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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1292 journals)
    - HISTORY (823 journals)
    - History (General) (51 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (49 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (53 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AND OTHER AREAS (8 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (161 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (121 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (26 journals)

HISTORY (823 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Showing 601 - 452 of 452 Journals sorted alphabetically
Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Peritia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Perspective     Open Access  
Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Pilipinas: A Journal of Philippine Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Pleine Marge     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
PLURA, Revista de Estudos de Religião / PLURA, Journal for the Study of Religion     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Polis : The Journal of the Society for Greek Political Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Politics & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Politikon: South African Journal of Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Politique et Sociétés     Full-text available via subscription  
Popular Music History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Portuguese Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
positions : asia critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Postcolonial Directions in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Postcolonial Text     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Préhistoires méditerranéennes     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society (hardback)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Engineering History and Heritage     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Linnean Society of New South Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Prehistoric Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy, Section C     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Proceedings of the Royal Society of Queensland, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Proceedings of the Zoological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Procesos Historicos     Open Access  
Prose Studies: History, Theory, Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Psychoanalysis and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Psychoanalysis Culture & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Public History Weekly     Hybrid Journal  
Publications du Centre Européen d'Etudes Bourguignonnes     Full-text available via subscription  
Purdue Historian     Open Access  
Quaderns d’Història de l’Enginyeria     Open Access  
Quaker History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Queensland Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription  
Queensland Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Questes : Revue pluridisciplinaire d'études médiévales     Open Access  
Quintana. Revista de Estudos do Departamento de Historia da Arte     Open Access  
Radical History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Rasenna : Journal of the Center for Etruscan Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Rationality and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Raven : A Journal of Vexillology     Hybrid Journal  
Reinardus     Hybrid Journal  
Relaciones. Estudios de historia y sociedad     Open Access  
Renaissance Drama     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Renaissance Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Rethinking History: The Journal of Theory and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Reti Medievali Rivista     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Review of Central and East European Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Reviews in American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Revista Análisis Internacional     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revista Chilena de Historia del Derecho     Open Access  
Revista de Estudios Historico-Juridicos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de História     Open Access  
Revista de História da UEG     Open Access  
Revista Historia Autónoma     Open Access  
Revista História da Educação - History of Education Journal     Open Access  
Revista Maracanan     Open Access  
Revista Memória em Rede     Open Access  
Revista Trías     Open Access  
Revolutionary Russia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revue archéologique de l'Est     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Revue archéologique du Centre de la France     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue d'histoire de l'Amérique française     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue d'Histoire de l'Eglise de France     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Revue d'histoire de l'enfance     Open Access  
Revue d'Histoire des Textes     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue d'histoire du XIXe siècle     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Revue d'Histoire Ecclésiastique     Full-text available via subscription  
Revue de l’Histoire des Religions     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Revue des Études Arméniennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Revue historique des armées     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revue Mabillon     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Rhetoric Society Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
RIHA Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
RIMA: Review of Indonesian and Malaysian Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Romanticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Romanticism and Victorianism on the Net     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Royal Studies Journal     Open Access  
Rúbrica Contemporánea     Open Access  
Rural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Russian Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Russian History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Russian Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Sacris Erudiri     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Saeculum : Jahrbuch für Universalgeschichte     Hybrid Journal  
Safundi : The Journal of South African and American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Scandinavian Journal of History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Scando-Slavica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Science & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Science Journal of Volgograd State University. History. Area Studies. International Relations     Open Access  
Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine / Scientia Canadensis : revue canadienne d'histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Scientia Militaria : South African Journal of Military Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Scientiae Studia     Open Access  
Scottish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Scrineum Rivista     Open Access  
Scrutiny2: Issues in English Studies in Southern Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Senses and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Sibirica     Full-text available via subscription  
Siècles     Open Access  
Signals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Signos Historicos     Open Access  
Slagmark - Tidsskrift for idéhistorie     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Slavonic and East European Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Slavonica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Social History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Social History of Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Social Science History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Social Sciences and Missions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Società e Storia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Society and Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
SourceOECD National Accounts & Historical Statistics     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Historical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
South African Journal of Art History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South African Journal of Cultural History     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Economic History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Asia Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
South Asia: Journal of South Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
South Asian History and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
South Asian Popular Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
South Asian Survey     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
South Australian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription  
South Central Review     Full-text available via subscription  
South European Society and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Southeast European and Black Sea Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Southwestern Historical Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Soviet and Post-Soviet Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Spontaneous Generations : A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sport in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Stewart Postharvest Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Studia Aurea : Revista de Literatura Española y Teoría Literaria del Renacimiento y Siglo de Oro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Studia Historiae Ecclesiasticae     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Studia Historiae Oeconomicae     Open Access  
Studia Iranica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studia Litteraria et Historica     Open Access  
Studia z Historii Filozofii     Open Access  
Studies in East European Thought     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in Eighteenth Century Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Studies in History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Studies in the History of Gardens & Designed Landscapes: An International Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Studies in Western Australian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Studium : Tijdschrift voor Wetenschaps- en Universiteits-geschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire des Sciences et des Universités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sydney Institute Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
T'oung Pao     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Tangence     Full-text available via subscription  
Tasmanian Historical Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Teaching History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Technology and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
temp - tidsskrift for historie     Full-text available via subscription  
Tempo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Tempo e Argumento     Open Access  
The Americas : A Quarterly Review of Latin American History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
The Court Historian : The International Journal of Court Studies     Full-text available via subscription  
The Eighteenth Century     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
The European Legacy: Toward New Paradigms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
The Hilltop Review : A Journal of Western Michigan University Graduate Student Research     Open Access  
The Historian     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
The International History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
The Irish Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
The Italianist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
The Journal of the Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
The Public Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
The Seventeenth Century     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
The South African Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Theatre History Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Theoria et Historia Scientiarum     Open Access  
Tiempo y Espacio     Open Access  
Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Tijdschrift voor Rechtsgeschiedenis / Revue d'Histoire du Droit / The Legal History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Time & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Trabajos y Comunicaciones     Open Access  
Traditio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transactions of the Philological Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transactions of the Royal Historical Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Transfers     Full-text available via subscription  
Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transmodernity : Journal of Peripheral Cultural Production of the Luso-Hispanic World     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Trocadero     Open Access  
Troianalexandrina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turcica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Turkish Historical Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Turkish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Twentieth Century British History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
U.S. Catholic Historian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
UCLA Historical Journal     Open Access  
Ufahamu : A Journal of African Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
United Service     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Urban History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Urban History Review / Revue d'histoire urbaine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Varia Historia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Vegueta : Anuario de la Facultad de Geografía e Historia     Open Access  
Vestiges : Traces of Record     Full-text available via subscription  
Viator     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Victorian Naturalist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5     

