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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1286 journals)
    - HISTORY (818 journals)
    - History (General) (51 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (49 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (53 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AND OTHER AREAS (8 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (160 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (121 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (26 journals)

HISTORY (818 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Pleine Marge     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PLURA, Revista de Estudos de Religião / PLURA, Journal for the Study of Religion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Polis : The Journal of the Society for Greek Political Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Politics & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Politique et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription  
Popular Music History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
positions : asia critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Postcolonial Directions in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Postcolonial Text     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (hardback)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering History and Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Zoological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Procesos Historicos     Open Access  
Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychoanalysis Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Publications du Centre Européen d'Etudes Bourguignonnes     Full-text available via subscription  
Purdue Historian     Open Access  
Quaderns d’Història de l’Enginyeria     Open Access  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Queensland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Queensland Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Questes : Revue pluridisciplinaire d'études médiévales     Open Access  
Quintana. Revista de Estudos do Departamento de Historia da Arte     Open Access  
Radical History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Rasenna : Journal of the Center for Etruscan Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rationality and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Reinardus     Hybrid Journal  
Relaciones. Estudios de historia y sociedad     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Renaissance Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Reti Medievali Rivista     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Central and East European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Revista Análisis Internacional     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chilena de Historia del Derecho     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Historico-Juridicos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de História     Open Access  
Revista de História da UEG     Open Access  
Revista Historia Autónoma     Open Access  
Revista História da Educação - History of Education Journal     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revista Trías     Open Access  
Revolutionary Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire de l'Eglise de France     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revue d'histoire de l'enfance     Open Access  
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue d'histoire du XIXe siècle     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue de l’Histoire des Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Revue des Études Arméniennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue historique des armées     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Mabillon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric Society Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
RIHA Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
RIMA: Review of Indonesian and Malaysian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romanticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Royal Studies Journal     Open Access  
Rúbrica Contemporánea     Open Access  
Rural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Russian Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Russian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Russian Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sacris Erudiri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Saeculum : Jahrbuch für Universalgeschichte     Hybrid Journal  
Safundi : The Journal of South African and American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Scando-Slavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Science & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Science Journal of Volgograd State University. History. Area Studies. International Relations     Open Access  
Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine / Scientia Canadensis : revue canadienne d'histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scientiae Studia     Open Access  
Scottish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Scrineum Rivista     Open Access  
Scrutiny2: Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sibirica     Full-text available via subscription  
Siècles     Open Access  
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Signos Historicos     Open Access  
Slagmark - Tidsskrift for idéhistorie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Slavonica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Social History of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Science History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Società e Storia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Society and Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
SourceOECD National Accounts & Historical Statistics     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Historical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South African Journal of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Asia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
South Asian History and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South Asian Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Australian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription  
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Soviet and Post-Soviet Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Spontaneous Generations : A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Stewart Postharvest Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Aurea : Revista de Literatura Española y Teoría Literaria del Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Historiae Oeconomicae     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia z Historii Filozofii     Open Access  
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studium : Tijdschrift voor Wetenschaps- en Universiteits-geschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire des Sciences et des Universités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sydney Institute Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tasmanian Historical Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription  
Tempo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tempo e Argumento     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Irish Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Public Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The South African Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Theoria et Historia Scientiarum     Open Access  
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access  
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Varia Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Vestiges : Traces of Record     Full-text available via subscription  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Vínculos de Historia. Revista del Departamento de Historia de la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha     Open Access  
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vulcan     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Journal Cover Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
  [SJR: 1.15]   [H-I: 22]   [7 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2970 journals]
  • A reappraisal of clinical research on arterial stiffness in hypertension
           in France
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michel E. Safar



      PubDate: 2016-05-19T13:22:02Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Look before you leap
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • The many benefits of exercise
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Title Page
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • 2016 Scientific Program Committee
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4, Supplement




