for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1276 journals)
    - HISTORY (807 journals)
    - History (General) (52 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (49 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (53 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (7 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (164 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (117 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (27 journals)

HISTORY (807 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Politique et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription  
Popular Music History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
positions : asia critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Postcolonial Directions in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Postcolonial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Postcolonial Text     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (hardback)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering History and Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Zoological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Procesos Historicos     Open Access  
Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Psychoanalysis Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Publications du Centre Européen d'Etudes Bourguignonnes     Full-text available via subscription  
Purdue Historian     Open Access  
Quaderns d’Història de l’Enginyeria     Open Access  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Queensland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Queensland Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Questes : Revue pluridisciplinaire d'études médiévales     Open Access  
Quintana. Revista de Estudos do Departamento de Historia da Arte     Open Access  
Radical History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Rasenna : Journal of the Center for Etruscan Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rationality and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Reinardus     Hybrid Journal  
Relaciones. Estudios de historia y sociedad     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Renaissance Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Renaissance Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Reti Medievali Rivista     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Central and East European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Revista Análisis Internacional     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chilena de Historia del Derecho     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Historico-Juridicos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de História     Open Access  
Revista de História da UEG     Open Access  
Revista do Instituto Histórico e Geográfico do Rio Grande do Sul     Open Access  
Revista Historia Autónoma     Open Access  
Revista História da Educação - History of Education Journal     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revolutionary Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire de l'Eglise de France     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revue d'histoire de l'enfance     Open Access  
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue d'histoire du XIXe siècle     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue de l’Histoire des Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Revue des Études Arméniennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue historique des armées     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Mabillon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric Society Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
RIMA: Review of Indonesian and Malaysian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romanticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Royal Studies Journal     Open Access  
Rúbrica Contemporánea     Open Access  
Rural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Russian Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Russian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Russian Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sacris Erudiri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Saeculum : Jahrbuch für Universalgeschichte     Hybrid Journal  
Safundi : The Journal of South African and American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Scando-Slavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Science & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Science Journal of Volgograd State University. History. Area Studies. International Relations     Open Access  
Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine / Scientia Canadensis : revue canadienne d'histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scientiae Studia     Open Access  
Scottish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Scrineum Rivista     Open Access  
Scrutiny2: Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Siècles     Open Access  
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Signos Historicos     Open Access  
Slagmark - Tidsskrift for idéhistorie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Slavonica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Social History of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Science History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Società e Storia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Society and Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
SourceOECD National Accounts & Historical Statistics     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Historical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Journal of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Asia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
South Asian History and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South Asian Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Australian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription  
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Soviet and Post-Soviet Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Spontaneous Generations : A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Stewart Postharvest Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Aurea : Revista de Literatura Española y Teoría Literaria del Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Historiae Oeconomicae     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia z Historii Filozofii     Open Access  
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studium : Tijdschrift voor Wetenschaps- en Universiteits-geschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire des Sciences et des Universités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sydney Institute Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tasmanian Historical Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription  
Tempo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tempo e Argumento     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
The Irish Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Public Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The South African Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Theoria et Historia Scientiarum     Open Access  
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access  
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Varia Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Vestiges : Traces of Record     Full-text available via subscription  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Vínculos de Historia. Revista del Departamento de Historia de la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha     Open Access  
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vulcan     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Whispering Wind     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Winterthur Portfolio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Journal Cover Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
  [SJR: 1.15]   [H-I: 22]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2969 journals]
  • Morning Blood Pressure Surge and Markers of Cardiovascular Alterations in
           Untreated Middle-Aged Hypertensive Subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Barbara Pręgowska-Chwała, Aleksander Prejbisz, Marek Kabat, Bogna Puciłowska, Katarzyna Paschalis-Purtak, Elżbieta Florczak, Anna Klisiewicz, Beata Kuśmierczyk-Droszcz, Katarzyna Hanus, Michael Bursztyn, Andrzej Januszewicz
      Purpose To evaluate the degree of morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) and its relationship with markers of cardiovascular alterations in untreated middle-aged hypertensives. Results We studied 241 patients (mean age 36.6±10.7 years). Subjects with higher sleep-through MBPS (st-MBPS) were older (p=0.003), had higher carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) (p=0.05) and lower E/A ratio (p=0.01), than those with lower MBPS. Subjects with higher pre-wakening MBPS (pw-MBPS) had significantly higher deceleration time (p=0.01), compared with those with lower pw-MBPS. St-MBPS correlated significantly with age, cIMT values, 24h systolic and diastolic BP and systolic BP night-time fall. The significant correlations between pw-MBPS and cIMT values, deceleration time, 24-h diastolic blood pressure and systolic BP night-time fall were observed. A relationship between MBPS and cardiovascular alterations was observed both in dippers and non-dippers, although in non-dippers it was less pronounced. Conclusions The results may imply a possible link between MBPS and markers of cardiovascular alterations in untreated hypertensive subjects.


      PubDate: 2016-08-24T23:31:06Z
       
  • Effect of visit-to-visit blood pressure variability on cardiovascular
           events in patients with coronary artery disease and well-controlled blood
           pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Sungha Park, Ping Yan, César Cerezo, Barrett W. Jeffers
      This post-hoc analysis of CAMELOT and PREVENT analyzed the impact of blood pressure variability (BPV, assessed as within-subject standard deviation of SBP from 12-weeks onwards) on the incidence of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE, defined according to original studies). Patients (n=1677 CAMELOT; n=776 PREVENT) were stratified by BPV quartile. Regardless of study, BPV was significantly lower for amlodipine versus other treatments. In CAMELOT, a significant association between BPV quartile and MACE was observed with amlodipine treatment. Significant associations between BPV quartile and MACE were observed for both studies, when analyzed overall (adjusting for treatment). In CAMELOT, with amlodipine-treatment an increased risk for MACE was observed with high (BPV≥Q3) vs. low BPV (<Q1) (adjusting for characteristics and risk factors). In both studies, increased risk for MACE was observed for BPV≥Q3 versus BPV<Q1 (analyzed overall, adjusting for treatment and covariates). For both studies, BPV, but not mean SBP, was associated with cardiovascular events BPV was associated with cardiovascular outcomes in patients with CAD and well-controlled BP.


