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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1159 journals)
    - HISTORY (768 journals)
    - History (General) (49 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (42 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (40 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AND OTHER AREAS (8 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (137 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (97 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (18 journals)

HISTORY (768 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Historical Studies in the Natural Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Historically Speaking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Histories of Anthropology Annual     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Historiographia Linguistica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Historiography East and West     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Historische Zeitschrift     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Historiæ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History & Memory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
History Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
History Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
History in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
History of CERN     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
History of Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
History of Education: Journal of the History of Education Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
History of European Ideas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
History of Political Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
History of Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
History of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
History Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
HSE - Social and Education History     Open Access  
IEEE Annals of the History of Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
IKON     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ILCEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Illawarra Unity - Journal of the Illawarra Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Indian Economic & Social History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Indonesia and the Malay World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Inner Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intellectual History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intermédialités : histoire et théorie des arts, des lettres et des techniques / Intermedialities: History and Theory of the Arts, Literature and Techniques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Culture and History     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203)
International Journal of Society Systems Science     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Politics     Partially Free   (Followers: 18)
International Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
INTRECCI d'arte     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Iran and the Caucasus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Irish Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Isis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Israel Studies Forum     Full-text available via subscription  
Italianist, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Itinerari di ricerca storica     Open Access  
Japanese Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal Asiatique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal for the Study of Judaism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Aging, Humanities, and the Arts: Official Journal of the Gerontological Society of America     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Journal of American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of American-East Asian Relations     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Baltic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of British Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Contemporary Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Contemporary China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Contemporary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Coptic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Cuneiform Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Early Modern History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of East Asian Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Ecclesiastical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Journal of English and Germanic Philology (JEGP)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Family History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Global History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Historical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Historical Linguistics     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Israeli History: Politics, Society, Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies: Travesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Legal History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover   Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
  [SJR: 1.15]   [H-I: 22]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2586 journals]
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 1 April 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:05:56Z
       
  • Treatment of hypertension in patients with coronary artery disease A
           scientific statement from the American Heart Association, American College
           of Cardiology, and American Society of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Clive Rosendorff , Daniel T. Lackland , Matthew Allison , Wilbert S. Aronow , Henry R. Black , Roger S. Blumenthal , Christopher P. Cannon , James A. de Lemos , William J. Elliott , Laura Findeiss , Bernard J. Gersh , Joel M. Gore , Daniel Levy , Janet B. Long , Christopher M. O'Connor , Patrick T. O'Gara , Olugbenga Ogedegbe , Suzanne Oparil , William B. White



      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:05:56Z
       
  • Hypertension – an emerging cardiovascular risk factor in HIV
           infection
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Vicente Sperb Antonello , Ivan Carlos Ferreira Antonello , Thiago Kreutz Grossmann , Cristiane Valle Tovo
      AIM Patients with HIV may have an increased risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in a population of HIV-infected patients at an HIV/AIDS clinic in southern Brazil. METHODS Review of medical records of 1,009 HIV-infected patients aged 18 years or more in an urban HIV/AIDS clinic based in Porto Alegre, southern Brazil. Hypertension was defined according to the JNC VIII criteria. RESULTS The prevalence of hypertension in this study cohort was 22.5% (CI 95%: 20-25.2%). Individuals were significantly older in the hypertensive group (p<0.001). After adjustment using a Poisson regression model of all variables that presented p<0.2 in the univariate analysis, only being aged 40 years or more and obesity were significantly associated with hypertension. Also in this setting, dyslipidemia (p=0.068) showed a tendency of association with hypertension. Compared to HIV-infected persons aged 18-39 years, those aged 40 to 59 years presented a 2-fold higher prevalence of hypertension (CI 95%: 1.2-3.3). CONCLUSION The present study showed a high prevalence of hypertension among HIV-infected persons, similar to other studies, ranging from 13 to 45 %, and also similar to the HIV-negative general population. Age and obesity were the factors associated with hypertension. Finally, the present study indicates a similar pattern of behavior and comorbidities for HIV-positive and -negative patients in relation to hypertension.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:05:56Z
       
  • New guidelines for hypertension control in cardiac patients – lower
           may not be better
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Aram V. Chobanian



      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:05:56Z
       
  • Ambulatory 24-hour cardiac oxygen consumption and blood pressure-heart
           rate variability: effects of nebivolol and valsartan alone and in
           combination
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joseph L. Izzo Jr. , Safi U. Khan , Osman Saleem , Peter J. Osmond
      Background We compared an angiotensin receptor blocker (valsartan, VAL), a beta-blocker (nebivolol, NEB) and the combination of NEB/VAL to determine their relative effects on 24-hour myocardial oxygen consumption (MVO2, determined by 24-hour ambulatory heart rate-central systolic pressure product, ACRPP) and its components. Methods Subjects with hypertension (SBP >140 or DBP>90, n=26) were studied in a double-blinded, forced-titration, sequence-controlled, crossover design with 3 experimental periods: VAL 320, NEB 40, and NEB/VAL 320/40 mg daily. After 4 weeks of each drug, ambulatory pulse wave analysis (IEM Mobil-O-Graph) was performed every 20 min for 24-hours, with hemodynamic variables compared sequentially. Results All 3 treatments resulted in nearly identical brachial and central systolic BP values. NEB alone or in combination with VAL resulted in lower ACRPP (by 11-14%, p<0.001 each) and heart rate (by 18-20%, p<0.001 each) compared to VAL but stroke work trended lower with VAL. Relative and adjusted variability (standard deviation and coefficient of variation) of heart rate and ACRPP were also lower with NEB and NEB/VAL than VAL. Results in African Americans, the majority subpopulation, were similar to those of the entire treatment group. Conclusions Due to the rate-slowing effects of NEB, ambulatory cardiac MVO2 was lower with NEB monotherapy or NEB/VAL combination therapy than with VAL monotherapy. NEB/VAL was not superior to NEB alone in controlling heart rate, BP, or ACRPP. Heart rate variability but not ACRPP variability was reduced by NEB or the combination NEB/VAL. There is no attenuation of beta-blocker-induced rate-slowing effects of in African Americans.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:05:56Z
       