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Impaired metabolic profileis a predictor of capillary rarefaction in a
           population of hypertensive and normotensive individuals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Areti Triantafyllou, Panagiota Anyfanti, Georgios Triantafyllou, Xenophon Zabulis, Spyros Aslanidis, Stella Douma
      Capillary rarefaction is typically encountered in essential hypertension, yet identification of factors interfering with this phenomenon remains substantially underinvestigated. We examined whether components of metabolic profile (dyslipidemia, insulin resistance), inflammatory (high sensitivity C-reactive protein, hsCRP) and angiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF) factors are implicated in this phenomenon in a population of newly-diagnosed, never-treated hypertensive patients and normotensive controls. Nailfold capillary density was estimated with nail fold capillaroscopy using specifically designed software. A total of 159individuals, 93 hypertensives and 66 normotensives, were included. Nailfold capillary density was lower among hypertensives compared to normotensives (146.4±31.0 vs 155.4±26.9 respectively, p=0.047). In the total population, capillary density significantly correlated with HDL (r=0.232, p=0.003), HDL/LDL ratio (r=0.175, p=0.025), age (r=0.236, p=0.003), but neither with VEGF or hsCRP. An inverse association was found with body mass index (r=–0.174, p=0.029), insulin levels (r=–0.200, p=0.018) and HOMA-IR (r=–0.223, p=0.009). In the separate analysis for the hypertensive population, sex (p=0.014) and HOMA-IR (p=0.011) were identified as significant predictors of capillary rarefaction after adjustment for other factors. On the contrary, only HDL levels (p=0.036) predicted capillary density in the multiple regression model for the normotensive population. Different aspects of impaired metabolic profile, i.e. insulin resistance and low HDL levels, but not angiogenic or inflammatory markers, appear to be independently associated with capillary rarefaction in hypertensive and normotensive individuals.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Exercise Systolic Blood Pressure Variability is Associated with Increased
           Risk for New-Onset Hypertension among Normotensive Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Assaf Berger, Ehud Grossman, Moshe Katz, Shaye Kivity, Robert Klempfner, Shlomo Segev, Ilan Goldenberg, Yehezkel Sidi, Elad Maor
      Objective Both resting blood pressure (BP) variability and exercise BP previously showed association with incident hypertension. The aim of the present study was to examine whether visit-to-visit variability in exercise systolic blood pressure (SBP) can predict the risk for new onset hypertension among normotensive adults. Methods We investigated 6,546 normotensive men and women who were annually screened in a tertiary medical center and completed treadmill exercise tests at each visit. Based on the initial three baseline annual visits, long term inter-visit variability of exercise SBP among the three tests was measured using standard deviation (SD) and coefficient of variation (CV) for each participant. The rate of newly diagnosed hypertension was measured in different variability levels during 6±3 years of follow-up. Results Multivariate analysis adjusted for various clinical factors, including resting BP, showed that each 5 mmHg rise in the SD of exercise SBP resulted in a significant 5% increase in the risk for the development of future hypertension (p=0.015). Subjects in the upper exercise SBP SD variability tertile had a 28% (p=0.007) increased risk for hypertension during follow-up, as compared with those in the lowest tertile. Similar results were achieved for the assessment of CV of exercise SBP. Conclusions Visit-to-visit variability in exercise SBP can predict the development of future hypertension among normotensive individuals.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Low-intensity isometric handgrip exercise has no transient effect on blood
           pressure in patients with coronary artery disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Karla Goessler, Roselien Buys, Véronique A. Cornelissen
      Hypertension is highly prevalent among patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation reduces blood pressure (BP). However, less is known about the transient effect of a single bout of exercise on BP. Isometric handgrip exercise has been proposed as a new nonpharmacologic tool to lower BP. We aimed to investigate the acute effect of isometric handgrip exercise on BP in CAD patients. Twenty-one male CAD patients were included. All patients completed two experimental sessions in random order: one control and one low-intensity isometric handgrip session. BP was measured by means of a 24-hour ambulatory BP monitor preintervention, for 1 hour in the office and subsequently for 24 hours. Our results suggest that isometric handgrip exercise performed at low intensity is safe in patients with CAD but does not induce a transient reduction in BP.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Intrafamilial aggregation and heritability of tissue Doppler indexes of
           left ventricular diastolic function in a group of African descent
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Vernice R. Peterson, Gavin R. Norton, Carlos D. Libhaber, Muzi J. Maseko, Pinhas Sareli, Angela J. Woodiwiss
      Although several indexes of left ventricular (LV) diastolic function show heritability, the genetic influence on the tissue Doppler index, E/eʹ (early transmitral velocity/velocity of myocardial tissue lengthening), an index of LV filling pressures in those of black African descent is currently unknown. Furthermore, whether any genetic influences on E/eʹ are through an impact of LV remodeling or aortic function is unknown. Intrafamilial aggregation and heritability (SAGE software) of E/eʹ (echocardiography) were assessed in 129 nuclear families (29 spouse pairs, 216 parent–child pairs, and 113 sibling–sibling pairs) from an urban developing community of black Africans, independent of LV mass index (LVMI), LV relative wall thickness (RWT), central aortic systolic pressure (SBPc), and backward wave pressures (Pb) (applanation tonometry, SphygmoCor software). Independent of confounders including LVMI and RWT, E/eʹ was correlated in parent–child (r = 0.23; P < .001) and sibling–sibling (r = 0.29; P < .005), but not in spouse (r = 0.13; P = .51) pairs. The relationships between parent–child (r = 0.22; P < .001) and sibling–sibling (r = 0.29; P < .005) pairs persisted with adjustments for SBPc. The relationships between parent–child (r = 0.22; P < .001) and sibling–sibling (r = 0.26; P < .01) pairs also persisted with adjustments for Pb. Independent of confounders including LVMI and RWT, E/eʹ showed significant heritability (h2 ± standard error of the mean [SEM] = 0.51 ± 0.11; P < .0001) which similarly persisted with adjustments for SBPc (h2 ± SEM = 0.50 ± 0.11; P < .0001) and Pb (h2 ± SEM = 0.49 ± 0.11; P < .0001). In conclusion, in a group of African ancestry, independent of LV remodeling and aortic function, E/eʹ shows significant intrafamilial aggregation and robust heritability. Hence, genetic factors may play an important role in determining moderate-to-severe LV diastolic dysfunction independent of cardiac remodeling or aortic function in groups of black African ancestry.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • We are what we eat (and drink)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 4




