
    • Abstract: Crane, Phil; Nicholson, Sean
      Acknowledgement to Traditional Owners: The Cherbourg Aboriginal Shire Council respectfully acknowledges the Wakka Wakka peoples who are the traditional owners of the land on which we are based, and we pay our respects to our Elders past and present. We also wish to acknowledge the historical peoples who were sent here and made Cherbourg their home. With many tribes in our one community, we strive to combine all of our services and skills, and are committed to reducing all inequalities between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Aboriginal sociality and kinship in west end street
           life
    • Abstract: Memmott, Paul; Bond, Alex
      This article was written by Paul Memmott, a white anthropologist with a longstanding social science approach to the study of Indigenous homelessness and Alex Bond, a Kabi Kabi scholar of Aboriginal culture and history in South-east Queensland.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - A: Housing and housing issues in Queensland the
           Brisbane housing story
    • Abstract: Eastgate, Jon
      Both the City of Brisbane and the wider South-East Queensland region have experienced steady population growth over a number of decades. Between 2003 and 2013 the population of Brisbane City grew from just over 930,000 to 1,130,000, and it could reach of 1.5 million by 2041. Across South-East Queensland the population grew from 2.6 million to 3.3 million between 2003 and 2013, and could reach over five million by 2041.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Just cause: A just outcome for Queensland private
           renters
    • Abstract: Carr, Penny
      Recent Census data shows the number of Queensland households renting their home was higher than the number of households paying off a mortgage. With declining home ownership rates for the under 55 year olds, Australia is becoming a nation of renters. Many young Australians are destined to rent for life and approximately half of the renting households in Australia's have done so continuously for ten years or more.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Australian's first rental vulnerability index
    • Abstract: Carr, Penny
      Originally conceived as a serviceplanning tool for TQ's delivery of the Queensland Statewide Tenant Advice and Referral Services (QSTARS), its usefulness will to expand over time.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - The ache for home: rental affordability in Brisbane
    • Abstract: Wood, Leanne
      Over the past eight years, Anglicare Australia has conducted the annual Rental Affordability Snapshot, to highlight the lived experience of people and families on low-incomes trying to find a home in the private rental market. Sadly, what is distinctive about the Snapshot is the sheer consistency of the results, right across the country, over that period.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Homelessness in rural and regional Queensland mining
           communities
    • Abstract: Warren, Shane; McDonald, Donna; McAuliffe, Donna
      The last 20 years has seen many Queensland rural and regional communities influenced by the mining cycle experience the dizzying economic heights associated with the boom and spectacular lows associated with the downturn. The decade long mining boom from 2002 to 2012 undoubtedly transformed mining communities across Queensland with rapid increases in community population and widening social and economic inequalities. The downturn from 2012 to the time of publication also impacted the prosperity of these communities with mining communities experiencing major job losses and general economic and community uncertainty. This article explores the impact of the mining cycle on regional and rural mining communities that support the coal mining industry, arguing that the mining cycle has been a major contributor to homelessness in these communities.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Keeping homelessness on the agenda
    • Abstract: Vidafar, Jessica
      The Cairns Housing and Homelessness Network (CHHN) is a collaboration of housing and homelessness services, women and youth services, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services and peak bodies who meet on a monthly basis and have as their goal to 'Achieve Housing Justice for all people in Cairns'.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - How to keep your place: Vulnerability of older
           indigenous women to homelessness in far North Queensland
    • Abstract: Every, Frances
      While research and policy focus has concentrated on chronic homelessness and rough sleeping over the last ten years the other broad category concerns those who have housing but are at risk of losing it, also referred to as hidden homelessness. In rural areas homelessness is hidden because people without stable housing tend to stay with family and friends. This often leads to overcrowding, breach of tenancy law and eviction.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - My money program: Supporting pathways to financial and
           housing stability
    • Abstract: Edwards, Sharon
      '...When your life is in crisis, you are only just surviving not living.' As we know, causes of homelessness and barriers to housing are rarely about one single issue. Similarly, when we consider some of the causes of poverty, financial exclusion and financial hardship in our community, it is often extremely complex. What we do know is that families presenting to Shelter Housing Action Cairns (SHAC) as homeless or at risk of losing their home, are also identifying extreme financial hardship and conversely, those identifying financial hardship are more often than not experiencing housing stress.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Dignity first
    • Abstract: Vidafar, Jessica
      The Queensland Government established the Dignity First Fund to deliver innovative responses to help people experiencing homelessness live with dignity. Access Community Housing Company (ACHC) was one of the recipients of the Dignity First Fund. We received $67,980 to provide 350 dignity bags to people experiencing homelessness in the Cairns region. The project is aimed to provide the basic necessities to disadvantaged and vulnerable people across our community.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Supplying affordable housing: Challenges and solutions
    • Abstract: Muchall, Jamie
      Given the audience of this publication, it should be unnecessary to argue that there is a significant lack of affordable and social housing supply in Queensland and that this lack of supply needs to be addressed in order to reduce homelessness. Despite some previous progress in the 'golden years' of community housing with the introduction of National Rental Affordability Scheme (NRAS) and the Nation Building and Economic Stimulus program, as a state we still struggle to resolve the problem of providing sufficient affordable and social housing in areas where it is most needed. This is the number one cause of homelessness. Unfortunately, the current operating environments both nationally and in Queensland provide additional headwinds that make progress harder to achieve than ever before.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Cairns street to home, Douglas house and Woree
           supported accommodation
    • Abstract: Flint, Phil; Musumeci, Natalie; Jentz, Mark
      Mission Australia (MA) has a number of unique and innovative homeless support services in the Cairns area. These have been specifically tailored to address the needs of this regional community in Far North Queensland. These programs emphasise both wrap-around services and trauma-informed practice. They rely heavily on collaboration with other services and an understanding of and respect for the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - YFS Logan: Embedding housing responses throughout a
           multi-disciplinary organisation
    • Abstract: Hunter, Judith; Grose, Christine
      Over the past five years, YFS in Logan has been overwhelmed with requests for help from people who are homeless or at significant risk of losing their housing.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - IT solutions in homelessness: Partnering with business
    • Abstract: Fritz, Elizabeth
      A Local Focus, Real-time, Interactive, Web Based Application.