  • Regional and Physician Specialty-Associated Variations in the Medical
           Management of Atherosclerotic Renal-Artery Stenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): David A. Folt , Kaleigh L. Evans , Sravya Brahmandam , Wencan He , Pamela S. Brewster , Shipeng Yu , Timothy P. Murphy , Donald E. Cutlip , Lance D. Dworkin , Kenneth Jamerson , William Henrich , Philip A. Kalra , Sheldon Tobe , Ken Thomson , Andrew Holden , Brian L. Rayner , Liliana Grinfeld , Steven T. Haller , Christopher J. Cooper
      For people enrolled in CORAL (Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions), we sought to examine whether variation exists in the baseline medical therapy of different geographic regions and if any variations in prescribing patterns were associated with physician specialty. Patients were grouped by location within the United States (US) and outside the US (OUS), which includes Canada, South America, Europe, South Africa, New Zealand, and Australia. When comparing US to OUS, participants in the US took fewer anti-hypertensive medications (1.9±1.5 vs. 2.4±1.4, p<0.001) and were less likely to be treated with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin II receptor blocker (46% vs. 62%, p<0.001), calcium channel antagonist (37% vs. 58%, p<0.001), and statin (64% vs. 75%, p<0.05). In CORAL, the identification of variations in baseline medical therapy suggests that substantial opportunities exist to improve the medical management of patients with atherosclerotic renal-artery stenosis.


      PubDate: 2015-04-05T03:05:56Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • The effect of vitamin D supplementation on arterial stiffness in an
           elderly community–based population
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3
      Author(s): Cora McGreevy , Miriam Barry , Colin Davenport , Brendan Byrne , Caroline Donaghy , Geraldine Collier , William Tormey , Diarmuid Smith , Kathleen Bennett , David Williams
      Vitamin D deficiency may lead to impaired vascular function and abnormalities in central arterial stiffness. We compared the effects of two different doses of vitamin D3 on arterial stiffness in an elderly population with deficient serum 25–hydroxy–vitamin D levels. A total of 119 known vitamin D deficient (<50 nmol/L) subjects were randomized to receive either 50,000 international units (IU) or 100,000 IU single intramuscular vitamin D3. In the group that received 100,000 IU vitamin D, median pulse wave velocity decreased from 12.2 m/s (range, 5.1–40.3 m/s) to 11.59 m/s (range, 4.3–14.9 m/s) after 8 weeks (P = .22). A mean decrease of 3.803 ± 1.7 (P = .032) in augmentation index (a measure of systemic stiffness) was noted. Only 3/51 (5.8%) who received 100,000 IU vitamin D reached levels of sufficiency (>75 nmol/L). A significant decrease in augmentation index was seen in the group that received 100,000 IU vitamin D. Serum levels of 25–hydroxy–vitamin D were still deficient at 8 weeks in the majority of patients, which may be attributable to impaired bioavailability.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Blood Pressure Targets in Patients with Diabetes – a New
           Perspective.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Clive Rosendorff



      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Effects of Carotid Body Tumor Resection on the Blood Pressure of Essential
           Hypertensive Patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marat Fudim , Kelly L. Groom , Cheryl L. Laffer , James L. Netterville , David Robertson , Fernando Elijovich
      Removal of the carotid body (CB) improves animal models of hypertension (HTN) and heart failure, presumably via withdrawal of chemoreflex-induced sympathetic activation. The effect of CB tumor (CBT) resection on blood pressure (BP) in subjects with HTN is unknown. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 20 subjects with HTN (BP≥140/90 mmHg or use of antihypertensives) out of 134 who underwent CBT resection. Short-term (from 3 months before to the first reading after 30 days from surgery) and long-term (slope of the regressions on time over the entire follow up) changes in BP and heart rate (HR) were ascertained and adjusted for covariates (interval between readings, total follow up, number of readings and changes in therapy). Age and duration of HTN were 56±4 and 9±5 years. Adjusted short-term decreases in systolic (SBP: -9.9±3.1, p<0.001) and pulse pressures (PP: -7.9±2.7, p<0.002) were significant and correlated with their respective long-term changes (SBP: r=0.47, p=0.047; PP: r=0.54, p=0.019). Also, there was a strong relationship between adjusted short-term changes in SBP and PP (r=0.64, p<0.004). Out of 12 subjects with concordant decreases in short- and long-term BP changes, 6 (50% of responders or 33% of the total) had short-term falls of SBP ≥10 mmHg and of PP ≥ 5mmHg. To our knowledge this study is the first to show that unilateral CBT resection is associated with sustained reduction of BP in subjects with HTN. Hence, we suggest that targeted removal of the CB chemoreflex conceivably has a role in the therapy of human HTN.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Secondary hypertension Obstructive sleep apnea
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Basic science Hypertensive target organ damage
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Treatment Drug therapy of hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • MicroRNAs in pulmonary arterial hypertension: pathogenesis,
           diagnosis and treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3
      Author(s): Julie Bienertova-Vasku , Jan Novak , Anna Vasku
      Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe and increasingly prevalent disease, manifested by the maladaptation of pulmonary vasculature, which consequently leads to right heart failure and possibly even death. The development of PAH is characterized by specific functional as well as structural changes, primarily associated with the aberrant function of the pulmonary artery endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and vascular fibroblasts. MicroRNAs constitute a class of small ≈22–nucleotides–long non–coding RNAs that post–transcriptionally regulate gene expression and that may lead to significant cell proteome changes. While the involvement of miRNAs in the development of various diseases—especially cancer—has been reported, numerous miRNAs have also been associated with PAH onset, progression, or treatment responsiveness. This review focuses on the role of microRNAs in the development of PAH as well as on their potential use as biomarkers and therapeutic tools in both experimental PAH models and in humans. Special attention is given to the roles of miR–21, miR–27a, the miR–17–92 cluster, miR–124, miR–138, the miR–143/145 cluster, miR–150, miR–190, miR–204, miR–206, miR–210, miR–328, and the miR–424/503 cluster, specifically with the objective of providing greater insight into the pervasive roles of miRNAs in the pathogenesis of this deadly condition.
      Graphical abstract image