Journal Cover Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
  [SJR: 1.15]   [H-I: 22]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2817 journals]
  • Arterial wave reflections and kidney function decline among persons with
           preserved estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR): the Multi-Ethnic
           Study of Atherosclerosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jeffrey J. Hsu, Ronit Katz, Julio A. Chirinos, David R. Jacobs, Daniel A. Duprez, Carmen A. Peralta
      Differences in arterial wave reflections have been associated with increased risk for heart failure and mortality. Whether these measures are also associated with kidney function decline is not well established. Reflection magnitude (RM, defined as the ratio of the backward wave [Pb] to that of the forward wave [Pf]), augmentation index (AIx), and pulse pressure amplification (PPA) were derived from radial tonometry measures among 5232 participants free of cardiovascular disease who were enrolled in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Kidney function was estimated by creatinine and cystatin C measurements, as well as albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR). We evaluated the associations of Pb, Pf, RM, AIx, and PPA with annualized eGFR change and rapid kidney function decline over 5 years, using generalized linear mixed models and logistic regression, respectively. Of the study participants, 48% were male, mean age was 62 years, mean eGFR and median ACR at baseline were 84 ml/min/1.73m2 and 5.3 mg/g, respectively. In demographically adjusted models, both Pb and Pf had similarly strong associations with kidney function decline; compared to those in the lowest tertiles, the persons in the highest tertiles of Pb and Pf had a 1.01 and 0.99 ml/min/1.73m2/year faster eGFR decline, respectively (p < 0.05). However, these associations were attenuated after adjustment for systolic blood pressure. We found no significant associations between RM, AIx, or PPA and kidney function decline. In conclusion, the reflected and forward wave components were similarly associated with kidney function decline, and these associations were explained by differences in systolic blood pressure.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T19:51:21Z
       
  • Severe and Refractory Hypertension in a Young Woman
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): René H. Cuadra, William B. White
      Background Refractory hypertension in a young person is an uncommon clinical problem, but one that may be referred to hypertension specialists. Factitious hypertension is fortunately quite rare, but should be considered when evaluating patients who are refractory to numerous classes of antihypertensive therapies and have failed to achieve control despite input from multiple providers. Report of a Case A 19 year old woman was referred to us after failing to achieve blood pressure control by a primary physician and 2 subspecialists in nephrology and hypertension; she also had numerous emergency department visits for symptomatic and severe hypertension. Exhaustive diagnostic testing for secondary causes and witnessed medication dosing in an outpatient setting was unrevealing. Subsequent inpatient admission demonstrated normalization of BPs with small doses of intravenous antihypertensive agents. During the hospitalization, she was observed “pocketing” her oral medications in the buccal folds, and then discarding them in a trash container. Confrontation by psychiatrists and the hypertension specialists led to the admission that she had learned to start and stop beta-blockers and clonidine to induce severe, rebound hypertension. Discussion Factitious and induced hypertension is a rare cause of resistant or refractory hypertension. Nevertheless, hypertension specialists should suspect the diagnosis when there is a history of visits to multiple institutions and physicians, negative secondary workup, absence of overt target organ damage, history of psychiatric illness, and employment in the medical field.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T19:51:21Z
       
