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  Subjects -> HISTORY (Total: 1088 journals)
    - HISTORY (736 journals)
    - History (General) (46 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AFRICA (41 journals)
    - HISTORY OF ASIA (35 journals)
    - HISTORY OF AUSTRALASIA AND OTHER AREAS (8 journals)
    - HISTORY OF EUROPE (116 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE AMERICAS (91 journals)
    - HISTORY OF THE NEAR EAST (15 journals)

HISTORY (736 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Historiæ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
History & Memory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
History Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
History Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
History in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
History of CERN     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
History of Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
History of Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
History of Education: Journal of the History of Education Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
History of European Ideas     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
History of Political Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
History of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
History of Religions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
History of Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
History Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Holocaust and Genocide Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Hortus Artium Medievalium     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
HSE - Social and Education History     Open Access  
IEEE Annals of the History of Computing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
IKON     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Il Capitale Culturale. Studies on the Value of Cultural Heritage     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
ILCEA     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Illawarra Unity - Journal of the Illawarra Branch of the Australian Society for the Study of Labour History     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Images re-vues : histoire, anthropologie et théorie de l'art     Open Access  
Imago Mundi: The International Journal for the History of Cartography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Immigrants & Minorities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Indian Economic & Social History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Indonesia and the Malay World     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Inner Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Intellectual History Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Interaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Intermédialités : histoire et théorie des arts, des lettres et des techniques / Intermedialities: History and Theory of the Arts, Literature and Techniques     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170)
International Journal of Society Systems Science     Hybrid Journal  
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Politics     Partially Free   (Followers: 15)
International Review of Social History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
INTRECCI d'arte     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Iran and the Caucasus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Irish Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Isis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Israel Studies Forum     Full-text available via subscription  
Itinerari di ricerca storica     Open Access  
Japanese Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Jewish Culture and History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal Asiatique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal for Contemporary History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal for Maritime Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal for the Study of Judaism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal for the Study of Radicalism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Aging, Humanities, and the Arts: Official Journal of the Gerontological Society of America     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of American History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of American-East Asian Relations     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Ancient History and Archaeology     Open Access  
Journal of Arts Management, Law, and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Australian Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Australian Naval History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Baltic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of British Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Journal of Canadian Studies/Revue d'études canadiennes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cognitive Historiography     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Colonialism and Colonial History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Conflict Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Contemporary Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Contemporary History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Coptic Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cuneiform Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Early Modern History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of East Asian Linguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ecclesiastical History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of English and Germanic Philology (JEGP)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Family History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Global History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Historical Geography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Historical Pragmatics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Historical Research in Marketing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Iberian and Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Imperial and Commonwealth History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Indian Society of Pedodontics and Preventive Dentistry     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Israeli History: Politics, Society, Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Jewish Identities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Latin American Cultural Studies: Travesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Latin American Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Legal History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Medieval History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 192)
Journal of Medieval Iberian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Military History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Modern Chinese History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern Greek Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Modern History, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 186)
Journal of Modern Italian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Modern Russian History and Historiography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Moravian History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
   [5 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1933-1711
     Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2573 journals]   [SJR: 0.803]   [H-I: 17]
  • Diagnostic evaluation Target organ damage: cardiac
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11




      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Diagnostic evaluation Target organ damage: cardiovascular
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11




      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Hypertension and kidney disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11




      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Stroke outcomes among participants randomized to chlorthalidone,
           amlodipine or lisinopril in ALLHAT
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11
      Author(s): José-Miguel Yamal , Suzanne Oparil , Barry R. Davis , Michael H. Alderman , David A. Calhoun , William C. Cushman , Herbert F. Fendley , Stanley S. Franklin , Gabriel B. Habib , Sara L. Pressel , Jeffrey L. Probstfield , Sithiporn Sastrasinh
      The Antihypertensive and Lipid-Lowering Treatment to Prevent Heart Attack Trial (ALLHAT) was a randomized, double–blind, practice–based, active–control, comparative effectiveness trial in 33,357 high–risk hypertensive participants. ALLHAT compared cardiovascular disease outcomes in participants initially treated with an angiotensin–converting enzyme inhibitor (lisinopril), a calcium channel blocker (amlodipine), or a thiazide–type diuretic (chlorthalidone). We report stroke outcomes in 1517 participants in–trial and 1596 additional participants during post–trial passive surveillance, for a total follow–up of 8–13 years. Stroke rates were higher with lisinopril (6-year rate/100 = 6.4) than with chlorthalidone (5.8) or amlodipine (5.5) in–trial but not including post–trial (10-year rates/100 = 13.2 [chlorthalidone], 13.1[amlodipine], and 13.7 [lisinopril]). In–trial differences were driven by race (race-by-lisinopril/chlorthalidone interaction P = .005, race-by-amlodipine/lisinopril interaction P = .012) and gender (gender-by-lisinopril/amlodipine interaction P = .041), separately. No treatment differences overall, or by race or gender, were detected over the 10-year period. No differences appeared among treatment groups in adjusted risk of all–cause mortality including post–trial for participants with nonfatal in-trial strokes. Among Blacks and women, lisinopril was less effective in preventing stroke in–trial than either chlorthalidone or amlodipine, even after adjusting for differences in systolic blood pressure. These differences abated by the end of the post–trial period.


