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  Subjects -> ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (Total: 111 journals)
Showing 1 - 15 of 15 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Acupuncture in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Advanced Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Alternative & Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Alternative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alternative Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arabian Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arteterapia. Papeles de arteterapia y educación artística para la inclusión social     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Plant Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletín Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Plantas Medicinales y Aromáticas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanics : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Naturologia e Terapias Complementares     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Herbal Medicines     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cognitive Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Complementary Therapies in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Current Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Deutsche Heilpraktiker-Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Erfahrungsheilkunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Medicinal Plants     Open Access  
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Global Journal of Integrated Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Traditional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herba Polonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herbal Medicines Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Innovare Journal of Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of High Dilution Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ipnosi     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Acupuncture and Herbs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asian Natural Products Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Fasting and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ginseng Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Drugs (An International Journal on Medicinal Herbs)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Herbal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Integrative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinally Active Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Remedies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Lekovite Sirovine     Open Access  
Médecine Palliative : Soins de Support - Accompagnement - Éthique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Acupuncture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mersin Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Lokman Hekim Tıp Tarihi ve Folklorik Tıp Dergisi     Open Access  
Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research     Open Access  
Natural solutions     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Medicinal Plant     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Plantas Medicinais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Acupuntura     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Traditional & Kampo Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Traditional Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Journal of Acupuncture - Moxibustion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Orthomolekulare Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.522
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 18  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1360-8592 - ISSN (Online) 1532-9283
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • Comparison of respiratory parameters in participants with and without
           chronic low back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Supriya G. Shah, Tenzin Choezom, G. Prabu RajaAbstractBackgroundIndividuals with chronic low back pain (CLBP) may lack coordination between the stabilising and respiratory functions of trunk muscles. The trunk stabilisers compromise breathing to maintain the spinal stability leading to breathing dysfunctions. Maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) is indicative of the respiratory muscle endurance and strength whereas end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) gives an estimate of breathing patterns that closely reflect the arterial measurement of CO2.CLBP has been shown to have a significant effect on respiratory functions. However, the impact has not yet been quantified. Further, there is a dearth of literature which compares the respiratory functions between CLBP and healthy individuals. This study investigates respiratory functions in participants with and without CLBP.MethodsThe study compared the respiratory functions of maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) and End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide (PETCO2) between 14 participants with CLBP and 14 healthy individuals. Participants in both groups were matched for age, height, weight and body surface area. The assessment of MVV and PETCO2 were performed in sitting, standing on a stable surface as well as on an unstable surface (BOSU ball).ResultsThe mean of measured MVV (L/min) was found to be lower (p
       
  • Assessing Chronic Fatigue Syndrome: Self-Reported Physical Functioning and
           Correlations with Physical Testing
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 16 March 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Jan b Eyskens, Jela Illegems, Luc De Nil, Jo Nijs, Jarl K. Kampen, Greta MoorkensAbstractThe pathophysiology of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) remains unclear; no biomarkers have thus far been identified or physical tests designed to underpin its diagnosis. Assessment mainly uses Fukuda’s criteria and is based on the exclusion of symptoms related to other diseases/syndromes, subjective self-reporting, and outcomes of self-report questionnaires. In order to improve the baseline assessment and progress evaluation of individuals suspected of CFS and using an association-oriented research strategy and a cross-correlational design, this study investigates possible associations between the performance on two physical tests, i.e. ‘Timed Loaded Standing’ (TLS), assessing trunk-arm endurance, and the ‘Stops Walking with Eyes Closed while performing a secondary Cognitive Task’ (SWECCT), measuring impaired automaticity of gait, and the results of two self-report questionnaires, the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS, total score and fatigue subscale score) and the physical functioning and vitality subscales of the Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) to gauge the participants’ subjective feelings of fatigue and beliefs regarding their abilities to perform daily-life activities. Comparisons of the outcomes obtained in 27 female patients with a confirmed diagnosis of CFS revealed that trunk-arm endurance as measured with the TLS correlated with the SF-36 physical functioning subscale only (raw p value: 0.004). None of the other correlations were statistically significant. It is concluded that the TLS may have potential as an objective assessment tool to support the diagnosis and monitoring of treatment effects in CFS.
       
  • Change, continuity, evolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 March 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Sasha Chaitow, Jerrilyn Cambron
       
  • Chronic neck pain and muscle activation characteristics of the shoulder
           complex
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Fariba Ghaderi, Khodabakhsh Javanshir, Mohammad Asghari Jafarabadi, Afsoun Nodehi Moghadam, Amir Masoud ArabAbstractIntroductionNeck pain is a very common musculoskeletal complaint in industrialized countries. Theoretically, chronic neck pain is thought to possibly change biomechanics and muscle activation patterns of the shoulder complex, causing its pain and dysfunction in the long term.PurposeThe present cross-sectional study was conducted to compare shoulder complex muscle activation characteristics in patients with chronic non-specific neck pain, compared to healthy participants.MethodTwenty patients with chronic neck pain and twenty healthy participants were recruited for the present study. Surface Electromyographic (sEMG) activity was recorded from four selected muscles (anterior and middle deltoid, upper and lower trapezius) during shoulder elevation with a predetermined load (25–30% of an individual's maximum voluntary exertion).ResultResults revealed only two significant increased onset delays in the anterior and middle deltoid,and a peak delay in the upper trapezius in chronic neck pain patients. Furthermore, increased onset delay for other muscles and decreased peak normalized amplitude (MVE%) for all muscles were found in chronic neck pain patients; however, these findings were not statistically significant.ConclusionThere were relationships between chronic non-specific neck pain and the shoulder muscle activation characteristic; hence, the alteration may be considered a predisposing factor for the shoulder dysfunction in future studies.
       
  • General Physical Preparation: The big rock of fitness
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Fred Duncan, D.C. Craig Liebenson
       
  • A pilot study of fascia Bowen therapy for 8-11 year-old boys with
           developmental coordination disorder
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 March 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Melanie Morgan-Jones, Fiona Knott, Hannah Wilcox, Chris AshwinAbstractBackgroundDevelopmental coordination disorder (DCD), also known as dyspraxia, is a disorder emerging in childhood characterised by motor skill impairments. The motor difficulties often produce negative effects in other areas of life, such as poor self-esteem and reduced social interactions. One treatment used for DCD is fascia Bowen therapy, which involves stimulating the fascia tissues of the body using finger and thumb rolling movements over the skin to improve overall muscle movement. However, no studies to date have been reported testing the effectiveness of fascia Bowen in DCD.MethodsThe present pilot study tested the effectiveness of 6 weeks of fascia Bowen in 10 boys aged 8–11 years with DCD. None of the boys had ever received treatment in any form before this study. Motor skills were assessed using the Movement Assessment Battery for Children-2 (MABC-2) and the DCD questionnaire, and psycho-social functioning was measured using the Self-Perception Profile, Spence Social Skills Questionnaire, and Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. All measures of interest were assessed before and after the therapy.ResultsResults showed significant improvement in motor function post-intervention, with 60% of the children no longer clinically being classified as having a movement difficulty on the MABC-2. However, no significant improvements were seen in psycho-social measures, at least within the short time-frame of the therapy in the current study.ConclusionsThe current pilot study revealed improvements in motor functioning after fascia Bowen therapy, across both performance and questionnaire measures, but that these improvements did not extend to wider areas of life. Further research in DCD is needed to test the effectiveness of fascia Bowen in larger studies with expanded ages and both genders over longer periods, including the generalisation of results of these longer interventions to different areas of life beyond motor ability.
       
  • Can we infer about the effects of KT in low back pain'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Jose Roberto de Souza Junior, Thiago Vilela Lemos, Joao Paulo Chieregato Matheus, Francisco García-Muro San José
       
  • Comparison of two mobilization techniques in management of chronic
           non-specific low back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Md. Nasir Ali, Kritika Sethi, Majumi M. NoohuAbstractAimThe aim of the study was to compare between the effects of Maitland's postero-anterior (PA glide) mobilization and Mulligan's sustained natural apophyseal glide (SNAG) on pain, mobility, muscle activation and functional disability in subjects with chronic, non-specific low back pain.MethodsThe study was a two arm repeated measure design with random allocation of subjects (n = 33). Subjects in group 1 received Maitland's PA glide mobilization and those in group 2 received Mulligan's SNAG. Along with the respective mobilization technique, individualized exercises were common for subjects in both the groups. Subjects in both groups received treatment for 4 days a week for 4 weeks. The outcome measures were numeric pain rating scale (NPRS) scores, lumbar flexion and extension range of motion, erector spinae muscle activity and Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire score.ResultsThe outcome measure scores showed statistical significance in time effect on NPRS (p = 0.001); lumbar flexion and extension range of motion (p = 0.001); erector spinae muscle activity (0.001); Oswestry low back pain disability questionnaire score (p = 0.001); group effect on lumbar flexion (p = 0.03) and extension range of motion (p = 0.05); and interaction effect (time x group) on lumbar flexion (p = 0.003) and extension range of motion (p = 0.002); and, erector spinae muscle activity (p = 0.05) at the 3rd lumbar vertebral level.ConclusionThe addition of Maitland or Mulligan mobilization techniques of the spine does not show a difference in the improvement of symptoms associated with chronic non-specific low back pain.
       