  • A practical approach for measurement of antihypertensive medication
           adherence in patients with resistant hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Nathalia Batista Correa, Ana Paula de Faria, Alessandra M.V. Ritter, Andrea Rodrigues Sabbatini, Aurélio Almeida, Veridiana Brunelli, David A. Calhoun, Heitor Moreno, Rodrigo Modolo
      Background Confirmation of medication adherence is a challenge in clinical practice and essential for the accurate diagnosis of resistant hypertension. Although it is well established that drug adherence is critical for controlling BP, there are still difficulties applying a simple, inexpensive, and reliable assessment of adherence in the clinical setting. We aimed to test a simple method to assess adherence in RH patients. Methods A pilot study with normotensives or mild/moderate hypertensive subjects was performed in order to provide a fluorescence cutoff point for adherence. After that, twenty-one patients referred to the Resistant Hypertension Clinic had triamterene prescribed and were monitored for a 30-day period. We conducted two unannounced randomly selected home visits for urine collection to test drug intake that day. Office, home and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure, biochemical data, and Morisky Monitoring Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) were systematically acquired. According to adherence indicated by urine fluorescence, subjects were divided into adherent and non-adherent groups. Results We found 57% of non-adherence. No differences were found between groups regarding baseline characteristics or prescribed medications; Kappa’s test showed concordance between adherence through MMAS-8 and fluorescence (Kappa=0.61; CI95% 0.28-0.94; p=0.005). Non-adherent patients had higher office (81±11 vs 73±6 mmHg, p=0.03), 24-h ABPM (75±9 vs 66±7 mmHg, p=0.01) and HBPM (77±9 vs 67±8 mmHg, p=0.01) diastolic BP than their counterparts. Conclusions Non-adherence to antihypertensive therapy is high in patients with RH, even when assessed in clinics specialized in this condition. Fluorometry to detect a drug in the urine of RH patients is safe, easy and reliable method to assess adherence.


      PubDate: 2016-04-07T19:51:21Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-04-02T18:51:09Z
       
  • ‘Translational’ Medicine: Transforming SPRINT findings into
           clinical practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Dominic A. Sica, Robert A. Phillips, William B. White, John D. Bisognano, Raymond R. Townsend



      PubDate: 2016-04-02T18:51:09Z
       
  • Prevalence of pseudoresistant hypertension due to inaccurate blood
           pressure measurement
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hemal Bhatt, Mohammed Siddiqui, Eric Judd, Suzanne Oparil, David Calhoun
      Background The prevalence of pseudoresistant hypertension (HTN) due to inaccurate BP measurement remains unknown. Methods Triage BP measurements and measurements obtained at the same clinic visit by trained physicians were compared in consecutive adult patients referred for uncontrolled resistant HTN (RHTN). Triage BP measurements were taken by the clinic staff during normal intake procedures. BP measurements were obtained by trained physicians using the BpTRU device. The prevalence of uncontrolled RHTN and differences in BP measurements were compared. Results Of 130 patients with uncontrolled RHTN, 33.1% (n=43) were falsely identified as having uncontrolled RHTN based on triage BP measurements. The median (IQR) of differences in systolic BP between pseudoresistant and true resistant groups were 23 (17 - 33) mm Hg and 13 (6 - 21) mm Hg, respectively (P=0.0001). The median (IQR) of differences in diastolic BP between the two groups were 12 (7 - 18) mm Hg and 8 (4 - 11) mm Hg, respectively (P=0.001). Conclusion Triage BP technique overestimated the prevalence of uncontrolled RHTN in approximately 33% of the patients emphasizing the importance of obtaining accurate BP measurements.


      PubDate: 2016-04-02T18:51:09Z
       
  • Remarks from the new President of the American Society of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John D. Bisognano



      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Future Prospects for Renal Artery Denervation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Deepak L. Bhatt



      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Hypertension in the Frail Elderly
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Barry J. Materson, Manuel Garcia-Estrada, Richard A. Preston
      Extant data indicate that treating to lower systolic pressure confers significant advantage to younger people in general good health as well as to relatively healthy octogenarians. Few data exist to guide practitioners on the treatment of frail elderly hypertensives. Chronological age alone does not suffice to make useful judgments regarding therapy. The definition of frailty remains controversial. One method, use of a simple questionnaire or a test of walking speed is practical but not universally accepted. Frail subjects, while at higher risk for cardiovascular complications, seem to benefit less or not at all from antihypertensive drug treatment. Clinicians should treat robust older patients as they would younger patients because the benefits far outweigh the low risk of adverse effects. Successful antihypertensive therapy in those less than 80 years should not be discontinued simply because that age milestone has been crossed. Treatment of frail older patients must be individualized. Some frail survivors age 80 or above may actually fare better with elevated systolic pressures. Pending the cognitive function sub-study of SPRINT, there is little evidence that antihypertensive treatment benefits established cognitive dysfunction. Since hypertension in middle age is a good predictor of later cognitive dysfunction, the clinical approach should be one of early prevention.


      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Hypertensive Encephalopathy: What’s in a Name?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Phyllis August



      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Symmetric Ambulatory Arterial Stiffness Index in the Young
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Minh B. Nguyen, Pamela Singer, Fredrick Kaskel, Joseph Mahgerefteh
      Introduction The ambulatory arterial stiffness index (AASI) and the symmetric ambulatory arterial stiffness index (s-AASI) have been shown to correlate to arterial stiffness in adults. This study assesses these indices with anthropometric and blood pressure (BP) measures in children. Methods 102 children at a pediatric hypertension clinic who had ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) done from 2009-2013 were included (75% males, 7-22yo, 47% hypertensive, 24% prehypertensive, and 34% whitecoat hypertensives). AASI is 1 - the regression slope of diastolic BP values on systolic BP values from a 24 hour ABPM. s-AASI is the symmetric regression of AASI. Results Obese patients had a significantly higher AASI. s-AASI correlated with systolic BP variability. In multivariable regression, BP variability independently correlated with AASI and s-AASI. s-AASI is related to systolic dipping. Conclusion AASI and s-AASI are highly dependent on BP variability in children. Further studies are necessary to assess their utility.


