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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1071 journals)
    - HISTORY (727 journals)
    - History (General) (46 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (41 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (34 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AND OTHER AREAS (8 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (110 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (91 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (14 journals)

HISTORY (727 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

History of CERN     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
History of Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
History of Education: Journal of the History of Education Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
History of European Ideas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
History of Political Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
History of Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
History of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
History Today     Full-text available via subscription  
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
HSE - Social and Education History     Open Access  
IEEE Annals of the History of Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
IKON     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ILCEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Illawarra Unity - Journal of the Illawarra Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access  
Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Indian Economic & Social History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indonesia and the Malay World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Inner Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intellectual History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intermédialités : histoire et théorie des arts, des lettres et des techniques / Intermedialities: History and Theory of the Arts, Literature and Techniques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
International Journal of Society Systems Science     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Politics     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
International Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
INTRECCI d'arte     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iran and the Caucasus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Irish Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Isis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Israel Studies Forum     Full-text available via subscription  
Itinerari di ricerca storica     Open Access  
Japanese Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal Asiatique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal for the Study of Judaism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Aging, Humanities, and the Arts: Official Journal of the Gerontological Society of America     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of American-East Asian Relations     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Baltic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of British Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Contemporary Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Contemporary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Coptic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cuneiform Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Early Modern History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of East Asian Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecclesiastical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of English and Germanic Philology (JEGP)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Family History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Global History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Historical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Israeli History: Politics, Society, Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies: Travesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Legal History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Medieval History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 177)
Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Modern Chinese History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Modern History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 171)
Journal of Modern Italian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern Russian History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Moravian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Natural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of North African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Northern Territory History     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Pacific History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Persianate Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [5 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2570 journals]   [SJR: 0.803]   [H-I: 17]
  • Prevalence of AT1R-activating autoantibodies in primary aldosteronism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hongliang Li , Xichun Yu , Maria Verena Cicala , Franco Mantero , Alexandria Benbrook , Vineet Veitla , Madeleine W. Cunningham , David C. Kem
      Background Autoantibodies to the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) have been reported in patients with primary aldosteronism including aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) and idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia (IAH). Methods and Results Sera from 25 primary aldosteronism subjects (12 with IAH and 13 with APA) and 15 normotensive control subjects were assayed for AT1R autoantibodies by ELISA and an AT1R-transfected cell-based bioassay. Nine of 12 IAH subjects (75%) and 6 of 13 APA subjects (46%) were positive for AT1R autoantibodies in the bioactivity assay. The mean AT1R autoantibody activity for the IAH and APA subjects was significantly greater than controls (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively), and this in vitro activity was suppressed by the AT1R blocker losartan. None of the controls had significant AT1R autoantibody activity. ELISA values were less sensitive but were positive in some subjects with IAH and APA. The mean arterial pressure of these primary aldosteronism subjects correlated modestly with AT1R autoantibody activity. Conclusion These data confirm the presence of active AT1R autoantibodies in a high percentage of subjects with primary aldosteronism irrespective of their underlying etiology. These observations have both pathophysiological and clinical implications.


      PubDate: 2014-10-24T07:04:07Z
       
  • Secondary Hypertension: Drugs and Herbal Preparations that Increase
           Pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Gary E. Sander



      PubDate: 2014-10-24T07:04:07Z
       
  • Comparison of the renal hyperemic effects of papaverine and dopamine in
           patients with renal artery stenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marcin Protasiewicz , Karol Początek , Rafał Poręba , Maciej Podgórski , Katarzyna Gosławska , Anna Szymańska - Chabowska , Grzegorz Mazur , Andrzej Mysiak , Adam Witkowski
      Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the hyperemic effects of papaverine and dopamine in the renal microcirculation of hypertensive patients with renal artery stenosis (RAS). Background Although a poor correlation between angiographic lesion assessment and its hemodynamic significance is known, angiography is a major criterion for the decision of renal artery stenting. Assessment of the hyperemic translesional pressure gradient was recently shown to be conducive in identifying patients who may benefit from renal revascularization. Methods The study included 14 patients (66±11.2 years) with resistant hypertension and moderate RAS. Using a pressure-sensing catheter, systolic, diastolic, and mean translesional pressure gradients, and the distal pressure (Pd):aortic pressure (Pa) ratio (SG, DG, MG, and Pd/Pa, respectively) were analyzed at baseline and after administration of 40 mg papaverine and 50 μg/kg dopamine. Results We did not observe significant changes in DG. Dopamine administration resulted in significant changes in SG, MG, and Pd/Pa when compared with baseline (p<0.05 for all). Changes in these parameters were caused by a decrease in systolic Pd in comparison with baseline conditions (119±34 mm Hg vs. 101 mm Hg, p<0.05). Systolic Pd pressure after papaverine (104 mm Hg) did not change significantly. Systolic and diastolic Pa values did not differ from baseline after either dopamine or papaverine bolus administration. Conclusions This study indicates that compared with papaverine, the intrarenal bolus of dopamine in hypertensive patients with RAS remains a more powerful hyperemic agent.
      Teaser In hypertensive patients with renal artery stenosis, translesional pressure gradients and the distal pressure:aortic pressure ratio were analyzed at baseline and after administration of 40 mg papaverine and 50 μg/kg dopamine using a pressure-sensing catheter. Dopamine administration resulted in significant changes in measured pressures when compared with baseline. The study indicates that compared with papaverine, the intrarenal bolus of dopamine in hypertensive individuals with renal artery stenosis remains a more powerful hyperemic agent.

      PubDate: 2014-10-24T07:04:07Z
       
  • Secondary Hypertension: Renovascular Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Stephen Textor



      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical
           Hypertension Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): William B. White
      For nearly 4 decades, studies have supported direct and independent association of cardiovascular risk with observed ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and inverse association with the degree of BP reduction from day to night. The daytime and nighttime mean BPs as well as the difference between daytime mean and night-time mean BP derived from ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data allow the identification of high-risk patients independent from the BP obtained in the clinic or office setting. The loss of the nocturnal dipping pattern and isolated nocturnal hypertension have also been shown to be an independent risk factors for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While ABPM is not necessarily required for routine use for the diagnosis of hypertension, its does offer substantial benefit to identify white-coat and masked hypertension and to evaluate the extent (or lack of) of BP control in high-risk patients. Ambulatory BP monitoring has proven to be particularly valuable in clinical evaluation of antihypertensive therapy, including both drugs and devices.