      Over many years' the Gold Coast Homelessness Network Inc (GCHN) has embraced and promoted innovation as a way to meet its objectives to support and assist people to end their homelessness, and to develop prevention and early intervention strategies for people at risk of homelessness. The GCHN has actively sought the support of government agencies, business, service clubs, sporting clubs and community services, and built strong partnerships, delivering significant support to the homelessness sector.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - SPER work and development orders: New SPER laws to
           provide fair and flexible fine options
    • Abstract: Tang, Belinda
      For many years, LawRight's Homeless Persons' Legal Clinic (HPLC) has identified debts to the State Penalties Enforcement Registry (SPER) as a key legal problem faced by our clients. A new Work and Development Order scheme provides hope to homeless Queenslanders struggling to manage their SPER debts. Whilst this is a welcome change, there is still more work to be done.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Homelessness with HART: Our story so far
    • Abstract: Cowie, Jodie
      HART 4000, the Homelessness Assessment and Referral Team, has been working with people who are either currently experiencing homelessness or at risk of homelessness in the greater Brisbane City Region.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - The art of community work: An alternative approach to
           reducing inter-generational homelessness
    • Abstract: Murat, Luan
      While observing the children of my previous clients, now young adults, walking through the doors of our local community centre, I could not help but wonder how we are falling short in addressing inter-generational homelessness.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Delivering remote housing that meets the needs of
           individual households and communities
    • Abstract:
      As noted in the following article, overcrowding in remote communities has been reduced by almost half through the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH) and National Partnership on Remote Housing (NPRH) program, and we have delivered almost 1,150 homes, almost 1,500 refurbishments and supported maintenance for almost 4,300 houses. The NPRH program has helped build the capacity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Councils and Indigenous businesses in Queensland, who now deliver over 80 percent of housing construction and repairs.