      PubDate: 2016-08-24T23:31:06Z
       
  • Involvement of vascular peroxidase 1 in angiotensin II- induced
           hypertrophy of H9c2 cells
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Wei Yang, Zhaoya Liu, Qian Xu, Haiyang Peng, Luyao Chen, Xiao Huang, Tianlun Yang, Zaixin Yu, Guangjie Cheng, Guogang Zhang, Ruizheng Shi
      Oxidative stress has been implicated in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1), a peroxidase in the cardiovascular system, utilizes the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) derived from co-expressed NADPH oxidases (NOX) to produce hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and catalyze peroxidative reactions. Our previous studies showed that VPO1 contributes to the vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), however, the role of VPO1 in cardiomyocytes hypertrophy is still uninvestigated. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine the role of VPO1 in the angiotensin II induced cardiac hypertrophy and the underlying mechanism by which VPO1 regulates the redox signaling. As compared to WKY rats, the SHRs exhibited increased myocyte cross sectional area, enhanced Nox2 and VPO1 expression level in cardiac tissue, and an increased Ang II level in plasma. In cultured H9c2 cell line, Ang II increased the hypertrophy related gene (BNP/ANF) expression and the cellular surface area, which was attenuated by knocking down of VPO1 via VPO1 siRNA or pharmacological inhibition of NOX/VPO1 pathway. Moreover, the enhanced hypochlorous acid (HOCl) production and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was suppressed by VPO1 knockdown. Furthermore, the protective role of VPO1 siRNA transfection on H9c2 cardiomyocytes hypertrophy was abrogated upon the HOCl stimulation, and the phosphorylated ERK1/2 expression level was found also up-regulated following HOCl stimulation. In conclusion, these results suggest that the Nox2/VPO1/HOCl/ERK1/2 redox signaling pathway was implicated in the pathogenesis of Ang II induced cardiac hypertrophy.


      PubDate: 2016-08-24T23:31:06Z
       
  • Instructions for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 8




      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • Low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise has no transient effect on blood
           pressure in patients with coronary artery disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 8
      Author(s): Karla Goessler, Roselien Buys, Véronique A. Cornelissen
      Hypertension is highly prevalent among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduces blood pressure (BP). However, less is known about the transient effect of a single bout of exercise on BP. Isometric handgrip exercise has been proposed as a new nonpharmacologic tool to lower BP. We aimed to investigate the acute effect of isometric handgrip exercise on BP in CAD patients. Twenty-one male CAD patients were included. All patients completed two experimental sessions in random order: one control and one low-intensity isometric handgrip session. BP was measured by means of a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor preintervention, for 1 hour in the office and subsequently for 24 hours. Our results suggest that isometric handgrip exercise performed at low intensity is safe in patients with CAD but does not induce a transient reduction in BP.


      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • Impaired metabolic profile is a predictor of capillary rarefaction in a
           population of hypertensive and normotensive individuals
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 8
      Author(s): Areti Triantafyllou, Panagiota Anyfanti, Georgios Triantafyllou, Xenophon Zabulis, Spyros Aslanidis, Stella Douma
      Capillary rarefaction is typically encountered in essential hypertension, yet identification of factors interfering with this phenomenon remains substantially underinvestigated. We examined whether components of metabolic profile (dyslipidemia, insulin resistance), inflammatory (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein), and angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor) factors are implicated in this phenomenon in a population of newly diagnosed, never-treated hypertensive patients and normotensive controls. Nailfold capillary density was estimated with nailfold capillaroscopy using specifically designed software. A total of 159 individuals, 93 hypertensives, and 66 normotensives were included. Nailfold capillary density was lower among hypertensives compared to normotensives (146.4 ± 31.0 vs. 155.4 ± 26.9, respectively; P = .047). In the total population, capillary density significantly correlated with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) (r = 0.232; P = .003), HDL/low-density lipoprotein ratio (r = 0.175; P = .025), age (r = 0.236; P = .003), but neither with vascular endothelial growth factor or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein. An inverse association was found with body mass index (r = −0.174; P = .029), insulin levels (r = −0.200; P = .018), and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (r = −0.223; P = .009). In the separate analysis for the hypertensive population, sex (P = .014) and homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (P = .011) were identified as significant predictors of capillary rarefaction after adjustment for other factors. On the contrary, only HDL levels (P = .036) predicted capillary density in the multiple regression model for the normotensive population. Different aspects of impaired metabolic profile, that is, insulin resistance and low HDL levels, but not angiogenic or inflammatory markers, appear to be independently associated with capillary rarefaction in hypertensive and normotensive individuals.


      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 8




      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 8




      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • Problems with the new guidelines
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 8
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • Aortic Root Dilatation in the Children and Young Adults: Prevalence,
           Determinants and Association with Target Organ Damage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Silvia Totaro, Franco Rabbia, Alberto Milan, Elaine M. Urbina, Franco Veglio
      Background Aortic root dilatation is associated with increased cardiovascular risk in hypertensive adults. In the young, few data have been published evaluating the cardiovascular organ damage that may be present in patients with aortic dilatation. Objectives To evaluate the prevalence of proximal aorta dilatation, its possible determinants and its relation with target organ damage in young subjects. Methods The aorta was measured at the level of the Sinus of Valsalva (SoV) and at its proximal ascending tract (pAA) in a total of 177 young subjects (11-35 years). Linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between aortic size, clinical and haemodynamic parameters. Results Prevalence of pAA and SoV dilatation was 10.2% and 8.7%, respectively. No significant differences in prevalence were found in hypertensive, diabetic and obese subjects; aortic enlargement was less frequent in African-Americans. Age, sex and central pulse pressure were the most important determinants of aortic size Left ventricular mass was increased in patients with aortic enlargement and aortic size showed an inverse relation with indices of local distensibility. Conclusion The prevalence of aortic dilatation among young patients is high (10%). As in adults, age and BSA are the main determinants of aortic size. Dilatation of the ascending aorta is associated with an increased left ventricular mass, as in adults, but not with increased arterial stiffness. Local distensibility is reduced in patients with pAA enlargement.