  • Changes of skin electrical potential in acupoints from Ren Mai and Du Mai
           conduits during Qigong practice: Documentation of a clinical phenomenon
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Luís Carlos Matos, Jorge Machado, Henry Johannes Greten, Fernando Jorge MonteiroAbstractQigong is a therapeutic method of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) that combines slow, soft movements and postures with breath control and a special mental state of ‘awareness’. TCM holds that the practice of Qigong promotes the ‘circulation of qi’ in the human body, the ‘flow’ of upward yang qi and downward yin qi to establish ‘balance’. In Western terms, this may be generally equivalent to vegetative homeostasis and the emotionally balanced state induced thereby. Researchers have often attempted to evaluate the functional movements of qi using measurements of the skin's electrical resistance. However, these methodologies have proven difficult to gauge, validate, repeat, and interpret. We aimed to overcome these limitations by measuring the skin's electrical potential between two points of the same system. The main goal of this study was to assess the skin's electrical potential changes in acupoints from the Ren Mai and Du Mai conduits, or meridians, as well as in other points of interest, during Qigong practice. While participants performed a specific Qigong exercise called ‘White Ball’, we observed significant changes in the skin electrical potential on Mìngmén (GV 4), Shèndáo (GV 11) and Baihuì (GV 20), from the Du Mai conduit, as well as on Huiyin (CV 1), Qìhai (CV 6), Zhongwan (CV 12) and Dànzhong (CV 17), from Ren Mai. These observations are in accordance with TCM theory and may contribute to the explanation of the vegetative physiological changes that are associated with ‘qi flow’ in TCM.
       
  • A critical overview of the current myofascial pain literature –
           February 2019
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Jan Dommerholt, Li-Wei Chou, Michelle Finnegan, Todd HooksAbstractThis edition of the overview of current myofascial pain literature features several interesting and important publications. From Australia, Braithwaite and colleagues completed an outstanding systematic review of blinding procedures used in dry needling (DN) studies. Other papers tackled the interrater reliability of the identification of trigger points (TrP), the presence of muscle hardness related to latent TrPs, pelvic floor examination techniques, and the links between TrPs, headaches and shoulder pain. Israeli researchers developed a theoretical model challenging the contributions of the Cinderella Hypothesis to the development of TrPs.As in almost all issues, we included many DN, injection and acupuncture studies, which continue to be the focus of researchers all over the world.
       
  • Traditional physical therapy exercises combined with sensorimotor
           training: The effects on clinical outcomes for chronic neck pain in a
           double-blind, randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Maryam Saadat, Reza Salehi, Hossein Negahban, Mohammad Jafar Shaterzadeh, Mohammad Mehravar, Masumeh HessamAbstractObjectiveThis study examined the effects of combining traditional physical therapy exercises with sensorimotor training on joint position sense, pain, muscle endurance, balance and disability in patients with chronic, non-specific neck pain.DesignDouble-blind, randomized controlled trial.SubjectsA total of 53 patients with chronic non-specific neck pain were randomized to either traditional or combined exercise groups.InterventionsAll patients received 12 sessions of supervised intervention 3 times per week. The traditional group performed traditional exercises, and the combined exercise group performed sensorimotor training in addition to traditional exercises.Outcome measuresJoint position sense, pain, neck flexor muscle endurance test, 10 Meter Walk Test, step test, and the Neck Disability Index.ResultsThe combined exercise group showed significantly greater improvement compared to the traditional group in joint position sense during extension, flexion, right rotation, the 10 m walk test with head turn, and the step test. Pain intensity, muscle endurance, and disability improved in both groups. Additionally, there was a higher degree of effect on muscle endurance in the combined exercise group compared to a moderate effect in the traditional group.ConclusionsA combination of sensorimotor training with traditional physical therapy exercises could be more effective than traditional exercises alone in improving joint position sense, endurance, dynamic balance and walking speed.
       
  • Regarding: The acute effects of integrated myofascial techniques on lumbar
           paraspinal blood flow compared with kinesio-taping: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Kesava Kovanur Sampath, Ramakrishnan Mani, Rajesh Katare, James Cotter, Steve Tumilty
       
  • Principles of diagnostic sonography in iliopsoas tendon pathology: A case
           report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Deepak Sebastian, Shankar KrishnanAbstractThis article describes the diagnostic value of musculoskeletal sonography in the management of tendon pathology and outlines a clinical example of its scope of utilization. Herein we describe the case of a 65-year-old man who sought rehabilitation services for left groin pain following a period of intense trekking and uphill walking. He presented with left hip flexor weakness and local tenderness over the left iliopsoas tendon with negative findings on neurological evaluation. Additionally, he presented with left hip capsule and hip flexor tightness with left gluteus maximus and gluteus medius weakness. The left hip capsule tightness was predominantly in the posterior fibres, with restriction of hip internal rotation. The clinical picture overall was suggestive of the presence of risk parameters for iliopsoas tendinopathy. Plain radiographs of the hip revealed mild degenerative changes with a mild pincer impingement. While his clinical and radiological picture was suggestive of degenerative and soft tissue pathology of the hip, a real-time sonographic study was useful in the quantitative confirmation of a partial tear of the left iliopsoas tendon. Additionally, a repeat sonographic study performed four weeks later, revealed a healing iliopsoas tendon seen as a decrease in the width of the hypoechoic presentation of the tear. To summarize, the value of musculoskeletal sonography as a diagnostic tool as well as the assessment of the progression of tendon healing is discussed. Sonography is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. It is steadily gaining popularity in the diagnosis of tendon lesions.
       
  • Proximal myofascial pain in patients with distal complex regional pain
           syndrome of the upper limb
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Adi Dor, Jean-Jacques Vatine, Leonid KalichmanAbstractBackgroundPatients suffering from complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) endure myofascial-related pain in at least 50% of cases.AimsTo evaluate the association of upper limb CRPS with myofascial pain in muscles that might influence arm or hand pain, and to evaluate whether the paraspinal skin and subcutaneous layers’ tenderness and allodynia are associated with CRPS.MethodsA case-control study comprising 20 patients presenting with upper limb CRPS, and 20 healthy controls matched for sex and age, were evaluated in the thoracic paraspinal area and myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) (infraspinatus, rhomboids, subclavius, serratus posterior superior and pectoralis minor) via a skin rolling test.ResultsThe prevalence of MTrPs in the affected extremity of the subjects was significantly higher than in the right limb of the controls: 45% exhibited active and latent MTrPs in the infraspinatus muscle (χ2 = 11.613, p = 0.001); 60% in active and latent MTrPs in the subclavius muscle (χ2 = 17.143, p 
       
  • Letter to the Editor, “Influence of a Pilates exercise program on the
           quality of life of sedentary elderly people: A randomized clinical
           trial”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Aurodeep Dasgupta, Asir John Samuel
       
  • The role of EEG and EMG combined virtual reality gaming system in facial
           palsy rehabilitation - A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Uvais Qidwai, M.S. Ajimsha, Mohamed ShakirAbstractBackgroundThe recovery rates for facial palsy are usually excellent; however, regularly patients present with problems with their fine facial movements that affect their emotional expressions.ObjectiveTo discover the viability and ease of using an Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Electromyography (EMG) combined Virtual Reality (VR) gaming system – the ‘Oculus Rift’ device in the evaluation and rehabilitation of facial palsy.DesignSingle case study.Patient informationA young 23-year-old female with facial palsy.Clinical findingsMost of the patient's facial features were re-established within the recovery time frame, except for her right forehead and eyebrow movements.InterventionA 10 day exercise program (Day 2–11) with an immersive virtual reality device, which randomly shoots virtually animated white balls in an unpredictable and testing pattern.Outcome measuresEEG and EMG patterns corresponding to the facial upper quadrant were taken at baseline, post-intervention, and at follow up.ResultsEMG and EEG investigation revealed a progressive improvement in the muscle activation in response to the impulsive and unpredictable activities in the virtual environment provided through the immersive VR device.ConclusionThe case report found a positive relationship between VR, facial upper quadrant EMG activation and EEG pattern changes following the intervention.
       