      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • From The Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • Natriuresis and blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with
           diabetes mellitus: the NESTOR study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yi Zhang , Davide Agnoletti , Ji-Guang Wang , Yawei Xu , Michel E. Safar
      Background The antihypertensive effect of indapamide has never been clearly understood, particularly in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 565 patients were randomly selected to receive either indapamide 1.5 mg or enalapril 10 mg daily for 12 months. Brachial blood pressure (BP) and plasma and urinary electrolytes were measured at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Sodium and potassium levels and excretion rates were measured in overnight urine collections. Results After 12 months’ treatment, similar significant reductions were observed in systolic and diastolic BP and pulse pressure levels in both treatment arms (P<0.001). However, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes duration and plasma sodium reductions were shown to be major, independent factors influencing BP reduction with indapamide, but not with enalapril. Regression coefficients were positive for age and plasma sodium reductions (P≤0.009) but negative for BMI and diabetes duration (P≤0.008). Similar findings were observed for pulse pressure. These results were more notable in elderly patients, did not differ regardless of whether BP reduction was measured in absolute or percent values, and were associated with increased sodium and potassium excretion rates. Conclusions Indapamide is more effective than enalapril at reducing BP in elderly diabetic hypertensives with marked sodium retention.


      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • The role of paced breathing in hypertension treatment- a review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Relu Cernes , Reuven Zimlichman
      Despite a good adherence to lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive drugs, hypertension remains resistant in more than a third of patients, thus creating the need for additional strategies, including nonpharmacological approaches. Slow and deep breathing (“paced breathing”) associated in the past with meditation has a direct antihypertensive effect by increasing baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) .With the method of guiding the pace of breathing, a FDA certified device, RESPeRATE®, may offer an easy, efficient, inexpensive and noninvasive option for treating hypertension. Multiple studies showed a significant reduction of blood pressure when RESPeRATE® was evaluated in a home and office setting. In conclusion, this review outlines the pathophysiologic background of paced respiration, describes RESPeRATE clinical trials, and presents briefly other guided breathing alternatives.


      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • Rates, Amounts, and Determinants of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
           Claim Reimbursements Among Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Shia T. Kent , Daichi Shimbo , Lei Huang , Keith M. Diaz , Anthony J. Viera , Meredith Kilgore , Suzanne Oparil , Paul Muntner
      Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) can be used to identify white coat hypertension and guide hypertensive treatment. We determined the percentage of ABPM claims submitted between 2007-2010 that were reimbursed. Among 1,970 Medicare beneficiaries with submitted claims, ABPM was reimbursed for 93.8% of claims that had an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 796.2 (“elevated blood pressure reading without diagnosis of hypertension”) versus 28.5% of claims without this code. Among claims without an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 796.2 listed, those for the component (e.g., recording, scanning analysis, physician review, reporting) versus full ABPM procedures and performed by institutional versus non-institutional providers were each more than two times as likely to be successfully reimbursed. Of the claims reimbursed, the median payment was $52.01 (25-75th percentiles: $32.95-$64.98). In conclusion, educating providers on the ABPM claims reimbursement process and evaluation of Medicare reimbursement may increase the appropriate use of ABPM and improve patient care.


      PubDate: 2014-10-04T04:42:38Z
       
  • Long-Term Safety of Nebivolol and Valsartan Combination Therapy in
           Patients with Hypertension: An Open-Label, Single-Arm, Multicenter Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joel M. Neutel , Thomas D. Giles , Henry Punzi , Robert J. Weiss , Huiling Li , Amy Finck
      Long-term safety of a free-tablet combination of nebivolol (Neb) and valsartan (Val) was assessed in a Phase III, open-label trial (NCT01415505). Adults with hypertension entered a 4-week placebo run-in phase, followed by a 52-week treatment phase. Initial dosage (Neb/Val 5/160 mg/d) was titrated up to 20/320 mg/d to achieve BP goal (JNC7 criteria), with the addition of HCTZ (up to 25 mg/d) if needed. Safety and tolerability parameters included adverse events (AEs). Efficacy assessments included baseline-to-endpoint change in DBP and SBP and the percentage of patients who achieved BP goal. All analyses were performed using descriptive statistics. Study completion rate was 60.4% (489/810). The most frequent reason for discontinuation was insufficient therapeutic response (8.4%). AEs were experienced by 59.2% of patients, with the most common being headache (5.7%), nasopharyngitis (5.0%) and upper respiratory tract infection (4.6%). Three (0.4%) deaths occurred during the study; none was considered related to study medication. Mean ± SD changes from baseline at week 52 (observed cases) were -25.5 ± 15.9 mmHg (SBP) and -19.0 ± 8.7 mmHg (DBP). A total of 75.7% Neb/Val-treated and 57.8% Neb/Val/HCTZ-treated completers achieved BP goal. Long-term treatment with nebivolol and valsartan in adults with hypertension was safe and well tolerated.


      PubDate: 2014-09-29T04:25:51Z
       
  • Salt intake, knowledge of salt intake and blood pressure control in
           Chinese hypertensive patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yu Qin , Ting Li , Peian Lou , Guiqiu Chang , Pan Zhang , Peipei Chen , Cheng Qiao , Zongmei Dong
      A cross-sectional study including involving 2,502 subjects was conducted to evaluate salt intake, knowledge of salt intake and blood pressure control in hypertension patients. The blood pressure control rate was 33.5% among the hypertensive patients. Of the patients, 69.9% had salt intake higher than 6 g/d. Overall 35.0% knew the recommended salt intake, and 94.9% knew “excess salt intake can result in hypertension”. Altogether 85.8% of patients had received health education related to a low salt diet at some time. Patients who consumed less than 6 g/d of salt had a higher control rate than those who consumed more than 6 g/d (48.7% vs27.0%, χ2=111.0, P<0.001). Patients with knowledge of the recommended salt intake had a higher control rate than those without (45.8% vs 26.9%, χ2=91.3, P<0.001). Our findings suggest a high salt intake and low blood pressure control rate among Chinese hypertensive patients. Knowledge of recommended salt intake is inappropriate for patients with education of a low-salt diet.