      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Differential effects of nebivolol and metoprolol on arterial stiffness,
           circulating progenitor cells, and oxidative stress
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 3
      Author(s): Salim S. Hayek , Joseph C. Poole , Robert Neuman , Alanna A. Morris , Mohamed Khayata , Nino Kavtaradze , Matthew L. Topel , Jose G. Binongo , Qunna Li , Dean P. Jones , Edmund K. Waller , Arshed A. Quyyumi
      Unlike traditional beta receptor antagonists, nebivolol activates nitric oxide. We hypothesized that therapy with nebivolol compared with metoprolol would improve arterial stiffness, increase levels of circulating progenitor cells (PC), and decrease oxidative stress (OS). In a randomized, double–blind, cross–over study, 30 hypertensive subjects received either once daily nebivolol or metoprolol succinate for 3 months each. Pulse wave velocity and augmentation index were measured using tonometry. Flow cytometry was used to measure circulating PC. OS was measured as plasma aminothiols. Measurements were performed at baseline, and repeated at 3 and 6 months. No significant differences were present between the levels of OS, arterial stiffness, and PC numbers during treatment with metoprolol compared with nebivolol. In subgroup analyses of beta–blocker naïve subjects (n = 19), nebivolol reduced pulse wave velocity significantly compared with metoprolol (−1.4 ± 1.9 vs. −0.1 ± 2.2; P = .005). Both nebivolol and metoprolol increased circulating levels of CD34+/CD133 + PC similarly (P = .05), suggesting improved regenerative capacity.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Refractory and resistant hypertension: characteristics and differences
           observed in a specialized clinic
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Rodrigo Modolo , Ana Paula de Faria , Andréa Rodrigues Sabbatini , Natália Ruggeri Barbaro , Alessandra M.V. Ritter , Heitor Moreno
      Resistant hypertension (RH) is defined as uncontrolled BP despite the use of ≥3 anti-hypertensive drugs, or controlled requiring use of ≥4 drugs. Recently, a new definition for an extreme phenotype of RH (uncontrolled BP using at least 5 drugs) has emerged – the refractory hypertension. Although characteristics of RH are well established, little is known about this newly described subgroup. For this work, 116 subjects with RH were enrolled from a specialized Clinic and divided into: RH (n=80), and refractory hypertension (RfH, n=36). Subjects were submitted to echocardiography, 24h-ABPM and biochemical analyses. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that: (1) white-coat effect (OR=3.23, 95%CI 1.12-9.27, p=0.03), (2) black race (OR=6.67, 95%CI 1.99-16.16, p<0.001) and (3) left ventricular mass index (OR=1.02, 95%CI 1.01-1.03, p=0.04) were independent predictors of refractoriness. In conclusion, refractory and resistant hypertension present different patients’ characteristics and these phenotypic aspects can be useful for better understanding this harder-to-treat subgroup.


      PubDate: 2015-03-20T01:24:38Z
       
  • Lack of Blood Pressure Difference by Race in Professional American
           Football Players
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Andrew M. Tucker , Andrew E. Lincoln , Robert A. Vogel , Henry R. Black , Reginald E. Dunn , Peter W.F. Wilson , Elliot J. Pellman
      Previous findings suggest that professional American football players have higher blood pressures (BP) and a higher prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension than the general population. We sought to determine whether race is associated with differences in BP and prevalence of prehypertension and hypertension among a large sample of professional football players. BP was measured at 2009 team mini-camps for 1484 black (n=1007) and white (n=477) players from 27 NFL teams. Players were categorized into three position groups based on body mass index (BMI). There was no racial difference in mean systolic or diastolic blood pressure in any of the three position groups. There were no racial differences in prevalence of hypertension (99 [9.8%] black players versus 39 [8.2%] white players; P=.353) or prehypertension (557 [55.3%] black players versus 264 [55.3%] white players; P=1.0). Contrary to findings in the general population, BP and prevalence of prehypertension/hypertension did not vary with race in a large population of active NFL players.


