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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1300 journals)
    - HISTORY (808 journals)
    - History (General) (51 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (50 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (54 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AREAS (8 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (170 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (133 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (26 journals)

HISTORY (808 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (hardback)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering History and Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Zoological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Procesos Historicos     Open Access  
Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Publications du Centre Européen d'Etudes Bourguignonnes     Full-text available via subscription  
Purdue Historian     Open Access  
Quaderns d’Història de l’Enginyeria     Open Access  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Queensland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Questes : Revue pluridisciplinaire d'études médiévales     Open Access  
Quintana. Revista de Estudos do Departamento de Historia da Arte     Open Access  
Radical History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Rasenna : Journal of the Center for Etruscan Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Rationality and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Reinardus     Hybrid Journal  
Relaciones. Estudios de historia y sociedad     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Renaissance Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Renaissance Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Reti Medievali Rivista     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Central and East European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Revista Alétheia     Open Access  
Revista Análisis Internacional     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Brasileira de História das Religiões     Open Access  
Revista Chilena de Historia del Derecho     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Crítica Histórica     Open Access  
Revista de Divulgação Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Historico-Juridicos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de História     Open Access  
Revista de História Bilros. História(s), Sociedade(s) e Cultura(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de História da UEG     Open Access  
Revista do Instituto Histórico e Geográfico do Rio Grande do Sul     Open Access  
Revista Historia Autónoma     Open Access  
Revista História da Educação - History of Education Journal     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revista Memória em Rede     Open Access  
Revista Mosaico     Open Access  
Revista Paginas     Open Access  
Revolutionary Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire de l'Eglise de France     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Revue d'histoire de l'enfance     Open Access  
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue d'histoire du XIXe siècle     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue de l’Histoire des Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Revue des Études Arméniennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Revue d’études comparatives Est-Ouest (RECEO)     Open Access  
Revue historique des armées     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue Mabillon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric Society Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
RIHA Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
RIMA: Review of Indonesian and Malaysian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romanticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Royal Studies Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rúbrica Contemporánea     Open Access  
Russian Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Russian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Russian Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Sacris Erudiri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Saeculum : Jahrbuch für Universalgeschichte     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Safundi : The Journal of South African and American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Scando-Slavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Science & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Science Journal of Volgograd State University. History. Area Studies. International Relations     Open Access  
Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine / Scientia Canadensis : revue canadienne d'histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Scientiae Studia     Open Access  
Scottish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Scrineum Rivista     Open Access  
Scrutiny2: Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Serendipities : Journal for the Sociology and History of the Social Sciences     Open Access  
Sibirica     Full-text available via subscription  
Siècles     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Signos Historicos     Open Access  
Slagmark - Tidsskrift for idéhistorie     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Slavery & Abolition: A Journal of Slave and Post-Slave Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Slavonica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Social History of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Società e Storia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Society and Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
SourceOECD National Accounts & Historical Statistics     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Historical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
South African Journal of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
South African Journal of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
South Asia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
South Asian History and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South Asian Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South Australian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription  
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Soviet and Post-Soviet Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Spontaneous Generations : A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Studia Aurea : Revista de Literatura Española y Teoría Literaria del Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Historiae Oeconomicae     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia z Historii Filozofii     Open Access  
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Studies in People’s History     Hybrid Journal  
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studium : Tijdschrift voor Wetenschaps- en Universiteits-geschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire des Sciences et des Universités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Suomen Sukututkimusseuran Vuosikirja     Open Access  
Sydney Institute Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tartu Ülikooli ajaloo küsimusi     Open Access  
Tasmanian Historical Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription  
Tempo     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Tempo e Argumento     Open Access  
Temporalidades     Open Access  
The Corvette     Open Access  
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
The Irish Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Public Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
The South African Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Theoria et Historia Scientiarum     Open Access  
Tiempo devorado     Open Access  
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Trans-pasando Fronteras     Open Access  
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Varia Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Vestiges : Traces of Record     Full-text available via subscription  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Victorian Periodicals Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Vigiliae Christianae     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Viking and Medieval Scandinavia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Vínculos de Historia. Revista del Departamento de Historia de la Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha     Open Access  
Visual Resources: An International Journal of Documentation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vivarium     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Vulcan     Hybrid Journal  
War & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Water History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Welsh History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
West 86th     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Whispering Wind     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Wicazo Sa Review     Full-text available via subscription  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Journal Cover Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
  [SJR: 1.039]   [H-I: 31]   [9 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3089 journals]
  • Interim report suggests that renal denervation appears to decrease
           ambulatory blood pressure in patients ‘off meds’ – a story that
           continues to unfold
    • Authors: Michael J. Bloch
      Pages: 699 - 700
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 11
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch


      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.001
       
  • Renal sympathetic denervation resurrected; or NOT'
    • Authors: Vasilios Papademetriou
      Pages: 700 - 703
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 11
      Author(s): Vasilios Papademetriou


      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.006
       
  • Personal-level exposure to environmental temperature is a superior
           predictor of endothelial-dependent vasodilatation than outdoor-ambient
           level
    • Authors: Chinedu Ejike; Lu Wang; Mochuan Liu; Wei Wang; Masako Morishita; Robert L. Bard; Wei Huang; Jack Harkema; Sanjay Rajagopalan; Robert D. Brook
      Pages: 746 - 753.e1
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 11
      Author(s): Chinedu Ejike, Lu Wang, Mochuan Liu, Wei Wang, Masako Morishita, Robert L. Bard, Wei Huang, Jack Harkema, Sanjay Rajagopalan, Robert D. Brook
      Environmental temperatures influence cardiovascular physiology. However, the majority of time is spent indoors, making outdoor-ambient temperatures inaccurate estimates of true exposures encountered by most individuals. We evaluated in 50 healthy adults the associations between previous 7-day outdoor-ambient (four occasions) and prior 24-hour personal-level (two occasions) environmental temperature exposures with blood pressure, heart rate variability, sleep parameters, and endothelial-dependent vasodilatation (brachial flow-mediated dilatation [FMD]) using generalized estimating equations. Participants (34 females; age, 32.1 ± 9.6 years) had normal blood pressures (107.8 ± 13.3/70.2 ± 9.4 mm Hg), FMD (7.4 ± 2.8%), as well as sleep and heart rate variability parameters. Mean 7-day outdoor-ambient (4.6 ± 9.7°C) differed from personal-level temperature exposures (22.0 ± 3.0°C). Colder outdoor-ambient temperatures (per −10°C) over the previous 1–6 days (rolling averages) were associated with decreases in FMD: −0.57% (95% confidence interval [CI]: −1.14% to 0.01%, P = .055) to −0.62% (95% CI: −1.07% to −0.18%, P = .006). However, a 10°C decrease in personal-level temperature during the prior 24 hours was associated with a greater decrement in FMD: −2.44% (95% CI: −4.74% to −0.13%, P = .038). Both were also linearly related to FMD during all seasons and without a threshold temperature. Other end points were not significantly related to either temperature level in this study. Short-term exposures to colder environmental temperatures reduced endothelial-dependent vasodilatation, supporting the epidemiologic associations with heightened cardiovascular risk. We show here for the first time that temperature exposures characterized at the personal level may be more robust predictors of endothelial function than outdoor-ambient levels.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.006
       