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Retraction notice to “Urinary sodium or potassium excretion and
           blood pressure in adults of Shandong province, China: preliminary results
           of the SMASH project”
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Instructions for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Baroreflex Activation Therapy: Future use as therapy for severe or
           resistant hypertension?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John D. Bisognano



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • HOPE-3 and SPRINT: Two Landmark Trials with Different Outcomes?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John B. Kostis, Suzanne Oparil



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 5




      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Does this patient have hypertensive encephalopathy?
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 5
      Author(s): Foteini Christopoulou, Evangelos C. Rizos, Paraskevi Kosta, Maria I. Argyropoulou, Moses Elisaf
      A 63-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for further investigation and management of brain metastases. The patient was initially presented with a 4-day history of confusion. On the day of admission, the patient was confused, agitated, disorientated in place and time, and had visual disturbances. His blood pressure was repeatedly recorded high, with levels of systolic blood pressure between 170–210 mm Hg. A brain magnetic resonance imaging showed areas of high signal on T2 and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images, located bilaterally in the white matter of the occipital regions and unilateral in the left frontal lobe, suggestive of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Aggressive treatment of hypertension resulted in complete resolution of the clinical and radiologic features of the syndrome.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Salt-induced hypertension—what do we really know about the
           mechanism?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Are we in the midst of a transition in cardiovascular epidemiology?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Allopurinol: can it undo the harm done by high dietary fructose?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Barry J. Materson