      PubDate: 2015-03-12T01:02:32Z
       
  • Comparison of an in-pharmacy automated blood pressure kiosk
           to daytime ambulatory blood pressure in hypertensive subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2
      Author(s): Raj S. Padwal , Raymond R. Townsend , Luc Trudeau , Peter G. Hamilton , Mark Gelfer
      The objective of this study was to compare serial readings from an in–pharmacy automated blood pressure (BP) kiosk to mean daytime ambulatory BP. A total of 100 community–dwelling adults with hypertension underwent (1) three baseline automated office readings; (2) three in–pharmacy readings on each of four visits (12 total) using the PharmaSmart PS–2000 kiosk; and (3) 24–hour ambulatory BP monitoring between in–pharmacy visits two and three. Paired t–tests, Bland–Altman plots, and Pearson correlation coefficients were used for analysis. Mean BPs were 137.8 ± 13.7/81.9 ± 12.2 mm Hg for in–pharmacy and 135.5 ± 11.7/79.7 ± 10.0 mm Hg for daytime ambulatory (difference of 2.3 ± 9.5/2.2 ± 6.9 mm Hg [P ≤ .05]). Bland–Altman plots depicted a high degree of BP variability but did not show clinically important systematic BP differences. With ambulatory BP as the reference standard, in–pharmacy device results were similar to automated office results. The PharmaSmart PS–2000 closely approximated mean daytime ambulatory BP, supporting the use of serial readings from this device in the assessment of BP.


      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Effects of high and low salt intake on left ventricular remodeling after
           myocardial infarction in normotensive rats
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2
      Author(s): Ludimila Forechi , Marcelo Perim Baldo , Isabela Binotti de Araujo , Breno Valentim Nogueira , José Geraldo Mill
      The dietary–sodium restriction is a standard approach following an acute myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the hypothesis in which the use of a high or low–sodium diet would worsen post–infarction left ventricular remodeling in rats and facilitate the development of heart failure. Left coronary artery ligation or sham–operated (SO) was produced in male Wistar rats (250–290 g). After surgery, animals were assigned to one of the three diets: standard amount of sodium (0.3% NaCl, SO and MI groups), a high–sodium diet (0.6% NaCl, SO–High and MI–High groups), or a low–sodium diet (0.03% NaCl, SO–Low and MI–Low groups). Diets were provided for 8 weeks post–surgery. Mortality rate was elevated in high–salt group (MI–Low, 21.4%; MI, 35.3%; MI–High, 47.6%). Contractility parameter was seen to be impaired in MI–Low animals (3195 ± 211 mm Hg/s) compared with MI (3751 ± 200 mm Hg/s). Low–salt diet did not prevent myocardial collagen deposition (MI–Low, 5.2 ± 0.5%; MI, 5.0 ± 0.4%) nor myocyte hypertrophy (MI–Low, 608 ± 41μ2; MI, 712 ± 53 μm2) in left ventricle after MI. High–salt intake increases collagen volume fraction (SO, 3.3 ± 0.4%; SO–High, 4.7 ± 0.4%) in animals sham, but no major changes after MI. Our results show that ventricular remodeling was not altered by immediate introduction of low sodium after MI, and it may be a safe strategy as a therapeutic intervention to avoid volume retention. However, high sodium can be harmful, accelerating the post–infaction ventricular remodeling.


      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Treatment: special conditions Co-existing vascular disease: stroke
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension




      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2




      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Twenty-four Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring to all?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Paolo Verdecchia , Fabio Angeli , Claudia Bartolini , Gianpaolo Reboldi



      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Should Blood Pressure Be Lowered in Acute Ischemic Stroke? The CATIS
           Trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Philip B. Gorelick



      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Use of metabolomics to elucidate the metabolic perturbation
           associated with hypertension in a black South African male cohort:
           the SABPA study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2
      Author(s): Cynthia A. van Deventer , Jeremie Z. Lindeque , Peet J. Jansen van Rensburg , Leoné Malan , Francois H. van der Westhuizen , Roan Louw
      There is concern about the increasing burden of essential hypertension in urban–dwelling black South Africans, especially males. Several studies have investigated urbanization and hypertension in South Africans, but in–depth metabolomics studies on these urbanized hypertensives are still lacking. We aimed to investigate hypertension via two metabolomics methods in order to explore underlying biological mechanisms, demonstrating the effectiveness of these methods in cardiovascular research. A comprehensive characterization of a group (n = 25) of black male South Africans was performed using urinary gas chromatography–mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry metabolic profiling in conjunction with 24–hour ambulatory blood pressure readings and anthropometric, clinical, and biochemical markers. Average 24–hour blood pressure readings served as the grouping variable, and test subjects were divided into quintiles. Statistical analyses were performed on Quintile 1 (normotensive subjects) and Quintile 5 (extreme hypertensive subjects). After feature selection was performed, several metabolites and cardiometabolic risk markers, including abdominal obesity and markers of liver damage, inflammation, and oxidative stress were significantly perturbed in Quintile 5 (hypertensives) compared with Quintile 1 (P < .05). Pathway analysis revealed perturbations in several systems involved in ethanol metabolism via shifted global NADH/NAD+ ratio. Although alcohol abuse has been established as a risk factor for hypertension, this study illustrated a metabolic perturbation associated with alcohol abuse, contributing to the development of hypertension—possibly by altering bioenergetics through a shift in the NADH/NAD+ ratio. Following this finding, future intervention studies on alcohol moderation, as well as further enhancement of metabolomics methods in cardiovascular research are highly recommended.