      While there is currently uncertainty around the future funding of the NPRH program, it is important to note that any potential cessation of investment would see housing standards in remote communities deteriorate and have lasting impacts on Indigenous health, education and community safety outcomes across Queensland.

      Addressing Overcrowding The Queensland Government has been working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to tackle disadvantage by improving and maximising housing outcomes and boosting socio-economic advancement through increased employment, training and business opportunities. This has been driven through the Commonwealth funded NPARIH and NPRH.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Understanding and meeting the contemporary needs of
           people impacted by domestic and family violence
    • Abstract:
      Queensland says Not, Now, Not Ever: Domestic and Family Violence Prevention Strategy.

      The Queensland Policy Landscape.

      One of the key features of the Queensland Housing Strategy 2017-2027 (the strategy) is the commitment to taking a personcentred approach to delivering high-quality and tailored housing responses to people experiencing homelessness or in housing need. This includes responses for families and women and children impacted by domestic and family violence. The strategy recognises that these clients may need tailored and focused support arrangements, along with access to stable housing.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - Clean clothes and fresh food restore dignity
    • Abstract:
      In 2016, the Queensland Government established the inaugural $2.5 million Dignity First Fund to deliver innovative, non-traditional responses to help Queenslanders experiencing homelessness to live with dignity and improve their quality of life.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - The benefits of good governance
    • Abstract: Wood, Helen
      The Queensland Housing Strategy 2017-2027 ('the Strategy') commits a $1.8 billion investment toward improving the current housing situations of the vulnerable. While service delivery is often considered the most practical and worthwhile area for expenditure, a large focus of the Strategy is on prevention and early intervention through investment in corporate governance and strategic business areas. While many see 'feeding the corporate agenda' as an ineffective use of resources and a diversion of funding from service delivery, if done effectively, good governance, strategic leadership and an effective corporate business model increases an organisation's ability to not only do more to assist the vulnerable, but also to deliver services in the most effective way. Ultimately, if we are without effective governance, we are without strategic direction and sustainability.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 9 - U1R Brisbane: A Synthesis of collaboration and
           imagination
    • Abstract: Hale, Dominic; Schulz, Jenny; Radunz, Travis; Caniglia, Fiona
      Under 1 Roof (U1R) Brisbane is a multi-agency service integration initiative that draws together front-line service providers from diverse agencies in collaborative planning to achieve housing and support outcomes. The agencies involved are from both government and non-government sectors, including services from housing and homelessness sectors as well as specialist support services from areas such as mental health and substance use.

      PubDate: Fri, 4 May 2018 10:43:50 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - From loneliness to inclusion: The ongoing challenge at
           McAuley
    • Abstract: Bignold, Jocelyn; Morris, Anita
      Recently the United Kingdom Government surprised many by appointing a Minister for Loneliness. Some laughed, others were cynical, and many were simply bemaused. There was bewilderment and some degree of denial that the issue could have grown to such a proportion and scepticism that the concept of 'loneliness' was something a government could, or should, tackle.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - The way forward in responding to domestic and family
           violence
    • Abstract: Clifford, Sue
      Victoria's Royal Commission into Family Violence gave us an extraordinary insight into the limitations of our service systems and the devastating consequences of family and intimate partner violence. It showed us how complex family violence is, and highlighted the urgent need to join the dots between family violence and other social issues such as mental health and homelessness. For instance, of those people accessing homelessness services in Victoria, a third are escaping family violence.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - New national statistical report sheds light on family
           violence
    • Abstract: Australian Institute of Health and Welfare
      In February 2018, the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) released its first comprehensive report on family, domestic and sexual violence in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Profiling Women and Children Experiencing Family
           Violence in Victoria who Require a Crisis Supported Response
    • Abstract: Murray, Suellen; Watson, Juliet; Theobald, Jacqui
      This article provides a brief overview of a research project conducted in 2017 on women and children experiencing family violence requiring crisis accommodation support, namely women's refuges. The research was commissioned by the Victorian Government in response to recommendations of the Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence, in particular, Recommendation 18: 'The Victorian Government give priority to removing current blockages in refuge and crisis accommodation and transitional housing, so that victims of family violence can gain stable housing as quickly as possible and with a minimum number of relocations, are not accommodated in motels and other ad hoc accommodation, and spend on average no longer than six weeks in refuge and crisis accommodation'.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Women's refuges as part of feminism: A view from a
           different angle
    • Abstract: Andrew, Merrindahl
      Violence, including sexual violence, has been a core concern of feminism in Australia as elsewhere, and has been a major focus of both non-government and government bodies established over the past 45 years. In this article I focus on refuges as one type of feminist non-government women's service, and trace some aspects of the changing position of these services within broader policy making and politics