  • Commentary: Statistical significance and clinical significance - A call to
           consider patient reported outcome measures, effect size, confidence
           interval and minimal clinically important difference (MCID)
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Michael Fleischmann, Brett VaughanAbstractIn healthcare research an intervention may be statistically significant based on quantitative analysis; however, simultaneously it may be relatively insignificant to the health or quality of life of patients affected by a particular condition or disease being treated by the intervention – thus may be interpreted as having low clinical significance. An understanding of statistics is fundamental for evidence informed healthcare. Patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) direct patients to evaluate aspects of their own health, including quality of life, disability and function. Data obtained from PROMs can be used to demonstrate the impact of healthcare interventions on these elements of a person's quality of life. To interpret outcome measure data for clinical decision making, a clinician must understand the concepts of statistical significance and clinical significance. This commentary explores the concepts of patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), their statistical and clinical significance, and explores their relationship with a practical example for the clinician. Limitations of research that only reports p-values and the need to consider effect size, confidence intervals, and minimal clinically important difference are also discussed. Together, these concepts can assist the clinician to evaluate whether an intervention may be suitable for their clinical practice.
       
  • Development of a Pilates Teaching Framework from an international survey
           of teacher practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Moira S. Lewitt, Lesley McPherson, Marisa StevensonAbstractObjectivePilates is used increasingly in a variety of clinical settings. However, there is lack of clarity in the literature as to what is meant by the term. Teachers incorporating apparatus based on the designs of Joseph Pilates (1883–1967) into their practice refer to themselves as Comprehensive Teachers, and this group divides itself further into Classical and Contemporary practice. The aim of this research was to explore the meanings of these terms with Comprehensive Teachers and to develop a framework that reflects current views and practice.MethodOnline international survey of Pilates Teachers through closed Facebook forums. Open questions were used to elicit views of the definition and practice of Pilates, and how standards should be set across the sector.ResultsOf 109 participants, 35% were based in the UK and 32% in the USA; 48% identified as Classical teachers, 32% as Contemporary, 5% as both and 15% as Matwork instructors. A thematic analysis of the qualitative data revealed agreement on the scope and content of Classical and Contemporary Comprehensive Pilates, however the discourse indicated there might be stereotyping about each other's practice. Classical teachers, for example, spoke of their own practice as authentic while Comprehensive teachers used terms such as strict and inflexible for Classical practice. However, members of either group may incorporate both Classical and Contemporary approaches within their practice. We have designed a Pilates Teaching Framework to take into account the types of apparatus, the types of exercises and the order in which the exercises are executed.ConclusionsA framework that emphasises Pilates teaching rather than teacher practice is proposed for consistency and clarity when describing Pilates in professional and public contexts.
       
  • Improving spatiotemporal gait parameters in spastic diplegic children
           using treadmill gait training
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Mariam A. Ameer, Eman S. Fayez, Hossameldien H. ElkholyAbstractBackgroundEven though several physiotherapy techniques help to improve the spatiotemporal gait parameters of diplegic children, the efficacy of treadmill gait training together with conventional treatment techniques on spatiotemporal parameter improvement needs more investigation.ObjectiveThis study's main purpose is to investigate the effect of treadmill gait training as an adjunct to conventional physiotherapy treatment on the spatiotemporal gait parameters of diplegic children.MethodsTwenty diplegic children were distributed randomly into two equal groups (a control group of ten children who received a traditional treatment and an experimental group of ten children who received the traditional treatment together with treadmill gait training). Gait data were collected using a Vicon three-dimensional motion analysis system during regular walking.ResultsWalking speed, cadence, step length, stride length, and single limb support were enhanced in both groups (p 
       
  • Clinical application of the Turkish Get-Up to an acute shoulder injury in
           a competitive Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu athlete
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Trevor ShawAbstractIntroductionThe rationale for this case report was to identify the strengths and weaknesses associated with prescribing the Turkish Get-Up as an isometric shoulder and neck exercise. The Turkish getup is an effective tool for isometrically loading the cervical spine and shoulder and can be used with minimal space and equipment.DiscussionThe Turkish Get-Up was selectively applied as a therapeutic corrective intervention to a patient suffering a mild to moderate cervical, acromio-clavicular and sterno-clavicular joint sprain with associated facet syndrome and muscle spasm. There were concerns that initially gave a guarded prognosis with the realization that further imaging may be warranted after an initial trial.ConclusionThe Turkish getup is an effective tool for isometrically loading the cervical spine and shoulder and can be used with minimal space and equipment. This exercise allowed the injured patient to integrate full body movement and conditioning with an emphasis on pain free isometric shoulder and cervical spine contractions to re-establish strength and motor control. The patient now has the ability to add to his training and rehabilitation an exercise that can be endlessly progressed to build continuous strength, endurance and motor control.
       
  • Is there a difference in response to manual cranial bone tissue assessment
           techniques between participants with cervical and/or temporomandibular
           complaints versus a control group'
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Miranda Hanskamp, Susan Armijo-Olivo, Harry von PiekartzAbstractAimManual cranial bone tissue techniques (CBTT) are used by physiotherapists as a tool for assessment and treatment of complaints in the craniocervical, face, and head regions. The goal of this study was to determine whether CBTT were able to discriminate between subjects with cervical and/or temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and a healthy group. In addition, the inter-rater reliability when applying CBTT was also investigated.MethodsA cross-sectional study was conducted and included 60 participants. Six standardized passive techniques were applied and judged for resistance, compliance, and sensory answer. In order to evaluate the inter-rater reliability of these techniques a cohort of participants was measured twice (by two evaluators) prospectively. A logistic regression model and Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analyses were used to determining the discriminative validity of these techniques.ResultsLogistic regression identified a significant difference for five techniques for resistance and/or compliance and/or the sensory answer between the groups. Based on the Area Under the Curve (AUC) analysis, the discriminative ability of the temporal rotation to distinguish between the groups was fair to good (for resistance AUC = 0.7775 and for compliance AUC = 0.8065). The highest agreement between the two assessors was for the resistance with occipital compression (73%) technique.ConclusionThis study highlights that some of the CBTT could be potentially useful in distinguishing subjects with cervical and/or TMD from healthy subjects. Inter-rater reliability was moderate. CBTT could be potentially integrated in the examination of participants with complaints in the craniofacial region.
       
  • Management of acute neck pain: A case series describing immediate and
           short term clinical outcomes following use of the Multifidus Isometric
           Technique
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 7 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): James A. Viti, Jason M. BeneciukAbstractBackgroundAcute facet capsular entrapment results in sudden onset of pain and reduced ability to perform active cervical motions. The Multifidus Isometric Technique (MIT) is a type of manual therapy intervention theorized to target the entrapped facet capsule and pull the entrapped synovial folds from the facet joint resulting in decreased pain and increased function.PurposeTo describe immediate MIT clinical outcomes for patients with acute neck pain.MethodsConsecutive patients (n = 30; 70% female) with sudden onset of neck pain received MIT within 48 hours of symptom onset. Clinical outcome measures included: 1) 11-point Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS); 2) cervical AROM, and 3) the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Paired-sample t-testing was used to assess for within and between-session changes in outcome measure scores.ResultsWithin-session NPRS improvements were observed during all cervical AROM movements (p 
       
  • Evaluation of hyaluronan content in areas of densification compared to
           adjacent areas of fascia
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Emmett J. Hughes, Kena McDermott, Matthew F. Funk
       
  • Effects of a short-term of whole-body, high-intensity, intermittent
           training program on morphofunctional parameters
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Alexandre Lopes Evangelista, Cauê La Scala Teixeira, Alexandre Fernandes Machado, Paulo Eduardo Pereira, Roberta Luksevicius Rica, Danilo Sales BocaliniAbstractBackgroundFew studies have analyzed the application of high-intensity interval training (HIIT) using exercises with body weight among the morphofunctional parameters.AimTo analyze and compare the effects of six weeks of high-intensity intermittent calisthenic training (HIICT) and moderate intensity, continuous exercise (MICT) on body composition, hypertrophy, and strength.Materials and methodsTwenty-five active, healthy adults were randomized in either the HIIT group (n = 14) or the MICT group (n = 11). The HIIT group performed high-intensity intermittent calisthenic training based on full body exercise. The training session involved 5 min of warm-up followed by 20 sets of 30s all-out exercise and 30 s of passive recovery between sets. Jumping jack, mountain climber, burpee and squat jump were used. The MICT group performed continuous moderate running (5 min of warm-up followed by 20 min of running with intensity fixed at 80% of maximum heart rate). Training for both groups was performed three times weekly on nonconsecutive days. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements and functional tests. Muscle thickness was also measured.ResultsThere were no significant changes observed in any anthropometric measurements in both groups. Regarding the functional tests, the analysis of the percentage changes revealed advantages of HIICT over MICT in push-ups only (p = 0.02). The muscular thickness of lower and upper limbs did not present significant differences in the pre- and post-times or between groups (p > 0.05).ConclusionWhen compared to MICT, HIIT improved push-up effects, without generating significant changes in body composition and muscle thickness.
       