      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Impaired coronary microvascular function and increased intima–media
           thickness in preeclampsia
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11
      Author(s): Faika C. Ciftci , Mustafa Caliskan , Ozgur Ciftci , Hakan Gullu , Ayla Uckuyu , Erzat Toprak , Filiz Yanik
      There is an association between preeclampsia (PE) and excessive morbidity and mortality. Some recent studies have revealed the presence of endothelial dysfunction in PE patients with inflammatory activity. Moreover, it has been argued that the chronic inflammatory state involved in PE leads to an acceleration in atherosclerosis. Accordingly, our goal in this study is to determine whether there is any coronary microvascular dysfunction and increase in the intima–media thickness in patients who had mild PE 5 years before, without the presence of any traditional cardiovascular risk factors. The study included 33 mild PE patients (mild preeclampsia is classified as a blood pressure (BP) of 140/90 mm Hg or higher with proteinuria of 0.3 to 3 g/d) whose mean age was 33.7 years old, and 29 healthy women volunteers whose mean age was 36.1 years old. Each subject was examined using transthoracic echocardiography 5 years after their deliveries. During the echocardiographic examination, coronary flow reserve (CFR) and carotid intima–media thickness (IMT) were measured. There was a statistically lower CFR value in PE patients as compared with controls (2.39 ± 0.48 vs. 2.90 ± 0.49; P < .001). On the other hand, there was a significant increase in their IMT and high–sensitivity C–reactive protein (hs–CRP) values (respectively, 0.59 ± 0.15 vs. 0.46 ± 0.10; P < .001 and 3.80 ± 2.10 vs. 2.33 ± 1.79; P = .004). There was a negative correlation between the CFR values of the PE patients and hs-CRP (r = −0.568; P = .001) and IMT (r = −0.683, P < .001) results.We determined in the study that there was impaired CFR and increased carotid IMT in patients with PE, and, moreover, that these adverse effects were significantly correlated with hs-CRP.


      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Wrist circumference as a novel predictor of hypertension and
           cardiovascular disease: results of a decade follow up in a West Asian
           cohort
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11
      Author(s): Reza Mohebi , Ahmad Mohebi , Farhad Sheikholeslami , Fereidoun Azizi , Farzad Hadaegh
      No study has yet evaluated the effect of wrist circumference on risk of incident hypertension and cardiovascular disease (CVD) in an adult population. The present study included 3642 women, aged ≥30 years, free of CVD at baseline, who had undergone health examinations between January 1999 and 2001 and were followed up until March 2010. Cox proportional hazard regression was performed to assess the hazard ratios (HRs) of wrist circumference for CVD and hypertension events. During 10 years of follow–up, 284 cases of first CVD and 615 cases of incident hypertension occurred. In a model adjusted for conventional CVD risk factors, the HR of 1 cm increase in wrist circumference was 1.15 (1.06–1.25) for hypertension and was marginally significant for CVD (HR, 1.12 [1.00–1.25]; P-value 0.052). After considering body mass index and waist circumference in the model, we found significant interaction between waist circumference and wrist circumference in risk prediction of hypertension and CVD (P < .001). In non–centrally obese women (waist circumference <95 cm), in multivariable model plus body mass index and waist circumference, increase in wrist circumference was independently associated with both hypertension (HR, 1.17 [1.02–1.35]) and CVD (HR, 1.29 [1.03–1.61]). However, among centrally obese women (waist circumference ≥95 cm), wrist circumference increase could not predict either hypertension (HR, 0.97 [0.84–1.18]) or CVD events (HR, 0.90 [0.75–1.07]). Wrist circumference as a novel anthropometric measure was an independent predictor for incident hypertension and CVD events among non–centrally obese women.


      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11




      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11




      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Is all hypertension local?
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11
      Author(s): John D. Bisognano



      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Pre-existing arterial hypertension as a risk factor for early left
           ventricular systolic dysfunction following (R)-CHOP chemotherapy in
           patients with lymphoma
    • Abstract: Publication date: November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 11
      Author(s): Sebastian Szmit , Wojciech Jurczak , Jan Maciej Zaucha , Joanna Drozd-Sokołowska , Wojciech Spychałowicz , Monika Joks , Monika Długosz-Danecka , Adam Torbicki
      Experimental studies in animals suggest that arterial hypertension may be a specific risk factor predisposing to anthracycline cardiotoxicity. The aim was determination of the effect of pre–existing arterial hypertension on the development of early left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) directly after rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristin, prednisone ([R]-CHOP) chemotherapy in patients with lymphomas.The study included 208 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma receiving conventional doxorubicin. LVSD was defined as a decrease of left ventricular ejection fraction below 50% and at least by 10 percentage points from baseline value. Patients with pre-existing hypertension more frequently developed new LVSD (19.7% vs. 6.6%; P = .004), pitting edema of the ankles (23.9% vs. 9.5%; P = .005), and nycturia (21.1% vs. 7.3%; P = .004) compared with patients without hypertension. As a consequence, the hypertension subgroup suffered from more delays of subsequent chemotherapy cycles (26.8% vs. 14.6%; P = .03), more reductions of doxorubicin doses (18.3% vs. 8.8%; P = .05), and premature discontinuations of chemotherapy (16.9% vs. 7.3%; P = .03). On logistic regression analyses, hypertension was one of the most important risk factors for developing new LVSD after (R)-CHOP chemotherapy.Arterial hypertension confers a significant risk of early LVSD in lymphoma patients treated with (R)-CHOP chemotherapy, interfering with its recommended schedule of administration.


      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Comparison of an In-Pharmacy Automated Blood Pressure Kiosk to Daytime
           Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Raj S. Padwal , Raymond R. Townsend , Luc Trudeau , Peter G. Hamilton , Mark Gelfer
      background /Objectives: To compare serial readings from an in-pharmacy automated BP kiosk to mean daytime ambulatory BP. subjects /Methods: 100 community-dwelling adults with hypertension underwent: a. three baseline automated office readings; b. three in-pharmacy readings on each of four visits (12 total) using the PharmaSmart PS-2000 kiosk; and c. 24-hour ambulatory BP monitoring between in-pharmacy visits two and three. Paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used for analysis. Results Mean BPs were 137.8±13.7/81.9±12.2 mmHg for in-pharmacy and 135.5±11.7/79.7±10.0 mmHg for daytime ambulatory (difference of 2.3±9.5/2.2±6.9 mmHg [p=<0.05]). Bland-Altman plots depicted a high degree of blood pressure variability but did not show clinically important systematic BP differences. With ambulatory BP as the reference standard, in-pharmacy device results were similar to automated office. Conclusions The PharmaSmart PS-2000 closely approximated mean daytime ambulatory BP, supporting the use of serial readings from this device in the assessment of BP.