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Rescue baroreflex activation therapy after Stanford B aortic dissection
           due to therapy-refractory hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Kay F. Weipert, Astrid Most, Oliver Dörr, Inga Helmig, Meshal Elzien, Gabriele Krombach, Christian W. Hamm, Damir Erkapic, Joern Schmitt
      Clinical trials have demonstrated significant and durable reduction in arterial pressure from baroreflex activation therapy (BAT) in patients with resistant arterial hypertension. There is a lack of data, however, concerning the use of BAT in a rescue approach during therapy-refractory hypertensive crisis resulting in life-threatening end-organ damage. Here, we describe the first case in which BAT was applied as a rescue procedure in an intensive care setting after ineffective maximum medical treatment. A 34-year-old male patient presented with Stanford B aortic dissection and hypertensive crisis. The dissection membrane extended from the left subclavian artery down to the right common iliac artery, resulting in a total arterial occlusion of the right leg. After emergency thoracic endovascular aortic repair and femorofemoral crossover bypass, the patient developed a compartment syndrome of the right lower limb, ultimately leading to amputation of the right leg above the knee. Even under deep sedation recurrent hypertensive crises of up to 220 mm Hg occurred that could not be controlled by eight antihypertensive drugs of different classes. Screening for secondary hypertension was negative. Eventually, rescue implantation of right-sided BAT was performed as a bailout procedure, followed by immediate activation of the device. After a hospital stay of a total of 8 weeks, the patient was discharged 2 weeks after BAT initiation with satisfactory blood pressure levels. After 1-year follow-up, the patient has not had a hypertensive crisis since the onset of BAT and is currently on fourfold oral antihypertensive therapy. The previously described bailout procedures for the treatment of life-threatening hypertensive conditions that are refractory to drug treatment have mainly comprised the interventional denervation of renal arteries. The utilization of BAT is new in this emergency context and showed a significant, immediate, and sustained reduction of blood pressure levels after activation. To our knowledge, we report the first case of an immediate activation of a barostim while the device is usually not activated before 2 to 4 weeks after implantation to allow time for the surgical site to heal. During the follow-up period, the healing process was not impaired, and a significant, immediate, and sustained reduction of blood pressure levels after activation could be observed. This treatment option offers maximum adherence to antihypertensive therapy to avoid future cardiovascular end-organ damage and possibly reduce antihypertensive medication and undesirable side effects.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Association between uric acid and renal function in hypertensive patients:
           which role for systemic vascular involvement?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Giulio Geraci, Giuseppe Mulè, Massimiliano Morreale, Claudia Cusumano, Antonella Castiglia, Francesca Gervasi, Francesco D’Ignoto, Manuela Mogavero, Calogero Geraci, Santina Cottone
      The role of systemic vascular involvement in mediating the association between serum uric acid (SUA) and renal function in hypertension has not been explored. Main purpose of our study was to investigate whether morphofunctional vascular changes, assessed as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) and aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV), might mediate the association between SUA and renal damage. We enrolled 523 hypertensive subjects with or without CKD and divided population into tertiles of SUA based on sex-specific cut-off values. cIMT and aPWV were higher in uppermost SUA-tertile patients when compared to those in the lowest ones (all p<0.001). Uricemia strongly correlated with cIMT and aPWV at univariate analysis (p<0.001), and with cIMT after adjustment for confounders (p<0.001). Adjustment for cIMT attenuated the relationship between SUA and eGFR (p=0.019). Systemic vascular changes seem partially to mediate the association between SUA and renal function in hypertensive patients, regardless of kidney function.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • SPRINT. Counteracting the risk of prehypertension?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Luis M. Ruilope