  • Ultrasonographic assessment of patellar tendon thickness at 16 clinically
           relevant measurement sites – A study of intra- and interrater
           reliability
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Pætur M. Holm, Søren T. Skou, Jens L. Olesen, Sissel Mølbak, Heidi Jørgensen, Morten Skjoldager, Steffan W. ChristensenAbstractObjectivesTo determine intra- and interrater reliability of ultrasonographic imaging (USI) measurements of patellar tendon (PT) thickness using 16 measurement sites covering the entire tendon.DesignReliability study.SettingPhysiotherapy outpatient clinic.ParticipantsTwenty healthy and physically active volunteers (9 women). Mean age: 24 years (SD ± 2.73). Mean body mass: 75.8 kg (SD ± 11.8).Main outcome measuresIntraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and 95% limits of agreement (LOA) in cm and in percentage relative to the mean PT thickness.ResultsIntrarater reliability ranged from 0.59 to 0.87 and 0.59 to 0.93 for examiners I and II, respectively. Interrater reliability ranged from 0.37 to 0.89. Measurement precision for examiner I ranged from 0.05 to 0.09 cm (17.5%–26.7%) while ranging from 0.04 to 0.13 cm (13.3%–38.7%) for examiner II. Interrater measurement precision ranged from 0.07 to 0.15 cm (19.1%–42.5%).ConclusionIn an attempt to replicate daily clinical USI practice, this was the first study extensively assessing reliability throughout the full range of the patellar tendon - revealing a considerable variation in intra- and interrater reliability as well as measurement precision throughout the 16 individual PT sites. In a clinical context, the low interrater reliability and precision found at the proximal tendon insertion site may have implications for USI of the symptomatic PT, as this is the site mainly associated with underlying pathologic changes. Further reliability studies are needed to clarify the region-specific reliability of the full length PT.
       
  • The effects of yoga practice on balance, strength, coordination and
           flexibility in healthy children aged 10–12 years
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Betsy Donahoe-Fillmore, Ethan GrantAbstractObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of yoga practice on balance, strength, coordination, and flexibility in healthy children aged 10–12 years.Study designQuasi-experimental, nonrandomized.BackgroundResearch on the effects of yoga in children has focused on the benefits seen in non-healthy children or on the effects on hand grip strength and motor performance. The studies on the effects of yoga on balance, strength, coordination, and flexibility have been limited.Methods and MeasuresA convenience sample of 26 children, aged 10–12 years was obtained. The children participated in 40 min yoga sessions, led by a registered yoga teacher, 1–3 times per week for 8 weeks. The Bruininks-Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency, second edition (BOT-2), the sit and reach test, and the 90/90 hamstring flexibility test were administered at baseline and at the end of the 8 weeks. Descriptive statistics were calculated for all measurements. A Shapiro-Wilk test was used to test normality. A Wilcoxin signed-rank test was used to analyze pre- and post-test measurements for all variables.ResultsThere was a statistically significant within-subject difference from pre-test to post-test for balance (p = 0.026), sit and reach (p = 0.000), popliteal angle right (p = 0.005), and popliteal angle left (p = 0.018). There were no statistically significant differences in strength and bilateral coordination from pre-to post-test measurements.ConclusionsYoga may be a beneficial form of exercise in the school-based setting for improving balance and flexibility in healthy children.
       
  • Pain requires processing – How the experience of pain is influenced by
           Basic Body Awareness Therapy in patients with long-term pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Adam Lundwall, Anton Ryman, Anna Bjarnegård Sellius, Kaisa MannerkorpiAbstractBackground and purposeLong-term pain is common and entails large costs to society. One physiotherapy treatment with documented positive effects for patients with long-term pain is Basic Body Awareness therapy (BBAT). However, studies are lacking about patients' experience of BBAT's influence on their pain. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate how patients experience BBAT's influence on their long-term pain.MethodsFor this qualitative interview study, participants were selected from two supervised BBAT groups. To qualify for the study, participants had to meet two inclusion criteria: having pain for at least 6 months, and attending BBAT for at least 6 months. Six females between the ages of 25 and 61 years were included. Pain duration ranged from 9 to 20 years, and duration of practicing BBAT ranged from 8 to 120 months. Semi-structured interviews were conducted and qualitative content analysis was performed.ResultsThe analysis revealed four main categories of BBAT experience: increases motivation, requires processing, increases control over pain and changes attitude to oneself, body and pain.DiscussionPatients with long-term pain experienced BBAT as being helpful in processing their pain because they were forced to face the pain instead of trying to ignore it. Participants experienced a decrease in pain through development of an increased sense of control as well as a changed attitude to themselves, their bodies and their pain. It is important for physiotherapists to understand that pain can increase during BBAT and to support the patients in this process during the therapy.
       
  • Google fit smartphone application or Gt3X Actigraph: Which is better for
           detecting the stepping activity of individuals with stroke'
           A validity study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Janaine Cunha Polese, Giselle Silva e Faria, Giane Amorim Ribeiro-Samora, Lorena Pereira Lima, Christina Danielli Coelho de Morais Faria, Aline Alvim Scianni, Luci Fuscaldi Teixeira-SalmelaAbstractObjectiveTo examine the validity of the GT3X® ActiGraph accelerometer and the Google Fit® smartphone application in estimating stepping activity in people with chronic stroke.MethodsThirty-seven stroke survivors walked along a straight, 10 metre hallway over 5 min at their fastest speeds, wearing the GT3X® ActiGraph accelerometer and a smartphone on their paretic lower limb. The criterion-standard measurement made was the actual number of steps, counted by a trained examiner.ResultsThe mean estimated steps measured by the GT3X® ActiGraph and Google Fit® respectively were 276.7 ± 97.6 and 481.0 ± 119.8; that calculated from the examiner's measurements was 472.0 ± 93.9. Statistically significant associations were found between the actual steps and those estimated by the GT3X® ActiGraph (r = 0.56; p 
       
  • Effects of lumbosacral orthosis on dynamical structure of center of
           pressure fluctuations in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain:
           A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Fatemeh Azadinia, Ismail Ebrahimi-Takamjani, Mojtaba Kamyab, Morteza Asgari, Mohamad ParnianpourAbstractBackgroundA few clinical trials have examined the effect of treatment interventions on postural control in patients with chronic low back pain, all of which have exclusively evaluated postural stability using traditional linear measures of postural sway. However, postural control improvement cannot be determined by exclusively relying on linear measurements, because these parameters provide no information on underlying motor control mechanisms.ObjectiveThis study aimed to compare the effect of using lumbosacral orthoses (LSO) together with routine physical therapy, compared to routine physical therapy alone on postural control, using nonlinear analysis techniques.MethodsForty-four patients with low back pain were randomly allocated to the intervention and control groups. Both groups underwent 8 sessions of physical therapy twice weekly for 4 weeks. The intervention group received LSO in addition to routine physical therapy. Before and after the intervention, non-linear dynamical features of center of pressure fluctuations were assessed during quiet standing at 3 difficulty levels of postural tasks, including eyes open while standing on a rigid surface, eyes closed while standing on a rigid surface, and eyes closed while standing on a foam surface.ResultsThe results of this study showed that a 4-week intervention consisting of LSO and routine physical therapy modalities did not affect the temporal structure of postural sways in patients with low back pain.ConclusionTreatment strategies, such as routine physical therapy modalities or LSO, which exclusively focus on the correction of peripheral mechanics, fail to affect the behavior of the postural control system.
       
  • Hospital based massage therapy specific competencies
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): M.K. Brennan, Dale Healey, Carolyn Tague, Beth RosenthalAbstractAs massage therapy experiences a resurgence of use for hospitalized patients, it is appropriate to consider the competencies needed by practitioners to practice safely and effectively in the inpatient setting. Hospitals differ vastly from other massage practice locations such as private offices, spas, and sports clubs. The variety of conditions encountered in an acute care setting require the knowledge and ability to adapt massage protocols appropriately. The Academic Collaborative for Integrative Health (ACIH) created the Hospital Based Massage Therapy (HBMT) Task Force to determine if there is a need for HBMT specific competencies and then, if needed, to develop peer reviewed competencies that hospital staff, massage therapy educators, and massage therapists all may find useful.The members of the task force identified massage therapists who worked in hospitals generally, as well as in hospitals known to have HBMT programs. A spreadsheet was created listing the individuals and a survey was distributed to those on the spreadsheet. These individuals were also asked to identify others who might be interested in participating in the project. The purpose of the survey was to assess various elements of HBMT programs such as educational/experience requirements, employment model, orientation, and supervision. 32 out of 37 hospitals (87%) completed the survey. The Task Force considered the high response rate and the extent to which respondents provided in-depth answers to the open-ended questions as evidence of the need for specific competencies for safe and effective massage therapy for hospitalized patients.In addition to the survey, the task force used a Delphi technique to engage survey participants and other experts in the field to shape the initial draft of the competencies. As these competencies are shared with hospitals, massage therapists, and massage educators, the Task Force members expect that additional development of the competencies will take place as various groups implement them.
       