      PubDate: 2014-11-23T08:58:26Z
       
  • Plasma visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase levels in
           hypertensive elderly – results from the Polsenior substudy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Piotr Kocelak , Magdalena Olszanecka-Glinianowicz , Aleksander Owczarek , Maria Bożentowicz-Wikarek , Aniceta Brzozowska , Małgorzata Mossakowska , Tomasz Zdrojewski , Tomasz Grodzicki , Andrzej Więcek , Jerzy Chudek
      Visfatin/nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), is a 52 kDa adipokine with proinflammatory properties produced mostly by macrophages and adipocytes from visceral adipose tissue. It seems that visfatin/NAMPT plays a role in the pathogenesis of arterial hypertension. As this condition is frequently present in elderly the aim of the study was to assess the plasma visfatin/NAMPT levels in normotensive and hypertensive subjects from the Polish elderly population. Visfatin/NAMPT levels were measured by specific ELISA method in plasma samples from 2789 elderly subjects (1338 females, 1451 males) without heart failure, the PolSenior study participants, in addition to previously estimated serum concentrations of insulin, glucose, creatinine, CRP, and interleukin-6. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was calculated and used as a marker of insulin resistance. In the study group 591 subjects were normotensive, 449 had untreated and 1749 treated hypertension. Plasma visfatin/NAMPT levels were not related to the presence of hypertension or the use of antihypertensive drugs, including angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists. The regression analysis revealed that plasma visfatin/NAMPT concentration variability is increased in subjects with hs-CRP concentration above 3 mg/L and with HOMA-IR≥2.5, and decreased in those aged over 80 years. Our study shows that the presence of hypertension is not associated with the plasma levels of visfatin/NAMPT in elderly subjects. Plasma visfatin/NAMPT concentrations positively correlate with inflammation and insulin resistance, and are decreased in the oldest.


      PubDate: 2014-11-15T08:28:09Z
       
  • SGLT2 Inhibitors: Their Potential Reduction in Blood Pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 12 November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): George Maliha , Raymond R. Townsend
      The Sodium Glucose Co-Transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors represent a promising treatment option for diabetes and its common co-morbidity, hypertension. Emerging data suggests that the SGLT2 inhibitors provide a meaningful reduction in blood pressure, although the precise mechanism of the blood pressure drop remains incompletely elucidated. Based on current data, the blood pressure reduction is partially due to a combination of diuresis, nephron remodeling, reduction in arterial stiffness, and weight loss. While current trials are underway focusing on cardiovascular endpoints, the SGLT2 inhibitors present a novel treatment modality for diabetes and its associated hypertension as well as an opportunity to elucidate the pathophysiology of hypertension in diabetes.


      PubDate: 2014-11-15T08:28:09Z
       
  • Elevated systolic blood pressure is associated with increased incidence of
           chronic kidney disease but not mortality in elderly veterans
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 November 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): James W. Lohr , Mojgan Golzy , Randolph L. Carter , Pradeep Arora
      The optimal blood pressure to prevent development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and mortality in the elderly is unclear. Our objective was to determine the effect of differing levels of blood pressure on incidence of CKD and mortality in elderly veterans. This retrospective cohort study included 15,221 individuals ≥ 70 years of age without chronic kidney disease (outpatient eGFR> 60 ml/min/ 1.73 m2) seen in primary care clinic in VISN2 between 2001 and 2008. To examine the association of explanatory variables on hazard ratios for outcomes of interest, incident CKD and death, competing risk analysis (with death as competing risk) was used for the analysis of incident CKD outcome and time dependent Cox model with CKD as time dependent covariate was used for the analysis of death outcome. The incidence of CKD was 16% over a median follow up of 19 quarters. Compared to reference of systolic blood pressure of 130-139 mmHg , there was an increased hazard of development of CKD with systolic blood pressure of 140-149 mmHg or higher. As compared to a reference range of 130-139 mmHg systolic blood pressure, the relative risk of mortality was higher in the range of 120-129 mmHg systolic or less. The optimal achieved systolic blood pressure in elderly patients to prevent the development of CKD was < 140 mmHg. However, lowering the systolic blood pressure below 130 mmHg was associated with increased mortality.