      PubDate: 2014-09-29T04:25:51Z
       
  • A Possible Mechanism for the Progression of Chronic Renal Disease AND
           Congestive Heart Failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Richard N. Re
      Chronic neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, as well as various forms of chronic renal disease and systolic congestive heart failure are among the most common progressive degenerative disorders encountered in medicine. Each disease follows a nearly relentless course, albeit at varying rates, driven by progressive cell dysfunction and drop out. The neurological diseases are characterized by the progressive spread of disease-causing proteins (prion-like proteins) from cell to cell. Recent evidence indicates that cell autonomous renin angiotensin systems (RASs) operate in heart and kidney, and it is known that functional intracrine proteins can also spread between cells. This then suggests that certain progressive degenerative cardiovascular disorders such as forms of chronic renal insufficiency and systolic congestive heart failure result from dysfunctional RAS intracrine action spreading in kidney or myocardium.


      PubDate: 2014-09-23T03:40:21Z
       
  • Hypertension and Kidney Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Matthew R. Weir



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Target Organ Damage: Cardiac
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Scott D. Solomon



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Target Organ Damage - Cardiovascular
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John B. Kostis



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • From the editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • The Use of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Among Medicare
           Beneficiaries in 2007-2010
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daichi Shimbo , Shia T. Kent , Keith M. Diaz , Lei Huang , Anthony J. Viera , Meredith Kilgore , Suzanne Oparil , Paul Muntner
      The US Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Services reimburses ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) for suspected white coat hypertension. We estimated ABPM use between 2007 and 2010 among a 5% random sample of Medicare beneficiaries (≥ 65 years). In 2007, 2008, 2009 and 2010, the percentage of beneficiaries with ABPM claims was 0.10%, 0.11%, 0.10%, and 0.09% respectively. A prior diagnosis of hypertension was more common among those with versus without an ABPM claim (77.7% versus 47.0%). Among hypertensive beneficiaries, 95.2% of those with an ABPM claim were taking antihypertensive medication. Age 75-84 versus 65-74 years, having coronary heart disease, chronic kidney disease, multiple prior hypertension diagnoses, and having filled multiple classes of antihypertensive medication were associated with an increased odds for an ABPM claim among hypertensive beneficiaries. ABPM use was very low among Medicare beneficiaries and was not primarily used for diagnosing white coat hypertension in untreated individuals.


      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • The effect of simvastatin and pravastatin on arterial blood pressure,
           baroreflex, vasoconstrictor and hypertensive effects of angiotensin II in
           Sprague-Dawley rats
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Adrian Drapala , Marta Aleksandrowicz , Tymoteusz Zera , Mariusz Sikora , Janusz Skrzypecki , Ewa Kozniewska , Marcin Ufnal
      Background Research suggests that statins affect the regulation of arterial blood pressure (BP), however, the mechanisms remain obscure. Methods We maintained male, 12-weeks-old, Sprague Dawley rats on tap water (controls) or water containing simvastatin or pravastatin for four weeks. Subsequently, we measured mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate (HR) at baseline and after intravenous infusion of either saline or angiotensin II (Ang II). Additionally, we tested baroreflex function and the effect of statins on vasoconstrictor response to Ang II on isolated femoral artery branches. Results Controls, simvastatin and pravastatin groups showed a significant increase in MABP and HR in response to Ang II. The increase was significantly smaller in the simvastatin group than in controls and in the pravastatin group. In contrast, when pretreated with hexamethonium, a ganglionic blocker, simvastatin and pravastatin groups showed a similar hypertensive response to Ang II, which was smaller than in controls. Likewise, the Ang II-induced vasoconstrictor response of femoral artery branches was comparable between simvastatin and pravastatin groups and smaller than in controls. We found no effect of statins on the baroreflex. Conclusions This study shows that simvastatin and pravastatin differ in their effects on the Ang II-dependent mechanisms controlling BP.


      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • Glucose series complexity in hypertensive patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9
      Author(s): Luis Vigil , Emilia Condés , Manuel Varela , Carmen Rodriguez , Ana Colas , Borja Vargas , Manuel Lopez , Eva Cirugeda
      Nonlinear methods have been applied to the analysis of biological signals. Complexity analysis of glucose time series may be a useful tool for the study of the initial phases of glucoregulatory dysfunction. This observational, cross-sectional study was performed in patients with essential hypertension. Glucose complexity was measured with detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), and glucose variability was measured by the mean amplitudes of glycemic excursion (MAGE). We included 91 patients with a mean age of 59 ± 10 years. We found significant correlations for the number of metabolic syndrome (MS)-defining criteria with DFA (r = 0.233, P = .026) and MAGE (r = 0.396, P < .0001). DFA differed significantly between patients who complied with MS and those who did not (1.44 vs. 1.39, P = .018). The MAGE (f = 5.3, P = .006), diastolic blood pressures (f = 4.1, P = .018), and homeostasis model assessment indices (f = 4.2, P = .018) differed between the DFA tertiles. Multivariate analysis revealed that the only independent determinants of the DFA values were MAGE (β coefficient = 0.002, 95% confidence interval: 0.001–0.004, P = .001) and abdominal circumference (β coefficient = 0.002, 95% confidence interval: 0.000015–0.004, P = .048). In our population, DFA was associated with MS and a number of MS criteria. Complexity analysis seemed to be capable of detecting differences in variables that are arguably related to the risk of the development of type 2 diabetes.