  • Inspiratory muscle training improves performance of a repeated sprints
           ability test in professional soccer players
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Rodrigo Luis Cavalcante Silva, Elliott Hall, Alex Souto MaiorAbstractBackgroundInspiratory muscle training (IMT) is an important method of attenuating both respiratory and peripheral effort perceptions, consequently improving neuromuscular performance and resulting in greater improvements in exercise capacity than exercise training alone.ObjectiveThe aim of this study was to investigate the effects of IMT on exercise tolerance, repeated sprint ability (RSA) performance, maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), and peak inspiratory flow (PIF) in a cohort of professional male soccer players.MethodsTwenty-two healthy male professional soccer players (18.3 ± 1.4 years; 174.5 ± 6.1 cm; 70.5 kg ± 4.6 kg; body fat 10.1 ± 4.2%) from a club in the Brazilian first division soccer league participated in this study. IMT consisted of 15 and 30 self-paced inspiratory breaths (each to 50% maximal static inspiratory pressure [P0]) in the 1-and 2-week intervention period, respectively. IMT was performed prior to soccer training (1 sets.d−1; 6 d.wk−1) with repeated sprint ability (RSA) assessed pre- and post- the 2-week period of IMT.ResultsStatistical analyses identified a significant (p 
       
  • Effects of different strength training volumes and subsequent detraining
           on strength performance in aging adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Ewertton de Souza Bezerra, Fernando Diefenthaeler, Raphael Luiz Sakugawa, Eduardo Lusa Cadore, Mikel Izquierdo, Antônio Renato Pereira MoroAbstractThe purpose of the present study was to investigate the volume-dependence of upper-body strength performance improvement and the retention effects after detraining in aging adults. Eighteen healthy, untrained, middle-aged volunteers were randomized into two groups: low volume (LV), mean = 494 kg. and high volume (HV), mean = 686 kg. load. Participants were tested and retested before a 12-week (2 times/week) period of RT for baseline values (pre-); after 6 weeks (middle) and 12 weeks of training (post-), and 12 weeks after interruption (detraining – no systematic exercise). On each test day, a five-repetition maximum (5-RM) for the seated row; handgrip strength test (HGS); and local muscular endurance for elbow flexors (LME) were carried out. Participants performed seated row training 2 times per week with a rest interval of at least 48 h between sessions. After 24 sessions of RT (resistance training), LME significantly increased in both groups (p 
       
  • Changes in body image during a 6-month lifestyle behaviour intervention in
           a sample of overweight and obese individuals
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Maša Černelič-BizjakAbstractBackgroundIndividuals with long-term chronic body image dissatisfaction may experience excessive stress and negative cognitions and feelings. Changes in negative cognition about body image are often reported as outcomes of obesity treatment. In turn, body image dissatisfaction also influences behavioural adherence and success in weight loss.ObjectivesThe purpose of the present study was to elucidate psychological changes during 6 months of lifestyle behaviour intervention and the association of these changes with actual weight loss.MethodsThe study examined associations between body image dissatisfaction and obesity treatment-related variables among 33 overweight and obese adults (age = 38.9 ± 6.5 years) participating in a 6-month diet and exercise weight loss intervention. Measurements of body image dissatisfaction and anthropometric variables were taken at baseline and after 6-months.DiscussionSignificant improvements were observed in all physical variables (e.g. weight, percentage of body fat mass, waist and hip circumference) after intervention. Body image dissatisfaction improved significantly over the treatment, and these changes were associated with changes in obesity indicators.ConclusionsChanges in weight and body image probably influence each other dynamically. Results from this study support the inclusion of cognitive intervention aimed at improving body image in weight management programs.
       
  • Single leg landing kinematics in volleyball athletes: A comparison between
           athletes with and without active extension low back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 30 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Marzieh Movahed, Mahyar Salavati, Rahman Sheikhhoseini, Amir Massoud Arab, Kieran O'SullivanAbstractPurposeThe purpose of this study was to compare kinematics of the lower extremity and lumbar spine during a single leg landing task between female volleyball athletes with and without persistent low back pain (LBP).MethodsIn this cross sectional study, 36 volunteer female volleyball athletes with (n = 18) and without (n = 18) LBP were recruited. Two specifically trained physical therapists selected only athletes with a specific movement-based subgroup of LBP for inclusion. Three dimensional kinematic and ground reaction force data were recorded for each athlete across three single leg landing trials by utilizing a Vicon 6-camera motion capture system and one in-floor embedded Kistler force plate, respectively. Independent t-tests compared data between the two groups.ResultsLumbar lordosis when standing (p = 0.046) as well as on initial contact (p = 0.025) and at the time which the maximal vertical ground reaction force occurred (p = 0.020) were significantly greater in the LBP group. There were no other significant differences.ConclusionsThe tendency for this specific subgroup of athletes to consistently adopt more extended lumbar postures in both static and dynamic tasks may be worth considering by those involved in coaching, performance optimizing and injury prevention.
       
  • Quadriceps foam rolling and rolling massage increases hip flexion and
           extension passive range-of-motion
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 29 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Estêvão Rios Monteiro, Jefferson da Silva Novaes, Mark Tyler Cavanaugh, Barbara J. Hoogenboom, James Steele, Jakob L. Vingren, Jakob ŠkarabotAbstractIncreases in joint range-of-motion may be beneficial for improving performance and reducing injury risk. This study investigated the effects of different self-massage volumes and modalities on passive hip range-of-motion. Twenty-five recreationally resistance-trained men performed four experimental protocols using a counterbalanced, randomized, and within-subjects design; foam rolling (FR) or roller massage (RM) for 60 or 120-s. Passive hip flexion and extension range-of-motion were measured in a counterbalanced and randomized order via manual goniometry before self-massage (baseline) and immediately, 10-, 20-, and 30-min following each self-massage intervention. Following FR or RM of quadriceps, there was an increase in hip flexion range-of-motion at Post-0 (FR: Δ = 19.28°; RM: Δ = 14.96°), Post-10 (FR: Δ = 13.03°; RM: Δ = 10.40°), and Post-20 (FR: Δ = 6.00°; RM: Δ = 4.64°) for all protocols, but these did not exceed the minimum detectable change at Post-10 for RM60 and RM120, and Post-20 for FR60, FR120, RM60, and RM120. Similarly, hip extension range-of-motion increased at Post-0 (FR: Δ = 8.56°; RM: Δ = 6.56°), Post-10 (FR: Δ = 4.64°; RM: Δ = 3.92°), and Post-20 (FR: Δ = 2.80°; RM: Δ = 1.92°), but did not exceed the minimum detectable change at Post-10 for FR60, RM60, and RM120, and Post-20 for FR60, FR120, RM60, and RM120. In conclusion, both FR and RM increased hip range-of-motion but larger volumes (120- vs. 60-second) and FR produced the greatest increases. These findings have implications for self-massage prescription and implementation, in both rehabilitation and athletic populations.
       
  • The effect of six weeks of Tai Chi Chuan training on the motor skills of
           children with Autism Spectrum Disorder
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Mostafa Sarabzadeh, Bita Bordbar Azari, Masoumeh HelalizadehAbstractObjectivesAutism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is related to a dysfunction of central nervous system that most frequently appears at the age of three years old. There is no certain cure for this disorder; however, decreasing complications can produce positive life changes. Increasing physical activity is an appealing method for reducing behavioral disorders in ASD. Since Tai Chi Chuan training improves focus, attention to internal cues and balance, it seems to be an effective system for autistic children.Materials & methods18 children with ASD in the age range between 6–12 years old were divided randomly into experimental and control groups. The experimental group participated in a six-week program of Tai Chi Chuan consisting of 18 sessions, limited to 60 min each. To assess motor skills, an M-ABC test was used during pre- and post-assessment. In order to analyze the data, dependent and independent T tests were used (with significance level of 0.05).ResultsResults showed a significant difference in the subscales of ball skills and balance performance (P  0.05) between the two groups.ConclusionAccording to the results, it may be concluded that forms of Tai Chi Chuan improve balance and motion coordination. Moreover, this training consists of slow motion workouts with strongly focused attention, which may lead to developed control of body motions with harmony and discipline. Therefore, Tai Chi Chuan training seems to be a helpful therapeutic program to reduce motor limitations, and these benefits can be transferred to daily life in autistic children.
       