      PubDate: 2016-08-09T20:02:59Z
       
  • “Complexity, Controversies and Disagreements in Hypertension
           Treatment Goals”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Allan B. Schwartz
      Recent reports and trials were intended to improve and simplify the management of hypertension. Instead the opposite has occurred. Complexity, controversies and disagreements in the treatment of Hypertension is noted in the last four years: JNC 7 to JNC 8 to JNC ?; 2013 to 2014 to SPRINT in 2015 to 2016. Was it possible that the future would be a return to the past? These questions require discussion and hopefully a comprehensive resolution in our journals and national meetings.” SPRINT, although answering some questions, raises other questions and creates controversies. The “twenty questions” that must be addressed by every practitioner to formulate hypertension treatment goals, since no two patients are alike, including: age, fraility, race, diabetes mellitus, proteinuria, chronic kidney disease, coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, TIA, what number is too high or too low, what medicine category to start, what combinations, ACE/ARB, what diuretic, CCB, Beta B, alpha AB, BP recording posture, time of day or night, type of BP recording device, aneroid, hand held bulb, analogue vs digital, etc., etc., etc... We shall look forward to a comprehensive and coordinated explanation of theses multiple hypertension management issues in our upcoming national journals and clinical and scientific gatherings and our national cardiovascular organizations.


      PubDate: 2016-08-04T18:35:53Z
       
  • Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 Attenuates Vascular Remodeling; Roles of
           Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hirotomo Nakaoka, Masaki Mogi, Jun Suzuki, Harumi Kan-no, Li-Juan Min, Jun Iwanami, Masatsugu Horiuchi
      We previously reported interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 plays physiological roles in “growth”-regulated angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor expression in fibroblasts. Here, we investigated whether IRF-1 is involved in attenuation of vascular remodeling in association with AT2 receptor up-regulation. Neointimal area in injured artery after 14 days of cuff placement was significantly increased in IRF-1 knockout mice (IRF-1KO) and AT2 receptor knockout mice (AT2KO) compared with wild-type mice (WT: C57BL/6J). Treatment with compound 21 attenuated neointima formation in both WT and IRF-1KO. AT2 receptor mRNA expression after 7 days of cuff placement was significantly decreased in IRF-1KO compared with WT; however, IRF-1 expression did not differ between AT2KO and WT. Apoptotic changes in injured artery after 14 days of cuff placement were significantly attenuated in IRF-1KO, with a decrease in ICE and iNOS mRNA levels. These results indicate IRF-1 is one of the key transcriptional factors for the prevention of neointimal formation involving AT2 receptors. (155 words)


      PubDate: 2016-08-04T18:35:53Z
       
  • The effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction on cardiac
           patients’ blood pressure, perceived stress and anger: a single-blind
           randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Javad Momeni, Abdollah Omidi, Fariba Raygan, Hossein Akbari
      This study aimed at assessing the effects of mindfulness-based stress reduction(MBSR) on cardiac patients’ blood pressure, perceived stress and anger. In total, 60 cardiac patients were recruited between April and June 2015 from a specialized private cardiac clinic located in Kashan, Iran. Patients were allocated to the intervention and control groups. Patients in the experimental group received MBSR in eight 2.5-hour sessions while patients in the control group received no psychological therapy. The main outcomes were blood pressure, perceived stress, and anger. Analysis of covariance revealed a significant difference between the study groups regarding the posttest values of systolic blood pressure, perceived stress and anger (P< 0.001). However, the study groups did not differ significantly in terms of diastolic blood pressure (P=0.061, P= 0.17). This study reveals that MBSR is effective in reducing cardiac patients’ systolic blood pressure, perceived stress and anger.


      PubDate: 2016-08-04T18:35:53Z
       
  • Effects of the novel norepinephrine prodrug, droxidopa, on ambulatory
           blood pressure in patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Horacio Kaufmann, Lucy Norcliffe-Kaufmann, L. Arthur Hewitt, Gerald J. Rowse, William B. White
      The prodrug droxidopa increases blood pressure (BP) in patients with neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH). The BP profile of droxidopa in nOH patients (n=18) was investigated using ambulatory BP monitoring. Following dose optimization and a washout period, 24-hour “off-drug” data were collected. “On-drug” assessment was conducted after 4–5 weeks of droxidopa treatment (mean dose, 444 mg, 3 times daily). Ambulatory monitoring off drug revealed that 90% of patients already had abnormalities in the circadian BP profile and did not meet criteria for normal nocturnal BP dipping. On treatment, both overall mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic BPs were higher compared to off drug (137/81 mmHg vs 129/76 mmHg; P=0.017/0.002). Mean daytime systolic BP was significantly higher with droxidopa (8.4 ± 3.1 mmHg; P=0.014). Although nocturnal BP was not significantly higher on droxidopa versus off treatment (P=0.122), increases in nocturnal (supine) BP ≥10 mmHg were observed in 4 cases (22%). Severe supine systolic hypertensive readings at night (>200 mmHg) were captured in 1 case, and only while on treatment. These data demonstrate that ambulatory BP monitoring is useful to evaluate the circadian BP profile after initiating treatment with a pressor agent.


      PubDate: 2016-08-04T18:35:53Z
       
  • Large artery stiffness is associated with gamma-glutamyltransferase in
           young, healthy adults: The African-PREDICT study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Melissa Maritz, Carla MT. Fourie, Johannes M. Van Rooyen, Sarah J. Moss, Aletta E. Schutte
      Increased arterial stiffness is linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD) development, particularly in black populations. Since detrimental health behaviours in young adults may affect arterial stiffness, we determined whether arterial stiffness associates with specific health behaviours, and whether it is more pronounced in young healthy black compared to white adults. We included 373 participants, (49% black, 42% men) aged 20-30 years. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) was higher for blacks than whites (p<0.001), but carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) was similar (6.37 vs. 6.36 m/s; p=0.89) after adjustment for MAP. The black group had higher gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) (p<0.001), cotinine, reactive oxygen species, interleukin-6 and monocyte-chemoattractant protein-1 (all p≤0.017). PWV related positively and independently to GGT in both groups before and after multiple-adjustments (both β=0.15; p≤0.049). Blacks had an unfavourable vascular profile and higher GGT, possibly indicating a higher vulnerability to CVD development, including changes in arterial stiffness. However, this observation needs confirmation.