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Regional and rural issues: Moving forward with
           effective hub and spoke domestic and family violence services
    • Abstract: Rowe, Elizabeth
      It's 2023. Anna, a mother-of-three, is living on a beef cattle farm between Bordertown and Naracoorte, in South Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Jocelyn Bignold
    • Abstract: Bignold, Jocelyn
      Chief Executive Officer, McAuley Community Services for Women Four years ago 11-year-old Luke Batty was murdered by his father. His mother Rosie, who did so much to transform our community conversations about family violence, recently announced that she will stand aside from public advocacy. In announcing her decision, she said: 'It is unrelenting and overwhelming what still needs to change'. 'There is Four years ago 11-year-old Luke Batty was murdered by his father. His mother Rosie, who did so much to transform our community conversations about family violence, recently announced that she will stand aside from public advocacy. In announcing her decision, she said: 'It is unrelenting and overwhelming what still needs to change'.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Beryl Women Inc: Understanding the challenges facing
           Australia's longest running women's refuge
    • Abstract: Kala, Lavanya
      Domestic violence (DV) must be recognised as the single greatest threat faced by women in Australia. Violence against women is a fundamental violation of human rights, and one that Australia has an obligation to prevent under international law. Despite this reality, current funding arrangements do not consider the complexities of domestic violence, and the central role of women's refuges in providing transitional support, case management and crisis accommodation.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Putting children at the core of the core and cluster
           model
    • Abstract: Gillespie, Annette; Hopper, Meghan; Burns-Warr, Lucie
      For more than 40 years, safe steps Family Violence Response Centre has played an important role in the provision of crisis accommodation for women and their children, including through our current safe house. Our role as the state-wide 24-hour referral point for women and children who have experienced family violence and require access to emergency, crisis or refuge accommodation in Victoria, has evolved over time and been strongly informed by our own history as part of the refuge movement. We have seen the provision of refuge and crisis accommodation in Victoria grow and change dramatically, and in this regard, Victoria's Royal Commission into Family Violence has heralded another new era and an unrivalled investment in the safety of women and their children.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Developing a 'Wraparound' model for client services at
           safe futures foundation
    • Abstract: Matusko, Ellen
      Safe Futures has its roots in the activist movement of the 1970s when Maroondah Halfway House, Robinson House, Woorarra and Brenda House were established to meet the crisis accommodation and support needs of women and children escaping family violence. Reflecting on this journey, we see the gradual evolution of the professionalisation of service delivery, and the move to a core and cluster refuge model in the late 2000s. At Safe Futures, an intensive case management program was implemented in 2008 followed by our 'Safe In the Community' Program and Children's Program in 2010, and then the Personal Safety Initiative in 2015. We have moved from babysitters looking after children in refuge to therapeutic interventions and programs that recognize that children make up the highest percentage of clients and the impact of trauma on their brains and life journey. We have moved from moving women and children to secure refuges to advances in technology allowing some to remain in their own home and community.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Experiences from a purpose-built cluster refuge
    • Abstract: Tzelepis, Georgia; Symmons, Georgia
      This year the Southern Women's Integrated Support Services (SWISS) at WAYSS celebrates its seventh year of operation. The vision underpinning the development of SWISS was to provide women and their children with a safe place to stay, while offering them a holistic suite of services and support after experiencing family violence.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - It's nothing you did or didn't Do: New models of
           refuge for women and children escaping violence
    • Abstract: Oberin, Julie
      April 2017 saw the opening of Annie North's new 'core and cluster' 'secure women's refuge facility' in the regional city of Bendigo, Victoria. It is one of the new 'models' of women's refuge revolving around a 'core' building housing staff and client support spaces, and a 'cluster' of fully self-contained units on the same site. A recommendation from the Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence will see four more of these 'core and clusters' built this year, and others in the pipeline.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Technology and safety: The personal safety initiative
    • Abstract: Burnham, Leonie
      Technology is a part of all our lives but not always as a welcome intrusion. For those living with family violence, Emails, Facebook and mobile phones can often to be utilised by perpetrators as weapons of abuse and control, while tracking devices allow the abuser to know the movements of women and their children from remote locations. The Royal Commission into Family Violence recognised the significant impact advancements in technologies has had in the facilitation of family violence. However, it also recognised the potential technology has for increasing the security and safety of victim-survivors.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Alison Birchall
    • Abstract: Birchall, Alison
      The family violence sector in Victoria is undergoing unprecedented reform as a result of the Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence (Royal Commission) and the subsequent commitment from the Victorian Government to implement all 227 of the Royal Commission's recommendations. Despite a lot of reform activity in relation to refuge, the reform efforts to date are yet to have significant impact on the refuge sector. Additionally, refuge participation in reform implementation has been inadequate. This begs the question, as the statewide peak body for specialist family violence services in Victoria - including refuge services - what is the role for Domestic Violence Victoria (DVVic) in the future of women's refuge'