  • The effectiveness of a therapist-oriented home rehabilitation program for
           a patient with acromegaly: A case study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Tatiana Rafaela Lemos Lima, Leandro Kasuki, Monica Roberto Gadelha, Agnaldo José LopesAbstractBackgroundAcromegaly causes numerous functional limitations that negatively impact patients’ performance of activities of daily living (ADLs) and contribute to the deterioration of health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Thus, the purpose of the present case study was to evaluate the effect of therapist-oriented home rehabilitation (TOHR) for a patient with acromegaly.Case descriptionWe report the case of a 53-year-old man who was diagnosed with primary acromegaly 17 years ago. He complained of difficulties performing tasks that involved his hands, pain in the lower limbs, and fatigue when he climbed a few flights of stairs. Although he performed ADLs independently, he reported some difficulties or discomfort when performing them.Intervention and outcomeThe patient underwent a booklet-guided physical exercise program that lasted two months (three times per week, 60 minutes per session). The activities included overall stretching, muscle strengthening, and endurance exercises, along with aerobic conditioning through functional circuit training. After two months of exercise, he reported improved HRQoL as assessed with the Acromegaly Quality of Life Questionnaire, with increases in quadriceps muscle strength and 6-min walking distance. However, none of these benefits remained when the patient was assessed after a 1-month washout period.ConclusionThis study showed that patients with acromegaly may benefit markedly from TOHR, which could provide a novel therapeutic approach as an adjunct to hormone control therapy.
       
  • A comparison of EMG output of four lower extremity muscles during selected
           yoga postures
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Kathleen K. Kelley, Kristianna Giannico, Gabrielle Lesnett, Alyssa RomanoAbstractThe purpose of this study was to use surface electromyography (EMG) analysis to examine the muscle activation of the anterior tibialis (TA), gastrocnemius (GA), rectus femoris (RF) and biceps femoris (BF) muscles during several yoga poses: tree pose (Vrksashana), half moon pose (Ardha Chandrasana) and warrior III (Virabadrasana) when compared to a rest pose (mountain pose). Ten healthy females with more than 3 months of continuous yoga experience who practiced at least 1.5 h per week were recruited. EMG activity was recorded from the aforementioned muscles during mountain pose (“rest”) for 30 s, three times. Subjects then performed the following yoga poses in a randomized sequence while surface EMG activity was recorded: tree pose, half-moon, and warrior III. Each pose was held for 20s to 30 s and performed three times. EMG data were band pass filtered and the root mean square (RMS) was obtained. The peak RMS of each of the resting trials was obtained and averaged to produce an average peak resting RMS value. The study revealed significantly greater EMG activity in TA and GA in all three poses when compared to BF and RF. BF produced greater EMG activity than RF in warrior III. In conclusion, single limb yoga poses require increased use of the ankle musculature when compared to thigh musculature.
       
  • Effects of an integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique program on
           neck muscle strength and endurance in individuals with chronic mechanical
           neck pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Dimitrios Lytras, Evaggelos Sykaras, Kosmas Christoulas, Ioannis Myrogiannis, Eleftherios KellisAbstractBackgroundThe aim of this study was to investigate whether the application of the integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique (INIT) combined with therapeutic exercise (TE) can provide faster and greater improvement in maximum isometric strength and isometric endurance of the neck muscles in patients with chronic mechanical neck pain (CMNP).MethodsIn this 10-week, single-blind clinical trial, 40 participants (men and women) with CMNP were divided into two groups. The intervention group (IG) followed a TE program in combination with the INIT, while the control group (CG) followed the same TE program without the INIT technique. Changes in maximum isometric strength and isometric endurance of the neck muscles were evaluated before, during, and after the intervention, with follow-up measurements taken at 1, 3, and 6 months after the intervention. Analysis of variance with repeated measures was applied.ResultsBoth groups showed a significant improvement in all dependent measures after the intervention (p 
       
  • Sport injury prevention in individuals with chronic ankle instability:
           Fascial Manipulation® versus control group: A randomized controlled trial
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Simone Brandolini, Giacomo Lugaresi, Antonio Santagata, Andrea Ermolao, Marco Zaccaria, Aurélie Marie Marchand, Antonio SteccoAbstractChronic ankle instability (CAI) is one of the most common syndromes that occurs following an initial ankle sprain. Sprains are often correlated with recurrent sprains, loss of range of motion (ROM) and deficits in proprioception and postural control. The objectives were to evaluate the effectiveness of Fascial Manipulation® (FM) as a preventative measure in semi-professional athletes with CAI, and to monitor the symptomatology, equilibrium and ROM of the injured ankle.A single-blinded randomized controlled trial was conducted in the rehabilitation department of a medical centre. Twenty-nine semi-professional male footballers were recruited. Nine subjects with no previous symptomatology, were assigned to a baseline group, twenty symptomatic subjects were randomized into either the study or the control group. All three groups followed a specific training program. The control group followed normal training protocols and received standard medical care. The study group received an additional three FM treatment sessions.Symptomatology and ROM outcomes were recorded for all players at baseline, before each treatment for the treatment group, and at 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-ups. At one year, an additional follow-up on was performed via phone.Four severe ankle traumas and one mild ankle trauma were reported in the control group during the trial period. The 6-month outcomes in the study group showed statistically significant improvements. The 1-year follow-up reported the absence of any reported trauma in the study group.FM was effective in improving ROM and symptomatology in footballers with CAI. FM intervention was effective in preventing injury in the study sample.
       
  • The effects of dorso-lumbar motion restriction on energy use and center of
           mass movement during running
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 22 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Joseph J. Morley, Edward TraumAbstractThe effects of restricting dorso-lumbar spine mobility on oxygen consumption in runners was investigated, as was vertical movement of the body's center of mass. Thermoplastic casting material was fashioned into a rigid orthosis and used to restrict spinal motion during running. Volunteers ran on a treadmill at 2.78 m/sec, under normal conditions and with spinal motion restricted. Oxygen consumption was assessed via a Douglas bag set-up. Separately, vertical movement of the center of mass was assessed with a Panasonic recorder.ResultsCasted running resulted in an increase in oxygen consumption (p 
       
  • Effects of Kinesio Taping on postural balance in patients with low back
           pain, a randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Rafaella Stradiotto Bernardelli, Eduardo Mendonça Scheeren, Alonso Romero Fuentes Filho, Paty Aparecida Pereira, Munir Antonio Gariba, Auristela Duarte de Lima Moser, Gerson Linck BichinhoAbstractPurpose: to identify postural balance changes in subjects with low back pain after the application of Kinesio Taping, which is then compared to a no treatment control group, using baropodometric evaluation. Methods: This randomized controlled trial was carried out on 50 individuals (both sexes) with chronic low back pain. They were then randomized into two groups: an experimental group - EG (treated with Kinesio Taping in the lumbar region) and a control group - CG (no intervention). Both groups underwent a baropodometric evaluation (mean plantar pressure, peak plantar pressure, plantar surface, mass distribution on right foot and left foot, mass distribution on forefoot and rear foot and base width) at four different moments: pre-intervention, 10 minutes, 48 hours, and 10 days after the intervention on the EG. The level of statistical significance was established at 5%. Results: Significant changes were observed in the EG compared to the CG. In the EG, peak pressure reduced on both right and left foot after Kinesio Taping application; the right base width was reduced, and the mass distribution between the forefoot and the rear foot normalized towards the ideal 50% distribution. These changes happened 48 hours after the Kinesio Taping application, with effects lasting up to 10 days. Conclusion: The use of Kinesio Taping in the lumbar region of subjects with chronic low back pain improved postural balance. This is proved by changes in peak plantar pressure, plantar surface, and mass distribution 48 h after Kinesio Taping application, with effects lasting up to 10 days.
       
  • The effect of combined exercise therapy on knee proprioception, pain
           intensity and quality of life in patients with hypermobility syndrome: A
           randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Mahnaz Daman, Farideh Shiravani, Ladan Hemmati, Shohreh TaghizadehAbstractObjectiveProprioception, the perception of limb movements and spatial orientation derived from body stimuli, plays a critical role in maintaining joint stability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of combined exercise therapy (closed kinetic chain exercises and proprioception exercises) on knee proprioception, pain intensity and quality of life in patients with hypermobility syndrome.DesignSingle-blind randomized clinical trial.SettingShiraz School of Rehabilitation Sciences.ParticipantsTwenty four patients with hypermobility syndrome.InterventionsThe patients were assigned to the control (no intervention) or intervention group (exercise therapy) by random allocation.MeasurementsKnee proprioception, pain intensity and quality of life were evaluated before and immediately after the intervention. Exercise sessions were held 3 days a week for 4 weeks.ResultsThe results showed that knee proprioception improved significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group. Quality of life increased, and knee pain intensity decreased significantly in the intervention group compared to the control group.ConclusionCombined exercise therapy can reduce pain intensity and increase knee proprioception and quality of life in patients with hypermobility syndrome.
       