      PubDate: 2016-03-28T17:16:39Z
       
  • Response to Budoff and Steigerwalt
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Raymond R. Townsend, Clive Rosendorff, Wilmer W. Nichols, David G. Edwards, Julio A. Chirions, Bo Fernhall, William C. Cushman



      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • Blood pressure response is impaired in patients with exercise induced
           ventricular ectopy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Oguzhan Ekrem Turan, Mustafa Ozturk, Ibrahim Kocaoglu, Selen Gursoy Turan
      Background Exercise induced ventricular ectopy (EIVE) has clinical and prognostic significance. But the mechanism underlying EIVE-related mortality still remains unclear. This study aims to assess blood pressure alteration in patients with EIVE and to identify the potential causes of increased mortality in this patient group. Methods and Results 3611 patients were screened within a one-year period, and patients with a structural heart disease, coronary artery disease, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, and chronic renal disease were excluded from the study. A total number of 98 patients with no chronic disease, who were retrospectively diagnosed with EIVE, were included in the study as patient group and 116 patients without EIVE were included as control group. The median age, gender distribution, laboratory test results and echocardiographic findings were similar between the two groups. Systolic blood pressure alterations during exercise stress testing were found to be significantly different. (p< 0.001) Moreover, EIVE group had significantly higher peak systolic blood pressure. (p< 0.001) A significant positive relation was found between peak systolic blood pressure level and ventricular ectopy count. (r:0.27, p=0.006) Conclusion Our study showed that EIVE patients without a structural heart disease or a chronic disease had higher peak systolic blood pressure levels. Higher systolic blood pressure alteration can be related to ventricular ectopy occurrence during exercise stress testing, which can be a possible reason underlying the increased rate of mortality among EIVE patients.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • Comment on ASH position paper on Central Blood pressure and Waveform
           analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Susan P. Steigerwalt



      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • The future for renal denervation depends on embracing the lessons learned
           from our previous studies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Murray Epstein
      •The knowledge base for the continued development of catheter-based renal denervation (RDN) is robust •A critical determinant of RDN success is the delivery of sufficient radiofrequency energy to both proximal and distal renal nerves, including in the renal artery divisions •New multi–electrode catheters circumvent the several drawbacks of early models.


      PubDate: 2016-03-23T16:14:14Z
       
  • Loop Diuretics are Most Appropriate for Hypertension Treatment in Chronic
           Kidney Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): William J. Elliott, Samuel Jurca



      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Thiazides Are Useful Agents in CKD
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Arjun D. Sinha, Rajiv Agarwal