  • Pentoxifylline treatment enhances antihypertensive activity of captopril
           through hemorheological improvement in spontaneously hypertensive rats
           during development of arterial hypertension
    • Authors: Mark B. Plotnikov; Alexander Y. Shamanaev; Oleg I. Aliev; Anastasia V. Sidekhmenova; Anna M. Anishchenko; Alexander M. Arkhipov
      Pages: 769 - 778
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 11
      Author(s): Mark B. Plotnikov, Alexander Y. Shamanaev, Oleg I. Aliev, Anastasia V. Sidekhmenova, Anna M. Anishchenko, Alexander M. Arkhipov
      The rheological properties of blood play a significant role in the onset and progression of arterial hypertension. The aim of our work was to evaluate the effect of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril (20 mg/kg/d), pentoxifylline (PTX; 100 mg/kg/d), and the combination of captopril + PTX (20 + 100 mg/kg/d) on the hemodynamic and hemorheological parameters in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) during the development of arterial hypertension. In the group of animals that received captopril, the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly lower by 30% due to a decrease in cardiac output of 23% and in total peripheral resistance (TPR) of 26% compared with the control group, whereas blood viscosity did not change significantly. PTX-treated SHRs had significantly lower MAP and TPR (by 19% and 31%, respectively) and blood viscosity (by 4%–6%) and a higher erythrocyte deformability index (by 1.5%–2%) than the control group. In the group of animals that received captopril + PTX, MAP and TPR were significantly lower, by 41% and 46%, than those in the control group, and by 16% and 27% than those in the captopril group. The combination of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril and the hemorheological agent PTX, affecting various systems that are involved in blood pressure regulation, exhibits synergism and prevents an increase in arterial blood pressure during the development of arterial hypertension in SHRs (ie, from 5 to 11 weeks of life).
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.007
       
  • Hypothyroidism as a cause of secondary hypertension - Myth dispelled
    • Authors: Franz H. Messerli; Louis Hofstetter; Ronald Victor; David Cerny
      First page: 615
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 10
      Author(s): Franz H. Messerli, Louis Hofstetter, Ronald Victor, David Cerny


      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.003
       
  • Aldosterone as a mediator of micro- and macrovascular damage in a
           population of normotensive to early-stage hypertensive individuals
    • Authors: Eugenia Gkaliagkousi; Panagiota Anyfanti; Areti Triantafyllou; Eleni Gavriilaki; Barbara Nikolaidou; Antonios Lazaridis; Anastasios Vamvakis; Stella Douma
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Eugenia Gkaliagkousi, Panagiota Anyfanti, Areti Triantafyllou, Eleni Gavriilaki, Barbara Nikolaidou, Antonios Lazaridis, Anastasios Vamvakis, Stella Douma
      We investigated whether aldosterone concurrently mediates micro- and macrovascular impairment, in a population of treatment-naïve young to middle-aged individuals free from cardiovascular comorbidities. Newly-diagnosed, never-treated essential hypertensive patients and normotensive individuals participated in the study. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) were estimated with applanation tonometry. Microalbuminuria was determined from 24-hour urine collections. Laboratory tests included measurement of plasma renin activity, serum aldosterone, and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). In 221 individuals aged 42.0±12.3 years, classification in the highest aldosterone tertile was associated with the highest levels of blood pressure (BP), PWV, and hsCRP (p<0.05 for all). These individuals also exhibited twice the prevalence of microalbuminuria, compared to the 1st tertile (p=0.081). Multivariate analysis showed that the positive association between PWV and increasing aldosterone tertiles remained significant after adjustment for BP and other parameters (p=0.035). Likewise, aldosterone independently predicted microalbuminuria (p=0.026) in the logistic regression analysis. In treatment-naïve individuals whose BP ranges from normal to early-stage hypertension, significant interactions exist between aldosterone and indices of micro- and macrovascular damage. These findings suggest that aldosterone concurrently modulates micro- and macrovascular function from the very early stages of essential hypertension and is dynamically implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertensive vascular disease.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T06:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.12.001
       
  • Recent data from National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES)
           demonstrates no improvement in U.S. blood pressure control rates
    • Authors: Michael J. Bloch
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 December 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch


      PubDate: 2017-12-12T06:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.11.003
       
  • Angiotensin II Type 2 Receptor Inhibits Expression and Function of Insulin
           Receptor in Rat Renal Proximal Tubule Cells
    • Authors: Yang Yang; Caiyu Chen; Chunjiang Fu; Zaicheng Xu; Cong Lan; Yongchun Zeng; Zhi Chen; Pedro A. Jose; Ye Zhang; Chunyu Zeng
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yang Yang, Caiyu Chen, Chunjiang Fu, Zaicheng Xu, Cong Lan, Yongchun Zeng, Zhi Chen, Pedro A. Jose, Ye Zhang, Chunyu Zeng
      Both renin–angiotensin systems and insulin participate in kidney-involved blood pressure regulation. Activation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AT2R) decreases sodium reabsorption in renal proximal tubule (RPT) cells, whereas insulin produces the opposite effect. We presume that AT2R has an inhibitory effect on insulin receptor expression in RPT cells, which may affect renal sodium transport and therefore be of physiological or pathological significance. Our present study found that activation of AT2R inhibited insulin receptor expression in a concentration and time-dependent manner in RPT cells from Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. In the presence of a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (PKC inhibitor peptide 19–31, 10−6mol/L) or a phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibitor (wortmannin, 10−6mol/L), the inhibitory effect of AT2R on insulin receptor was blocked, indicating that both PKC and PI3K were involved in the signaling pathway. There was a linkage between AT2R and insulin receptor which was determined by both laser confocal microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation. However, the effect of AT2R activation on insulin receptor expression was different in RPT cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Being contrary to the effect in WKY RPT cells, AT2R stimulation increased insulin receptor in SHR RPT cells. Insulin (10−7 mol/L, 15 min) enhanced Na+-K+-ATPase activity in both WKY and SHR RPT cells. Pretreatment with CGP42112 decreased the stimulatory effect of insulin on Na+-K+-ATPase activity in WKY RPT cells, while increased it in SHR RPT cells. It is suggested that activation of AT2R inhibits insulin receptor expression and function in RPT cells. The lost inhibitory effect of AT2R on insulin receptor expression may contribute to the pathophysiology of hypertension.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T06:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.11.009
       
  • The effect of intermittent fasting on blood pressure variability in
           patients with newly diagnosed hypertension or prehypertension
    • Authors: Yunus Erdem; Gülsüm Özkan; Şükrü Ulusoy; Mustafa Arıcı; Ülver Derici; Şule Şengül; Şükrü Sindel; Şehsuvar Ertürk
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yunus Erdem, Gülsüm Özkan, Şükrü Ulusoy, Mustafa Arıcı, Ülver Derici, Şule Şengül, Şükrü Sindel, Şehsuvar Ertürk
      Background Intermittent fasting is a phenomenon which can be observed in most humans. The effect of intermittent fasting on blood pressure variability (BPV) has not previously been investigated. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of fasting on BP (with office, home, central and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring [ABPM]) and on BPV. Methods Sixty individuals were included in the study. Office, home, ABPM and central BP measurements were performed before and during intermittent fasting. Standard deviation (SD) and coefficient variation (CV) were used for office and home BPV measurement, while the smoothness index (SI) was used to calculate ABPM variability. Patients’ BP and BPV values before and during intermittent fasting were then compared. Results Intermittent fasting resulted in a significant decrease in office BP values and ABPM measurements but caused no significant change in home and central BP measurements. Twenty-four hour urinary sodium excretion decreased. SI values obtained from ABPM measurements were low, in other words, BPV was greater. BPV was higher in patients who woke up to eat before sunrise, but BPV was low in patients with high BMI. Conclusion Intermittent fasting produced a significant decrease in BP values in terms of office and ABPM measurements in this study, but caused no significant change in central BP and home measurements. We also identified an increase in BPV during intermittent fasting, particularly in patients who rose before sunrise.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T06:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.11.008
       