      PubDate: 2014-11-11T08:11:10Z
       
  • The variability of ankle–arm blood pressure difference and
           ankle–brachial index in treated hypertensive patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Kaiwu Cao , Jinsong Xu , Hanjun Sun , Ping Li , Juxiang Li , Xiaoshu Cheng , Hai Su
      The purpose of this study was to investigate whether ankle–arm blood pressure (BP) difference (An–a) and ankle–brachial index (ABI) are consistent in treated hypertensive patients with obvious BP variation. This study enrolled 414 hypertensive patients (200 males; mean age, 61.3 ± 13.3 years) admitted to our hospital. BP of four limbs was simultaneously measured using four automatic BP measurement devices on the day of admission, and three and six day after admission. The An-a differences on systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean artery pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP) in both sides were calculated, respectively. The relative decrease amplitude (RDA) of BP was calculated using the formula: RDA = (BP1 − BPn)/BP1. The ABI of the right side was calculated. From the first to the third measurement, arm SBP and DBP levels of both arms significantly decreased (right arm: SBP: 163.7 ± 18.4, 147.7 ± 15.3 vs. 135.4 ± 11.7 mm Hg; P < .05; DBP: 86.6 ± 13.4, 79.9 ± 11.6 vs. 74.5 ± 9.6 mm Hg; P < .05); at the same time, the ankle SBP (right ankle: 182.1 ± 22.1, 147.7 ± 15.3 vs. 153.4 ± 16.6 mm Hg; P < .05) and DBP (84.8 ± 13.4, 79.9 ± 11.6 vs. 75.8 ± 9.8 mm Hg; P < .05) of both sides also significantly decreased. The mean An–a of three measurements of both sides was consistent at the levels of about 20 mm Hg on SBP and PP, 7 mm Hg on MAP, and 0 mm Hg on DBP. However, sABI gradually increased from the first to the third measurement.In treated hypertensive patients, the An–a differences on SBP, DBP, PP, and MAP are generally consistent, but sABI is associated with underlying SBP levels.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Basic Science Epidemiology of Hypertension Self–Assessment Questions
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10




      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Basic Science Pharmacology of Antihypertensive Drugs Self-Assessment
           Questions
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10




      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Treatment Recent Clinical Trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10




      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Public-use blood pressure measurement: the kiosk quandary
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Bruce S. Alpert , Richard A. Dart , Domenic A. Sica