      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • Relationship between cardio-ankle vascular index and N-terminal pro-brain
           natriuretic peptide in hypertension and coronary heart disease subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9
      Author(s): Hongyu Wang , Jinbo Liu , Hongwei Zhao , Yingyan Zhou , Xujing Zhao , Yuejie Song , Lihong Li , Hongyan Shi
      Arterial stiffness is an independent predictor for vascular diseases. Cardio-ankle vascular index (CAVI) is a new index of arterial stiffness. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a strong prognostic marker in advanced stage of coronary heart disease (CHD). In the present study, we investigated the relationship between CAVI and NT-proBNP in hypertension and CHD subjects. Five hundred one subjects (male/female, 209/292) from Vascular Medicine of Peking University Shougang Hospital were divided into four groups: healthy group (n = 186), hypertension group (n = 159), CHD group (n = 45), and hypertension with CHD group (n = 111). CAVI was measured using VS-1000 apparatus. Our results showed that CAVI was significantly higher in hypertension subjects with CHD than in healthy and hypertension group, respectively (8.42 ± 1.51 vs. 7.77 ± 1.19; 8.42 ± 1.51 vs. 7.92 ± 1.11; both P < .05). NT-proBNP was significantly higher in hypertension subjects with CHD than in healthy, hypertension, and CHD group, respectively (422.48 ± 761.60 vs. 174.29 ± 415.48; 422.48 ± 761.60 vs. 196.14 ± 299.16; 422.48 ± 761.60 vs. 209.66 ± 242.66; all P < .05). And after log transformation of NT-proBNP, this phenomenon also exists (2.32 ± 0.47 vs. 2.03 ± 0.40; 2.32 ± 0.47 vs. 2.09 ± 0.44; 2.32 ± 0.47 vs. 2.12 ± 0.42; all P < .05). There was positive correlation between log NT-proBNP and CAVI in the entire study group, healthy group, and nonhealthy group (r = 0.235, P < .001; r = 0.184, P = .023; r = 0.237, P < .001; respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that NT-proBNP was an independent associating factor of CAVI in all subjects (β = 0.150, P = .021). Our present study showed that CAVI and NT-proBNP were significantly higher in hypertension subjects with CHD compared with healthy and hypertension groups. There was significant correlation between NT-proBNP and CAVI, which indicates the relationship between arterial stiffness and biomarkers in vascular-related diseases.


      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • Ventricular-arterial coupling in obstructive sleep apnea
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9
      Author(s): Alena Shantsila , Eduard Shantsila , Mehmood Butt , Omer A. Khair , Girish Dwivedi , Gregory Y.H. Lip
      Arterial elastance (Ea) and systolic elastance are important parameters determining effective functional interaction of heart and vessels. The aims of this study were to (1) compare arterial (arterial elastance index [EaI]) and ventricular (end-systolic elastance [Ees] and end-diastolic elastance [Eed]) elastance in subjects with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and patients with treated ‘high-risk’ hypertension (HHT) and (2) test whether these parameters in OSA patients can be improved by continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Echocardiographic parameters of cardiac and vascular stiffness (EaI, Ees, and Eed) were quantified in 28 patients with OSA (mean [standard deviation], age 51 [11] years; 79% male) and 28 treated subjects with HHT (mean [standard deviation], age 48 [12] years; 61% male). Twenty-three OSA patients were treated with CPAP for median of 26 weeks. Ea was calculated from stroke volume and systolic BP and adjusted by body area (EaI). Both study groups had preserved and comparable left ventricle contractility. There was no significant differences in EaI (P = .94), Ees (P = .5), Eed (P = .63), and arterial-ventricular interaction (P = .62) between OSA and HHT groups. After CPAP therapy, there was a significant reduction in EaI (paired t test, P = .013) and arterial-ventricular interaction (paired t test, P = .004). Ees (P = .17) and Eed (P = .66) parameters did not change significantly. OSA and HHT patients have similar parameters of elastance and ventricular-arterial coupling. CPAP treatment in OSA patients significantly improved ventricular-arterial coupling.


      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • Clinical predictors and impact of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in
           pediatric hypertension referrals
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9
      Author(s): Marguerite L. Davis , Michael A. Ferguson , Justin P. Zachariah
      Elevated blood pressure (BP) is rising in children. Significant proportions of children have reactive hypertension or masked hypertension, making ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) a valuable tool, although with potential economic implications. In youth referred for elevated BP, we sought clinic BP combinations that obviated the need for ABPM and to specify the economic role of ABPM. In a retrospective pediatric referral cohort (N = 170), we examine clinic systolic BP (SBP) predictors of components of ABPM hypertension and their combination. In economic analyses, we compared effectiveness and charges of three diagnostic pathways: (1) clinic BP alone; (2) abnormal clinic BP prompting ABPM; or (3) universal ABPM. ABPM hypertension occurred in 55 (32.4%) and reactive hypertension in 37 (21.8%), average automated (β = 0.208; 95% confidence interval, 0.027, 0.389; P = .03) and maximum auscultatory clinic SBP (β = 0.160; 95% confidence interval 0.022, 0.299; P = .02) were associated with ABPM SBP mean, but none predicted SBP load. No clinic SBP combination was associated with ABPM hypertension. Universal ABPM accrued the lowest average charge per hypertensive youth identified ($10,948). We did not identify a clinic SBP combination that predicted ABPM hypertension in youth referred for elevated BP. Universal ABPM, in this context, may be the most economically and clinically efficient diagnostic strategy.