      PubDate: 2016-08-04T18:35:53Z
       
  • Long-term Safety of Droxidopa in Patients With Symptomatic Neurogenic
           Orthostatic Hypotension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 August 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Stuart Isaacson, Steven Vernino, Adam Ziemann, Gerald J. Rowse, Uwa Kalu, William B. White
      The long-term safety of droxidopa for the treatment of symptomatic neurogenic orthostatic hypotension (nOH) in patients with Parkinson disease, pure autonomic failure, multiple system atrophy, or nondiabetic autonomic neuropathy was evaluated in a phase 3, multinational, open-label study in patients who previously participated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of droxidopa. A total of 350 patients received droxidopa 100 to 600 mg 3 times daily. Mean duration of droxidopa exposure was 363 days (range, 2–1133 days). Rates of serious adverse events (AEs), cardiac-related AEs, and supine hypertension were 24%, 5%, and 5%, respectively. Most AEs, including those of a cardiovascular nature, were not attributed by investigators to droxidopa. In this large cohort of patients with nOH, droxidopa was well tolerated during long-term use.


      PubDate: 2016-08-04T18:35:53Z
       
  • Acculturation and Changes in Body Mass Index, Waist Circumference, and
           Waist-Hip Ratio among Filipino Americans with Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Reimund Serafica, Alona D. Angosta
      The purpose of this research study was to examine whether level of acculturation is a predictor of body mass index (BMI), wait circumference (WC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) in Filipino Americans with hypertension in the United States (U.S.) The Filipino Americans (N=108) were recruited from a primary care clinic in the U.S. Two instruments were used to collect and operationalize the variables, specifically: (1) Socioeconomic/Demographic Questionnaire; and (2) A Short Acculturation Scale for Filipino Americans (ASASFA). Descriptive statistics and Partial Least Squares (PLS) were used to calculate the results. The PLS path model identified acculturation as a predictor of BMI, WC, and WHR among Filipino Americans. The positive path coefficient (β = .384) was statistically significant (t = 5.92, p < .001). Health care providers need to stress the importance of the degree of acculturation when developing culturally appropriate lifestyle and health promotion interventions among immigrant patients with hypertension.


      PubDate: 2016-07-29T16:31:53Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-07-29T16:31:53Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 7




      PubDate: 2016-07-24T14:42:46Z
       
  • SPRINT and the elderly
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 7
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-07-24T14:42:46Z
       
  • Instructions for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 7




      PubDate: 2016-07-24T14:42:46Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 7




      PubDate: 2016-07-24T14:42:46Z
       
  • Subclinical hypothyroidism causing hypertension in pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Rishi Ramtahal, Andrew Dhanoo
      This is a case of a 25-year-old primigravida who was referred to the hypertension specialist for elevated blood pressures. The patient had an elevated Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) with normal free Thyroxine (T4) levels and was positive for Thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPO Ab) resulting in a diagnosis of subclinical hypothyroidism. The patient was successfully treated with levothyroxine which normalised the blood pressure without the need for antihypertensive treatment. This case illustrates a cause of secondary hypertension that is not always considered in the differential diagnosis of a patient with hypertension in pregnancy.


      PubDate: 2016-07-24T14:42:46Z
       
  • Hypovitaminosis D Predicts the Onset of Orthostatic Hypotension in Older
           Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Nicola Veronese, Caterina Trevisan, Francesco Bolzetta, Marina De Rui, Sabina Zambon, Estella Musacchio, Leonardo Sartori, Brendon Stubbs, Egle Perissinotto, Gaetano Crepaldi, Enzo Manzato, Giuseppe Sergi
      A number of small cross sectional studies have demonstrated that hypovitaminosis D (represented by low 25 hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD) levels) is associated with orthostatic hypotension (OH). We investigated if hypovitaminosis D is associated with the onset of OH in older adults over a follow-up of 4.4 years. 25OHD was categorized using sex specific quartiles; OH was defined as a drop of ≤20 mm Hg in systolic or ≤10 mm Hg in diastolic blood pressure <3 minutes of standing. Among 1,308 elderly without OH at baseline, using an adjusted logistic regression analysis and taking those with higher baseline serum 25OHD as reference, there was a significant increase in the onset of OH in those with lower serum 25OHD levels. The association was significant only in women when we stratified by sex. In conclusion, hypovitaminosis D predicts the onset of OH in older adults, particularly in women.


      PubDate: 2016-07-06T10:57:21Z
       
  • Hypotension based on office and ambulatory monitoring blood pressure.
           Prevalence and clinical profile among a cohort of 70,997 treated
           hypertensives
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): J.A. Divisón-Garrote, J.R. Banegas, J.J. De la Cruz, C. Escobar-Cervantes, A. De la Sierra, M. Gorostidi, E. Vinyoles, J. Abellán-Aleman, J. Segura, L.M. Ruilope
      We aimed to determine the prevalence of hypotension and factors associated with the presence of this condition in treated hypertensive patients undergoing ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM). Data were taken from the Spanish ABPM Registry. Office blood pressure (BP) and ambulatory BP were determined using validated devices under standardized conditions. Based on previous studies, hypotension was defined as office systolic/diastolic BP <110 and/or 70 mmHg, daytime ABPM <105 and/or 65 mmHg, nighttime ABPM <90 and/or 50 mmHg, and 24-h ABPM <100 and/or 60 mmHg. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to determine the variables associated with the presence of hypotension. A total of 70,997 hypertensive patients on treatment (mean age 61.8 years, 52.5% men) were included in the study. The prevalence of hypotension was 8.2% with office BP, 12.2% with daytime ABPM, 3.9% with nighttime ABPM and 6.8% with 24-h ABPM. Low diastolic BP values were responsible for the majority of cases of hypotension. Some 68% of the hypotension cases detected by daytime ABPM did not correspond to hypotension according to office BP. The variables independently and consistently associated with higher likelihood of office, daytime, and 24h-based hypotension were age, female gender, history of ischemic heart disease and body mass index <30 kg/ m2 (p<0.05). In conclusion, in this large cohort of patients in usual daily practice, one in 8 treated hypertensive patients are at risk of hypotension according to daytime BP. Two thirds of them are not adequately identified with office BP. ABPM could be especially helpful for identifying ambulatory hypotension, in particular in patients who are older, women, or with previous ischemic heart disease where antihypertensive treatment should be especially individualized and cautious.