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Core and cluster refuges: Victoria's approach and
           opportunities
    • Abstract: Nyhuis, Marita
      When Victoria's Royal Commission into Family Violence (the Royal Commission) delivered its final report in March 2016, it dedicated an entire chapter to exploring the issues of safe housing and homelessness experienced by women and children impacted by family violence.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - The future of women's refuges: A vision for the
           future, a voice from the future
    • Abstract: Prowse, Tillie
      Imagine a future where the passive acceptance of family and domestic violence (FDV) has been replaced by conscious activism. Where legislation, social and economic policy, and societal responsibility triangulate for the sole purpose of achieving gender parity; thereby ending FDV.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - The role of law: Home safe: The role for the law,
           economic empowerment and social housing in keeping women and children
           housed
    • Abstract: Kenyon, Sally; Driver, Rachelle
      Supporting Survivors of Family Violence to Stay in their Homes Victoria's Royal Commission into Family Violence (RCFV) acknowledged the need for a cultural, legal and practical shift away from the assumption that victims of family violence should flee their homes.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Developing new models and services: Supporting women
           and children who currently do not have residency in Australia
    • Abstract: Kristal, Kedy
      Refuges across Australia have been struggling to respond to the ongoing demand for accommodation and income support for a complex and diverse group of women and children who currently do not have permanent residency in Australia. These women and children are not entitled to Centrelink, Medicare and in some cases access to schooling and have no exit options from the Refuge into social or public housing.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Refugees, Asylum Seekers and migrants: No income, no
           visa, no way out: Improving pathways out of family violence for women on
           temporary visas
    • Abstract: O'Brien, Ange
      Among the many women and children in Australia seeking to escape the fear and shame of family violence, there is a growing group that has come to our attention.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Meeting the needs of aboriginal and Torres Strait
           Islander women and children who experience family violence-related
           homelessness
    • Abstract: Young, Janelle; Andy, Kellyanne; Doherty, Joanne
      Refuges are a critical component of the family violence service sector because they provide women and children with a safe place to escape family violence and rebuild their lives in a supportive environment. Refuges work best when, in addition to ensuring immediate safety, they promote individual and familial empowerment through participation in community, and through educational and economic opportunities.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Using an 'infant and child led' model of practice to
           facilitate healing within the context of women's refuges
    • Abstract: Bunston, Wendy
      It is all too often assumed that by osmosis, any healing that occurs for the mother in refuge will automatically transfer to the child. This justifies a powerful assumption that the role of the refuge is to focus support on the women, and those women who are mothers will be able to support their child. This way of thinking and working takes an unacceptable gamble on what the infant will receive with regards to the quality, quantity and capacity of their mother's care-giving capacities, therefore underestimating the impact of the infants earliest developmental and formative relational experiences. It also fails to consider the lengthy recovery time needed for highly traumatised women. Early childhood relational deprivations are not truly understood to matter, despite the current neurophysiological research clearly demonstrating the opposite.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Infants in refuge: The ignored crisis
    • Abstract: Westhead, Paula; Hodges, Emma
      Few would argue against the importance of delivering early intervention programs with infants in refuge as the ideal opportunity to support children at risk of abuse, neglect, and relational trauma arising from family violence (FV). The FV discourse shifted with the 2016 Victorian Government's Royal Commission into FV shining a spotlight on the needs of children (aged 0 to five years), propelling them into view and out of the shadows of their mothers.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Celebrating 40 years with dignity
    • Abstract: Hartwig, Angela
      In 1977, nine refuges in Western Australia decided to coordinate their efforts and formed the Women's Refuge Group of WA (now known as the Women's Council for Domestic and Family Violence Services WA). A peak body providing a voice on behalf of Women's Refuges and the women and children they serve. Refuges did more than provide crisis accommodation and support, they worked to politicise what was deemed a private matter, the intolerable situation faced by women and children, often at the hands of their violent male partner and/or ex-partner.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Women's refuge: A personal reflection
    • Abstract: Austin, Wendy
      In writing this piece, I have the privilege of reflecting on my 40 years in the family violence sector from 1978 until today. What did women's refuges look like then' What do they look like now, and into the future' How will we support those living with an imbalance of power and lack of safety in their relationships, to choose agency over their lives'