      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Water aerobics is followed by short-time and immediate systolic blood
           pressure reduction in overweight and obese hypertensive women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 May 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Raphael Martins Cunha, Gisela Arsa, Eduardo Borba Neves, Lorena Curado Lopes, Fabio Santana, Marcelo Vasconcelos Noleto, Thais I. Rolim, Alexandre Machado Lehnen
      One exercise training session such as walking, running and resistance can lead to a decrease in blood pressure in normotensive and hypertensive individuals, but few studies have investigated the effects of exercise training in an aquatic environment for overweight and obese hypertensive individuals. We aimed to assess the acute effects of a water aerobics session on blood pressure (BP) changes in pharmacologically treated overweight and obese hypertensive women. A randomized crossover study was carried out with 18 hypertensive women, 10 of them were overweight (54.4±7.9 years; BMI: 27.8±1.7 kg/m2) and eight obese (56.4±6.6 years; BMI: 33.0±2.0 kg/m2). The water aerobics exercise session consisted of a 45-minute training at the intensity of 70-75% of maximum heart rate adjusted for the aquatic environment. The control group did not enter the pool and did not perform any exercise. We measured systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) before, immediately after and every 10 minutes up to 30 minutes after the aerobic exercise or control session. Overall (n=18), DBP did not change after the water aerobic exercise and control session, and SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes post-exercise compared to the control session. Among overweight women, SBP decreased at 10 and 20 minutes post-exercise. In contrast, among obese women, SBP decreased only at 10 minutes post-exercise. SBP variation was –2.68 mm Hg in overweight and –1.24 mm Hg in obese women. In conclusion, the water aerobics session leads to a reduction in SBP, but not in DBP, during 10 and 20 minutes post-exercise recovery. Thus, it may be safely prescribed to overweight and obese women.


      PubDate: 2016-05-14T07:23:36Z
       
  • Arterial wave reflections and kidney function decline among persons with
           preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): the Multi-Ethnic
           Study of Atherosclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jeffrey J. Hsu, Ronit Katz, Julio A. Chirinos, David R. Jacobs, Daniel A. Duprez, Carmen A. Peralta
      Differences in arterial wave reflections have been associated with increased risk for heart failure and mortality. Whether these measures are also associated with kidney function decline is not well established. Reflection magnitude (RM, defined as the ratio of the backward wave [Pb] to that of the forward wave [Pf]), augmentation index (AIx), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA) were derived from radial tonometry measures among 5232 participants free of cardiovascular disease who were enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Kidney function was estimated by creatinine and cystatin C measurements, as well as albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). We evaluated the associations of Pb, Pf, RM, AIx, and PPA with annualized eGFR change and rapid kidney function decline over 5 years, using generalized linear mixed models and logistic regression, respectively. Of the study participants, 48% were male, mean age was 62 years, mean eGFR and median ACR at baseline were 84 ml/min/1.73m2 and 5.3 mg/g, respectively. In demographically adjusted models, both Pb and Pf had similarly strong associations with kidney function decline; compared to those in the lowest tertiles, the persons in the highest tertiles of Pb and Pf had a 1.01 and 0.99 ml/min/1.73m2/year faster eGFR decline, respectively (p < 0.05). However, these associations were attenuated after adjustment for systolic blood pressure. We found no significant associations between RM, AIx, or PPA and kidney function decline. In conclusion, the reflected and forward wave components were similarly associated with kidney function decline, and these associations were explained by differences in systolic blood pressure.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T19:51:21Z
       
  • Severe and Refractory Hypertension in a Young Woman
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): René H. Cuadra, William B. White
      Background Refractory hypertension in a young person is an uncommon clinical problem, but one that may be referred to hypertension specialists. Factitious hypertension is fortunately quite rare, but should be considered when evaluating patients who are refractory to numerous classes of antihypertensive therapies and have failed to achieve control despite input from multiple providers. Report of a Case A 19 year old woman was referred to us after failing to achieve blood pressure control by a primary physician and 2 subspecialists in nephrology and hypertension; she also had numerous emergency department visits for symptomatic and severe hypertension. Exhaustive diagnostic testing for secondary causes and witnessed medication dosing in an outpatient setting was unrevealing. Subsequent inpatient admission demonstrated normalization of BPs with small doses of intravenous antihypertensive agents. During the hospitalization, she was observed “pocketing” her oral medications in the buccal folds, and then discarding them in a trash container. Confrontation by psychiatrists and the hypertension specialists led to the admission that she had learned to start and stop beta-blockers and clonidine to induce severe, rebound hypertension. Discussion Factitious and induced hypertension is a rare cause of resistant or refractory hypertension. Nevertheless, hypertension specialists should suspect the diagnosis when there is a history of visits to multiple institutions and physicians, negative secondary workup, absence of overt target organ damage, history of psychiatric illness, and employment in the medical field.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T19:51:21Z
       