      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9




      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9




      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • An imbalance in serum concentrations of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory
           cytokines in hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9
      Author(s): Seyed Reza Mirhafez , Mohsen Mohebati , Mahboobeh Feiz Disfani , Maryam Saberi Karimian , Mahmoud Ebrahimi , Amir Avan , Saied Eslami , Alireza Pasdar , Hassan Rooki , Habibollah Esmaeili , Gordon A. Ferns , Majid Ghayour-Mobarhan
      Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and there is increasing evidence that inflammation and abnormal immune responses are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. However, the data on the association between specific cytokine concentrations and hypertension are inconsistent. We have evaluated the association between 12 cytokines/growth factors and the presence of different degrees of hypertension, comparing these concentrations to values in a healthy group of subjects. The concentrations of interleukin (IL)-1α, -1β, -2, -4, -6, -8, -10, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), epidermal growth factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor were measured in 155 hypertensive patients and 148 healthy subjects, using EV-3513 cytokine biochip arrays, a competitive chemiluminescence immunoassay. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the association of specific cytokines and growth factors with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP). Hypertensive subjects had higher serum concentrations of IL-1α, -2, -8, vascular endothelial growth factor, IFN-γ, TNF-α, MCP-1, and epidermal growth factor; and lower concentrations of anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10 (P < .05), compared with the healthy individuals. The serum concentrations of IL-4, -6, and -1β did not differ between the hypertensive subjects and control group. Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that IL-1α and IFN-γ were independent predictors of a high SBP, while IFN-γ, IL-1α, TNF-α, and MCP-1 remained statistically significant for DBP after correction for age, gender, Body mass index, smoking, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides. There was a significant association between the concentrations of several cytokines and hypertension. These associations may either be related to common underlying factors that cause hypertension and may also be proinflammatory or because these inflammatory cytokines might directly be involved in the etiology of hypertension.


      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • Hemodynamic effects of angiotensin inhibitors in elderly hypertensives
           undergoing total knee arthroplasty under regional anesthesia
    • Abstract: Publication date: September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 9
      Author(s): James J. Calloway , Stavros G. Memtsoudis , Daniel G. Krauser , Yan Ma , Linda A. Russell , Susan M. Goodman
      The aim was to investigate the association between continuing angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) with postinduction hypotension and vasoactive drug use in elderly orthopedic surgery patients under regional anesthesia. Retrospective design consisted of 114 patients (mean age 66) undergoing elective total knee arthroplasty, including 84 patients with chronic hypertension, and they were divided as group I (n = 37), ACEI/ARB continued; group II (n = 23), ACEI/ARB withdrawn; group III (n = 24), β-blocker/calcium channel blocker continued; and group IV (n = 30), without hypertension (control). Primary end points are systolic blood pressures (SBPs) and mean arterial blood pressures (MAPs) at 0, 30, 60, and 90 minutes postinduction, incidence of hypotension (SBP <85 mm Hg), and ephedrine requirements. Repeated measurements were analyzed using generalized estimating equations controlling for baseline characteristics and accounting for correlations. Logistic regression was used for remaining variables. Hypotension occurred more frequently (P = .02) in group I (30%) versus groups II–IV (9%, 13%, 3%). Ephedrine use was increased (P < .001) in group I (51%) compared with groups II–IV (26%, 17%, 7%). Group I had lower mean SBPs compared with group II (110 vs. 120; P = .0045) and group IV (110 vs. 119; P = .0013). Lower mean MAPs were found in group I versus group II (74 vs. 81, P = .001) and group IV (74 vs. 80; P = .001). Group I had an increased odds of receiving ephedrine versus group IV (odds ratio, 16.27; 95% confidence interval, 3.10–85.41; P = .001). No adverse clinical events were recorded. Day of surgery ACEI/ARB use is associated with a high incidence and severity of postinduction hypotension with associated high vasopressor requirements. Associated clinical outcomes merit further study.


      PubDate: 2014-09-14T02:16:58Z
       
  • “Hold the Catheters” – Renal Denervation may not be the
           answer to the management of resistant or hard-to-treat hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marvin Moser , Joel Handler