      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • The association between elevated admission systolic blood pressure in
           patients with acute coronary syndrome and favorable early and late
           outcomes
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2
      Author(s): Gadi Shlomai , Eran Kopel , Ilan Goldenberg , Ehud Grossman
      In patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS), the predictive potential of admission systolic blood pressure (SBP) on early and late outcomes is not entirely clear. We investigated the association between admission SBP in patients hospitalized for ACS and subsequent morbidity and mortality in a real world setting. The study population comprised 7645 ACS patients enrolled in the Acute Coronary Syndromes Israeli Survey (ACSIS) between 2002 and 2010. We analyzed the association between admission SBP, and the rates of 7–day and 1–year all–cause mortality and of 30–day major cardiovascular adverse events (MACE). Admission SBP was categorized as low (<110 mm Hg), normal (110–140 mm Hg), high (141–160 mm Hg), and very high (>160 mm Hg). Compared with patients with normal admission SBP, those with low SBP had a significantly increased hazard ratios (HRs) for 7–day and 1–year mortality, and MACE of 2.37, 1.92, and 1.51, respectively (all P < .001). In contrast, patients with very high admission SBP had significantly decreased HRs for 7–day and 1–year mortality, and MACE of 0.46, 0.65, and 0.84, respectively (P = .004, <.001, and .07, respectively). In patients with ACS, elevated admission SBP is associated with favorable early and late outcomes.


      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Diagnosis of preeclampsia with soluble Fms–like tyrosine kinase
           1/placental growth factor ratio: an inter–assay comparison
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 9, Issue 2
      Author(s): Louise Bjørkholt Andersen , Britta Frederiksen-Møller , Kathrine Work Havelund , Ralf Dechend , Jan Stener Jørgensen , Boye L. Jensen , Jan Nielsen , Sine Lykkedegn , Torben Barington , Henrik Thybo Christesen
      The angiogenic factor ratio soluble Fms–kinase 1 (sFlt–1)/placental growth factor (PlGF) is a novel diagnostic tool for preeclampsia. We compared the efficacy of the KRYPTOR (BRAHMS) automated assays for sFlt–1 and PlGF with the Elecsys (Roche) assays in a routine clinical setting. Preeclamptic women (n = 39) were included shortly after the time of diagnosis. Normotensive control pregnancies were matched by gestational age (n = 76). The KRYPTOR assays performed comparably or superior to Elecsys (sFlt–1/PlGF area under the curve 0.746 versus 0.735; P = .09; for non–obese 0.820 versus 0.805, P = .047). For early–onset preeclampsia, KRYPTOR area under the curve increased to 0.929 with a 100% specificity for preeclampsia at cut–off 85 and an 88.9% sensitivity for preeclampsia at cut–off 33. For women with preeclampsia and preterm delivery or Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count (HELLP) syndrome, the KRYPTOR sFlt–1/PlGF ratio was manifold increased (P < .01). The sFlt–1/PlGF ratio proved especially useful in early–onset preeclampsia, preeclampsia with preterm delivery or HELLP, and among non–obese women.


      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Plasma homocysteine level and subclinical carotid artery disease in
           patients with hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Tomoyuki Kawada



      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Arterial Stiffness Is Increased In Young Normotensive Subjects With High
           Central Blood Pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): S. Totaro , P.R. Khoury , T.R. Kimball , L.M. Dolan , E.M. Urbina
      Information on high Central Blood Pressure (CBP) in normotensive subjects (HCP) and its relation to target organ damage (TOD) is not well established in young. Aim: To elucidate determinants of HCP and its relation with TOD. Methods Anthropometrics, lab, brachial and CBP were obtained on 430 normotensive subjects (NT) (16-24 years, 34% male, 44% Caucasian, 27% type-2 diabetes). HCP was defined as elevated CBP, with normal brachial BP. Results HCP (prevalence 16%) were more frequently female, African-American, had a higher prevalence of obesity and diabetes, a more adverse metabolic profile, higher levels of inflammation, brachial BP, central pulse pressure and heart rate, compared to NT. HCP also had evidence for TOD with a significant higher cIMT, LVM, AIx, PWV and lower BrachD than NT. Conclusions HCP is related to early cardiac and vascular dysfunction and remain an independent predictor of TOD even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors.


      PubDate: 2015-03-08T00:56:40Z
       
  • Design of Renal Denervation Studies not Confounded by Antihypertensive
           Drugs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Sverre E. Kjeldsen , Alexandre Persu , Michel Azizi



      PubDate: 2015-03-03T23:41:10Z
       
  • Comparison of Atenolol Versus Bisoprolol with Noninvasive Hemodynamic and
           Pulse Wave Assessment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Lucas S. Aparicio , José Alfie , Jessica Barochiner , Paula E. Cuffaro , Diego H. Giunta , Cristina M. Elizondo , Juan J. Tortella , Margarita S. Morales , Marcelo A. Rada , Gabriel D. Waisman
      We aimed to compare atenolol versus bisoprolol regarding general hemodynamics, central-peripheral blood pressure, pulse wave parameters and arterial stiffness. In this open-label, cross-over study, we recruited 19 hypertensives, untreated or with stable monotherapy. Patients were randomized to receive atenolol (25-50 mg) or bisoprolol (2.5-5 mg), and then switched medications totaling 4 weeks. Studies were performed at baseline and after each drug period. In pulse wave analyses, both drugs significantly increased augmentation index (p<0.01) and ejection duration (p<0.02), and reduced heart rate (p<0.001), brachial systolic BP (p≤0.01), brachial diastolic BP (p≤0.001) and central diastolic BP (p≤0.001), but not central systolic BP (p≥0.06). Impedance cardiographic assessment showed a significantly increased stroke volume (p≤0.02) . There were no significant differences in the effects between drugs. In conclusion, atenolol and bisoprolol show similar hemodynamic characteristics. Failure to decrease central systolic BP results from bradycardia with increased stroke volume and an earlier reflected aortic wave.