  • A practical approach for measurement of antihypertensive medication
           adherence in patients with resistant hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Nathalia Batista Correa, Ana Paula de Faria, Alessandra M.V. Ritter, Andrea Rodrigues Sabbatini, Aurélio Almeida, Veridiana Brunelli, David A. Calhoun, Heitor Moreno, Rodrigo Modolo
      Background Confirmation of medication adherence is a challenge in clinical practice and essential for the accurate diagnosis of resistant hypertension. Although it is well established that drug adherence is critical for controlling BP, there are still difficulties applying a simple, inexpensive, and reliable assessment of adherence in the clinical setting. We aimed to test a simple method to assess adherence in RH patients. Methods A pilot study with normotensives or mild/moderate hypertensive subjects was performed in order to provide a fluorescence cutoff point for adherence. After that, twenty-one patients referred to the Resistant Hypertension Clinic had triamterene prescribed and were monitored for a 30-day period. We conducted two unannounced randomly selected home visits for urine collection to test drug intake that day. Office, home and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, biochemical data, and Morisky Monitoring Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were systematically acquired. According to adherence indicated by urine fluorescence, subjects were divided into adherent and non-adherent groups. Results We found 57% of non-adherence. No differences were found between groups regarding baseline characteristics or prescribed medications; Kappa’s test showed concordance between adherence through MMAS-8 and fluorescence (Kappa=0.61; CI95% 0.28-0.94; p=0.005). Non-adherent patients had higher office (81±11 vs 73±6 mmHg, p=0.03), 24-h ABPM (75±9 vs 66±7 mmHg, p=0.01) and HBPM (77±9 vs 67±8 mmHg, p=0.01) diastolic BP than their counterparts. Conclusions Non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy is high in patients with RH, even when assessed in clinics specialized in this condition. Fluorometry to detect a drug in the urine of RH patients is safe, easy and reliable method to assess adherence.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T19:51:21Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-04-02T18:51:09Z
       
  • ‘Translational’ Medicine: Transforming SPRINT findings into
           clinical practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Dominic A. Sica, Robert A. Phillips, William B. White, John D. Bisognano, Raymond R. Townsend



      PubDate: 2016-04-02T18:51:09Z
       
  • Remarks from the new President of the American Society of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John D. Bisognano



      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Future Prospects for Renal Artery Denervation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Deepak L. Bhatt



      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Hypertensive Encephalopathy: What’s in a Name?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Phyllis August



      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Response to Budoff and Steigerwalt
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Raymond R. Townsend, Clive Rosendorff, Wilmer W. Nichols, David G. Edwards, Julio A. Chirions, Bo Fernhall, William C. Cushman