  • The effect of traditional dysphagia therapy on the swallowing function in
           patients with Multiple Sclerosis: A pilot double-blinded randomized
           controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Maryam Tarameshlu, Leila Ghelichi, Amir Reza Azimi, Noureddin Nakhostin Ansari, Ahmad Reza KhatoonabadiAbstractBackgroundDysphagia is common following Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The current rehabilitation program to swallowing therapy is Traditional Dysphagia Therapy (TDT), but there is a dearth of evidence about its effectiveness in MS patients.ObjectivesThis study was aimed to determine the effects of the TDT on the swallowing function in MS patients with dysphagia.MethodsA pilot double blind randomized clinical trial was carried out on 20 patients with MS. Patients were randomly divided into experimental group (TDT) comprising sensorimotor exercises and swallowing maneuvers, and Usual Care (UC) comprising diet prescription and postural changes. Patients in both groups received treatments for 6 weeks, 18 treatment sessions, 3 times per week, every other day. The Mann Assessment of Swallowing Ability (MASA) was the main outcome measure. The swallowing ability was assessed before treatment (T0), after the end of 9th session (T1), after the end of 18th session (T2), and after 6 weeks follow-up (T3). Penetration–Aspiration Scale (PAS) and Pharyngeal Residue Rating Scale (PRRS) as secondary outcome measures were applied at T0 and T2.ResultsBoth groups had improved regarding MASA, PAS and PRRS scores over the time (P 
       
  • Perceptions of individuals with stroke regarding the use of a cane for
           walking: A qualitative study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Lucas R. Nascimento, Louise Ada, Gerdeany M. Rocha, Luci F. Teixeira-SalmelaAbstractIt is well known that clinical decisions, which include prescription of canes after stroke, should not only be based on biomechanical research. According to the principles of evidence-based medicine, patients' perceptions and preferences should also be investigated to help planning good clinical decisions. The purpose of this study was to comprehend how ambulatory people with stroke, naïve to the use of canes, perceive using a cane during walking. An exploratory, qualitative study was conducted. Twenty-four people, on average 6 years after a stroke, were included. Participants were categorized as slow (0.8 m/s), based on their baseline walking speed. Participants' spontaneous perceptions regarding the use of a cane were collected during a timed-walk test and analyzed, following standardized recommendations. The discourse of each participant was categorized into “positive perceptions” or “negative perceptions”. Overall, the nature of the perceptions was both positive (i.e., improvements of mobility and/or independence, and improvement of safety/balance and/or reduced risk of falls) and negative (i.e., social stigmatisms, and interference with use of the non-paretic upper limb). However, participants’ perceptions were diverse, depending on their walking ability. Participants categorized as slow walkers perceived the use of a cane as positive, but this positive perception decreased, as walking ability increased. The most positive perceptions came from individuals with severe and moderate walking limitations, who tended to believe that using a cane may be helpful for improving walking, safety, and promoting independence. Fast walkers provided negative perceptions, and may not choose to use canes for walking due to social stigmatisms or interference with use of the non-paretic upper limb.
       
  • The effect of aerobic exercises among women with mild and moderate
           irritable bowel syndrome: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Mozhgan Fani, Javid Mostamand, Maedeh Fani, Navid Chitsaz, Awat FeiziAbstractBackgroundIrritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by abdominal pain or discomfort. Although patients with IBS are commonly recommended to increase their physical activity, after reviewing the literature, it was found that no study has assessed the effect of aerobic exercises on the severity of symptoms and quality of life in patients with IBS. Therefore the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of aerobic exercises with treadmill on the severity of symptoms and quality of life among women with mild and moderate IBS.MethodsTwenty women with mild and moderate IBS were randomly assigned into two groups of treadmill exercise (10 participants) and control (10 participants). The treadmill group had six weeks (30 min, three sessions per week) of aerobic exercises on treadmill. The control group continued their usual daily activities.ResultsAfter six weeks of aerobic exercises on a treadmill a significant improvement was observed in the severity of IBS symptoms (p ≤ 0.001) and IBS quality of life (p = 0.001) in the treadmill group compared to the control group. Also in the treadmill group, the severity of symptoms and quality of life demonstrated a significant improvement after the intervention compared to before the intervention (p ≤ 0.001). No significant difference was observed in the severity of symptoms and quality of life in the control group before and after the study (p > 0.05).
       
  • The deficit reverse lunge
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Fred Duncan, Craig Liebenson
       
  • Leon Chaitow's legacy, a ‘light upon paths’
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Warrick McNeill, Matt Wallden, Craig Liebenson
       
  • Correlations between the Helkimo indices and the maximal mandibular
           excursion capacities of patients with temporomandibular joint disorders
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Victor Moreira Leamari, Alex de Freitas Rodrigues, Rubens Camino Junior, João Gualberto C. LuzAbstractTemporomandibular disorders (TMD) may present with diverse signs and symptoms, and one very significant is the limitation of mandibular movements. Additionally, the Helkimo indices allow for the reliable quantification of the signs and symptoms of TMD. The purpose of this study was to ascertain whether there are any correlations between the Helkimo indices and the maximal mandibular excursion capacity in a group of patients with TMD. Eighty patients (72 women and 8 men, mean age 33.6 years) with diagnosis of TMD according to the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) were evaluated to obtain the Helkimo indices and their maximal mandibular excursion capacities. Normal or decreased maximum mandibular movements, i.e., opening, lateral and protrusion were compared with the anamnestic index, muscular pain symptoms, joint pain symptoms and the dysfunction index. Chi-squared analysis was used to compare normal and decreased movement capacities in terms of the Helkimo indices, and the muscle and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain. The statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 19.0. There were statistically significant differences in the clinical dysfunction index with the maximum opening (p = .011) and lateral movements (p = .024) but not with the maximum protrusion. There were no significant differences in the anamnestic index or the muscle pain and TMJ pain items of the clinical dysfunction index according to the mandibular excursions. The occurrences of limitations in the maximum opening and lateral movements are indications of greater TMD intensity.
       
  • Computerized photogrammetric assessment of postural alignment in visually
           impaired athletes
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Raphael C.M. Pereira, Patrícia S. Vigário, Míriam R.M. Mainenti, Dalila T.R. Silva, Tatiana R.L. Lima, Thiago LemosAbstractObjectiveThe aim of the study was to provide a computerized photogrammetric description of the postural alignment of visually impaired athletes.MethodsTwenty-six athletes were evaluated. Athletes were asked to stand at easy with styrofoam balls placed on selected anatomical landmarks, and photographic images were acquired in four viewpoints. Postural Assessment Software (PAS/SAPO) was applied for image analysis. Body's angles and distances were calculated and transformed in absolute (nonnegative) values for analysis. Factor analysis was applied for data reduction.ResultsAbsolute values of PAS/SAPO variables resulted in lower coefficient of variation (CV) than raw values (average of 57% versus 500%, respectively), which potentially enhances the comparative use of these measures. Head's forward positioning and rightward inclination were among the most prevalent postural deviation, being observed in more than 70% of the athletes. With respect to the magnitude of the deviation, large variability was observed in data derived from anterior/posterior compared with lateral viewpoint. For instance, head's rightward inclination (head horizontal alignment in the anterior view) achieved 2.9 ± 2.5° (mean ± SD), with a CV of 86%, while head's forward positioning (C7 horizontal alignment in left viewpoint) reaches 42.7 ± 6.6°, with a CV of only 16%. Factor analysis did not result in significant data reduction, although anterior body's angles and distances were identified as important sources of data variability.ConclusionsThe PAS/SAPO values described here can be adopted as reference for future investigations of postural alignment in visually impaired athletes.
       
  • Reliability of sonography in the assessment of lumbar stabilizer muscles
           size in healthy subjects and patients with scoliosis
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Nahid Rahmani, Alireza Karimian, Mohammad Ali Mohseni-Bandpei, Seyyed Alireza BassampourAbstractObjectiveThe purpose of the present study was to compare the reliability of sonography in the evaluation of abdominal and multifidus muscles size between healthy subjects and patients with scoliosis.MethodsIn this study, 20 healthy males and 20 male patients with scoliosis (20–50 years old) were recruited. Multifidus and abdominal muscles (transversus abdominis, internal and external oblique) size were assessed by sonography. Three images were recorded; the first and second images were taken on the same day with an hour interval to evaluate within-day reliability, and the third image was taken one-week later to assess between-day reliability.ResultsIntraclass correlation coefficient (ICC = 0.82–0.91) demonstrated high within-day reliability of sonography in the assessment of abdominal muscle thickness in both groups. In addition, high between-day reliability was observed for these muscles in both healthy and patient groups (ICC = 0.80–0.89). Within-day and also between-day reliability of multifidus muscle were shown to be high in the healthy group (ICC = 0.81–0.88) and the patient group (ICC = 0.78–0.85). Overall, within-day reliability was higher than between-day reliability and also the reliability of sonography in healthy subjects was greater than of those suffering from scoliosis.ConclusionsAccording to the results, sonography was shown to be a highly reliable imaging technique for assessment of abdominal and multifidus muscle size in healthy males and those suffering from scoliosis.
       