      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Does masked hypertension impact left ventricular deformation?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marijana Tadic, Cesare Cuspidi, Vladan Vukomanovic, Vera Celic, Ivan Tasic, Ana Stevanovic, Vesna Kocijancic
      Objective Our aim was to compare left ventricular (LV) deformation in subjects with masked hypertension (MH) to normotensive and sustained hypertensive patients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 185 untreated subjects who underwent 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring and complete two-dimensional echocardiographic examination (2DE) including multilayer strain analysis. MH was diagnosed if clinic blood pressure (BP) was normal (<140/90 mmHg) and 24-hour BP was increased (≥130/80 mmHg). Results 2DE LV longitudinal and circumferential strains gradually and significantly decreased from normotensive controls across MH individuals to sustained hypertensive patients. 2DE radial strain was not different between groups. 2DE longitudinal and circumferential endocardial and mid-myocardial layer strains progressively decreased from normotensive control to sustained hypertensive individuals. Longitudinal and circumferential epicardial layer strains were lower in sustained hypertensive patients than in normotensive controls. Clinic and 24-hour systolic BP were associated with 2DE LV longitudinal endocardial strain, mid-myocardial strain and 2DE circumferential endocardial strain in the whole study population independent of LV structure and diastolic function. Conclusion MH significantly affect LV deformation assessed by 2DE traditional strain and 2DE multilayer strain. Clinic and 24h systolic BP were associated with LV mechanics evaluated with comprehensive 2DE strain analysis independent of LV structure and diastolic function.


      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Controversies in Hypertension: Is lower blood pressure always better?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Sheldon Tobe, Joseph L. Izzo
      Cardiovascular disease risk is continuously related to BP over the range of about 115/75 to 185/115 mmHg, yet all clinical guidelines use arbitrary cutoffs to determine acceptable antihypertensive therapy. There is substantial conflict in the results of clinical trials with respect to how low the most appropriate BP threshold should be to reduce CVD and renal risk. This divergence should not be surprising given the intrinsic differences in circulatory anatomy and physiology among the heart, brain, vessels, and kidney. In the real world, however, discreet BP targets or even ranges may be a tolerable practical necessity as long as it is recognized that any arbitrary threshold in a continuous relationship can serve as both a stimulus and a barrier to effective treatment. Overall, it may be necessary to assess risk differentially by organ or disease process; lower systolic pressure is most beneficial in preventing recurrent stroke and heart failure episodes, benefits on kidney function and ischemic heart disease are less demonstrable for a variety of scientific and experimental design reasons. It may also be a good time for practice guideline writers and individual physicians to re-evaluate the benefits of lower BP targets.


      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • HOPE-3—Finding the positive in the negative
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch



      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Vascular Peroxidase 1 Up-Regulation by Angiotensin II Attenuates Nitric
           Oxide Production Through Increasing Asymmetrical Dimethylarginine in
           HUVECs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 July 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Haiyang Peng, Luyao Chen, Xiao Huang, Tianlun Yang, Zaixin Yu, Guangjie Cheng, Guogang Zhang, Ruizheng Shi
      Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), the endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), contributes to endothelial dysfunction and subsequent cardiovascular events including hypertension. Vascular peroxidase 1 (VPO1) is a novel heme-containing peroxidase that utilizes hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generated from co-expressed nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase to catalyze peroxidative reactions. Our previous study revealed a clear connection between VPO1 gene expression and endothelial dysfunction in spontaneously hypertensive rats. In the present study, we explored whether VPO1 participates in endothelial dysfunction during hypertension by increasing ADMA production. Spontaneously hypertensive rats displayed impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation, decreased eNOS expression and nitric oxide production, significantly increased VPO1 expression in both plasma and aorta tissue, and an increased ADMA level in plasma. In cultured endothelial cells, angiotensin II increased the ADMA level by inhibiting dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity, which was inhibited by knockdown of VPO1 using small hairpin RNA. Moreover, the NADPH oxidase inhibitor, and the hydrogen peroxide scavenger attenuated angiotensin II-mediated up-regulation of VPO1 and generation of hypochlorous acid. Furthermore, VPO1-derived hypochlorous acid suppressed recombinant dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase activity and increased ADMA production. VPO1 plays a critical role in ADMA production via H2O2–VPO1– hypochlorous acid pathways, which may contribute to endothelial dysfunction in hypertension.
      Teaser The present study revealed that VPO1 plays a role in endothelial dysfunction in SHR by enhancing ADMA production and that this effect of VPO1 was fulfilled by inhibiting DDAH-2 activity via the VPO1 product HOCl. The present study also elucidated that VPO1 acts downstream of NOX and plays an important role in NOX-mediated oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension.