      PubDate: 2015-02-26T22:05:31Z
       
  • Grim status of hypertension in rural China: Results from Northeast China
           Rural Cardiovascular Health Study 2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Zhao Li , Xiaofan Guo , Liqiang Zheng , Hongmei Yang , Yingxian Sun
      Background The last study reported the prevalence of hypertension in rural Northeast China was conducted approximately ten years ago. We aimed to update the data on the prevalence and epidemiological features of hypertension in rural Northeast China. Methods This study examined a total of 11,576 adults using a multistage cluster sampling method to select a representative sample of individuals 35 years or older. Sitting blood pressure was measured three times for each participant by trained observers using a standardized electric sphygmomanometer after resting for five minutes. Related medical histories were obtained using a standard questionnaire and blood biochemical indexes were collected by well-trained personnel. Results Prevalence of hypertension was 51.1%, 53.9% for men and 48.7% for women. Among subjects with hypertension, 43.5% were aware of the diagnosis, and 31.2% were taking antihypertensive medications, but only 6% had their blood pressure controlled. Besides traditional risk factors, multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and hyperuricemia were becoming risk factors for hypertension in rural area. Conclusion Status of hypertension in rural China is grim nowadays in rural Northeast China. Prevalence of hypertension remained seriously high, while the control rate was still frustrating low. Obesity, diabetes, dyslipidemia and hyperuricemia were more likely associated with hypertension in rural area.


      PubDate: 2015-02-26T22:05:31Z
       
  • A pilot study comparison of a new method for aortic pulse wave velocity
           measurements using transthoracic bioimpedance and thigh cuff oscillometry
           with the standard tonometric method
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Julia Brinkmann , Jens Jordan , Jens Tank
      Aortic pulse wave velocity (aPWV) can be measured with different methodologies including applanation tonometry. These pilot study findings suggest that impedance cardiography combined with thigh oscillometry provides comparable results. Methods Intra- and inter-observer variability was tested by two observers in two subjects. We instrumented 41 patients and 12 healthy normotensive controls for impedance cardiography and consecutive applanation tonometry and compared methods using the Bland-Altman method. Results Observer variability for the impedance - thigh cuff method (range 3.61-7.77 %) was comparable with the tonometric method (range 2.93–7.37%). Comparison of the two methods based on the Bland–Altman plot revealed a good agreement between methods. The bias between impedance and tonometric measurements was - 0.28 ± 0.37 m/s. Both measurements were significantly correlated (r²= 0.94, p<0.0001, slope=1.038). Conclusion Impedance cardiography combined with thigh oscillometry is an easy to use approach which in addition to providing hemodynamic information yields aPWV measurements comparable to applanation tonometry. Following full validation according to current guidelines, the methodology could prove useful in cardiovascular risk stratification.


      PubDate: 2015-02-21T21:01:26Z
       
  • Detecting Initial Orthostatic Hypotension: A Novel Approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Brittain McJunkin , Brandon Rose , Om Amin , Nirmita Shah , SachIn Sharma , Sujal Modi , Suzanne Kemper , Muhammad Yousaf
      Our purpose, by modification of standard bedside tilt testing, was to search for lesser known but important initial orthostatic hypotension (IOH), occurring transiently within the first 30 seconds of standing, heretofore only detectable with sophisticated continuous photoplethysmographic monitoring systems, not readily available in most medical facilities. In screened outpatients over 60 years of age, supine BP parameters were recorded. To achieve readiness for immediate BP after standing, the cuff was re-inflated prior to standing, rather than after. Immediate, 1, and 3 minute standing BPs were recorded. One-hundred fifteen patients were studied (mean age 71.1 years, male 50.5%). Eighteen (15.6%) had OH, of whom fourteen (12.1%) had classical OH (COH), and 4 (3.5%) had IOH. Early standing BP detection time was 20.1 ± 5.3 seconds. Immediate transient physiologic systolic BP decline was detected in Non-OH (-8.8 ± 9.9 mm Hg, P < .0001). In contrast to COH (with lesser but persistent orthostatic BP decrements), IOH patients had immediate mean orthostatic systolic/diastolic BP change of -32.8 (± 13.8) mm Hg/ -14.0 (± 8.5) mm Hg, P < .02, with recovery back to baseline by 1 minute. Two of the four IOH patients had pre-syncopal symptoms. For the first time, using standard inflation-deflation BP equipment, immediate transient standing physiologic BP decrement and IOH were demonstrated. This preliminary study confirms proof of principle that manual BP cuff inflation prior to standing may be useful and practical in diagnosing IOH, and may stimulate direct comparative studies with continuous monitoring systems.


      PubDate: 2015-02-21T21:01:26Z
       
  • Risk factor panels associated with hypertension in obstructive sleep apnea
           patients with different body mass indexes
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Wei Hu , Xian Jin , Jun Gu , Peng Zhang , Qiang Yu , Guizhi Yin , Yi Lu , Hongbing Xiao , Yueguang Chen , Dadong Zhang
      Although hypertension (HTN), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and obesity frequently co-occur, the precise role of obesity in this interrelationship is not completely understood. A total of 727 OSA patients were assigned to BMI<25 (27.6%; n=201), 25≤BMI<29.99 (53.4%; n=388), and BMI≥30 (19%; n=138). HTN risk factors in each group were evaluated. A total of 244 (33.6%) patients exhibited comorbid HTN, of whom 20.5% (50/244), 52.9% (129/244) and 26.6% (65/244) were distributed between the BMI<25, 25≤BMI<29.99 and BMI≥30 groups, respectively. Multiple logistic regression indicated that age, male sex, triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and Apnea-Hypopnea Index scores (AHI) were HTN risk factors for the BMI<25 group. In the 25≤BMI<29.99 group, risk factors were age, BMI, diabetes and AHI. Finally, in the BMI≥30 group, risk factors were age, diabetes, TG, LDL-C and AHI. These results demonstrate that different risk factor panels were associated with HTN in OSA patients with different BMIs.