      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis in the Post-CORAL Era Part 2: New
           Directions in Transcatheter Nephron Salvage Following Flawed
           Revascularization Trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Alan Alper Sag, Thomas A. Sos, Caghan Benli, Oguzhan Sal, Patrick Rossignol, Alberto Ortiz, Yalcin Solak, Mehmet Kanbay
      Unlike endovascular therapeutic studies for atherosclerosis in many other vascular beds, major trials regarding endovascular renovascular revascularization have resulted in a stagnating equipoise. However, every major trial completed for this topic thus far has suffered from major methodological flaws that limit the validity and external generalizability of their results. Furthermore, certain patient populations who are known to benefit from renovascular revascularization may never be studied because they cannot be ethically withheld from life-saving treatment. Forthcoming percutaneous techniques may one day complement angioplasty and stenting in a burgeoning era of cellular modulation and endovascular-directed renal regeneration.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Model of human cardiovascular system with a loop of autonomic regulation
           of the mean arterial pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3
      Author(s): Anatoly S. Karavaev, Yurii M. Ishbulatov, Vladimir I. Ponomarenko, Mikhail D. Prokhorov, Vladimir I. Gridnev, Boris P. Bezruchko, Anton R. Kiselev
      A model of human cardiovascular system is proposed which describes the main heart rhythm, the regulation of heart function and blood vessels by the autonomic nervous system, baroreflex, and the formation of arterial blood pressure. The model takes into account the impact of respiration on these processes. It is shown that taking into account nonlinearity and introducing the autonomous loop of mean arterial blood pressure in the form of self-oscillating time-delay system allow to obtain the model signals whose statistical and spectral characteristics are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those for experimental signals. The proposed model demonstrates the phenomenon of synchronization of mean arterial pressure regulatory system by the signal of respiration with the basic period close to 10 seconds, which is observed in the physiological experiments.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Instructions for Authors
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Renal denervation for human hypertension: is there a future?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joseph L. Izzo, Sheldon W. Tobe
      The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) plays a permissive, if not primary causal, role in the genesis and maintenance of human essential hypertension. Excessive SNS activity in man is most apparent in early forms of hypertension (prehypertension and white-coat-type). Renal nerves are of particular interest because of their roles in modulating the activity of the renin-angiotensin system and renal sodium excretion. Renal denervation substantially ameliorates the development of hypertension in animal models such as renovascular, spontaneously hypertensive, and steroid-induced hypertension in rats and aortic coarctation in dogs. In man, catheter ablation of renal nerves has been undertaken in the late phases of hypertension; in a rigorously controlled trial in resistant hypertension (SYMPLICITY HTN-3), renal denervation did not reduce blood pressure over the long term. Is this because renal denervation is more appropriate to prevent than treat late-stage hypertension? Are there anatomical or technical barriers yet to be overcome in the procedure? These and other issues are addressed by two experts in this issue of the Controversies series: Deepak L. Bhatt and Murray Epstein.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Sustained high blood pressure reduction with etamicastat, a peripheral
           selective dopamine β-hydroxylase inhibitor
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3
      Author(s): Bruno Igreja, Lyndon C. Wright, Patricio Soares-da-Silva
      The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of chronic inhibition of dopamine ß-hydroxylase by etamicastat on the development of hypertension in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) and the sustainability of effects on the systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the SHR and the normotensive Wistar–Kyoto rat (WKY). WKY and SHR received etamicastat (10 mg/kg/d) from 5 weeks of age for 35 weeks in drinking water, and cardiovascular assessments were performed on a weekly basis. Etamicastat reduced systolic and diastolic blood pressure when SHRs reached the age of 16 weeks with mean decreases of 37 and 32 mm Hg, respectively, for the subsequent for 24 weeks of treatment, but did not prevent the increase in blood pressure (BP) aged between 5 and 11 week. The BP lowering effect of etamicastat in SHR was reversible on discontinuation and quickly resumed after reinstatement of therapy and was not accompanied by changes in heart rate. Etamicastat affected neither BP nor heart rate in WKY during 36 weeks of treatment. Etamicastat reduced urinary excretion of norepinephrine to a similar extent in WKY and SHR, accompanied by significant increases in urinary dopamine in SHR. Chronic administration of etamicastat did not adversely affected development of animals. Chronic dopamine ß-hydroxylase inhibition with etamicastat effectively decreases BP, although does not prevent the development of hypertension in the SHR.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Studies comparing ambulatory blood pressure and home blood pressure on
           cardiovascular disease and mortality outcomes: a systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3
      Author(s): Daichi Shimbo, Marwah Abdalla, Louise Falzon, Raymond R. Townsend, Paul Muntner
      Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) is more commonly recommended for assessing out-of-clinic blood pressure (BP) than home blood pressure monitoring (HBPM). We conducted a systematic review to examine whether ABPM or HBPM is more strongly associated with cardiovascular disease events and/or mortality. Of 1007 abstracts published through July 20, 2015, nine articles, reporting results from seven cohorts, were identified. After adjustment for BP on HBPM, BP on ABPM was associated with an increased risk of outcomes in two of four cohorts for systolic blood pressure and two of three cohorts for diastolic blood pressure. After adjustment for BP on ABPM, systolic blood pressure on HBPM was associated with outcomes in zero of three cohorts; an association was present in one of two cohorts for diastolic blood pressure on HBPM. There is a lack of strong empiric evidence supporting ABPM or HBPM over the other approach for predicting cardiovascular events or mortality.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Association of dental infections with systemic diseases in Brazilian
           Native Indigenous: A cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): L.S.F. Ribeiro, J.N. Santos, C.L.Z. Vieira, B. Caramelli, L.M.P. Ramalho, P.R. Cury
      The aim of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate the association between dental infections and systemic diseases in the Indigenous population of Brazil. A representative sample of 225 Indigenous (≥19 years) was assessed. The T-test and bivariate and logistic models were used to assess the associations of diabetes, hypertension, and obesity with dental caries and destructive periodontal disease. After adjustments for covariates, dental caries was associated with hypertension (OR=1.95, 95% CI=1.03-3.66, p=0.04). Individuals with destructive periodontal disease had a higher systolic blood pressure (124 ± 20.34 mmHg) than those without destructive periodontal disease (117.52 ± 16.54 mmHg, p=0.01). In conclusion, dental infections were found to be associated with hypertension in the present population. Thus, patients diagnosed with hypertension should be referred for dental evaluation and vice-versa.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3




      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Cardiometabolic risks related to obesity severity in children and
           adolescents: a commentary
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 10, Issue 3
      Author(s): Bonita Falkner