  • Relation of urinary endothelin-1 to stress-induced pressure natriuresis in
           healthy adolescents
    • Authors: Shreya Mathur; Jennifer S. Pollock; Sunil Mathur; Gregory A. Harshfield; David M. Pollock
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Shreya Mathur, Jennifer S. Pollock, Sunil Mathur, Gregory A. Harshfield, David M. Pollock
      We hypothesize that delayed natriuresis during mental stress increases the risk of hypertension and other diseases. Our pre-clinical studies demonstrate an important role for renal endothelin-1 (ET-1) in regulating sodium excretion. Thus, we predict ET-1 may be linked to the delayed stress response in at-risk individuals. We hypothesize that reduced renal ET-1 accounts for derangements in sodium handling under stress, a link never explored in a large human cohort. We determined urinary ET-1 excretion in three observational studies of changes in sodium excretion during mental stress, in which 776 healthy youth (15–19 years) enrolled in a 5 hour protocol (2 hours of rest before and after 1 hour of mental stress). In all studies, 60 minutes urine samples were obtained throughout the protocol. Subjects were grouped as retainers (reduced sodium excretion during stress relative to baseline) or excreters (increased sodium excretion during stress relative to baseline). In excreters, ET-1 excretion was significantly increased from baseline to stress (+0.02 pg/min; P < .001). In contrast, ET-1 excretion was significantly higher (P = .028) in retainers than excreters at baseline but significantly reduced in retainers under stress (−0.02 pg/min; P < .001). ET-1 excretion declined further in retainers during recovery but returned to pre-stress levels in excreters. Albumin excretion and albumin to creatinine ratio were significantly higher in retainers (P = .022, P < .001, respectively). Thus, loss of ET-1-dependent natriuresis may account for sodium retention during stress and may predispose retainers to renal diseases such as hypertension and kidney disease.

      PubDate: 2017-12-12T06:24:17Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.11.005
       
  • Latest guidelines for hypertension: adopt and adapt
    • Authors: C. Venkata S. Ram
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): C. Venkata S. Ram


      PubDate: 2017-11-16T18:12:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.11.002
       
  • Occupational noise exposure and hypertension: the Dongfeng-Tongji Cohort
           Study
    • Authors: Dongming Wang; Min Zhou; Wenzhen Li; Weijia Kong; Zhichao Wang; Yanjun Guo; Xiaomin Zhang; Meian He; Huan Guo; Weihong Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Dongming Wang, Min Zhou, Wenzhen Li, Weijia Kong, Zhichao Wang, Yanjun Guo, Xiaomin Zhang, Meian He, Huan Guo, Weihong Chen
      The association between occupational noise exposure and hypertension is unclear. We aimed to explore the association in a Chinese population and to summarize our findings with previous published articles. The cross-sectional study included 22450 participants from Dongfeng-tongji Cohort Study. In a subsample of 10636 subjects, we assessed the association between hearing loss and hypertension. For the meta-analysis, we searched Pubmed and Embase until April 2017, and the pooled odds ratio was combined by using a random-effect model. Compared with participants without occupational noise exposure, the risk of hypertension was significantly higher for noise exposure duration ≥20 (OR=1.09, 95%CI=1.00-1.18). In the sex-specific analysis, the association was only significantly pronounced in males (OR=1.16, 95%CI=1.03-1.31), but not in females (OR=1.01, 95%CI=0.88-1.14). In the subsample analyses, hearing loss, which was an indicator for exposure to loud noise, was associated with a higher risk of hypertension, especially for participants who were bilateral hearing loss (OR=1.39, 95%CI=1.24-1.54). In the meta-analysis, the pooled OR for the association between occupational noise exposure and hypertension was 1.25 (95%CI=1.10-1.42). On the basis of an indicator for exposure to occupational noise, the cross-sectional study and meta-analysis identified occupational noise exposure as a potential risk factor for increased hypertension risk.

      PubDate: 2017-11-16T18:12:59Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.11.001
       
  • Association of office and ambulatory blood pressure with blood lead in
           workers prior to occupational exposure
    • Authors: Wen-Yi Yang; Ljupcho Efremov; Blerim Mujaj; Zhen-Yu Zhang; Fang-Fei Wei; Qi-Fang Huang; Lutgarde Thijs; Thomas Vanassche; Tim S. Nawrot; Jan A. Staessen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Wen-Yi Yang, Ljupcho Efremov, Blerim Mujaj, Zhen-Yu Zhang, Fang-Fei Wei, Qi-Fang Huang, Lutgarde Thijs, Thomas Vanassche, Tim S. Nawrot, Jan A. Staessen
      In view of decreasing lead exposure and guidelines endorsing ambulatory above office BP measurement, we re-assessed association of BP with blood lead (BL) in 236 newly employed men (mean age, 28.6 years) without previous lead exposure not treated for hypertension. Office BP was the mean of five auscultatory readings at one visit. 24-h BP was recorded at 15- and 30-minute intervals during wakefulness and sleep. BL was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Systolic/diastolic office BP averaged 120.0/80.7 mm Hg and the 24-h, awake and asleep BP 125.5/73.6, 129.3/77.9 and 117.6/65.0 mm Hg, respectively. BL geometrically averaged 4.5 μg/dL (IQR, 2.60–9.15 μg/dL). In multivariable-adjusted analyses, effect sizes associated with BL doubling were 0.79/0.87 mm Hg (P = .11/.043) for office BP and 0.29/-0.25, 0.60/-0.10 and -0.40/-0.43 mm Hg for 24-h, awake and asleep BP (P ≥ .33). Neither office nor 24-h ambulatory hypertension were related to BL (P ≥ .14). A clinically relevant white-coat effect (WCE; office minus awake BP, ≥20/≥10 mm Hg) was attributable to exceeding the systolic or diastolic threshold in 1 and 45 workers, respectively. With BL doubling, the systolic/diastolic WCE increased by 0.20/0.97 mm Hg (P = .57/.046). Accounting for the presence of a diastolic WCE, reduced the association size of office diastolic BP with BL to 0.39 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -0.20 to 1.33; P = .15). In conclusion, a cross-sectional analysis of newly hired workers prior to lead exposure identified the WCE as confounder of the association between office BP and BL and did not reveal any association between ambulatory BP and BL.