      PubDate: 2015-02-12T18:00:19Z
       
  • Resistant Hypertension: A volemic or nervous matter?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 9 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Rodrigo Modolo , Ana Paula de Faria , Heitor Moreno



      PubDate: 2015-02-12T18:00:19Z
       
  • III Secondary hypertension D. Obstructive Sleep Apnea
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): C. Anwar Ahmed Chahal , Virend K. Somers



      PubDate: 2015-02-12T18:00:19Z
       
  • Treatment: Special Conditions: Co-existing Heart Disease: Atrial
           Fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Rishi Arora , Clyde W. Yancy



      PubDate: 2015-02-12T18:00:19Z
       
  • Treatment: Special Conditions: Co-Existing Vascular Disease: Stroke
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Philip B. Gorelick



      PubDate: 2015-02-12T18:00:19Z
       
  • Racial impact of diurnal variations in blood pressure on cardiovascular
           events in chronic kidney disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 February 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Ciaran J. McMullan , Yuichiro Yano , George L. Bakris , Kazuomi Kario , Robert A. Phillips , John P. Forman
      Ambulatory blood pressure parameters, nocturnal dipping and morning surge, are associated with cardiovascular outcomes in several populations. While significant variation exists between racial groups in ambulatory blood pressure measurements and the incidence of cardiovascular disease, the effect of race on the associations of dipping and morning surge with cardiovascular outcomes is unknown. In a prospective analysis of 197 African American and 197 Japanese individuals with non-diabetic chronic kidney disease matched by age and renal function we analyzed the associations of dipping and morning surge with cardiovascular events for both races and assessed whether these relations differed by race.. Higher sleep-trough morning surge was independently associated with cardiovascular events in Japanese (HR=1.93 per 10 mmHg; 95% CI, 1.20 – 3.10) but not in African American participants, with race an effect modifier (p-value <0.01). Dipping was not associated with cardiovascular events in either racial group. In individuals with chronic kidney disease the association between morning surge and cardiovascular events appears to be dependent upon race, with higher morning surge a risk factors in Japanese but not in African Americans.


      PubDate: 2015-02-12T18:00:19Z
       
  • Cornell product relates to albuminuria in hypertensive black adults
           independently of blood pressure: the SABPA study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 December 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Rudolph Schutte , Hugo W. Huisman , lisa J. Ware , Catherina MC. Mels , Wayne Smith , Nicolaas T. Malan , Leoné Malan , Johannes M. van Rooyen , Carla MT. Fourie , Aletta E. Schutte
      Background Evidence of the relationship between left ventricular hypertrophy and urinary albumin excretion is contradictory and limited in black adults in whom hypertensive heart disease is common. We aimed to investigate the relationship between subclinical left ventricular hypertrophy and albuminuria in non-diabetic hypertensive blacks. Methods Urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (UACR) was determined from 8h overnight urine collection. We recorded ambulatory blood pressure and 12-lead electrocardiogram during a typical working day. Results Cornell product (P=0.002), UACR (P=0.042), 24h systolic pressure (P<0.0001) and 24h pulse pressure (P<0.0001) were higher in the hypertensive group. Cornell product was associated with UACR in single (r=0.25,P=0.012), partial (P trend=0.002) and multiple regression (β=0.326,P=0.0005) analyses in the hypertensive group only, even below the threshold for microalbuminuria and independent of 24h systolic pressure. Conclusion Urinary albumin excretion is associated with subclinical left ventricular hypertrophy in non-diabetic hypertensive blacks and may be a useful marker of early cardiovascular disease in blacks.


      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Home blood pressure profile in very elderly hypertensives: should we use
           the same thresholds as in younger patients?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jessica Barochiner , Lucas S. Aparicio , Paula E. Cuffaro , Carlos R. Galarza , Marcos J. Marín , José Alfie , Margarita S. Morales , Marcelo A. Rada , Gabriel D. Waisman
      We aimed to determine the characteristics of home BP in very elderly hypertensives. 485 treated hypertensive patients ≥18 years (median age 70.8 (RI 18), 67.2% women) underwent home BP measurements. Characteristics of patients ≥80 and <80 years of age and prevalence of office and home uncontrolled hypertension, isolated morning- (IMH), isolated evening- (IEH), isolated office- (IOH) and masked hypertension (MH) were compared. Very elderly subjects had higher levels of systolic and lower levels of diastolic BP at home, a higher prevalence of home uncontrolled hypertension (68.5 vs. 37.7%, p<0.001), MH (30.6 vs. 14.9%, p=0.02) and IMH (19.4 vs. 10.9%, p=0.02) and a lower prevalence of IOH (8.3 vs. 18.8%, p=0.01). When using differential home BP thresholds in the very elderly, determined through the percentile method, statistical differences disappeared, except for IMH. The very elderly depict a particular home BP profile. Benefit from using differential home BP thresholds should be determined in prospective studies.