      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Utility of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) in the Evaluation
           of Elevated Clinic Blood Pressures (BPs) in Children
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Susan M. Halbach, Robin Hamman, Karyn Yonekawa, Coral Hanevold
      Although ABPM is recognized for its role in assessing white coat hypertension (WCH), other uses include evaluation of treatment adequacy, nocturnal hypertension, dipping status, and hypertension severity. We performed a retrospective study of ABPMs completed at a single center from November 2007 to October 2011 to determine the frequency of WCH, prehypertension, and hypertension in children and the correlation of these findings with office BPs. 247 ABPMs were performed in 206 children, ages 4-20 years, including 48 recordings in 39 diabetic patients and 64 recordings in treated hypertensive patients. We found a poor correlation between hypertensive status based on clinic BP (cBP) and diagnosis on ABPM, and evidence for a white-coat effect (WCE). Among treated patients, ABPM results resulted in medication changes in 63%. We conclude that ABPM is a useful tool for characterizing hypertensive status and treatment adequacy in children.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Long sleep duration: A non-conventional indicator of arterial stiffness in
           Japanese at high risk of cardiovascular disease: the J-HOP Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Satoshi Niijima, Michiaki Nagai, Satoshi Hoshide, Mami Takahashi, Masahisa Shimpo, Kazuomi Kario
      Background Long and short sleep durations were reported as independently associated with hypertension, aortic stiffness and cardiovascular disease. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was shown to be associated with increased aortic stiffness. Here we investigated the relationship between self-reported sleep duration and pulse wave velocity (PWV) in the elderly at high risk of cardiovascular disease. We also investigated whether hs-CRP moderates this relationship. Methods Among 4,310 patients with > 1 cardiovascular risks recruited for the Japan Morning Surge-Home Blood Pressure (J-HOP) Study, a questionnaire including items on daily sleep duration was completed. We measured the brachial-ankle PWV (baPWV) and hs-CRP levels in 2,304 of these patients (mean age 64.7 years, 49.6% males). Results In accord with the patients’ sleep duration (<6 h, ≥6 to <8 h, and ≥8 h per night), significant associations between sleep duration and the PWV were observed (1594 vs. 1644 vs. 1763 cm/s, p<0.0001). In the multiple regression analysis adjusted for age, body mass index, total cholesterol, HbA1c and clinic systolic blood pressure (SBP), long sleep duration (≥8 h per night) (p<0.05) and log hs-CRP (p<0.05) were significantly positively associated with PWV when the patients with 6–8-h sleep duration were defined as a reference group. Significant interactions of long sleep duration by age and that by antihypertensive medication for baPWV were observed. The effect of long sleep on PWV was greatest in the oldest age group. Conclusions Long sleep duration and hs-CRP were significant indicators of increased baPWV in this elderly high-risk Japanese population. Age and antihypertensive medication use were significant modulators of the relationship between long sleep duration and arterial stiffness.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Ambulatory blood pressure reduction following high-intensity interval
           exercise performed in water or dryland condition
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Philippe Sosner, Mathieu Gayda, Olivier Dupuy, Mauricio Garzon, Christopher Lemasson, Vincent Gremeaux, Julie Lalongé, Mariel Gonzales, Douglas Hayami, Martin Juneau, Anil Nigam, Laurent Bosquet
      We aimed to compare blood pressure (BP) responses following moderate-intensity continuous exercise (MICE), high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) in dry land or HIIE in immersed condition, using 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Forty-two individuals (65±7 years, 52% men) with a baseline BP ≥130/85 mm Hg (systolic/diastolic, SBP/DBP), were randomly assigned to perform one of the three following exercises on a stationary cycle: MICE (24-min at 50% peak power output (PPO)) or HIIE in dry land (two sets of 10-min with phases of 15-sec 100% PPO interspersed by 15-sec of passive recovery) or HIIE in up-to-the-chest immersed condition. While MICE modified none of the 24-h average hemodynamic variables, dryland HIIE induced a 24-h BP decrease (SBP: -3.6±5.7 / DBP: -2.8±3.0 mm Hg, P<.05) and, to a much greater extent, immersed HIIE (SBP: -6.8±9.5 / DBP: -3.0±4.5 mm Hg, P<.05). The one condition that modified 24-h PWV was immersed HIIE (-0.21±0.30 m/s, P<.05).


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Angioedema With Renin Angiotensin System Drugs and Neutral Endopeptidase
           Inhibitors
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John B. Kostis, Abel E. Moreyra, William J. Kostis



      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Evidence for A Critical Role of the Sympathetic Nervous System in
           Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 March 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Guido Grassi, Venkata S. Ram
      Autonomic cardiovascular control is impaired in hypertension, leading to a reduction in the parasympathetic tone and to an increase in the sympathetic influences to the heart and peripheral vessels. The sympathetic dysfunction depends on a variety of reflex and non-reflex mechanisms and participates at development and progression of the essential hypertesive state. This has been shown to be the case for borderline hypertension, for moderate and severe high blood pressure and for resistant hypertension as well. In addition the adrenergic overdrive participates at the pathophysiology of the complex cardiometabolic alterations, known as ‘‘end-organ damage’’, detectable in the clinical course of hypertensive disease. In the present article we will review the main features of the adrenergic abnormalities characterizing essential hypertension, the mechanisms potentially involved in this neural abnormality and its consequences as well. We will also discuss the most recent information achieved in the field and the areas worthy of future investigations.


      PubDate: 2016-03-09T03:56:18Z
       
  • Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis in the Post-CORAL Era Part 1: The
           Renal Penumbra Concept and Next-Generation Functional Diagnostic Imaging
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Alan Alper Sag, Ibrahim Inal, John Okcuoglu, Patrick Rossignol, Alberto Ortiz, Baris Afsar, Thomas A. Sos, Mehmet Kanbay
      Following three neutral trials in which renal artery stenting failed to improve renal function or reduce cardiovascular and renal events, the controversy surrounding diagnosis and treatment of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and renovascular hypertension has led to paradigm shifts in the diagnostic algorithm. Noninvasive determination of earlier events (cortex hypoxia and renal artery hemodynamic changes) will supersede late sequelae (calcific stenosis, renal cortical thinning). This review therefore proposes a new concept of renal penumbra in defining at-risk parenchyma. The complex field of functional kidney magnetic resonance imaging reviewed succinctly in a clinician-centered fashion.


      PubDate: 2016-02-26T00:40:28Z
       
  • Is there a preferred diuretic class for patients with renal impairment and
           hypertension?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Joseph L. Izzo, Sheldon W. Tobe
      It is widely believed that “high-ceiling” loop diuretics are required in patients with renal impairment and that “low-ceiling” thiazides are not sufficiently potent to cause meaningful natriuresis and diuresis. If this statement is true, at what level of renal function do thiazides lose their punch? Another related issue is the enlightened use of diuretic combinations. Use of diuretics in chronic kidney disease and hypertension has been addressed in the many guidelines but further insight is provided in this installment of the “Controversies” series by two well-known authorities, William Elliott, M.D. Ph.D. and Rajiv Agarwal, M.D.