      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Detection, evaluation, and treatment of severe and resistant hypertension
           Proceedings from an American Society of Hypertension Interactive Forum
           held in Bethesda, MD, USA, October 10th 2013
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): William B. White , J. Rick Turner , Domenic A. Sica , John D. Bisognano , David A. Calhoun , Raymond R. Townsend , Herbert D. Aronow , Deepak L. Bhatt , George L. Bakris
      The epidemiology, evaluation, and management of severe and resistant hypertension in the United States (US) are evolving. The American Society of Hypertension held a multi-disciplinary forum in October 2013 to review the available evidence related to the management of resistant hypertension with both drug and device therapies. There is strong evidence that resistant hypertension is an important clinical problem in the US and many other regions of the world. Complex drug therapy is effective in most of the patients with severe and resistant hypertension, but there are certain individuals who may be refractory to multiple-drug regimens or have adverse effects that make adherence to the regimen difficult. When secondary forms of hypertension and pseudo-resistance, such as medication nonadherence, or white-coat hypertension based on marked differences between clinic and 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, have been excluded, the impact of device therapy is under evaluation through clinical trials in the US and from clinical practice registries in Europe and Australia. Clinical trial data have been obtained primarily in patients whose resistant hypertension is defined as systolic clinic blood pressures of ≥160 mm Hg (or ≥ 150 mm Hg in type 2 diabetes) despite pharmacologic treatment with at least three antihypertensive drugs (one of which is a thiazide or loop diuretic). Baroreceptor stimulation therapy has shown modest benefit in a moderately sized sham-controlled study in drug-resistant hypertension. Patients selected for renal denervation have typically been restricted to those with preserved kidney function (estimated glomerular filtration rate ≥ 45 mL/min/1.73 m2). The first sham-controlled safety and efficacy trial for renal denervation (SYMPLICITY HTN-3) did not show benefit in this population when used in addition to an average of five antihypertensive medications. Analyses of controlled clinical trial data from future trials with novel designs will be of critical importance to determine the effectiveness of device therapy for patients with severe and resistant hypertension and will allow for proper determination of patient selection and whether it will be acceptable for clinical practice. At present, the focus on the management of severe and resistant hypertension will be through careful evaluation for pseudo-resistance and secondary forms of hypertension, appropriate use of combination pharmacologic therapy, and greater utility of specialists in hypertension.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Cost estimation of hypertension management based on home blood pressure
           monitoring alone or combined office and ambulatory blood pressure
           measurements
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Nadia Boubouchairopoulou , Nikos Karpettas , Kostas Athanasakis , Anastasios Kollias , Athanase D. Protogerou , Apostolos Achimastos , George S. Stergiou
      This study aims at estimating the resources consumed and subsequent costs for hypertension management, using home blood pressure (BP) monitoring (HBPM) alone versus combined clinic measurements and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (C/ABPM). One hundred sixteen untreated hypertensive subjects were randomized to use HBPM or C/ABPM for antihypertensive treatment initiation and titration. Health resources utilized within 12-months follow-up, their respective costs, and hypertension control were assessed. The total cost of the first year of hypertension management was lower in HBPM than C/ABPM arm (€1336.0 vs. €1473.5 per subject, respectively; P < .001). Laboratory tests' cost was identical in both arms. There was no difference in achieved BP control and drug expenditure (HBPM: €233.1 per subject; C/ABPM: €247.6 per subject; P = not significant), whereas the cost of BP measurements and/or visits was higher in C/ABPM arm (€393.9 vs. €516.9, per patient, respectively P < .001). The cost for subsequent years (>1) was €348.9 and €440.2 per subject, respectively for HBPM and C/ABPM arm and €2731.4 versus €3234.3 per subject, respectively (P < .001) for a 5-year projection. HBPM used alone for the first year of hypertension management presents lower cost than C/ABPM, and the same trend is observed in 5-year projection. The results on the resources consumption can be used to make cost estimates for other health-care systems.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Simvastatin but not ezetimibe reduces sympathetic activity despite similar
           reductions in cholesterol levels
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Jacek Lewandowski , Maciej Siński , Liana Puchalska , Bartosz Symonides , Zbigniew Gaciong
      The relationship between the sympatholytic effects of statins and their lipid-lowering activity remains unclear. Ezetimibe lowers cholesterol, but its sympatholytic activity is unknown. The purpose of study was to compare the influence of equipotent doses of simvastatin and ezetimibe on sympathetic activity. This randomized double-blinded study was performed in 22 hypertensive patients (age, 45.6 ± 2.2 years; female/male, 2/20) with untreated hypercholesterolemia. The subjects were administered 20 mg/d of simvastatin (n = 11) or 20 mg/d of ezetimibe (n = 11) for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-treatment measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), baroreceptor control of heart rate (baroreflex sensitivity), and impedance cardiography were recorded. Simvastatin and ezetimibe produced similar reductions of total (−58.0 ± 23.4 vs. −45.2 ± 17.2 mg/dL; P = .15, respectively) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (−52.6 ± 20.9 vs. −37.9 ± 17.6 mg/dL; P = .09, respectively). There was a significant difference in the effect of simvastatin and ezetimibe on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (−8.5 ± 5.1 vs. −0.7 ± 3.5 bursts/min; P = .0005). Simvastatin improved baroreflex sensitivity as compared with ezetimibe (10.0 ± 14.3 vs. −2.8 ± 6.1 ms/mm Hg; P = .01). There was no difference in the effect of both treatments on blood pressure, heart rate, cardiac output, stroke volume, total peripheral resistance, high-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Simvastatin reduced sympathetic activity via lipid-independent mechanisms, but ezetimibe exerts no sympatholytic effects.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Role of RAAS and adipokines in cardiovascular protection: effect of
           different doses of angiotensin II receptor blocker on adipokines level in
           hypertensive patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Anat Hass , Hadar Oz , Margarita Mashavi , Marina Shargorodsky
      The present study was designed to determine the effect of different doses of the angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), candesartan, on circulating adiponectin and leptin levels as well as leptin adiponectin ratio (LAR) in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.Sixty-nine hypertensive patients were randomized to three groups: group 1 included patients treated with high doses of Candesartan (32 mg); group 2 included patients treated with conventional doses of Candesartan (16 mg); and group 3 included patients that received antihypertensive treatment other than ARBs or angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors. Patients were evaluated for lipid profile, HbA1C, insulin, C-peptide, c-reactive protein, aldosterone, renin, Homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance, leptin, adiponectin and LAR. Baseline adiponectin, leptin, and LAR levels did not differ significantly between the three groups. After 6 months of treatment, LAR was significantly higher in group 3 than group 1 (P = .007) or group 2 (P = .023). Differences between effects of high (32 mg) and conventional doses (16 mg) of Candesartan on LAR were not observed (P = .678). Marginal across-group differences were detected for posttreatment circulating adiponectin level (P = .064). Univariate general linear model (GLM) analysis of posttreatment LAR detected significant by-group differences even after adjustment for age, gender, baseline values of LAR, and blood pressure. In this model, group was the only significant predictor of LAR after controlling for these variables. Treatment with high doses of the ARB, candesartan, is associated with significantly reduced LAR and marginally increased circulating adiponectin levels in hypertensive patients with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • The association between heart rate variability and biatrial phasic
           function in arterial hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Marijana Tadic , Cesare Cuspidi , Biljana Pencic , Tamara Marjanovic , Vera Celic
      We sought to investigate (1) left atrial (LA) and right atrial (RA) phasic function and mechanics; (2) heart rate variability (HRV); and (3) their relationship in untreated hypertensive patients. This cross-sectional study involved 73 untreated hypertensive patients and 51 subjects without cardiovascular risk factors with similar gender and age. All the subjects underwent a 24-hour Holter monitoring and comprehensive two- and three-dimensional echocardiography examination. LA and RA reservoir and conduit function, estimated by total and passive atrial emptying fractions and systolic and early diastolic strain rates, were reduced in the hypertensive patients. On the other hand, LA and RA booster function, assessed by active atrial emptying fraction and late diastolic strain rate, was increased in this group. All time and frequency domain heart-rate variability parameters were reduced in the hypertensive subjects. In the whole study population, parameters of cardiac sympathovagal balance (standard deviation of all normal RR intervals, root mean square of the difference between the coupling intervals of adjacent R-R intervals, 24-hour low-frequency domain [0.04–0.15 Hz], 24-hour high-frequency domain [0.15–0.40 Hz], and 24-hour total power [0.01–0.40 Hz]) correlated with LA and RA volume indexes, biatrial booster function assessed by active emptying fraction, biatrial longitudinal function evaluated by longitudinal strain; and biatrial expansion index. LA and RA phasic function and mechanics are significantly impaired in the untreated hypertensive patients. Heart-rate variability parameters are also deteriorated in the hypertensive population. Biatrial function and mechanics correlated with cardiac autonomic nervous system indexes in the whole study population.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Carotid-radial pulse wave velocity responses following hyperemia in
           patients with congestive heart failure
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10
      Author(s): Yang Liu , Andrew Beck , Olawale Olaniyi , Sahib B. Singh , Fiona Shehaj , Ravi-Inder Mann , Syed R. Hassan , Haroon Kamran , Louis Salciccioli , John Carter , Jason M. Lazar
      Carotid-radial pulse wave velocity (PWV) normally decreases following hyperemia and is an indicator of vasodilator reserve. This response is impaired in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). To identify specific factors related to an impaired response, we studied 50 patients (60 ± 14 years, 67% male) with chronic CHF. Baseline PWV was measured using applanation tonometry and repeated 1 minute after release of upper arm occlusion for 5 minutes. Percentage changes (Δ) of PWV were normally distributed and mean ΔPWV was −2.2 ± 15.3%. On univariate analyses, ΔPWV correlated with New York Heart Association class, mean arterial pressure, log brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels, and baseline PWV, but not with left ventricular ejection fraction. Multivariate linear regression analysis demonstrated log BNP levels, mean arterial pressure, and baseline PWV (all P < .05) as independent predictors of ΔPWV. Hyperemia increased PWV in 42% of patients. On logistic regression, higher BNP levels and lower baseline PWV were independent predictors of a PWV increase. Higher BNP levels and lower baseline PWV are independent predictors of an abnormal hyperemic PWV response in patients with CHF. Higher BNP levels may reflect abnormal vasodilator reserve. Forty-two percent of heart failure patients showed an increase in PWV following hyperemia, which may reflect more severe arterial vasodilator impairment.