      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Onset of hypertension during pregnancy is associated with long-term worse
           blood pressure control and adverse cardiac remodeling
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Roberto F. Mesquita , Muriel Reis , Ana Paula Beppler , Vera Regina Bellinazzi , Sandra S. Mattos , José L. Lima-Filho , José A. Cipolli , Otavio R. Coelho-Filho , José A. Pio-Magalhães , Andrei C. Sposito , José R. Matos-Souza , Wilson Nadruz Jr.
      Up to 20% of women with hypertensive pregnancy disorders might persist with chronic hypertension. This study compared clinical and echocardiographic features between women whose hypertension began as hypertensive pregnancy disorders (PH group) and women whose diagnosis of hypertension did not occur during pregnancy (NPH group). Fifty PH and 100 NPH women were cross-sectionally evaluated by clinical, laboratory and echocardiography analysis and the groups were matched by duration of hypertension. PH exhibited lower age (46.6±1.4 vs. 65.3±1.1 years; p<0.001), but higher systolic (159.8±3.9 vs. 148.0±2.5mmHg; p=0.009) and diastolic (97.1±2.4 vs. 80.9±1.3mmHg; p<0.001) blood pressure than NPH, although used more antihypertensive classes (3.4±0.2 vs. 2.6±0.1; p<0.001). Furthermore, PH showed higher left ventricular wall thickness and increased prevalence of concentric hypertrophy than NPH after adjusting for age and blood pressure. In conclusion, this study showed that PH may exhibit worse blood pressure control and adverse left ventricular remodeling compared to NPH.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • The effects of the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor fostamatinib on
           ambulatory blood pressure in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis:
           Results of the OSKIRA-ABPM (ambulatory blood pressure monitoring)
           randomized trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): George D. Kitas , Gabriel Abreu , Krystyna Jedrychowicz-Rosiak , Jeffrey L. Miller , Roumen Nakov , Seva Panfilov , Jiri Vencovsky , Millie Wang , Michael E. Weinblatt , William B. White
      Clinical trials of fostamatinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) showed blood pressure (BP) elevation using clinic measurements. The OSKIRA-ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) trial assessed fostamatinib’s effect on 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) in patients with active RA. One hundred thirty-five patients were randomized to fostamatinib 100 mg twice daily (bid) (n = 68) or placebo bid (n = 67) for 28 days. Ambulatory, clinic, and home BPs were measured at baseline and after 28 days of therapy. Primary end point was change from baseline in 24-hour mean SBP. Fostamatinib increased 24-hour mean SBP by 2.9 mmHg (P = .023) and diastolic BP (DBP) by 3.5 mmHg (P < .001) vs. placebo. Clinic/home-measured BPs were similar to those observed with ABPM. After treatment discontinuation (1 week), clinic BP values returned to baseline levels. Fostamatinib induced elevations in 24-hour mean ambulatory SBP and DBP. BP elevations resolved with fostamatinib discontinuation.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Gender differences in antihypertensive drug treatment: Results from the
           Swedish primary care cardiovascular database (SPCCD)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): C. Ljungman , T. Kahan , L. Schiöler , P. Hjerpe , J. Hasselström , B. Wettermark , K.B. Boström , K. Manhem
      Background There are gender differences in antihypertensive treatment. This study aimed to investigate if gender differences in treatment could be explained by comorbidities. Further we aimed to study if blood pressure control are different in women and men and if women more often interrupt treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI) or angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) compared to men. Method and results This cohort study within the Swedish primary care cardiovascular database included 40, 825 patients with hypertension attending primary health care from 2007-2008. Cardiovascular comorbidities except heart failure were more common in men. Women were more often treated with diuretics, and men with ACEI, also in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. Comorbidities could not entirely explain gender differences in antihypertensive treatment in a regression model. Women had higher systolic and lower diastolic blood pressures, also in subgroups with cardiovascular comorbidity. Men more often than women were prescribed ACEI/ARB and interrupted treatment. Conclusion Women and men are treated with different antihypertensive drugs, and this is not fully explained by differences in comorbidities. Women have higher systolic blood pressures, irrespective of comorbidity. Men have more often interrupted treatment with ACEI/ARB. These gender differences could affect outcome and warrant further investigation.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Maternal hypertensive pregnancy disorders and cognitive functioning of the
           offspring: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Soile Tuovinen , Johan G. Eriksson , Eero Kajantie , Katri Räikkönen
      Hypertensive pregnancy disorders may affect the fetal developmental milieu and thus hint at mechanisms that link prenatal conditions with later developmental outcomes of the offspring. Here, we systematically review studies that have tested whether maternal pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension and hypertensive pregnancy disorders as a single diagnostic entity are associated with cognitive functioning of the offspring. Twenty-six studies were eligible for this review. Of them, 19 provided detailed methodological information deemed necessary to be included for a more detailed review. An overall conclusion is that, in the general population, maternal hypertensive disorders may be associated with lower cognitive ability of the offspring. Studies that extend to adulthood show the most consistent pattern of findings. It is possible that the associations arise during the lifetime or that the findings reflect improvements in management of these disorders. Evidence is, however, insufficient to conclude whether these associations are dissimilar in the offspring exposed to maternal pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension, due to the varied criteria used across the different studies to distinguish between these conditions. The existing studies also vary in the definition of control groups, and very few have taken into account important confounding factors, including maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and lifestyle behaviors. Given the mixed pattern of findings and limitations related to internal and external validity, further studies are clearly warranted to clarify the associations.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Stroke Outcomes Among Participants Randomized To Chlorthalidone,
           Amlodipine Or Lisinopril In Allhat
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): José-Miguel Yamal , Suzanne Oparil , Barry R. Davis , Michael H. Alderman , David A. Calhoun , William C. Cushman , Herbert F. Fendley , Stanley S. Franklin , Gabriel B. Habib , Sara L. Pressel , Jeffrey L. Probstfield , Sithiporn Sastrasinh
      Background The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) was a randomized, double-blind, practice-based, active-control, comparative effectiveness trial in 33,357 high-risk hypertensive participants. Methods and Results ALLHAT compared cardiovascular disease outcomes in participants initially treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril), calcium channel blocker (amlodipine), or thiazide-type diuretic (chlorthalidone). We report stroke outcomes in 1517 participants in-trial and 1596 additional participants during post-trial passive surveillance, for total follow-up of 8–13 years. Stroke rates were higher with lisinopril (6-year rate/100=6.4) than with chlorthalidone (5.8) or amlodipine (5.5) in-trial but not including post-trial (10-year rates/100=13.2 [chlorthalidone], 13.1[amlodipine], and 13.7 [lisinopril]). In- trial differences were driven by race (race-by-lisinopril/chlorthalidone interaction P=0.005, race-by-amlodipine/lisinopril interaction P=0.012) and gender (gender-by-lisinopril/amlodipine interaction P=0.041), separately. No treatment differences overall, or by race or gender, were detected over the 10-year period. No differences appeared among treatment groups in adjusted risk of all-cause mortality including post-trial for participants with nonfatal in-trial strokes. Conclusions Among Blacks and women, lisinopril was less effective in preventing stroke in-trial than either chlorthalidone or amlodipine, even after adjusting for differences in systolic blood pressure. These differences abated by the end of the post-trial period.


      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Impaired coronary microvascular function and increased intima-media
           thickness in preeclampsia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Faika Ceylan Ciftci , Mustafa Caliskan , Ozgur Ciftci , Hakan Gullu , Ayla Uckuyu , Erzat Toprak , Filiz Yanik
      Background There is an association between preeclampsia (PE) and excessive morbidity and mortality. Some recent studies have revealed the presence of endothelial dysfunction in PE patients with inflammatory activity. Moreover, it has been argued that the chronic inflammatory state involved in PE leads to an acceleration in atherosclerosis. Accordingly, our goal in this study is to determine whether there is any coronary microvascular dysfunction and increase in the intima-media thickness in patients who had mild PE five years before, without the presence of any traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Methods The study included thirty three mild PE patients (Mild preeclampsia is classified as a blood pressure (BP) of 140/90 mm Hg or higher with proteinuria of 0.3 to 3 g/day.) that mean age was 33.7 years old , and 29 healthy women volunteers mean age was 36.1 years old. Each subject was examined using transthoracic echocardiography five years after their deliveries . During the echocardiographic examination coronary flow reserve (CFR) and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) were measured. Results There was a statistically lower CFR value in PE patients as compared to controls (2,39±0,48 vs. 2,90±0,49, P < 0.001). On the other hand, there was a significant increase in their IMT and high-sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hs-CRP) values (respectively 0,59±0,15 vs. 0,46±0,10, P < 0.001; 3,80±2,10 vs. 2,33±1,79, p= 0,004). There was a negative correlation between the CFR values of the PE patients and hs-CRP (r = -0.568, p = 0.001) and IMT (r =−0.683, P < 0.001) results. Conclusions We determined in the study that there was impaired CFR and increased carotid IMT in patients with PE, and moreover that these adverse effects were significantly correlated with hs-CRP.
      Teaser Coronary microvascular dysfunction was found in patients who had preeclampsia five years ago, without the presence of any traditional cardiovascular risk factors.