      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Emphasized warning reduces salt intake: a randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Nina Pinjuh Markota , Mirjana Rumboldt , Zvonko Rumboldt
      Background Excessive salt intake is a major cardiovascular risk factor. At variance to the developed countries, the main source of sodium in transitional and developing countries is salt added while cooking and/or at the table. The objective of this trial was to examine the impact of warning labels placed on home salt containers on daily salt intake. Subjects and methods A sample of treated hypertensives (n= 150) was randomised in two subgroups, one receiving just a leaflet about the harmful effects of excessive salt intake (control, n= 74), and the other one receiving in addition warning stickers for household salt containers (intervention, n= 76). Arterial blood pressure (BP) and 24 h urinary sodium excretion (24Na) were measured in all the subjects at the start of the trial, and one month and two months later. Results The average starting 24Na was 207 ± 71 mmol in the control group and 211 ± 85 mmol in the intervention group (p=0.745). One month and two months later a significant decrease was observed in the intervention group (to 183 ± 63 and 176 ± 55 mmol; P<0.0001), as opposed to the control group (203 ± 60 and 200 ± 58 mmol; P= 0.1466). Initial BP was 143.7/84.1 mm Hg in the control, and 142.9/84.7 mm Hg in the intervention group (P= 0.667). One month and two months later a significant drop in BP, by 5.3/2.9 mm Hg was observed in the intervention group as opposed to the control group (0.4/0.9 mm Hg). Decrease in 24Na positively correlated to BP lowering (r2 = 0.5989; p<0.0001). Conclusions A significant reduction in 24Na and BP is achieved with warning labels on harmful effects of excessive salt intake. Decreasing daily salt input by 35 mmol may result in an extra BP lowering by some 5-6/2-3 mm Hg.


      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Subclinical carotid artery disease and plasma homocysteine levels in
           patients with hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Cristiana Catena , GianLuca Colussi , Marion Url-Michitsch , Francesca Nait , Leonardo A. Sechi
      Information on the association between homocysteine (Hcy) levels and subclinical carotid artery disease is limited. We investigated the relationship of plasma Hcy concentration with carotid artery plaques and intima-media thickness (IMT) in patients with hypertension. In 486 essential hypertensive patients who underwent ultrasound examination of the carotid arteries, we measured plasma levels of Hcy, vitamin B12, folate, and C-reactive protein. Plaques were detected in 34% of the study patients. Plasma Hcy levels were significantly greater in hypertensive patients with evidence of carotid plaques than patients without carotid plaques. Carotid IMT progressively increased across quartiles of plasma Hcy levels. Multivariate regression showed that carotid IMT was independently related with age, blood pressure, C-reactive protein, and Hcy levels. In a logistic regression, age, blood pressure, triglyceride, and Hcy independently predicted the presence of carotid plaques. Thus, elevated plasma Hcy levels are associated with asymptomatic carotid disease in hypertensive patients suggesting a role of Hcy in the development and progression of carotid atherosclerosis in these patients.


      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Sustained Pre-hypertensive Blood Pressure and Incident Atrial
           Fibrillation: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Wesley T. O’Neal , Elsayed Z. Soliman , Waqas Qureshi , Alvaro Alonso , Susan R. Heckbert , David Herrington
      Background The association between sustained pre-hypertension and AF has not been thoroughly examined. Methods This study included 5,311 participants (mean age 62 ± 10 years; 47% male; 42.9% non-whites) from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Sustained exposure was based on 2 or more visits within the same blood pressure category (optimal: <120/80 mm Hg; pre-hypertension: 120-139/80-89 mm Hg; hypertension: ≥140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication use) during visits 1, 2, and 3. Cox regression was used to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association between blood pressure category and AF. Results Over a median follow-up of 5.3 years, 182 (3.4%) participants developed AF. Pre-hypertension and hypertension were associated with an increased risk of AF compared with participants who had optimal blood pressure (optimal: HR=1.0, referent; pre-hypertension: HR=1.8, 95%CI=1.004, 3.2; hypertension: HR=2.6, 95%CI=1.6, 4.4). Conclusion Sustained pre-hypertension is associated with an increased risk of AF.


      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Basic Science. Target Organ Damage
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Anil K. Bidani , Karen A. Griffin



      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Prevalence and Trends of Isolated Systolic Hypertension among Untreated
           Adults in the United States
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Xuefeng Liu , Carlos J. Rodriguez , Kesheng Wang
      Background Isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) is an important hypertension subtype that predominates in the old people. However, the prevalence and long-term trends of ISH among untreated adults have not been reported. Design and Methods A study sample of 24,653 participants aged ≥18 years were selected from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2010 (12,018 persons from 1999-2004 and 12,635 persons from 2005-2010), representing a probability sample of the US civilian population. The prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of untreated ISH were estimated to compare differences in the prevalence over two 6-year periods by conducting the independent survey t-test. Results The prevalence of untreated ISH was 9.4% in 1999-2010 and decreased from 10.3% in 1999-2004 to 8.5% in 2005-2010 (p=0.00248). Old persons, females, and non-Hispanic blacks had higher prevalence of untreated ISH. Compared with 1999-2004, the prevalence of untreated ISH in 2005-2010 decreased among older (33.6%, 95% CI=30.9-36.3% vs. 25.1%, 95% CI=22.7-27.5%) and female individuals (8.3%, 95% CI=7.5-9.2% vs. 11.4%, 95% CI=10.4-12.3%). The stratified prevalence of untreated ISH declined in 2005-2010 (vs. 1999-2004) for older non-Hispanic whites (24.6% vs. 32.8%; p<0.0001) and blacks (27.7% vs. 40.8%; p=0.0013), non-Hispanic white females (7.5% vs. 10.8%; p<0.0001), older individuals with higher education (21.0% vs. 30.6%; p=0.0024) and females with lower education (10.1% vs. 13.1%; p=0.006). Conclusion Untreated ISH is more prevalent in older adults and females. Significant decreases in untreated ISH prevalence over time among these groups suggest that public health measures and/or treatment patterns are trending in the right direction.


      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
  • Treatment Drug Therapy of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 January 2015
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): William J. Elliott



      PubDate: 2015-01-20T12:41:54Z
       
 
 
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