      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Table of Contents
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10




      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Editorial Board
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension, Volume 8, Issue 10




      PubDate: 2014-11-02T07:39:31Z
       
  • Prevalence of AT1R-activating autoantibodies in primary aldosteronism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Hongliang Li , Xichun Yu , Maria Verena Cicala , Franco Mantero , Alexandria Benbrook , Vineet Veitla , Madeleine W. Cunningham , David C. Kem
      Background Autoantibodies to the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) have been reported in patients with primary aldosteronism including aldosterone producing adenoma (APA) and idiopathic adrenal hyperplasia (IAH). Methods and Results Sera from 25 primary aldosteronism subjects (12 with IAH and 13 with APA) and 15 normotensive control subjects were assayed for AT1R autoantibodies by ELISA and an AT1R-transfected cell-based bioassay. Nine of 12 IAH subjects (75%) and 6 of 13 APA subjects (46%) were positive for AT1R autoantibodies in the bioactivity assay. The mean AT1R autoantibody activity for the IAH and APA subjects was significantly greater than controls (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively), and this in vitro activity was suppressed by the AT1R blocker losartan. None of the controls had significant AT1R autoantibody activity. ELISA values were less sensitive but were positive in some subjects with IAH and APA. The mean arterial pressure of these primary aldosteronism subjects correlated modestly with AT1R autoantibody activity. Conclusion These data confirm the presence of active AT1R autoantibodies in a high percentage of subjects with primary aldosteronism irrespective of their underlying etiology. These observations have both pathophysiological and clinical implications.


      PubDate: 2014-10-24T07:04:07Z
       
  • Secondary Hypertension: Drugs and Herbal Preparations that Increase
           Pressure
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Gary E. Sander



      PubDate: 2014-10-24T07:04:07Z
       
  • Comparison of the renal hyperemic effects of papaverine and dopamine in
           patients with renal artery stenosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marcin Protasiewicz , Karol Początek , Rafał Poręba , Maciej Podgórski , Katarzyna Gosławska , Anna Szymańska - Chabowska , Grzegorz Mazur , Andrzej Mysiak , Adam Witkowski
      Aim The purpose of this study was to assess the hyperemic effects of papaverine and dopamine in the renal microcirculation of hypertensive patients with renal artery stenosis (RAS). Background Although a poor correlation between angiographic lesion assessment and its hemodynamic significance is known, angiography is a major criterion for the decision of renal artery stenting. Assessment of the hyperemic translesional pressure gradient was recently shown to be conducive in identifying patients who may benefit from renal revascularization. Methods The study included 14 patients (66±11.2 years) with resistant hypertension and moderate RAS. Using a pressure-sensing catheter, systolic, diastolic, and mean translesional pressure gradients, and the distal pressure (Pd):aortic pressure (Pa) ratio (SG, DG, MG, and Pd/Pa, respectively) were analyzed at baseline and after administration of 40 mg papaverine and 50 μg/kg dopamine. Results We did not observe significant changes in DG. Dopamine administration resulted in significant changes in SG, MG, and Pd/Pa when compared with baseline (p<0.05 for all). Changes in these parameters were caused by a decrease in systolic Pd in comparison with baseline conditions (119±34 mm Hg vs. 101 mm Hg, p<0.05). Systolic Pd pressure after papaverine (104 mm Hg) did not change significantly. Systolic and diastolic Pa values did not differ from baseline after either dopamine or papaverine bolus administration. Conclusions This study indicates that compared with papaverine, the intrarenal bolus of dopamine in hypertensive patients with RAS remains a more powerful hyperemic agent.
      Teaser In hypertensive patients with renal artery stenosis, translesional pressure gradients and the distal pressure:aortic pressure ratio were analyzed at baseline and after administration of 40 mg papaverine and 50 μg/kg dopamine using a pressure-sensing catheter. Dopamine administration resulted in significant changes in measured pressures when compared with baseline. The study indicates that compared with papaverine, the intrarenal bolus of dopamine in hypertensive individuals with renal artery stenosis remains a more powerful hyperemic agent.

      PubDate: 2014-10-24T07:04:07Z
       
  • Secondary Hypertension: Renovascular Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Stephen Textor



      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Clinical
           Hypertension Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): William B. White
      For nearly 4 decades, studies have supported direct and independent association of cardiovascular risk with observed ambulatory blood pressure (BP) and inverse association with the degree of BP reduction from day to night. The daytime and nighttime mean BPs as well as the difference between daytime mean and night-time mean BP derived from ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) data allow the identification of high-risk patients independent from the BP obtained in the clinic or office setting. The loss of the nocturnal dipping pattern and isolated nocturnal hypertension have also been shown to be an independent risk factors for increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. While ABPM is not necessarily required for routine use for the diagnosis of hypertension, its does offer substantial benefit to identify white-coat and masked hypertension and to evaluate the extent (or lack of) of BP control in high-risk patients. Ambulatory BP monitoring has proven to be particularly valuable in clinical evaluation of antihypertensive therapy, including both drugs and devices.