      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.010
       
  • From the Editor
    • Authors: Daniel Levy
      Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 11
      Author(s): Daniel Levy


      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
       
  • Instructions for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 11


      PubDate: 2017-11-09T16:31:55Z
       
  • Optimal blood pressure control after coronary events: the challenge
           remains
    • Authors: Elise Sverre; Kari Peersen; Jan Erik Otterstad; Lars Gullestad; Joep Perk; Erik Gjertsen; Torbjørn Moum; Einar Husebye; Toril Dammen; John Munkhaugen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Elise Sverre, Kari Peersen, Jan Erik Otterstad, Lars Gullestad, Joep Perk, Erik Gjertsen, Torbjørn Moum, Einar Husebye, Toril Dammen, John Munkhaugen
      We identified sociodemographic, medical and psychosocial factors associated with unfavorable BP control in 1012 patients, hospitalized with myocardial infarction and/or a coronary revascularization procedure. This cross-sectional study collected data from hospital records, a comprehensive self-report questionnaire, clinical examination, and blood samples after 2-36 (mean 17) months follow-up. Forty-six percent had unfavorable BP control (≥140/90 [80 in diabetics] mmHg) at follow-up. Low socioeconomic status and psychosocial factors did not predict unfavorable BP control. Patients with unfavorable BP used on average 1.9 (SD 1.1) BP lowering drugs at hospital discharge, and the proportion of patients treated with angiotensin-inhibitors and beta-blockers decreased significantly (p<0.001) from discharge to follow-up. Diabetes (Odds ratio (OR) 2.4), higher body mass index (BMI) (OR 1.05 per 1.0 kg/m2) and older age (OR 1.04 per year), were significantly associated with unfavorable BP control in adjusted analyses. Only age (standardized beta (β) 0.24) and BMI (β 0.07) were associated with systolic BP in linear analyses. We conclude that BP control was insufficient after coronary events and associated with obesity and diabetes. Prescription of BP lowering drugs in hypertensive patients seems suboptimal. Overweight and intensified drug treatment thus emerge as the major factors to target in order to improve BP control.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T15:50:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.007
       
  • ACE2 activation ameliorates pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in rats with
           
    • Authors: Gang Li; Han Zhang; Lei Zhao; Yaozhong Zhang; Daole Yan; Yinglong Liu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Gang Li, Han Zhang, Lei Zhao, Yaozhong Zhang, Daole Yan, Yinglong Liu
      Objective This study aims to investigate the effect of ACE2 activation on pulmonary endothelial function in the process of preventing pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in rat models and to explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods SPF rats were randomly divided into 5 groups including control group, PAH group, PAH+Resorcinolnaphthalein(Res) group (ACE2 activation), PAH+Res+MLN4760 group (ACE2 inhibition) and PAH+Res+L-NAME group (eNOS inhibition). Rat PAH model was constructed using combined left pneumonectomy with a single dose of monocrotaline injection 1 week after the surgery and the rats were then given corresponding reagents. Hemodynamics, endothelial function and pathological changes were evaluated 3 weeks after monocrotaline injection. The concentration of NO, expression of eNOS and phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 and Thr495 in the lung tissues from rats were also investigated. Results The Res-induced activation of ACE2 led to decreased mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and pulmonary artery remodeling in the PAH+Res group comparing with the PAH rats (p<0.05). In addition, the reduction in mPAP induced by acetylcholine (Ach) was augmented in PAH+Res group(p<0.05), but this was not observed under the treatment with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) (p>0.05). The ratio of decrease in mPAP caused by Ach to that caused by SNP (Ach/SNP) was also increased (p<0.05) in ACE2-activated rats. However, the protective effects of ACE2 activation on PAH was counteracted by co-administration of MLN4760, an ACE2 antagonist (all p>0.05). The mechanistic study showed that the concentration of NO in the lung tissues was down-regulated in the PAH group but up-regulated in the PAH+Res group (p<0.05), while the NO concentration in the PAH+Res+MLN4760 group was not obviously different from that in the PAH group (p>0.05). Regarding the factors regulating NO release, we found that the eNOS was up-regulated in the PAH group, and Res didn’t affect the expression of eNOS. The phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 was increased but at Thr495 was reduced after Res injection, when compared to the PAH group (p<0.05). As expected, co-injection of MLN4760 eliminated these differences (p>0.05). The reduction in mPAP induced by Ach was attenuated in the PAH+Res+L-NAME group compared to the PAH+Res group (p<0.05), but this was not observed in rats treated with SNP (p>0.05). The Ach/SNP ratio of decline in mPAP was also decreased in the PAH+Res+L-NAME group (p<0.05). Conclusions Activation of ACE2 had a protective role in the development of PAH via improving the function of pulmonary arterial endothelium. This effect was potentially mediated by promoted NO release as a consequence of increased phosphorylation of eNOS at Ser1177 and dephosphorylation of eNOS at Thr495.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T15:50:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.009
       
  • Plasma microRNA-155-5p is increased among patients with chronic kidney
           disease and nocturnal hypertension
    • Authors: Dominika Klimczak; Marek Kuch; Tomasz Pilecki; Dorota Zochowska; Agnieszka Wirkowska; Leszek Paczek
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Dominika Klimczak, Marek Kuch, Tomasz Pilecki, Dorota Zochowska, Agnieszka Wirkowska, Leszek Paczek
      Background MicroRNA play multiple roles in the regulation of blood pressure. Nevertheless, to date no study has assessed the association between microRNA plasma expression and blood pressure (BP) control in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. Given this background, we evaluated the plasma expression of miR-155-5p, a translational inhibitor of angiotensin receptor type 1, in CKD patients, to determine the association between miR-155-5p level and BP control. Methods In this single centre, cross-sectional study we analyzed the mir-155-5p concentration by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) using the U6 snRNA as a reference gene and 24-hour ABPM in CKD patients (stage ≥ 2) in relation to a control group of healthy age- and gender-matched individuals, with normal BP proven by the ABPM. Results We enrolled a total of 105 patients with CKD (stage 2-5, including 33 kidney renal transplant recipients), aged 59±14; 47% male and 26 healthy volunteers (aged 55±13, 50% male). Within the study group, a total of 36 (40%) patients presented with an average 24-hour SBP >130 mmHg and 41 patients (45%) presented nocturnal hypertension (NHT, SBP > 120 or DBP > 70). miRNA-155-5p was increased in plasma of CKD patients with median expression relative to control subjects equal to 2.92 (1.34-5.58). Interestingly, the plasma miRNA-155-5p expression was significantly higher in patients with nocturnal HT: 4.04 (2.92-10.8) vs. 2.01(1.21-3.07), p=0.001 and its expression maintained an independent association with the average nocturnal SBP (Coefficient B = 4.368, p 0.047) by a multivariate regression analysis adjusted for confounders. Conclusion The miR-155-5p was increased among CKD patients and further increased among subjects presenting with nocturnal hypertension. Further studies are warranted to determine the role of this non-coding RNA as a potential novel biomarker and therapeutic target in the non-dipping CKD individuals, characterized by increased cardiovascular risk.

      PubDate: 2017-11-02T15:50:41Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.008
       
  • Association of Interleukin-6 With Aortic Stiffness In End-Stage Renal
           Disease
    • Authors: Marie-Pier DESJARDINS; Aboubacar SIDIBÉ; Catherine FORTIER; Fabrice MAC-WAY; Karine MARQUIS; Sacha DE. SERRES; Richard LARIVIÈRE; Mohsen AGHARAZII
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marie-Pier DESJARDINS, Aboubacar SIDIBÉ, Catherine FORTIER, Fabrice MAC-WAY, Karine MARQUIS, Sacha DE. SERRES, Richard LARIVIÈRE, Mohsen AGHARAZII
      Objectives Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Aortic stiffness, a non-traditional risk factor, is associated with high rate of mortality in CKD. Using a CKD animal model with medial vascular calcification, we previously reported increased mRNA expression of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in calcified aorta. The aim of the study was to investigate the association between IL-6, TNF, IL-1β and aortic stiffness in ESRD patients. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we enrolled 351 patients on dialysis. Aortic stiffness was assessed by carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cf-PWV) while central pulse pressure (PP) and augmentation index (AIx) were assessed using generalized transfer function applied to the radial artery pressure wave form. Plasma IL-6, TNF and IL-1β were measured by ELISA. Results IL-6 was associated with cf-PWV adjusted for mean blood pressure (MBP) (Standardized β=0.270; P<0.001). In a multivariate adjusted model for age, diabetes, hypertension, CVD and MBP, IL-6 was still associated with cf-PWV (Standardized β=0.096; P=0.026). The impact of age, diabetes and CVD on cf-PWV was partially mediated by IL-6 in a mediation analysis. However, there were no associations between TNF, IL-1β and aortic stiffness. While IL-6 was associated with AIx (Standardized β=0.224; P<0.001) and central PP (Standardized β=0.162; P=0.001) when adjusted for MBP and heart rate, this relationship was not significant after adjusting for potential confounders. Conclusion This study suggests a potential role of IL-6 for CKD-related aortic stiffness.