      PubDate: 2016-02-26T00:40:28Z
       
  • RE: American Society of Hypertension position paper: central blood
           pressure waveforms in health and disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Matthew J. Budoff



      PubDate: 2016-02-26T00:40:28Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-02-20T23:37:20Z
       
  • Sleep apnea, hypertension, and hemorrhagic stroke – Déjà
           vu all over again
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Naima Covassin, Virend K. Somers



      PubDate: 2016-01-30T21:20:54Z
       
  • ARAs to the RESCUE
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-01-30T21:20:54Z
       
  • Recurrence of stroke caused by nocturnal hypoxia-induced blood pressure
           surge in a young adult male with severe obstructive sleep apnea syndrome
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Tetsuro Yoshida, Mitsuo Kuwabara, Satoshi Hoshide, Kazuomi Kario
      Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) causes resistant hypertension and a hypopnea-related nocturnal blood pressure (BP) surge. This could lead to an increase of not only the nocturnal BP level but also nocturnal BP variability, both of which increase an individual’s cardiovascular risk. We recently developed a trigger sleep BP monitoring (TSP) method that initiates BP measurement when an individual’s oxygen desaturation falls below a variable threshold, and we demonstrated that it can detect a BP surge during apnea episodes. We here report the case of a 36-year-old man with severe OSAS who experienced the recurrence of stroke due to nocturnal hypoxia and a nocturnal BP surge measured by this TSP device. A nocturnal BP surge during sleep in OSAS patients could be a strong trigger of cardiovascular events.


      PubDate: 2016-01-30T21:20:54Z
       
  • From the Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Daniel Levy



      PubDate: 2016-01-30T21:20:54Z
       
  • Blood pressure effects of SGLT2 inhibitors make them an attractive option
           in diabetic patients with hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Michael J. Bloch



      PubDate: 2016-01-24T20:46:25Z
       
  • The complexity of diagnosing postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome:
           influence of the diurnal variability
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jangsup Moon, Han Sang Lee, Jung-Ick Byun, Jun-Sang Sunwoo, Jung-Won Shin, Jung-Ah Lim, Tae-Joon Kim, Yong-Won Shin, Keon-Joo Lee, Daejong Jeon, Keun-Hwa Jung, Soon-Tae Lee, Ki-Young Jung, Kon Chu, Sang Kun Lee
      We investigated how the diagnosis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) would be changed due to diurnal variability in orthostatic tachycardia. The orthostatic vital sign (OVS) test was administered to each patient twice, in the afternoon of the day of admission and the next morning (n=113). Forty-six patients were diagnosed with POTS, and the remaining 67 patients were assigned to non-POTS group. Heart rate increments after standing were larger in the morning than in the afternoon in every group (all P < 0.001). Among the POTS patients, 82.6% fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for POTS in the morning, and 52.2% in the afternoon. The majority of the POTS group (65.2%) displayed normal result on single OVS test. Orthostatic intolerance symptoms were provoked in only 45.7% of the POTS patients, more frequently in the morning. In conclusion, diurnal variability in hemodynamic parameters and provoked symptoms significantly challenged the diagnosis of POTS.


      PubDate: 2016-01-20T20:23:28Z
       
  • Derivation of a measure of systolic blood pressure mutability: a novel
           information theory-based metric from ambulatory blood pressure tests
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): D.J. Contreras, E.E. Vogel, G. Saravia, B. Stockins
      We provide ambulatory blood pressure (BP) exams with tools based on information theory to quantify fluctuations thus increasing the capture of dynamic test components. Data from 515 ambulatory 24-hour BP exams were considered. Average age: 54 years, 54 % women, 53 % under BP treatment. The average systolic pressure (SP) was 127±8 mm Hg. A data compressor (wlzip) designed to recognize meaningful information is invoked to measure mutability which is a form of dynamical variability. For patients with the same average SP different mutability values are obtained which reflects the differences in dynamical variability. In unadjusted linear regression models, mutability had low association with the mean systolic blood pressure (R2=0.056; p<0.000001) but larger association with the SP deviation (R2=0.761; p<0.001) . Wlzip allows detecting levels of variability in SP that could be hazardous. This new indicator can be easily added to the 24-hour BP monitors improving information towards diagnosis.


      PubDate: 2016-01-20T20:23:28Z
       
  • Predicting home-clinic blood pressure differences
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Norman M. Kaplan



      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
  • Differential Effects of Enalapril-Felodipine vs Enalapril-Lercanidipine
           Combination Drug Treatment on Sympathetic Nerve Traffic and Metabolic
           Profile in Obesity-Related Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Gino Seravalle, Gianmaria Brambilla, Daniela Prata Pizzalla, Anna Casati, Marta Riva, Cesare Cuspidi, Michele Bombelli, Giuseppe Mancia, Guido Grassi
      Scanty information is available on the effects of combination drug treatment based on an ACE-inhibitor and a calcium channel blocker on the neurometabolic alterations characterizing obesity-related hypertension (OHT). After 2 weeks run-in with enalapril (E, 20 mg), 36 OHTs were randomized according to a double-blind crossover design to a combination therapy with either lercanidipine 10 mg (L) or felodipine extended release 5 mg (F), each lasting 8 weeks. Measurements included clinic and ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and heart rate, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) index, plasma norepinephrine (NE) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA). Patients with uncontrolled BP were then uptitrated to 20 mg/day (L) and 10 mg/day (F) combined with E 20 mg respectively, for further 8 weeks. For similar BP reductions, EL caused NE and MSNA increases significantly less pronounced than those seen with EF, the lesser sympathoexcitation observed with EL being coupled with a significant improvement in HOMA index. This was the case also when L and F were uptitrated in the combination. In OHT, at variance from EF, EL combination is almost entirely devoid of any major sympathoexcitatory effect and is associated with an improvement in insulin sensitivity.