      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • From The Editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • Natriuresis and blood pressure reduction in hypertensive patients with
           diabetes mellitus: the NESTOR study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yi Zhang , Davide Agnoletti , Ji-Guang Wang , Yawei Xu , Michel E. Safar
      Background The antihypertensive effect of indapamide has never been clearly understood, particularly in hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 565 patients were randomly selected to receive either indapamide 1.5 mg or enalapril 10 mg daily for 12 months. Brachial blood pressure (BP) and plasma and urinary electrolytes were measured at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Sodium and potassium levels and excretion rates were measured in overnight urine collections. Results After 12 months’ treatment, similar significant reductions were observed in systolic and diastolic BP and pulse pressure levels in both treatment arms (P<0.001). However, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes duration and plasma sodium reductions were shown to be major, independent factors influencing BP reduction with indapamide, but not with enalapril. Regression coefficients were positive for age and plasma sodium reductions (P≤0.009) but negative for BMI and diabetes duration (P≤0.008). Similar findings were observed for pulse pressure. These results were more notable in elderly patients, did not differ regardless of whether BP reduction was measured in absolute or percent values, and were associated with increased sodium and potassium excretion rates. Conclusions Indapamide is more effective than enalapril at reducing BP in elderly diabetic hypertensives with marked sodium retention.


      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • The role of paced breathing in hypertension treatment- a review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Relu Cernes , Reuven Zimlichman
      Despite a good adherence to lifestyle modifications and antihypertensive drugs, hypertension remains resistant in more than a third of patients, thus creating the need for additional strategies, including nonpharmacological approaches. Slow and deep breathing (“paced breathing”) associated in the past with meditation has a direct antihypertensive effect by increasing baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) .With the method of guiding the pace of breathing, a FDA certified device, RESPeRATE®, may offer an easy, efficient, inexpensive and noninvasive option for treating hypertension. Multiple studies showed a significant reduction of blood pressure when RESPeRATE® was evaluated in a home and office setting. In conclusion, this review outlines the pathophysiologic background of paced respiration, describes RESPeRATE clinical trials, and presents briefly other guided breathing alternatives.


      PubDate: 2014-10-18T06:20:06Z
       
  • Rates, Amounts, and Determinants of Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring
           Claim Reimbursements Among Medicare Beneficiaries
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 October 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Shia T. Kent , Daichi Shimbo , Lei Huang , Keith M. Diaz , Anthony J. Viera , Meredith Kilgore , Suzanne Oparil , Paul Muntner
      Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) can be used to identify white coat hypertension and guide hypertensive treatment. We determined the percentage of ABPM claims submitted between 2007-2010 that were reimbursed. Among 1,970 Medicare beneficiaries with submitted claims, ABPM was reimbursed for 93.8% of claims that had an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 796.2 (“elevated blood pressure reading without diagnosis of hypertension”) versus 28.5% of claims without this code. Among claims without an ICD-9 diagnosis code of 796.2 listed, those for the component (e.g., recording, scanning analysis, physician review, reporting) versus full ABPM procedures and performed by institutional versus non-institutional providers were each more than two times as likely to be successfully reimbursed. Of the claims reimbursed, the median payment was $52.01 (25-75th percentiles: $32.95-$64.98). In conclusion, educating providers on the ABPM claims reimbursement process and evaluation of Medicare reimbursement may increase the appropriate use of ABPM and improve patient care.


      PubDate: 2014-10-04T04:42:38Z
       
  • Salt intake, knowledge of salt intake and blood pressure control in
           Chinese hypertensive patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Yu Qin , Ting Li , Peian Lou , Guiqiu Chang , Pan Zhang , Peipei Chen , Cheng Qiao , Zongmei Dong
      A cross-sectional study including involving 2,502 subjects was conducted to evaluate salt intake, knowledge of salt intake and blood pressure control in hypertension patients. The blood pressure control rate was 33.5% among the hypertensive patients. Of the patients, 69.9% had salt intake higher than 6 g/d. Overall 35.0% knew the recommended salt intake, and 94.9% knew “excess salt intake can result in hypertension”. Altogether 85.8% of patients had received health education related to a low salt diet at some time. Patients who consumed less than 6 g/d of salt had a higher control rate than those who consumed more than 6 g/d (48.7% vs27.0%, χ2=111.0, P<0.001). Patients with knowledge of the recommended salt intake had a higher control rate than those without (45.8% vs 26.9%, χ2=91.3, P<0.001). Our findings suggest a high salt intake and low blood pressure control rate among Chinese hypertensive patients. Knowledge of recommended salt intake is inappropriate for patients with education of a low-salt diet.


      PubDate: 2014-09-29T04:25:51Z
       
  • Hypertension and Kidney Disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Matthew R. Weir



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Target Organ Damage: Cardiac
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Scott D. Solomon



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • Diagnostic Evaluation: Target Organ Damage - Cardiovascular
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): John B. Kostis



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • From the editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-09-19T02:55:50Z
       
  • “Hold the Catheters” – Renal Denervation may not be the
           answer to the management of resistant or hard-to-treat hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Marvin Moser , Joel Handler