      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.013
       
  • Role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor during electrophysiological
           remodeling of left ventricular hypertrophic myocardium in spontaneously
           hypertensive rats
    • Authors: Xiao Ying; Long Wei-Qing; Guan Kai-Pan; Long Ming; Lu Gui-Hua; Huang Zhi-Bin
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Xiao Ying, Long Wei-Qing, Guan Kai-Pan, Long Ming, Lu Gui-Hua, Huang Zhi-Bin
      The objective was to investigate the role of angiotensin II type 2 receptor during electrophysiological remodeling of left ventricular hypertrophic myocardium in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). A total of 36 10-week-old male SHR were divided into 3 groups: control, valsartan and valsartan+PD123319 groups (n=12 in each). The systolic blood pressure, left ventricular mass index (LVMI), ventricular effective refractory period, and ventricular fibrillation threshold (VFT) were also measured after eight weeks. At the same time, INa, ICaL, Ito and membrane capacitance were measured in left ventricular myocytes by whole-cell patch-clamp. The VFT of valsartan was higher than that of control (valsartan vs. control: 17.4±0.6mA vs. 15.8±0.5mA, P<0.05). The VFT of valsartan was higher than that of valsartan+PD123319 (valsartan vs. valsartan+PD123319: (17.4±0.6mA vs. 16.6±0.9mA, P<0.05). The density of Ito of valsartan was higher than that of control (valsartan vs. control: 14.7±0.42pA/pF vs. 11.2±0.15pA/pF, P<0.05). The density of Ito of valsartan was higher than that of valsartan+PD123319 (valsartan vs. valsartan+PD123319: 14.7±0.42pA/pF vs. 13.6±0.30pA/pF, P<0.05). The density of ICaL of valsartan was lower than that of control (valsartan vs. control: -4.6±0.2pA/pF vs. -6.9±0.1pA/pF, P<0.05). The density of ICaL of valsartan was lower than that of valsartan+PD123319 (valsartan vs. valsartan+PD123319: -4.6±0.2pA/pF vs. -5.4±0.1pA/pF, P<0.05). These results demonstrated that the stimulation of angiotensin II type 2 receptor improved electrophysiological remodeling of left ventricular hypertrophic myocardium in SHR.

      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.014
       
  • Albuminuria and Kidney Function as Prognostic Marker of Left Ventricular
           Mass among South Asians with Hypertension
    • Authors: Liang Feng; Aamir Hameed Khan; Imtiaz Jehan; John Allen; Tazeen H. Jafar
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Liang Feng, Aamir Hameed Khan, Imtiaz Jehan, John Allen, Tazeen H. Jafar
      We aimed to evaluate the association of albuminuria and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at baseline and changes in these parameters with left ventricular mass index (LVMI) at 7 years in adults with hypertension from communities in Pakistan. A nested cohort of 539 hypertensives aged 40 years and older from a community-living population in Karachi, Pakistan followed up for 7 years in the Control of Blood Pressure and Risk Attenuation (COBRA) trial. Urine spot albumin to creatinine ratio (UACR) and serum creatinine-based eGFR were assessed at baseline and 7 years, and echocardiography at 7 years. Mean age of participants was 50.9±9.1 (SD) years; 63% were female. Mean eGFR was 91.0±15.9 (SD) ml/min/1.73 m2, and median (IQR) UACR 6.2 (3.9, 11.3) mg/g. In multivariate analysis, although baseline eGFR was marginally associated with LVMI, a strong association was found between higher LVMI with greater rate of decline in eGFR (β = -1.05, 95% CI (-1.94, -0.17)). Higher baseline UACR was significantly associated with higher follow-up LVMI (β = 2.26, 95% CI (0.87, 3.65)), as was rate of UACR increase of ≥1.07 mg/g/year vs. of <0.14 mg/g/year. (β = 4.19, 95% CI (0.75, 7.63)). Associations with developing left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) were found for reduced baseline eGFR, higher baseline UACR, and greater rate of UACR increase, but not for rate of eGFR decline. Comparable results were observed for the outcomes of posterior wall thickness and septal wall thickness. Higher baseline albuminuria, lower baseline eGFR and their longitudinal worsening were significantly associated with higher LVMI or the development of LVH among individuals with hypertension in Pakistan.

      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.003
       
  • From the President, American Society of Hypertension
    • Authors: John D. Bisognano; Jan N. Basile
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John D. Bisognano, Jan N. Basile


      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.10.005
       
  • From the Editor
    • Authors: Daniel Levy
      Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 10
      Author(s): Daniel Levy


      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
       
  • Instructions for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 10


      PubDate: 2017-10-18T12:21:18Z
       
  • Potassium homeostasis in health and disease: A scientific workshop
           cosponsored by the National Kidney Foundation and the American Society of
           Hypertension
    • Authors: Csaba Kovesdy; Lawrence Appel Morgan Grams Lisa Gutekunst Peter McCullough
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Csaba P. Kovesdy, Lawrence J. Appel, Morgan E. Grams, Lisa Gutekunst, Peter A. McCullough, Biff F. Palmer, Bertram Pitt, Dominic A. Sica, Raymond R. Townsend
      While much emphasis, and some controversy, centers on recommendations for sodium intake, there has been considerably less interest in recommendations for dietary potassium intake, in both the general population and patients with medical conditions, particularly acute and chronic kidney disease. Physiology literature and cohort studies have noted that the relative balance in sodium and potassium intakes is an important determinant of many of the sodium-related outcomes. A noteworthy characteristic of potassium in clinical medicine is the extreme concern shared by many practitioners when confronted by a patient with hyperkalemia. Fear of this often asymptomatic finding limits enthusiasm for recommending potassium intake and often limits the use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney diseases. New agents for managing hyperkalemia may alter the long-term management of heart failure and the hypertension, proteinuria, and further function loss in chronic kidney diseases. In this jointly sponsored effort between the American Society of Hypertension and the National Kidney Foundation, 3 panels of researchers and practitioners from various disciplines discussed and summarized current understanding of the role of potassium in health and disease, focusing on cardiovascular, nutritional, and kidney considerations associated with both hypo- and hyperkalemia.