      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
  • Controversies in Hypertension: How Should BP be Measured in the
           Office?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Sheldon W. Tobe, Joe L. Izzo
      There have always been substantial concerns among experts regarding the physical measurement of blood pressure. When the normally wide physiologic variation of BP is compounded by substantial measurement artifact and environmental interactions, the result is great uncertainty regarding the value of any single BP determination and a potentially skewed impression of how BP elevation affects us. The ensuing discussion and the opinions of Clarence Grim and Martin Myers in this installment highlight the need for greater attention to be paid to the conditions in which BP is measured and ask the question whether traditional sphygmomanometry should be replaced with newer automated techniques.


      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
  • Reporting of Adherence to Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors among Hypertensive
           Adults in the 50 States and the District of Columbia, 2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Jing Fang, Latetia Moore, Fleetwood Loustalot, Quanhe Yang, Carma Ayala
      Achieving and maintaining a healthy lifestyle is an important part of hypertension management. The purpose of this study was to assess US state-level prevalence of adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors among those with self-reported hypertension. Using 2013 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, a state-based telephone survey, we examined the adherence to 5 healthy lifestyle behaviors related to hypertension management: having a “normal” weight, not smoking, avoiding or limiting alcohol intake, consuming the recommended amount of fruits and vegetables, and engaging in the recommended amount of physical activity. We estimated age-standardized percentages of each healthy lifestyle behavior overall and by state, as well as prevalence of all 5 healthy lifestyle behaviors. Overall, the prevalence of healthy lifestyle behaviors varied widely among those with self-reported hypertension: 20.5% had a normal weight, 82.3% did not smoke, 94.1% reported no or limited alcohol intake, 14.1% consumed the recommended amounts of fruits or vegetables, and 46.6% engaged in the recommended amount of physical activity. Overall, only 1.7% of adults with self-reported hypertension reported all 5 healthy lifestyle behaviors, with significant variation by state. Age-standardized prevalence of individuals reporting all 5 healthy lifestyle behaviors ranged from 0.3% in Louisiana to 3.8% in the District of Columbia. In conclusion, adherence to healthy lifestyle behaviors varied among those with hypertension; fewer than 2% reported meeting current recommendations and standards when assessed collectively. Disparities were observed by demographic and descriptive characteristics, including geography.


      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
  • Importance of Inhibiting Sodium-Glucose Co-Transporter and its Compelling
           Indication in Type 2 Diabetes: Pathophysiological Hypothesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Genjiro Kimura
      Primarily the sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors suppress the co-transport of glucose and sodium from the tubular lumen of proximal tubules to the blood, and enhance the glucose excretion into urine. Therefore, glucose and caloric balances become negative, making the blood glucose level as well as insulin secretion both reduced. On the other hand, the proximal tubular fluid, constituting with low chloride concentration because of SGLT2 inhibition, is transferred to the loop of Henle. On the low chloride conditions, the reabsorption mechanisms in the loop of Henle do not work, as if loop diuretics are given. Finally, blood pressure is also lowered secondarily due to the loop diuretic action by SGLT2 inhibitions. Thus, the metabolic and hemodynamic combined systems synergistically interact further to suppress the risks leading to atherosclerosis and organs damage. Precise mechanisms for SGLT2 inhibitors to work in various aspects, especially in preventing organ damage and cardiovascular events must be clarified further.


      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
  • Automated Office Blood Pressure – The Preferred Method for Recording
           Blood Pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Martin G. Myers



      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
  • Auscultatory BP: Still the Gold Standard
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 11 January 2016
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Clarence E. Grim, Carlene M. Grim
      There is considerable debate about the use of auscultatory blood pressure (AusBP) versus oscillometric BP measurement (OBPM). We first present the evidence that AusBP is still the gold standard. Then we point out the serious errors of OBPM. While many are recommending AusBP be abandoned and replaced by OBPM arguing OBPM saves time and eliminates observer error, we posit these arguments are not valid on either point. First, we have shown that proper measurement using either method requires virtually the same amount of staff time. Second, the elimination of observer error augment is invalid as no OBPM device has been shown to insure that the steps needed to obtain an accurate pressure are followed. We suggest these can only be corrected by proven staff training programs and implementation of quality assurance methods. Third, and most bothersome to us and to our patient's health, is the demonstration that the oscillometric method reads BP unreliably in many individuals. These BP errors will seriously affect an individual's BP diagnosis and management. The only method to detect such serious errors is to compare OBPM readings to the AusBP in the individual. As this comparison must be carried out in every patient before relying on OBPM readings it is mandatory that the gold standard AusBP must be available in every office. Because of the time involved in doing these comparisons in every patient many offices may choose to continue using the gold standard AusBP until OBPM becomes more reliable.


      PubDate: 2016-01-11T18:22:35Z
       
 
 
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