      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Wrist circumference as a novel predictor of hypertension and
           cardiovascular disease: Results of a decade follow up in a West Asian
           cohort
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Reza Mohebi , Ahmad Mohebi , Farhad sheikholeslami , Fereidoun Azizi , Farzad Hadaegh
      Background No study has yet evaluated the effect of wrist circumference on risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adult population. Methods and Materials The present study included 3642 women, aged ≥ 30 years, free of CVD at baseline, who had undergone health examinations between January 1999-2001 and were followed up until March 2010. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to assess the hazard ratios (HRs) of wrist circumference for CVD and hypertension events. Results During 10 years of follow up, 284 cases of first CVD and 615 cases of incident hypertension occurred. In a model adjusted for conventional CVD risk factors, the HR of 1 cm increase in wrist circumference was 1.15(1.06-1.25) for hypertension and was marginally significant for CVD (HR; 1.12(1.00-1.25), p-value 0.052). After considering body mass index and waist circumference in the model, we found significant interaction between waist circumference and wrist circumference in risk prediction of hypertension and CVD (p<0.001). In non-centrally obese women (waist circumference < 95 cm), in multivariable model plus BMI and waist circumference, increase in wrist circumference was independently associated with both hypertension (HR: 1.17(1.02-1.35)) and CVD (HR: 1.29(1.03-1.61)). However among centrally obese women (waist circumference ≥ 95 cm), wrist circumference increase could not predict either hypertension (HR: 0.97(0.84-1.18)) or CVD events (HR: 0.90(0.75-1.07)). Discussion- Wrist circumference as a novel anthropometric measure was an independent predictor for incident hypertension and CVD events among non-centrally obese women.


      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Pre-existing arterial hypertension as a risk factor for early left
           ventricular systolic dysfunction following (R)-CHOP chemotherapy in
           patients with lymphoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Sebastian Szmit , Wojciech Jurczak , Jan Maciej Zaucha , Joanna Drozd-Sokołowska , Wojciech Spychałowicz , Monika Joks , Monika Długosz-Danecka , Adam Torbicki
      Background Experimental studies in animals suggest that arterial hypertension may be a specific risk factor predisposing to anthracycline cardiotoxicity. The aim was determination of the effect of pre-existing arterial hypertension on the development of early left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) directly after (R)-CHOP chemotherapy in patients with lymphomas. Methods The study included 208 patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma receiving conventional doxorubicin. LVSD was defined as a decrease of LVEF below 50% and at least by 10 percent points from baseline value. Results Patients with pre-existing hypertension more frequently developed new LVSD (19.7% vs 6.6%; p=0.004), pitting edema of the ankles (23.9% vs 9.5%; p=0.005) and nycturia (21.1% vs 7.3%; p=0.004) compared to patients without hypertension. As a consequence, hypertension subgroup suffered from more: delays of subsequent chemotherapy cycles (26.8% vs 14.6%; p=0.03), reductions of doxorubicin doses (18.3% vs 8.8%; p=0.05) and premature discontinuations of chemotherapy (16.9% vs 7.3%; p=0.03). On logistic regression analyses hypertension was one of the most important risk factors for developing new LVSD after (R)-CHOP chemotherapy. Conclusions Arterial hypertension confers a significant risk of early LVSD in lymphoma patients treated with (R)-CHOP chemotherapy interfering with its recommended schedule of administration.


      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Oscillometric Blood Pressure: A Review for Clinicians
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Bruce S. Alpert , David Quinn , David Gallick
      Oscillometric devices for the non-invasive estimation of blood pressure (BP) have become the “clinical standard” because of training requirements for determination of BP by auscultation, cost, and the phasing out/banning of mercury in many states and countries. Analysis of recent publications reveals a lack of understanding of the “meaning” of oscillometric blood pressure (OBP) measurements by authors, journal editors, and clinicians. We were invited to submit a review of OBP methodology written for clinicians. We hope that the material contained herein will clarify how clinicians should interpret OBP values for their patients.


      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Basic Science: Epidemiology of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Nathan D. Wong , Stanley S. Franklin



      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Tick-tock- tick-tock: The Impact of Circadian Rhythm Disorders on
           Cardiovascular Health and Wellness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Charlene E. Gamaldo , Youjin Chung , Yu Min Kang , Rachel Marie E. Salas
      Humans spend a third of their lives asleep. A well-balanced synchrony between sleep and wakefulness is needed to maintain a healthy lifestyle. Optimal sleep is based on an individual's inherent sleep requirement and circadian rhythm. If either one or both of these critical elements are disrupted, daytime dysfunction, non-restorative sleep, and/or reduced sense of well-being may result. While the medical community is more familiar with sleep disorders such as sleep apnea, insomnia, and narcolepsy, circadian rhythm sleep wake disorders (CRSWDs) are less known despite these being common within the general population. CRSWDs are comprised of the following: shiftwork disorder, delayed sleep phase disorder, advanced sleep phase disorder, jet lag disorder, non-24-hour sleep-wake disorder, and irregular sleep-wake rhythm disorder. In general, a CRSWD results when there is misalignment between the sleep pattern and the desired sleep schedule, dictated by work, family, and social schedules. Subsequently, patients have difficulty falling asleep, maintaining sleep, and/or experience poor quality sleep predisposing them to insomnia or excessive sleepiness