      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • Blood pressure response is impaired in patients with exercise induced
           ventricular ectopy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Oguzhan Ekrem Turan, Mustafa Ozturk, Ibrahim Kocaoglu, Selen Gursoy Turan
      Background Exercise induced ventricular ectopy (EIVE) has clinical and prognostic significance. But the mechanism underlying EIVE-related mortality still remains unclear. This study aims to assess blood pressure alteration in patients with EIVE and to identify the potential causes of increased mortality in this patient group. Methods and Results 3611 patients were screened within a one-year period, and patients with a structural heart disease, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, and chronic renal disease were excluded from the study. A total number of 98 patients with no chronic disease, who were retrospectively diagnosed with EIVE, were included in the study as patient group and 116 patients without EIVE were included as control group. The median age, gender distribution, laboratory test results and echocardiographic findings were similar between the two groups. Systolic blood pressure alterations during exercise stress testing were found to be significantly different. (p< 0.001) Moreover, EIVE group had significantly higher peak systolic blood pressure. (p< 0.001) A significant positive relation was found between peak systolic blood pressure level and ventricular ectopy count. (r:0.27, p=0.006) Conclusion Our study showed that EIVE patients without a structural heart disease or a chronic disease had higher peak systolic blood pressure levels. Higher systolic blood pressure alteration can be related to ventricular ectopy occurrence during exercise stress testing, which can be a possible reason underlying the increased rate of mortality among EIVE patients.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • Comment on ASH position paper on Central Blood pressure and Waveform
           analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Susan P. Steigerwalt



      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • The future for renal denervation depends on embracing the lessons learned
           from our previous studies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Murray Epstein
      •The knowledge base for the continued development of catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is robust •A critical determinant of RDN success is the delivery of sufficient radiofrequency energy to both proximal and distal renal nerves, including in the renal artery divisions •New multi–electrode catheters circumvent the several drawbacks of early models.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • Renal denervation for human hypertension: is there a future?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joseph L. Izzo, Sheldon W. Tobe
      The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays a permissive, if not primary causal, role in the genesis and maintenance of human essential hypertension. Excessive SNS activity in man is most apparent in early forms of hypertension (prehypertension and white-coat-type). Renal nerves are of particular interest because of their roles in modulating the activity of the renin-angiotensin system and renal sodium excretion. Renal denervation substantially ameliorates the development of hypertension in animal models such as renovascular, spontaneously hypertensive, and steroid-induced hypertension in rats and aortic coarctation in dogs. In man, catheter ablation of renal nerves has been undertaken in the late phases of hypertension; in a rigorously controlled trial in resistant hypertension (SYMPLICITY HTN-3), renal denervation did not reduce blood pressure over the long term. Is this because renal denervation is more appropriate to prevent than treat late-stage hypertension? Are there anatomical or technical barriers yet to be overcome in the procedure? These and other issues are addressed by two experts in this issue of the Controversies series: Deepak L. Bhatt and Murray Epstein.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Association of dental infections with systemic diseases in Brazilian
           Native Indigenous: A cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): L.S.F. Ribeiro, J.N. Santos, C.L.Z. Vieira, B. Caramelli, L.M.P. Ramalho, P.R. Cury
      The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between dental infections and systemic diseases in the Indigenous population of Brazil. A representative sample of 225 Indigenous (≥19 years) was assessed. The T-test and bivariate and logistic models were used to assess the associations of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity with dental caries and destructive periodontal disease. After adjustments for covariates, dental caries was associated with hypertension (OR=1.95, 95% CI=1.03-3.66, p=0.04). Individuals with destructive periodontal disease had a higher systolic blood pressure (124 ± 20.34 mmHg) than those without destructive periodontal disease (117.52 ± 16.54 mmHg, p=0.01). In conclusion, dental infections were found to be associated with hypertension in the present population. Thus, patients diagnosed with hypertension should be referred for dental evaluation and vice-versa.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Utility of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) in the Evaluation
           of Elevated Clinic Blood Pressures (BPs) in Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Susan M. Halbach, Robin Hamman, Karyn Yonekawa, Coral Hanevold