      PubDate: 2017-10-11T05:16:47Z
       
  • Body weight-dependent relationships between alcohol consumption and pulse
           pressure in middle-aged Japanese women
    • Authors: Ichiro Wakabayashi
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 October 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Ichiro Wakabayashi
      High pulse pressure is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, and excessive alcohol drinking increases the risk of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the relationship between alcohol intake and pulse pressure in women and to determine whether body weight influences their relationship. The subjects were 18791 Japanese middle-aged women and they were divided into tertile groups for body weight or three different body mass index (BMI, kg/m 2 ) groups (low BMI, < 22; middle BMI, ≥ 22 and < 25; high BMI, ≥ 25). The subjects in each group were further divided into four groups of nondrinkers, occasional drinkers, regular light drinkers and regular heavy drinkers by habitual alcohol consumption. Pulse pressure levels were compared between nondrinkers and drinkers in each group for body weight or BMI. Pulse pressure was significantly higher in regular heavy drinkers than in nondrinkers in the 1st tertile group for body weight and in the low BMI group but not in the 2nd and 3rd tertile groups for body weight and in the middle and high BMI groups. In all tertile groups and all BMI groups, pulse pressure was not significantly different in occasional drinkers and regular light drinkers than in nondrinkers. In women with lower body weight, heavy drinking was positively associated with pulse pressure, while this association was not found in women with middle or higher body weight. Thus, body weight potently confounds the relationship between alcohol consumption and pulse pressure.

      PubDate: 2017-10-04T03:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.012
       
  • The burden and correlates of hypertension among Chinese rural population
           in Han, Uygur and Kazak : A cross- sectional study
    • Authors: Yong-tao Wang; Dilare Adi; Zi-xiang Yu; Yi-Tong Ma; Yi-Ning Yang; Xiao-mei Li; Xiang Ma; Fen Liu; Bang-Dang Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yong-tao Wang, Dilare Adi, Zi-xiang Yu, Yi-Tong Ma, Yi-Ning Yang, Xiao-mei Li, Xiang Ma, Fen Liu, Bang-Dang Chen
      The present study was conducted to investigate the prevalence, awareness, treatment, control, and associated risk factors of hypertension among rural population in Xinjiang Province in northwest China. The Cardiovascular Risk Survey (CRS) study was conducted on a representative sample of the northwest China adult population. A 4-stage stratified cluster random sampling scheme was adopted to recruit representative samples. The data was collected by trained staff. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify the associated risk factors. Overall, 8295 study participants aged 35-101 years were enrolled. The overall hypertension prevalence was 35.01%%. The prevalence of hypertension in Han, Uygur and Kazak population was 36.84%, 33.32% and 52.57% respectively. The hypertension awareness, treatment, control and control among treated participants were 56.1%, 44.7%, 10.9% and 24.3% respectively. Multivariate logistic regression showed that age, BMI, central obesity, ethnic and drinking status were identified as risk factors for hypertension. Hypertension was found to be highly prevalent in rural adults in Xinjiang, China, especially in Kazak population. Though the levels of awareness, treatment, and control have improved, it was still lower than developed countries. Effective measures should be adopted to promote the prevention and control of hypertension.

      PubDate: 2017-10-04T03:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.010
       
  • Air Pollution And Arterial Hypertension. A New Risk Factor Is In The Air
    • Authors: Elias Sanidas; Dimitris P. Papadopoulos; Harris Grassos; Maria Velliou; Kostas Tsioufis; John Barbetseas; Vasilios Papademetriou
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 September 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Elias Sanidas, Dimitris P. Papadopoulos, Harris Grassos, Maria Velliou, Kostas Tsioufis, John Barbetseas, Vasilios Papademetriou
      Air pollution is one of the greatest environmental threats and has been implicated for several adverse cardiovascular effects including arterial hypertension. However, the exact relationship between air pollution exposure and hypertension is still unclear. Air contamination provokes oxidative stress, systemic inflammation and autonomic nervous system imbalance that subsequently induce endothelial dysfunction and vasoconstriction leading to increased blood pressure. The aim of this review was to describe the potential mechanisms by which air pollution contributes to hypertension and to summarize the consequences of short and long term exposure.

      PubDate: 2017-10-04T03:30:07Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.008
       
  • Cover 2: Staff appreciation notice
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 11, Issue 9


      PubDate: 2017-10-04T03:30:07Z
       
  • Prehypertension is Real and Can be Associated with Target Organ Damage
    • Authors: Barry J. Materson; Manuel Garcia-Estrada; Stephane B. Degraff; Richard A. Preston
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 September 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Barry J. Materson, Manuel Garcia-Estrada, Stephane B. Degraff, Richard A. Preston
      Prehypertension (systolic blood pressure 120-139 or diastolic blood pressure 80-89 mm Hg) confers a risk of progression to hypertension, impairment of cognitive function, increased left ventricular mass, risk of end-stage renal disease and an association with arteriosclerosis. Recent studies provide data that could support the rationale for treating prehypertensives subjects with antihypertensive medications in addition to lifestyle modification, especially if they have concomitant cardiovascular risk factors.

      PubDate: 2017-09-26T00:57:34Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.09.005
       
  • Effects of chronic hepatitis C infection on arterial stiffness
    • Authors: Chang-Hua Chou; Chin-Shan Ho; Wei-Chuan Tsai; Ming-Cheng Wang; Yau-Sheng Tsai; Ju-Yi Chen
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 August 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Chang-Hua Chou, Chin-Shan Ho, Wei-Chuan Tsai, Ming-Cheng Wang, Yau-Sheng Tsai, Ju-Yi Chen
      Background Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with increased arterial stiffness. Although chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was shown to be associated with metabolic disorder and chronic inflammation, the effects of chronic HCV infection on arterial stiffness remain unclear. Methods This study recruited 221 patients including 32 normal controls (NC), 72 NAFLD patients, and 117 subjects with HCV infection. Arterial stiffness was assessed by peripheral arterial stiffness index, Compliance Index (CI) and central arterial stiffness index, Stiffness Index (SI) derived from digital volume pulse by photoplethysmography. Levels of oxidative stress marker and inflammatory markers were also measured. Results The HCV group had significantly lower CI (4.8 ± 3.1 units vs. 3.9 ± 2.1 units vs. 3.0 ± 1.7 units; p for trend < 0.001) and higher SI (7.0 ± 1.6 m/s vs. 8.3 ± 2.3 m/s vs. 8.4 ± 2.3 m/s; p for trend = 0.001) compared to the NC and NAFLD groups. Multi-variate linear regression analysis showed that CI was independently correlated with systolic blood pressure (beta = -0.202, p = 0.013) and HCV infection (beta = -0.216, p = 0.036). Conclusion Chronic HCV infection was independently associated with peripheral arterial stiffness. Peripheral arterial stiffness in chronic HCV infection was not associated with a marker of general inflammation (hsCRP); however a role for more specific markers of inflammation cannot be ruled out.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.08.007
       