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Refuge and discrimination: Helping women's refuges to
           comply with the equal opportunity Act 2010
    • Abstract: Squatrito, Gina
      Women's refuges have been pivotal in bringing family violence out of the shadows in Australia. And in 2016, the Royal Commission into Family Violence highlighted the importance of their work.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Smith, Jenny
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Turning off the tap: Can we do it'
    • Abstract: Walshe, Sorcha; Clark, Alice
      In an ideal world, women's refuges would not exist; there would be no domestic violence or homelessness, and there would not be a need for service responses to women fleeing their homes due to physical violence. Unfortunately, unless we do things differently, the future of women's refuges looks far from idyllic. They will continue to be in high demand as the number of people experiencing domestic violence related homelessness across the country rises.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Research in progress: Encountering interspecies
           homelessness: Developing an evidence base of social work with women at
           risk of, or experiencing homelessness with a companion animal
    • Abstract: Laing, Melissa
      Most people I cross paths with become animated when recounting a story about a beloved pet, or companion animal. Similarly, frontline workers in the housing/homelessness and domestic and family violence spaces have at least one anecdotal account of supporting a woman with an animal companion that they helped against the odds, or of a companion animal who was sadly left behind in a violent home when there were no other options. In this article, I provide a background and description of how I aim to cultivate an evidence base from these kinds of stories in my PhD research.