      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Onset of hypertension during pregnancy is associated with long-term worse
           blood pressure control and adverse cardiac remodeling
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Roberto F. Mesquita , Muriel Reis , Ana Paula Beppler , Vera Regina Bellinazzi , Sandra S. Mattos , José L. Lima-Filho , José A. Cipolli , Otavio R. Coelho-Filho , José A. Pio-Magalhães , Andrei C. Sposito , José R. Matos-Souza , Wilson Nadruz Jr.
      Up to 20% of women with hypertensive pregnancy disorders might persist with chronic hypertension. This study compared clinical and echocardiographic features between women whose hypertension began as hypertensive pregnancy disorders (PH group) and women whose diagnosis of hypertension did not occur during pregnancy (NPH group). Fifty PH and 100 NPH women were cross-sectionally evaluated by clinical, laboratory and echocardiography analysis and the groups were matched by duration of hypertension. PH exhibited lower age (46.6±1.4 vs. 65.3±1.1 years; p<0.001), but higher systolic (159.8±3.9 vs. 148.0±2.5mmHg; p=0.009) and diastolic (97.1±2.4 vs. 80.9±1.3mmHg; p<0.001) blood pressure than NPH, although used more antihypertensive classes (3.4±0.2 vs. 2.6±0.1; p<0.001). Furthermore, PH showed higher left ventricular wall thickness and increased prevalence of concentric hypertrophy than NPH after adjusting for age and blood pressure. In conclusion, this study showed that PH may exhibit worse blood pressure control and adverse left ventricular remodeling compared to NPH.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • The effects of the spleen tyrosine kinase inhibitor fostamatinib on
           ambulatory blood pressure in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis:
           Results of the OSKIRA-ABPM (ambulatory blood pressure monitoring)
           randomized trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): George D. Kitas , Gabriel Abreu , Krystyna Jedrychowicz-Rosiak , Jeffrey L. Miller , Roumen Nakov , Seva Panfilov , Jiri Vencovsky , Millie Wang , Michael E. Weinblatt , William B. White
      Clinical trials of fostamatinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) showed blood pressure (BP) elevation using clinic measurements. The OSKIRA-ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) trial assessed fostamatinib’s effect on 24-hour ambulatory systolic BP (SBP) in patients with active RA. One hundred thirty-five patients were randomized to fostamatinib 100 mg twice daily (bid) (n = 68) or placebo bid (n = 67) for 28 days. Ambulatory, clinic, and home BPs were measured at baseline and after 28 days of therapy. Primary end point was change from baseline in 24-hour mean SBP. Fostamatinib increased 24-hour mean SBP by 2.9 mmHg (P = .023) and diastolic BP (DBP) by 3.5 mmHg (P < .001) vs. placebo. Clinic/home-measured BPs were similar to those observed with ABPM. After treatment discontinuation (1 week), clinic BP values returned to baseline levels. Fostamatinib induced elevations in 24-hour mean ambulatory SBP and DBP. BP elevations resolved with fostamatinib discontinuation.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Maternal hypertensive pregnancy disorders and cognitive functioning of the
           offspring: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 September 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Soile Tuovinen , Johan G. Eriksson , Eero Kajantie , Katri Räikkönen
      Hypertensive pregnancy disorders may affect the fetal developmental milieu and thus hint at mechanisms that link prenatal conditions with later developmental outcomes of the offspring. Here, we systematically review studies that have tested whether maternal pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension and hypertensive pregnancy disorders as a single diagnostic entity are associated with cognitive functioning of the offspring. Twenty-six studies were eligible for this review. Of them, 19 provided detailed methodological information deemed necessary to be included for a more detailed review. An overall conclusion is that, in the general population, maternal hypertensive disorders may be associated with lower cognitive ability of the offspring. Studies that extend to adulthood show the most consistent pattern of findings. It is possible that the associations arise during the lifetime or that the findings reflect improvements in management of these disorders. Evidence is, however, insufficient to conclude whether these associations are dissimilar in the offspring exposed to maternal pre-eclampsia and gestational hypertension, due to the varied criteria used across the different studies to distinguish between these conditions. The existing studies also vary in the definition of control groups, and very few have taken into account important confounding factors, including maternal pre-pregnancy obesity and lifestyle behaviors. Given the mixed pattern of findings and limitations related to internal and external validity, further studies are clearly warranted to clarify the associations.


      PubDate: 2014-09-09T01:41:36Z
       
  • Basic Science: Epidemiology of Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Nathan D. Wong , Stanley S. Franklin



      PubDate: 2014-09-03T01:21:27Z
       
  • Basic Science: Pharmacology of Antihypertensive Drugs
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Addison A. Taylor



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • Treatment: Recent clinical trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Alan H. Gradman , Jan N. Basile



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • Use of the Plasma Triglyceride/High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Ratio
           to Identify Cardiovascular Disease in Hypertensive Subjects
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Martin R. Salazar , Horacio A. Carbajal , Walter G. Espeche , Marcelo Aizpurúa , Carlos E. Leiva Sisnieguez , Betty C. Leiva Sisnieguez , Carlos E. March , Rodolfo N. Stavile , Eduardo Balbín , Gerald M. Reaven
      Background This analysis evaluated the hypothesis that the plasma triglyceride (TG)/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentration ratio can help identify patients with essential hypertension who are insulin-resistant, with the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk profile associated with that defect. Methods and Results Data from a community-based study developed between 2003 and 2012 were used to compare CVD risk factors and outcome. Plasma TG/HDL-C cut-points of 2.5 (women) and 3.5 (men) subdivided normotensive (n=574) and hypertensive (n=373) subjects into “high” and “low” risk groups. Metabolic syndrome criteria (MetS) were also used to identify “high” and “low” risk groups. The baseline cardio-metabolic profile was significantly more adverse in 2003 in “high” risk subgroups, irrespective of BP classification or definition of risk (TG/HDL-C ratio vs. MetS criteria). Crude incidence of combined CVD events increased across risk groups, ranging from 1.9 in normotensive-low TG/HDL-C subjects to 19.9 in hypertensive-high TG/HDL-C ratio individuals (P for trends <0.001). Adjusted hazard ratios for CVD events also increased with both hypertension and TG/HDL-C. Comparable findings were seen when CVD outcome was predicted by MetS criteria. Conclusions the TG/HDL-C concentration ratio and the MetS criteria identify to a comparable degree hypertensive subjects who are at greatest cardio-metabolic risk and develop significantly more CVD.


      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
  • From the editor
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 14 August 2014
      Source:Journal of the American Society of Hypertension
      Author(s): Myron H. Weinberger



      PubDate: 2014-08-16T23:34:57Z
       
 
 
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