      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Target blood pressure for patients with hypertension: Lower Blood Pressure
           is not better
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Simon W. Rabkin
      The ‘lower is better’ hypothesis for BP management, is too simplistic, does not take into account the complexity of the other conditions that patients with hypertension may have and ignores: the basic and sometimes complex pathophysiology of organ blood flow; the presence, severity and location of atherosclerosis; the mechanism of the effects of antihypertensive drugs on SBP and DBP and the epidemiologic data relating BP to cardiovascular outcomes at lower DBP levels. A number of studies in conditions including coronary artery disease, chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus have demonstrated that BP reductions to much lower levels than 140/90 either do not further reduce or may increase cardiovascular events. In summary, rigid adherence to a lower is better strategy for all patients is not warranted. Rather clinicians must treat their patients recognize the patients’ co-morbid diseases along with their severity, as well as the patient’s risk for cardiovascular events and drug-induced complications.


      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Subclinical Hypothyroidism and Gestational Hypertension: Causal or
           Coincidence?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Andrea Kattah, Vesna D. Garovic



      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Prevalence of electrocardiographic abnormalities based on hypertension
           severity and blood pressure levels: The REasons for Geographic and Racial
           Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hemal Bhatt, Christopher M. Gamboa, Monika M. Safford, Elsayad Soliman, Stephen P. Glasser
      Background We evaluated the prevalence of major and minor electrocardiographic (ECG) abnormalities based on blood pressure (BP) control and hypertension (HTN) treatment resistance. Methods We analyzed data from the REGARDS study of 20,932 participants who were divided into presence of major (n = 3,782), only minor (n = 8,944) or no (n = 8,206) ECG abnormalities. The cohort was stratified into normotension (n = 3,373), prehypertension (n = 4,142), controlled HTN (n = 8,619), uncontrolled HTN (n = 3,544), controlled apparent treatment resistant HTN (aTRH, n = 400) and uncontrolled aTRH (n = 854) groups and the prevalence ratios (PR) of major and minor ECG abnormalities were assessed separately for each BP group. The full multi-variable adjustment included demographics, risk factors and HTN duration. Results Compared with normotension, the PRs of major ECG abnormalities for prehypertension, controlled HTN, uncontrolled HTN, controlled aTRH and uncontrolled aTRH groups were 1.01 (0.90 – 1.14), 1.30 (1.16 – 1.45), 1.37 (1.23 – 1.54), 1.42 (1.22 – 1.64) and 1.44 (1.26 – 1.65) respectively (p < 0.001), whereas, the PRs of minor ECG abnormalities among each of the above BP groups were similar. Conclusion Detection of major ECG abnormalities among hypertensive persons with poor control and treatment resistance may help improve their cardiovascular risk stratification and early intervention.


      PubDate: 2016-07-01T08:36:49Z
       
  • Lower is better in hypertension, but how low should blood pressure be
           targeted?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Rhian M. Touyz



      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:35:39Z
       
  • Important practice lessons from the SPRINT study beyond the blood pressure
           goal: All well-known and now confirmed
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): George S. Stergiou, Michael Doumas, Anastasios Kollias, Vasilios Papademetriou



      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:35:39Z
       
  • Significance of adjusting salt intake by body weight in the evaluation of
           dietary salt and blood pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Tomomi Hashimoto, Hiroyuki Takase, Tateo Okado, Tomonori Sugiura, Sumiyo Yamashita, Genjiro Kimura, Nobuyuki Ohte, Yasuaki Dohi
      The close association between dietary salt and hypertension is well established. However, previous studies generally assessed salt intake without adjustment for body weight. Herein, we investigated the significance of body weight-adjusted salt intake in the general population. The present cross-sectional study included 7,629 participants from our yearly physical checkup program and their salt intake was assessed using a spot urine test to estimate 24-hour urinary salt excretion. Total salt intake increased with increasing body weight. Body weight-adjusted salt intake was greater in participants with hypertension than in those without hypertension. Systolic blood pressure, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and urinary albumin were independently correlated with body weight-adjusted salt intake after adjustment for possible cardiovascular risk factors. Excessive body weight-adjusted salt intake could be related to an increase in blood pressure and hypertensive organ damage. Adjustment for body weight might therefore provide clinically important information when assessing individual salt intake.


      PubDate: 2016-06-18T18:35:39Z
       
  • Decision sharing in preventive cardiology
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Lawrence R. Krakoff