  • Increased platelet alpha2B–adrenergic receptor gene expression in
           well-controlled hypertensives: The effect of arterial stiffness
    • Authors: Maria E. Marketou; Joanna E. Kontaraki; John A. Papadakis; George E. Vrentzos; Alexandros Patrianakos; Konstantinos Fragkiadakis; Panagiotis Tsiverdis; Dimitris Lempidakis; Gregory Chlouverakis; Panos E. Vardas; Fragiskos I. Parthenakis
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 August 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Maria E. Marketou, Joanna E. Kontaraki, John A. Papadakis, George E. Vrentzos, Alexandros Patrianakos, Konstantinos Fragkiadakis, Panagiotis Tsiverdis, Dimitris Lempidakis, Gregory Chlouverakis, Panos E. Vardas, Fragiskos I. Parthenakis
      Introduction Catecholamines play a major role in atherothrombotic mechanisms in essential hypertension. Alpha2B–adrenergic receptors (α2B–ARs) are implicated in the pathophysiology of platelet aggregation. In this study, we evaluated platelet α2B–AR gene expression levels in patients with well-controlled essential hypertension compared to normal individuals and investigated their association with increased arterial stiffness. Methods Fifty-nine patients with well-controlled essential hypertension (34 men, mean age 65 ± 9 years) and 26 normotensives (19 men, mean age 64 ± 8 years) were included in the study. For each patient, carotid femoral pulse wave velocity (c-f PWV) and carotid radial PWV (c-r PWV) were evaluated. In addition, blood samples were obtained and platelets were isolated. The α2B-AR gene expression levels in platelets were examined by real time PCR for each participant. Results Well-controlled hypertensive patients showed significantly higher gene expression levels of α2B-Rs in platelets compared to normotensives (34.7 ± 29.5 versus 17.6 ± 12.5, respectively, p = 0.005). Interestingly, we found that c-f PWV and c-r PWV were positively correlated with platelet α2B-R gene expression levels (r = 0.59, p < 0.001, and r = 0.39, p = 0.002, respectively). Conclusions Platelet α2B-R gene expression levels are increased in patients with well-controlled essential hypertension compared to normotensives, and are correlated with increased PWV in those patients. Our data indicate an association of arterial stiffness and platelet α2B-Rs gene expression and indicate the need for further research.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.08.006
       
  • Soluble (Pro)Renin Receptor in Preeclampsia and Diabetic Pregnancies
    • Authors: Meryam Sugulle; Harald Heidecke; Ulrike Maschke; Florian Herse; A.H. Jan Danser; Dominik N. Mueller; Anne Cathrine Staff; Ralf Dechend
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Meryam Sugulle, Harald Heidecke, Ulrike Maschke, Florian Herse, A.H. Jan Danser, Dominik N. Mueller, Anne Cathrine Staff, Ralf Dechend
      Women with preexisting or gestational diabetes mellitus have an increased risk for developing preeclampsia. Diabetes and pregnancy are both characterized by very high prorenin levels and renin-angiotensin system activation. Prorenin bound to the (pro)renin receptor has enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that soluble (pro)renin receptor levels are elevated in high risk pregnancies. Third trimester maternal blood samples from complicated pregnancies (n=165), [preeclampsia (n=76), diabetes mellitus (type 1 diabetes, n=35; type 2 diabetes, n=11; gestational diabetes mellitus, n=43)], and healthy pregnancies (n=49) were analyzed for prorenin, renin and soluble (pro)renin receptor. There were no significant differences in prorenin or renin levels between the study groups in a multivariate model. In the group of women with gestational diabetes, soluble (pro)renin receptor concentrations were significantly higher as compared to healthy pregnancies or preeclampsia. Soluble (pro)renin receptor did not correlate with renin or prorenin levels for any of the study groups. Our results show that soluble (pro)renin receptor is dysregulated in pregnancies affected by diabetes mellitus, but not in preeclampsia. Alterations in circulating soluble (pro)renin receptor are unrelated to renin/prorenin in pregnancy, but may be of pathophysiological relevance in diabetic pregnancies in a renin-angiotensin system-independent manner.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.08.001
       
  • Contribution of Backward and Forward Wave Pressures to Age-Related
           Increases in Aortic Pressure in a Community Sample Not Receiving
           Antihypertensive Therapy.
    • Authors: Bryan Hodson; Gavin R. Norton; Imraan Ballim; Pinhas Sareli; Angela J. Woodiwiss
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Bryan Hodson, Gavin R. Norton, Imraan Ballim, Pinhas Sareli, Angela J. Woodiwiss
      Reports on the contribution of aortic forward (Pf) and backward (Pb) wave pressures to age-related increases in aortic pulse pressure (PPc) have been confounded by the use of participants receiving antihypertensive therapy. We assessed the relative contribution of Pf and Pb to age-related increases in PPc (radial applanation tonometry and SphygmoCor software using an assumed triangular wave for wave separation analysis) in 892 community participants not receiving antihypertensive therapy. We validated our results using aortic flow waves (echocardiography) for wave separation analysis in 254 of these participants. In multivariate regression models in those <50 years of age, adjustments for both Pb and a Pf-independent measure of reflected wave function (RM=Pb/Pf), but not Pf abolished the impact of age on PPc. However, in those older than 50 years of age, adjustments for Pf (β-coefficient: 0.25±0.06 vs 0.74±0.08 p<0.0001) and Pb (0.04±0.04 vs 0.74±0.08 p<0.0001), but not RM markedly decreased the relationship between age and PPc. On product of coefficient mediation analysis, whether assessed in men or in women, in those participants <50 years of age, independent of several confounders and mean arterial pressure (MAP), Pb (p<0.005), but not Pf contributed to age-related increases in PPc. In contrast, in those participants ≥50 years of age, independent of several confounders and MAP, Pb (p<0.005) and Pf (p<0.01) contributed to age-related increases in PPc, and Pb effects were markedly diminished by adjustments for Pf (0.26±0.002 vs 0.52±0.003 mm Hg per year, p<0.0001 for comparison). In conclusion, independent of the effects of antihypertensive therapy, aortic backward waves contribute to age-related increases in aortic PPc across the adult lifespan, but at an older age, this effect may be attributed in-part to the impact of forward on backward wave pressures.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.08.003
       
  • The 8-oxo-deoxiguanosine glycosylase increases its migration to
           mitochondria in compensated cardiac hypertrophy.
    • Authors: Jorge E. Vela-Guajardo; Perla Pérez-Treviño; Irais Rivera-Álvarez; Fabio A. González-Mondellini; Julio Altamirano; Noemí García
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jorge E. Vela-Guajardo, Perla Pérez-Treviño, Irais Rivera-Álvarez, Fabio A. González-Mondellini, Julio Altamirano, Noemí García
      Cardiac hypertrophy is a compensatory mechanism maladapted because it presents an increase in the oxidative stress which could be associated with the development of the heart failure. A mechanism proposed is by mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) oxidation, which evolved to a vicious cycle due the synthesis of proteins encoded in the genome is committed. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the mtDNA damage and enzyme repairing, the 8-oxo-desoxiguanosine glycosylase mitochondrial isoform 1-2a (OGG1-2a) in the early stage of compensated cardiac hypertrophy induced by abdominal aortic constriction (AAC). Results showed that after six weeks of AAC hearts presented a compensated hypertrophy (22%), with an increase in the cell volume (35%), mitochondrial mass (12%) and mitochondrial membrane potential (94%). However, the increased of oxidative stress did not affect mtDNA, most probably because OGG1-2a, was found to increase 3.2 times in the mitochondrial fraction. Besides, mitochondrial function was not altered by the cardiac hypertrophy condition but in vitro mitochondria from AAC heart showed an increased sensibility to stress induced by the high Ca2+ concentration. Conclusion The increase in the oxidative stress in compensated cardiac hypertrophy induced the OGG1-2a migration to mitochondria to repair mtDNA oxidation, as a mechanism that allows maintaining the cardiac function in the compensatory stage.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.08.004
       