      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 31 Issue 1 - Introduction
    • Abstract: Macdonald, Alison; Theobald, Jacqui
      PubDate: Thu, 26 Apr 2018 18:49:31 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - The work and role of justice connect homeless law
    • Abstract: Kenyon, Sally; Driver, Rachelle
      Established in 2001, Justice Connect Homeless Law (Homeless Law) is a specialist legal service for people who are experiencing or at risk of homelessness. In partnership with eight member law firms, we run seven clinics each week at homelessness, health and community services. We work closely with pro bono lawyers to provide approximately 450 clients with legal representation each year. In the 2016-2017 financial year, Homeless Law opened 304 tenancy matters and prevented the eviction of 121 clients and their families through legal representation and social work support.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Swimming against the tide: Managing impossible demand
    • Abstract: Holst, Heather
      All those working in the homelessness sector will now that there is an ever increasing demand for their services and that there is an insufficient supply of housing available to meet that demand.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - The NDIS and the homelessness sector: When a person
           is homeless everything is just harder
    • Abstract: Rao, Mirella
      Defunding of Community Mental Health Support Service.

      The ending of the Mental Health Community Support Services (MHCSS) has been significant. The recovery model of care in the community mental health sector is under challenge as funds divert from community mental health to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS). They are not the same thing. People recovering from the psychiatric episode are often not disabled, they are not part of the same continuum.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - The NDIS: Is it working for people experiencing
           homelessness'
    • Abstract: Patterson, Kate
      This conference presentation was prepared as part of a broader panel discussion and focuses on the challenges of people who are homeless in accessing the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS).

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Ending homelessness in Ireland, Denmark and
           Finland'
    • Abstract: O'Sullivan, Eoin
      In most European states, as well as in Australia, homelessness is on the increase. It is also at stubbornly high levels in North America. This is despite virtually all European and North American states having devised strategies in recent years that promise to end long-term homelessness and the need to sleep rough. Somewhat paradoxically, as the numbers of homeless people are rising in many countries, provinces, and regions, or are at best remaining stable, there is greater optimism than ever before that homelessness can be ended.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - The 2017 Victorian homelessness achievement awards
    • PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Conference overview
    • Abstract: Patterson, Damien
      Council to Homeless Persons was proud to present the Victorian Homelessness Conference 2017, themed Talking Solutions. With more than 60 speakers and more than 400 participants, it was our biggest state conference yet.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Editorial
    • Abstract: Smith, Jenny
      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Ending homelessness in New Zealand: Housing first
           research programme
    • Abstract: Ombler, Jenny; Ombler, Polly; Nelson, Julie; Howden-Chapman, Philippa; Te-Aho, Keri Lawson; Fariu-Ariki, Paikea; Cook, Hera; Aspinall, Clare; Fraser, Brodie; McMinn, Carole; Shum, Renee Frances; Pierse, Nevil
      The Ending Homelessness in New Zealand: Housing First research programme is a five-year research partnership between He Kainga Oranga at the University of Otago Wellington, the National Institute for Demographic and Economic Analysis at the University of Waikato, and The People's Project. The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment funded this work under their contestable research funding.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Understanding family conflict as it relates to young
           people experiencing homelessness
    • Abstract: Roche, Steven; Barker, Justin; Turton, Paul
      What is clear, and has been established in scholarship on youth homelessness for some time, is that homelessness and its causes are complex and multi-faceted relating to the structural, familial and personal impediments that contribute to young people's marginalisation. However, we also know that, both in Australia and internationally, family conflict and breakdown is one of the most significant factors in young people becoming homeless, a group which accounts for about one quarter of the total homeless population in Australia.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Transitional housing: Does it still have an important
           role in addressing homelessness'
    • Abstract:
      I will argue that it most certainly does.

      I will:

      - define the topic.

      - look at particular groups that transitional housing works well for.

      - underline the importance of the intensive tenancy management that comes with transitional housing in Victoria.

      - describe the expertise that has been built up by transitional housing managers in dealing with hard-to-house people.