      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Renal denervation significantly attenuates cardiorenal fibrosis in rats
           with sustained pressure overload
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Qian Liu, Dasheng Lu, Shengchan Wang, Kai Wang, Qi Zhang, Ying Wang, Ping Fang, Zhenzhen Li, Jie Geng, Qijun Shan
      To investigate the effects of renal denervation (RDN) on comprehensive cardiac and renal fibrosis in cardiomyopathy. Five weeks after successful transverse aortic constriction (TAC)–induced cardiomyopathy model building, Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to three groups: (1) RDN, (2) sham, and (3) losartan. Sham TAC rats served as control group. Compared with control, TAC groups showed a significant decrease in left ventricle ejection fraction and increase in ventricular septum thickness and left atrium diameter on echocardiography after 5 weeks. At 10 weeks post-TAC, venous blood samples were collected for fibrosis biochemical assay. Heart and kidney samples were also harvested for fibrosis pathophysiological detection. Cardiac and renal fibrosis quantity results showed that, compared with sham group, collagen volume fraction was significantly decreased in RDN group more than in losartan group. Biochemical parameters such as tumor necrosis factor α, aldosterone, and B-type natriuretic peptide levels as well as biomarkers for fibrosis such as procollagen type I N-terminal propeptide and procollagen type III N-terminal propeptide concentrations were significantly decreased in RDN group in comparison with sham. In addition, compared with sham group, left ventricle tissue protein expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and angiotensin II type I receptor was downregulated, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was upregulated in RDN but not in losartan group. RDN significantly attenuates cardiac and renal fibrosis in cardiomyopathy. Differing from losartan, which only has angiotensin II type I receptor inhibition effects, RDN comprehensively suppresses cardiac and renal fibrogenesis through multiple pathways.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Is there an association between the prevalence of atrial fibrillation and
           severity and control of hypertension? The REasons for Geographic And
           Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hemal Bhatt, Christopher M. Gamboa, Monika M. Safford, Elsayad Soliman, Stephen P. Glasser
      Background The association of atrial fibrillation (AF) with the severity and control of hypertension (HTN) remains unclear. Methods We analyzed data from the national biracial cohort of REasons for Geographic And Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study. The AF prevalence ratios were estimated and full multi-variable adjustment included demographics, risk factors, medication adherence, HTN duration and antihypertensive medication classes. Results Of the 30,018 study participants (8.6% with AF), 4,386 had normotension (4.3% with AF), 5,916 had prehypertension (4.3 with AF%), 12,294 had controlled HTN (11.2% with AF), 5,587 had uncontrolled HTN (8.1% with AF), 547 had controlled apparent treatment resistant hypertension (aTRH) (19.2% with AF), and 1288 had uncontrolled aTRH (15.5% with AF). Compared with normotension, the AF prevalence ratios for prehypertension, controlled HTN, uncontrolled HTN, controlled aTRH and uncontrolled aTRH groups in fully adjusted model were 1.01 (95% CI 0.84 – 1.21), 1.42 (1.18 – 1.71), 1.37 (1.14 – 1.65), 1.17 (0.86 – 1.58) and 1.42 (1.10 – 1.84) respectively (p < 0.001). Conclusion The prevalence of AF was similar among persons with HTN regardless of BP level and antihypertensive treatment resistance.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Spironolactone and glucose metabolism, a systematic review and
           meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jie V. Zhao, Lin Xu, Shi Lin Lin, C Mary Schooling
      Diabetes predicts cardiovascular disease (CVD); some drugs are effective for CVD prevention but increase the risk of diabetes. In a systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled trials we assessed if spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, affected glycemic control. We searched PubMed using (“spironolactone” or “aldactone”) and trial and (“glucose” or “diabetes” or “insulin” or “insulin resistance”) from March 3, 2015 to January 4, 2016. In total, 18 eligible trials were identified; 10 on fasting glucose, 8 on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), 7 on homeostatic model assessment (HOMA)-insulin resistance (IR) and 8 on insulin. Spironolactone increased HbA1c (0.16%, 95% confidence interval 0.02 to 0.30), but had no clear effect on fasting glucose, HOMA-IR and insulin. A mechanistic randomized controlled trial in people with and without diabetes might provide insight concerning these pleiotropic effects on diabetes and CVD relevant to prevention of both diseases.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 6




      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Renal denervation in the era of HTN-3. Comprehensive review and glimpse
           into the future
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joana Delgado Silva, Marco Costa, Bernard J. Gersh, Lino Gonçalves
      The pathophysiologic role of sympathetic overactivity in conditions such as hypertension has been well documented. [1] Catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is a minimally invasive percutaneous procedure which aims to disrupt sympathetic nerve afferent and efferent activity through the application of radiofrequency energy directly within the renal artery wall. This technique has emerged as a very promising treatment with dramatic effects upon refractory hypertension but also in other conditions in which a sympathetic influence is present. Several studies have evaluated the safety and efficacy of this procedure, presently surrounded by controversy since the recent outcome of Symplicity HTN-3, the first randomized, sham-control trial, which failed to confirm RDN previous reported benefits on BP and cardiovascular risk lowering. Consequently, although some centers halted their RDN programs, research continues and both the concept of denervation and treatment strategies are being redefined in order to identify patients who can drive the most benefit from this technology. In the United States, The FDA has appropriately mandated that RDN remains an investigative procedure and a new generation of sham controlled trials are ongoing and aimed to assess not only its efficacy against pharmacotherapy but also trials in drug free patients with the objective of demonstrating once and for all whether the procedure actually does lower BP in comparison to a placebo arm. In this article, we present an overview of the sympathetic nervous system and its role in hypertension, examine the current data on RDN and share some insights and future expectations.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Hypertension and Alterations in Left Ventricular Structure and Geometry in
           African Americans: The Jackson Heart Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marwah Abdalla, John N. Booth, Keith M. Diaz, Mario Sims, Paul Muntner, Daichi Shimbo
      African Americans (AAs) have an increased risk for hypertension-related cardiovascular outcomes compared with Whites, which may be related to abnormal left ventricular (LV) structure. We examined the association of prevalent hypertension with concentric remodeling (CR: normal LV mass index [LVMI] and increased relative wall thickness: RWT), eccentric hypertrophy (EH: increased LVMI and normal RWT), and concentric hypertrophy (CH: increased LVMI and increased RWT) within the Jackson Heart Study. Among 4,721 participants (mean ± SD age 55.7±12.7 years), 2,841 (60.2%) had prevalent hypertension, defined as mean clinic BP ≥140/90mmHg or antihypertensive medication use. Prevalent hypertension was associated with a statistically significantly increased odds for having CR (odds ratio [OR] 1.78 95% confidence interval CI: 1.42-2.24), EH (OR 1.68 95%CI: 1.15-2.44), and CH (OR 3.86 95%CI: 2.28-6.54) after multivariable adjustment. In conclusion, in a population-based sample of AAs, hypertension was associated with an increased odds for having abnormal LV structure, particularly CH.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Vitamin D depletion does not affect key aspects of the preeclamptic
           phenotype in a transgenic rodent model for preeclampsia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Louise Bjørkholt Andersen, Michaela Golic, Lukasz Przybyl, Grith Lykke Sorensen, Jan Stener Jørgensen, Palle Fruekilde, Frauke von Versen-Höynck, Florian Herse, Carsten Schriver Højskov, Ralf Dechend, Henrik Thybo Christesen, Nadine Haase
      Maternal vitamin D deficiency is proposed as a risk factor for preeclampsia in humans. We tested the hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates and high supplementation ameliorates the preeclampsia phenotype in an established transgenic rat model of human renin-angiotensin system (RAS) mediated preeclampsia. Methods Adult rat dams, transgenic for human angiotensinogen (hAGT) and mated with male rats transgenic for human renin (hREN), were fed either vitamin D-depleted chow (VDd) or enriched chow (VDh) two weeks before mating and during pregnancy. Mean blood pressure was recorded by tail-cuff, and 24-hour urine samples were collected in metabolic cages at days 6 and 18 of gestation. Rats were sacrificed at day 21 of gestation. Results Depleted dams (VDd) had negligible serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D2+3 levels (mean±SEM; 2.95±0.45 nmol/l vs. VDh 26.20±2.88 nmol/l, p=0.01), but in both groups, levels of 1,25(OH)2D3 remained below detection level of 25 pmol/l. Dietary vitamin D depletion did not aggravate hypertension (mean±SEM BP, day 20 of gestation: 151.38±5.65 mmHg VDd vs. 152.00±4.10 mmHg VDh), or proteinuria. Fetal anthropometrics were similar between the groups, whereas VDd displayed lower placental:fetal weight ratios (0.15 vs. 0.16 g/g, p=0.01) and increased sFlt-1/PlGF ratio. Expression of hREN was lower in placenta of VDd dams (0.82±0.44 AU vs. 1.52±0.15 AU, p=0.04). Expression of key vitamin D metabolizing enzymes was unchanged. Conclusion Dietary vitamin D intervention did not alter key aspects of the preeclampsia phenotype using the transgenic rodent model of human RAS-mediated pre-eclampsia, plausibly due to altered vitamin D metabolism or excretion in the transgenic rats.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Gender, Race, Age, and Regional Differences in the Association of Pulse
           Pressure with Atrial Fibrillation: The Reasons for Geographic and Racial
           Differences in Stroke Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 June 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Lama Ghazi, Monika M. Safford, Yulia Khodneva, Wesley T. O’Neal, Elsayed Z. Soliman, Stephen P. Glasser
      Background Pulse pressure (PP) has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF) independent of other measures of arterial pressure, and other AF risk factors. However, the impact of gender, race, age, and geographic region on the association between PP and AF is unclear. Method A cross-sectional study of data from 25,109 participants (65±9 years of age), 54% women, 40% black) from the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study recruited between 2003 and 2007 were analyzed. AF was defined as a self-reported history of a previous physician diagnosis, or presence of AF on ECG. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to calculate the odds ratio for AF. Interactions for age (< and >75 years), gender, race, and region were examined in the multivariable adjusted model. Results The prevalence of AF increased with widening PP (7.9%, 7.9%, 8.4%, and 11.6%, for PP <45, 45-54.9, 55-64.9, and >65 mm Hg, respectively, [p for trend <0.001]), but attenuated with adjustment. No differences by gender, race, and region were observed. However, there was evidence of significant effect modification by age (interaction p=0.0002). For those <75 years of age, PP >65 mm Hg compared to PP<45 mm Hg was significantly associated with higher risk of AF in both the unadjusted and multivariable adjusted models (Odds Ratio 1.66 [95% CI 1.42-1.94] and 1.32 [95% CI 1.03-1.70], respectively). In contrast, higher PP (55-64.9 mm Hg) among those >75 years of age was significantly associated with a lower risk of AF. Conclusion The relationship between PP and AF may differ for older vs. younger individuals.