      Although ABPM is recognized for its role in assessing white coat hypertension (WCH), other uses include evaluation of treatment adequacy, nocturnal hypertension, dipping status, and hypertension severity. We performed a retrospective study of ABPMs completed at a single center from November 2007 to October 2011 to determine the frequency of WCH, prehypertension, and hypertension in children and the correlation of these findings with office BPs. 247 ABPMs were performed in 206 children, ages 4-20 years, including 48 recordings in 39 diabetic patients and 64 recordings in treated hypertensive patients. We found a poor correlation between hypertensive status based on clinic BP (cBP) and diagnosis on ABPM, and evidence for a white-coat effect (WCE). Among treated patients, ABPM results resulted in medication changes in 63%. We conclude that ABPM is a useful tool for characterizing hypertensive status and treatment adequacy in children.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Long sleep duration: A non-conventional indicator of arterial stiffness in
           Japanese at high risk of cardiovascular disease: the J-HOP Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Satoshi Niijima, Michiaki Nagai, Satoshi Hoshide, Mami Takahashi, Masahisa Shimpo, Kazuomi Kario
      Background Long and short sleep durations were reported as independently associated with hypertension, aortic stiffness and cardiovascular disease. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was shown to be associated with increased aortic stiffness. Here we investigated the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the elderly at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We also investigated whether hs-CRP moderates this relationship. Methods Among 4,310 patients with > 1 cardiovascular risks recruited for the Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure (J-HOP) Study, a questionnaire including items on daily sleep duration was completed. We measured the brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and hs-CRP levels in 2,304 of these patients (mean age 64.7 years, 49.6% males). Results In accord with the patients’ sleep duration (<6 h, ≥6 to <8 h, and ≥8 h per night), significant associations between sleep duration and the PWV were observed (1594 vs. 1644 vs. 1763 cm/s, p<0.0001). In the multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, total cholesterol, HbA1c and clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP), long sleep duration (≥8 h per night) (p<0.05) and log hs-CRP (p<0.05) were significantly positively associated with PWV when the patients with 6–8-h sleep duration were defined as a reference group. Significant interactions of long sleep duration by age and that by antihypertensive medication for baPWV were observed. The effect of long sleep on PWV was greatest in the oldest age group. Conclusions Long sleep duration and hs-CRP were significant indicators of increased baPWV in this elderly high-risk Japanese population. Age and antihypertensive medication use were significant modulators of the relationship between long sleep duration and arterial stiffness.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval
           exercise performed in water or dryland condition
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Philippe Sosner, Mathieu Gayda, Olivier Dupuy, Mauricio Garzon, Christopher Lemasson, Vincent Gremeaux, Julie Lalongé, Mariel Gonzales, Douglas Hayami, Martin Juneau, Anil Nigam, Laurent Bosquet
      We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65±7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic, SBP/DBP), were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24-min at 50% peak power output (PPO)) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10-min with phases of 15-sec 100% PPO interspersed by 15-sec of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-h average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-h BP decrease (SBP: -3.6±5.7 / DBP: -2.8±3.0 mm Hg, P<.05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8±9.5 / DBP: -3.0±4.5 mm Hg, P<.05). The one condition that modified 24-h PWV was immersed HIIE (-0.21±0.30 m/s, P<.05).


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Angioedema With Renin Angiotensin System Drugs and Neutral Endopeptidase
           Inhibitors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John B. Kostis, Abel E. Moreyra, William J. Kostis



      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Evidence for A Critical Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System in
           Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Guido Grassi, Venkata S. Ram
      Autonomic cardiovascular control is impaired in hypertension, leading to a reduction in the parasympathetic tone and to an increase in the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral vessels. The sympathetic dysfunction depends on a variety of reflex and non-reflex mechanisms and participates at development and progression of the essential hypertesive state. This has been shown to be the case for borderline hypertension, for moderate and severe high blood pressure and for resistant hypertension as well. In addition the adrenergic overdrive participates at the pathophysiology of the complex cardiometabolic alterations, known as ‘‘end-organ damage’’, detectable in the clinical course of hypertensive disease. In the present article we will review the main features of the adrenergic abnormalities characterizing essential hypertension, the mechanisms potentially involved in this neural abnormality and its consequences as well. We will also discuss the most recent information achieved in the field and the areas worthy of future investigations.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • RE: American Society of Hypertension position paper: central blood
           pressure waveforms in health and disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Matthew J. Budoff



      PubDate: 2016-02-26T00:40:28Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-02-20T23:37:20Z
       
 
 
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