      - ask the question 'What if the transitional housing program ceased to exist tomorrow''

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - What I have learnt about youth homelessness by
           building a school for young people at risk of, or experiencing
           homelessness
    • Abstract: Wells, Dave
      Principal of The Hester Hornbrook Academy Dave Wells reflects on the development and growth of the Hester Hornbrook Academy from 2012 to today, with 164 students in eight classrooms across five campuses; and shares his learnings about responding to youth homelessness.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - 'Happiness is hugging a therapy dog': Exploring the
           
    • Abstract: Heerde, Jessica A; Jones, Melanie G; Fotiadis, Poppy
      Finding effective ways to support young people experiencing homelessness is important. This project was designed to examine the influence of animal assisted activities at a Melbourne youth service working with young people who are experiencing homelessness, at risk of homelessness, or are disengaged. This article presents the preliminary evaluation findings. The program involved over 170 young people participating in weekly animal assisted activities. It appears feasible to incorporate animal assisted activities in homeless services, with these activities playing a key role in the lives of clients, particularly related to their sense of wellbeing and connectedness.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Redesigning crisis accommodation
    • Abstract: Barnes, Jane
      The Need for Change.

      Crisis Supported Accommodation Services have for many years been the backbone of the response to single adult men's homelessness in the inner metropolitan area of Melbourne. The last time a major overhaul of these services was undertaken was in the 1990s and the service model now seems tired and ineffective, and no longer enables us to respond constructively and flexibly to complex and changing client needs.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Melbourne street 2 home: A housing first model
    • Abstract: Swanborough, Theresa
      The National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH) that followed the 2008 The Road Home: A National approach to reducing homelessness White Paper identified Street 2 Home (S2H) 'as its principal programmatic response to ending rough sleeping'. This saw a range of S2H programs implemented across Australia including the Melbourne S2H (MS2H) program that was funded in 2009.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Effective support post-housing: What works'
    • Abstract: Bawden, Cassandra
      The views of people with a lived experience of homelessness and resettlement are at the centre of this discussion. The panel consisted of four current members and one graduate of the Council to Homeless Persons Peer Education and Support Program (PESP); Christine Thirkell, Jody Letts, Jason Russell, Trevor Brown and Allan Martin.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Resolving homelessness for young care leavers
    • Abstract: McDonald, Paul
      Ireland has undertaken great positive steps to reduce homelessness over the last 25 years. The first of these was the Child Care Act, 1991 (which put in place a statutory right to services for homeless young people, including limited aftercare). The second move was through the Child Care (Amendment) Act 2015 (which provides an enhanced statutory right to aftercare), a combination of statutory entitlements and strategic focus on prevention. As a result homelessness amongst young people (under the age of 18) has substantially declined.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Resolving homelessness for young care leavers in
           Ireland: A long journey...
    • Abstract: O'Sullivan, Eoin
      In 1970, a review of residential care in Ireland highlighted the many deficiencies in the system, and recommended the abandonment of the 19th century institutional model of reformatory and industrial schools. The review specifically noted that aftercare was non-existent in Ireland, and that it should form an integral part of the child welfare system. It took until 1991 before a legislative entitlement to aftercare was provided via the Child Care Act, 1991. However, for many, the provisions of the Act provided an implicit entitlement and there were concerns that the provision of aftercare varied by administrative area, and in September 2017, legislation was enacted to strengthen the entitlement to aftercare in Ireland by explicitly outlining the aftercare entitlements. This brief article will outline the path to the provision of an explicit entitlement to aftercare in Ireland.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
  • Volume 30 Issue 10 - Housing isn't everything: Music therapy in youth
           homelessness
    • Abstract: Koike, Asami
      Every week, 19-year old Matt trudges down the steps to the Frontyard music room and spends an hour learning his favourite hip hop songs on piano. Matt doesn't say much. Some days his fingers move swiftly over the keys, other days, he holds his head in frustration. After six months of working individually with the music therapist, Matt begins to open up about his long history of substance abuse and intergenerational mental health issues and how these issues create a barrier to him completing school. He explains that playing piano in the only activity that is enjoyable, relaxing and most importantly, occupies his attention enough so that he does not engage in drug taking behaviour. Matt loves hip hop music but has no interest in becoming a performer. Instead, piano is Matt's health resource to help him recover from substance addiction and in doing so, keep him on track with his goal to complete Year 12 and attend university.

      PubDate: Wed, 7 Feb 2018 12:15:39 GMT
       
 
 
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