      PubDate: 2016-06-16T18:07:20Z
       
  • Salt-induced hypertension—what do we really know about the
           mechanism?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Association between uric acid and renal function in hypertensive patients:
           which role for systemic vascular involvement?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Giulio Geraci, Giuseppe Mulè, Massimiliano Morreale, Claudia Cusumano, Antonella Castiglia, Francesca Gervasi, Francesco D’Ignoto, Manuela Mogavero, Calogero Geraci, Santina Cottone
      The role of systemic vascular involvement in mediating the association between serum uric acid (SUA) and renal function in hypertension has not been explored. Main purpose of our study was to investigate whether morphofunctional vascular changes, assessed as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), might mediate the association between SUA and renal damage. We enrolled 523 hypertensive subjects with or without CKD and divided population into tertiles of SUA based on sex-specific cut-off values. cIMT and aPWV were higher in uppermost SUA-tertile patients when compared to those in the lowest ones (all p<0.001). Uricemia strongly correlated with cIMT and aPWV at univariate analysis (p<0.001), and with cIMT after adjustment for confounders (p<0.001). Adjustment for cIMT attenuated the relationship between SUA and eGFR (p=0.019). Systemic vascular changes seem partially to mediate the association between SUA and renal function in hypertensive patients, regardless of kidney function.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • SPRINT. Counteracting the risk of prehypertension?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Luis M. Ruilope



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Water aerobics is followed by short-time and immediate systolic blood
           pressure reduction in overweight and obese hypertensive women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Raphael Martins Cunha, Gisela Arsa, Eduardo Borba Neves, Lorena Curado Lopes, Fabio Santana, Marcelo Vasconcelos Noleto, Thais I. Rolim, Alexandre Machado Lehnen
      One exercise training session such as walking, running and resistance can lead to a decrease in blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, but few studies have investigated the effects of exercise training in an aquatic environment for overweight and obese hypertensive individuals. We aimed to assess the acute effects of a water aerobics session on blood pressure (BP) changes in pharmacologically treated overweight and obese hypertensive women. A randomized crossover study was carried out with 18 hypertensive women, 10 of them were overweight (54.4±7.9 years; BMI: 27.8±1.7 kg/m2) and eight obese (56.4±6.6 years; BMI: 33.0±2.0 kg/m2). The water aerobics exercise session consisted of a 45-minute training at the intensity of 70-75% of maximum heart rate adjusted for the aquatic environment. The control group did not enter the pool and did not perform any exercise. We measured systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) before, immediately after and every 10 minutes up to 30 minutes after the aerobic exercise or control session. Overall (n=18), DBP did not change after the water aerobic exercise and control session, and SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes post-exercise compared to the control session. Among overweight women, SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes post-exercise. In contrast, among obese women, SBP decreased only at 10 minutes post-exercise. SBP variation was –2.68 mm Hg in overweight and –1.24 mm Hg in obese women. In conclusion, the water aerobics session leads to a reduction in SBP, but not in DBP, during 10 and 20 minutes post-exercise recovery. Thus, it may be safely prescribed to overweight and obese women.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.162.21.214
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016