  • Postexercise hypotension during different water-based concurrent training
           intrasession sequences in young women
    • Authors: Stephanie Santana Pinto; Daniel Umpierre; Hector Kerchirne Ferreira; Gabriela Neves Nunes; Rodrigo Ferrari; Cristine Lima Alberton
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 August 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Stephanie Santana Pinto, Daniel Umpierre, Hector Kerchirne Ferreira, Gabriela Neves Nunes, Rodrigo Ferrari, Cristine Lima Alberton
      The purpose of the study was to compare the acute effects of water-based resistance-aerobic (RA) and aerobic-resistance (AR) sequences on systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure (DBP), and mean blood pressure (MBP) in young women. Thirteen active women participated in four sessions: (1) exercises familiarization, (2) aquatic maximal test to determine the heart rate (HR) corresponding to the anaerobic threshold (HRAT), (3) concurrent protocol RA, and (4) concurrent protocol AR. Both protocols were initiated with the blood pressure measurements at rest in supine position. After that, either RA or AR concurrent protocol was performed. At the end of both protocols, blood pressure was measured throughout 60 minutes (every 10 minutes). The water-based resistance protocol was made up by exercises at maximal velocity, and the water-based aerobic protocol was performed at ±5 bpm of HRAT continuously. Two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to analyze the data (α = 0.05). There was no hypotensive effect on systolic blood pressure among the time points (P = .235) in both water-based intrasession exercise sequences (P = .423). Regarding the DBP and MBP, both intrasession exercise sequences presented similar (DBP: P = .980; MBP: P = .796) hypotensive effects in the first 10 minutes (DBP: P = .003; MBP: P = .008) at the end of RA and AR sessions (DBP: −4 vs. −13 mm Hg; MBP: −3 vs. −10 mm Hg). It was concluded that both RA and AR water-based concurrent training sessions resulted in postexercise hypotension (DBP and MBP) in normotensive young women.

      PubDate: 2017-09-01T20:54:54Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.08.002
       
  • Central Systolic Blood Pressure and Aortic Stiffness Response to Dietary
           Sodium in Young and Middle-Aged Adults
    • Authors: Bryce J. Muth; Michael S. Brian; Julio A. Chirinos; Shannon L. Lennon; William B. Farquhar; David G. Edwards
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 July 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Bryce J. Muth, Michael S. Brian, Julio A. Chirinos, Shannon L. Lennon, William B. Farquhar, David G. Edwards
      High dietary sodium intake can lead to hypertension and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease. We sought to determine the effect of short-term dietary sodium loading on central blood pressure and arterial stiffness in young (YG; 22-40 years) and middle-aged (MA; 41-60 years) normotensive adults. YG (n=49; age: 27±1 yrs) and MA (n=36; age: 52±1 yrs) subjects were randomized, in a cross-over design, to 7 days of low sodium (20mmol/day) or high sodium (300mmol/day) diet. On the last day of each diet, central pressures, forward and reflected wave amplitudes (via radial artery applanation tonometry) and carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (CF-PWV) were assessed. Central systolic blood pressure (cSBP) was greater after HS in both YG (LS: 96±1 vs. HS: 99±1mmHg; p=0.012) and MA (LS: 106±2 vs. HS: 115±3mmHg; p<0.001). However, the increase in cSBP was greater in MA (YG: 4±1 vs. MA: 9±2; p=0.02). In MA subjects, HS elicited greater forward (LS: 25±1 vs. HS: 29±1mmHg; p<0.001) and reflected (LS: 19±1 vs. HS: 23±1mmHg; p<0.001) wave amplitudes. CF-PWV was also greater in MA on HS but after adjustment for MAP the difference was no longer significant. Our data indicate that HS intake leads to a greater increase in cSBP in MA adults, which may be the result of increased forward and reflected wave amplitudes.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T16:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.07.010
       
  • Galectin-3 mediates pulmonary vascular remodeling in hypoxia-induced
           pulmonary arterial hypertension
    • Authors: Hui Luo; Bin Liu; Lin Zhao; Jingni He; Tangzhiming Li; Lihuang Zha; Xiaohui Li; Qiangqiang Qi; Yuwei Liu; Zaixin Yu
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 July 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hui Luo, Bin Liu, Lin Zhao, Jingni He, Tangzhiming Li, Lihuang Zha, Xiaohui Li, Qiangqiang Qi, Yuwei Liu, Zaixin Yu
      Objective Pulmonary vascular adventitia serves as a key regulator of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Excessive proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts (PAFs) are proven to be crucial in the pathogenesis of PAH. Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is known as a key fibroblasts activing factor which is involved in the fibrogenesis of several diseases, such as pulmonary fibrosis, vascular fibrosis, and heart failure. Therefore, we seek to investigate the potential role of Gal-3 in regulating PAF cells in the pathogenesis of PAH. Result Gal-3 plasma concentration was significantly higher in PAH patients. Gal-3 was upregulated in pulmonary artery adventitia of hypoxia-induced PAH rats. Inhibition of Gal-3 with N-Acetyl-D-lactosamine (N-Lac) ameliorated PAH and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Gal-3 can stimulate the proliferation, differentiation and collagen synthesis of PAFs, which was reversed by N-Lac. TGF-β1 increased Gal-3 expression in PAFs, while N-Lac significantly suppressed TGF-β1-induced proliferation, differentiation and collagen synthesis of PAFs. Conclusion Gal-3 serves as a critical regulator in the pathogenesis of PAH by regulating the proliferation, differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition synthesis of PAFs. Inhibition of Gal-3 may represent a novel therapeutic target for PAH treatment.

      PubDate: 2017-08-03T16:08:26Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.07.009
       
  • Tumor necrosis factor-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) contributes to ethanol-induced
           vascular reactive oxygen species generation and hypertension
    • Authors: Janaina A. Simplicio; Natália A. Gonzaga; Marcelo A. Nakashima; Bruno S. De Martinis; Thiago Mattar Cunha; Luis F. Tirapelli; Carlos R. Tirapelli
      Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 July 2017
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Janaina A. Simplicio, Natália A. Gonzaga, Marcelo A. Nakashima, Bruno S. De Martinis, Thiago Mattar Cunha, Luis F. Tirapelli, Carlos R. Tirapelli
      We evaluated the contribution of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) to ethanol-induced hypertension and vascular oxidative stress and the possible role of perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT) in such response. Male C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) or TNFR1-deficient mice (TNFR1-/-) were treated with ethanol (20% v/v) for 12 weeks. Ethanol induced an increase in blood pressure in WT and TNFR1−/– mice at 4 and 5 weeks of treatment, respectively. Treatment with ethanol increased TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-6 levels in aortas with or without PVAT (PVAT+ and PVAT-, respectively) from WT, but not TNFR1-/- mice. Ethanol increased superoxide anion (O2 -) generation, TBARS concentration and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase in aortas (PVAT- and PVAT+) from WT, but not TNFR1−/- mice. Conversely, ethanol consumption decreased the concentration of nitrate/nitrite (NOx) in aortas (PVAT- and PVAT+) from WT, but not TNFR1-/- mice. Treatment with ethanol increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in aortas (PVAT- and PVAT+) from WT, but not TNFR1-/- mice. The major finding of our study is that TNFR1 contributes to ethanol-induced hypertension and oxidative stress in the vasculature. Additionally, TNFR1 plays a role in ethanol-induced increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophils migration. However, PVAT does not counteract or aggravate the effects induced by ethanol.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2017-07-23T14:20:28Z
      DOI: 10.1016/j.jash.2017.07.008
       
 
 
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