      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Basic Science: Pharmacology of Antihypertensive Drugs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Addison A. Taylor



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • Treatment: Recent clinical trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Alan H. Gradman , Jan N. Basile



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • Use of the Plasma Triglyceride/High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio
           to Identify Cardiovascular Disease in Hypertensive Subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Martin R. Salazar , Horacio A. Carbajal , Walter G. Espeche , Marcelo Aizpurúa , Carlos E. Leiva Sisnieguez , Betty C. Leiva Sisnieguez , Carlos E. March , Rodolfo N. Stavile , Eduardo Balbín , Gerald M. Reaven
      Background This analysis evaluated the hypothesis that the plasma triglyceride (TG)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration ratio can help identify patients with essential hypertension who are insulin-resistant, with the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profile associated with that defect. Methods and Results Data from a community-based study developed between 2003 and 2012 were used to compare CVD risk factors and outcome. Plasma TG/HDL-C cut-points of 2.5 (women) and 3.5 (men) subdivided normotensive (n=574) and hypertensive (n=373) subjects into “high” and “low” risk groups. Metabolic syndrome criteria (MetS) were also used to identify “high” and “low” risk groups. The baseline cardio-metabolic profile was significantly more adverse in 2003 in “high” risk subgroups, irrespective of BP classification or definition of risk (TG/HDL-C ratio vs. MetS criteria). Crude incidence of combined CVD events increased across risk groups, ranging from 1.9 in normotensive-low TG/HDL-C subjects to 19.9 in hypertensive-high TG/HDL-C ratio individuals (P for trends <0.001). Adjusted hazard ratios for CVD events also increased with both hypertension and TG/HDL-C. Comparable findings were seen when CVD outcome was predicted by MetS criteria. Conclusions the TG/HDL-C concentration ratio and the MetS criteria identify to a comparable degree hypertensive subjects who are at greatest cardio-metabolic risk and develop significantly more CVD.


      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • Is all Hypertension Local?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John D. Bisognano



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • From the editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • Increased Morning Blood Pressure Surge and Coronary Microvascular
           Dysfunction in Patient with Early Stage Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Mustafa Caliskan , Zuhal Caliskan , Hakan Gullu , Nursen Keles , Serkan Bulur , Yasar Turan , Osman Kostek , Ozgur Ciftci , Aytekin Guven , Soe Moe Aung , Haldun Muderrisoglu
      Background Morning blood pressure surge (MBPS) is defined as an excessive increase in blood pressure (BP) in the morning from the lowest systolic blood pressure during sleep, and it has been reported as a risk factor for cardiovascular events in current clinical studies. In this study, we evaluated the association between the rate of BP variation derived from ambulatory blood pressure monitoring data analysis and coronary microvascular function in patients with early stage hypertension. Methods One hundred and seventy patients with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension who fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria were included in the study. We divided our study population into two subgroups according to the median value of coronary flow reserve (CFR). Patients with CFR values <2.5 were defined as the impaired CFR group, and patients with CFR values ≥2.5 were defined as the preserved CFR group, and we compared the MBPS measurements of these two subgroups. CFR was measured using transthoracic Doppler echocardiography (TTDE). Results Ambulatory 24-h systolic and diastolic BP, uric acid, systolic MBPS amplitude, diastolic MBPS amplitude, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and mitral flow E/A ratio were statistically significant. These predictors were included in age- and gender-adjusted multivariate analysis; ambulatory 24-h systolic pressure (ß=0.077, p<0.001; OR=1.080; CI 95% [1.037–1.124]) and systolic MBPS amplitude (ß=0.043, p=0.022; OR=1.044; CI 95% [1.006–1.084]) were determined to be independent predictors of impaired CFR (Hosmer–Lemeshow test p=0.165, Nagelkerke’s R squared=0.320). Conclusion We found that increased changes in MBPS values in patients with prehypertension and stage I hypertension seemed to cause microvascular dysfunction in the absence of obstructive coronary artery disease.


      PubDate: 2014-07-29T21:20:40Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-07-24T20:29:45Z
       
  • A Review of Blood Pressure Measurement Protocols among Hypertension
           Trials: Implications for “Evidence-Based” Clinical Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Paolo Giorgini , Alan B. Weder , Elizabeth A. Jackson , Robert D. Brook
      Background Hypertension guidelines recommend following published standardized protocols to obtain accurate blood pressure (BP) readings in clinical practice. However, the various measurement techniques among clinical trials that provide the basis for evidence-based management have not been evaluted or compared to guideline recommendations. Methods We reviewed published information regarding BP measurement in clinical trials (n=64) from 1990-2014 by searching PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Results Every trial failed to provide published information regarding at least one of the 10 methodological aspects we evaluated. Details regarding the healthcare provider(s) performing measurement(s), temporal-relation to last medication dosage, number of readings, resting time before (and between recordings), and the device(s) employed varied amongst the trials and often differed from clinical recommendations. Most studies did evaluate ≥2 BP readings in a seated position, presumably from the upper arm (though explicit acknowledgement of this latter detail was rare). When indicated, “trough” BP levels were most commonly obtained (15/16 trials), while the usage of automated devices increased over time. Conclusions Numerous aspects of BP measurement varied considerably across trials and often from most recent guideline recommendations. The lack of uniform methodologies in outcome studies that form the foundation of evidence-based guidelines may have significant clinical implications.


      PubDate: 2014-07-24T20:29:45Z
       
  • Pediatric Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Grows Up
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joseph T. Flynn



      PubDate: 2014-07-24T20:29:45Z
       
  • Initial Evaluation – Laboratory Testing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Gary L. Schwartz , Lawrence R. Krakoff



      PubDate: 2014-07-24T20:29:45Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Clinical Characteristics
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Barry J. Materson



      PubDate: 2014-07-24T20:29:45Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Classification of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 July 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Barry J. Materson



      PubDate: 2014-07-24T20:29:45Z
       
 
 
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