  • Fascial manipulation vs. standard physical therapy practice for low back
           pain diagnoses: A pragmatic study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Brent Harper, Larry Steinbeck, Adrian AronAbstractBackgroundConnective tissue mobility alters motor unit recruitment, but the restoration of fascial mobility allows for optimal motor function. The Fascial Manipulation® (FM®) method is a multiplanar approach that assesses and treats the mobility of deep fascia in specific anatomical locations where motor units converge.ObjectivesTo assess the effects of FM® vs. standard physical therapy treatment (SPT) in patients with low back pain (LBP).DesignSix-months controlled clinical trial.Method102 participants with LBP received SPT or FM®. Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS), 15- point Global Rating of Change (GROC), and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were used to monitor progress.ResultsThe FM® group had a significantly lower ODI (p 
       
  • Fascia Net Plastination Project
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): John Sharkey
       
  • Report from the 5th International Fascia Research Congress,
           Berlin, Germany
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): John Sharkey
       
  • Findings from the frontiers of fascia research: Insights into ‘inner
           space’ and implications for health
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Susan Shockett, Thomas Findley
       
  • Notes from Berlin: The 2018 Fascia Research Congress
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Thomas Myers
       
  • Dry needling in chronic abdominal wall pain of uncertain origin
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Pandurangan Rajkannan, Rajagopalan VijayaraghavanAbstractBackgroundAbdominal wall pain is considered as pain that arises from the abdominal muscles rather than the underlying viscera or the spine. It is frequently overlooked and is often misdiagnosed, as these patients continue to suffer with pain. Many such patients would have even been subjected to a psychiatric evaluation in view of the absence of any ostensible clinical cause for the pain. In this study, we describe the role of myofascial trigger points in the abdominal wall pain that could be a cause of chronic pain and present our findings of pain relief by dry needling technique.ObjectivesTo report the effect of dry needling treatment for patients who suffer from chronic abdominal wall pain of uncertain etiology and in whom specific myofascial trigger points were identified.MethodsTwelve patients diagnosed with chronic abdominal wall pain were included in the study. All patients were clinically evaluated and subjected to a combination of imaging techniques. Once categorized as patients suffering from chronic abdominal wall pain, they were subjected to a thorough palpation of the abdominal wall to identify the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs) over the abdominal muscles. All had MTrPs over one or more abdominal muscles either unilaterally or bilaterally. Dry Needling using a standard technique was done based on the side and localization of the myofascial trigger points. Numerical pain rating scale (NPRS) was used to measure pain before and after treatment and at the end of four months. All patients were then seen by the primary clinician and re-evaluated.ResultsEleven out of twelve patients had significant reduction with a mean difference 5.95 in NPRS in their pain levels at four months follow up. Seven patients had complete resolution of the pain. Some patients had improvement in complaints such as Dysmenorrhea, Urinary Frequency and constipation.ConclusionDry Needling can be a useful adjunct in treating chronic abdominal wall pain especially in those patients in whom Myofascial Trigger Points in the muscles of abdomen are identified by palpation.Level of evidenceLevel 4.
       
  • Dry needling versus friction massage to treat tension type headache:
           A randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Fahimeh Kamali, Marzieh Mohamadi, Leila Fakheri, Fatemeh MohammadnejadAbstractTension type headache (TTH), the most common type of headache, is known to be associated with myofascial pain syndrome and the existence of myofascial trigger points. There are several treatment options for myofascial trigger points. In this study we compared the effectiveness of dry needling and friction massage to treat patients with TTH.A convenience sample of 44 patients with TTH participated in this randomized clinical trial. The frequency and intensity of headache, pressure pain threshold at the trigger point site, and cervical range of motion were recorded. Then the participants were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups for dry needling or friction massage, delivered in 3 sessions during 1 week. The participants were evaluated 48 h after the last treatment session. Analysis of covariance, paired t-test and Wilcoxon's test were used for statistical analysis.The results showed that both treatment methods significantly reduced headache frequency and intensity, and increased pain threshold at the trigger points. However, neither treatment had any effect on cervical range of motion except for extension, which increased in the dry needling group. Between-group comparisons showed that dry needling increased pain threshold significantly more than friction massage. There were no significant differences between groups in any other outcome variables.Dry needling and friction massage were equally effective in improving symptoms in patients with TTH. The decreases in frequency and intensity of headache were similar after both dry needing and friction massage.
       
  • The effects of dry needling and radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy on
           latent trigger point sensitivity in the quadriceps: A randomised control
           pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Richie Walsh, Sharon Kinsella, Johnson McEvoyAbstractObjectivesLatent myofascial trigger points (TrP) can alter joint kinematics, reduce strength and alter activation patterns, affecting athletic performance. TrP sensitivity can be measured with the pressure pain threshold (PPT). Dry needling (DN) has been used to treat latent TrPs, but may cause post-needling soreness. Radial extracorporeal shockwave therapy (rESWT) could be used as an alternative to DN during heavy training or competition.MethodsAfter baseline measures, 21 recreational athletes were split into three groups: DN, rESWT or control group, and were treated for three sessions in one week. Follow-up outcome sessions were conducted two to four and seven days after the last treatment. TrP sensitivity was measured using the PPT.ResultsThere was a groupXtime interaction for the PPT (p 
       
  • Immediate biomechanical, systemic, and interoceptive effects of myofascial
           release on the thoracic spine: A randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Ellie Cathcart, Terence McSweeney, Ross Johnston, Hayley Young, Darren J. EdwardsAbstractBackgroundMyofascial release (MFR) is used to restore tissue extensibility of the fascia tissue and is considered to be useful in a number of clinical settings such as low back pain, ankle injuries, fibromyalgia, and headaches. There is, however, despite the popularity of MFR in manual therapy, little consensus on whether it leads to biomechanical, systemic or interoceptive outcomes.AimsThis study aimed to explore the immediate biomechanical (increased elasticity for increased range of motion), systemic (local vs. distal areas of pain threshold) and bodily awareness effects (interoception) of a myofascial release technique on the thoracic spine.MethodTwelve healthy participants took part in this triple-bind, repeated measures, cross-over design study, and were randomised into counterbalanced sequences of three conditions; a control, a sham, and the MFR condition. The outcome measures used were; range of motion (ROM), pain pressure thresholds (PPT), and interoceptive sensitivity (IS) to assess biomechanical, systemic, and interoceptive effects of MFR.ResultsThere were significant increases in ROM and PPT (both local and distal) post MFR intervention. There was also a positive correlation between baseline interoceptive sensitivity and post-MFR ROM and a negative correlation for baseline interoceptive sensitivity and post-MRF PPT. Interoceptive sensitivity did increase post-MFR but this was non-significant.ConclusionsThe increase in ROM suggests that the MFR may have caused a biomechanical change in tissue elasticity creating an increase in tissue flexibility. The increase in both local and distal sites of the PPT suggest an overall systemic response to the therapy. The correlation between baseline IS and post-MFR ROM and PPT suggest that IS may be usefully applied as a predictor for ROM and PPT post-MFR.
       
  • A critical overview of the current myofascial pain
           literature – November 2018
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Jan Dommerholt, Todd Hooks, Li-Wei Chou, Michelle FinneganAbstractThis is the first issue of this review column since the passing of Dr. Leon Chaitow. We would like to take a brief moment to acknowledge how much his mentorship, friendship, and confidence have meant to us. Leon was a force in osteopathic and naturopathic medicine and his influence reaches to all corners of the musculoskeletal realm crossing over many disciplines through his lectures, workshops, and of course, his many books, editorials, and articles. In the foreword to one of his books, Jan Dommerholt wrote that “Leon Chaitow […] continued the work of Travell and Simons, but also of many others, whose contributions he has skillfully woven into an intricate tapestry of clinical pearls, practical tips, and solid evidence-informed research.” Dr. Chaitow was a synthesizer, who always considered what different clinicians and researchers could possibly contribute to a better understanding of pain and dysfunction and provide real solutions to real problems. Even when he would not necessarily agree with all suggested remedies, he maintained an open mind and was able to take a step back and consider the bigger picture. For example, Leon was not a big fan of dry needling, yet, he valued the importance of this approach and encouraged the inclusion of dry needling papers in this review article and in his journal. The Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies became his baby and, considering the growth of the journal, there is no question that Leon's intense focus and efforts are appreciated by many around the globe. We wish to extend our condolences to Leon's wife Alkmini and daughter Sasha. He will surely be missed, but we can find peace in knowing that his legacy will stay with us forever.In this issue, we have included several basic myofascial pain research articles. As usual, dry needling (DN) studies and case reports are the most commonly referenced papers, but we also included neuroscience and electromyography studies, sleep studies, interrater reliability studies, and case reports of adverse events.
       
  • Comparison of muscular activities between subjects with and without
           scapular downward rotation impairment during diagonal pattern of exercises
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Se-Yeon Park, Du-Jin ParkAbstractBackgroundsOne form of abnormal scapular alignment is scapular downward rotation (SDR). Changes in muscle function in SDR have not been clearly identified, and SDR exercises also require investigation. Although a diagonal pattern of exercise is commonly used as part of the exercise protocol, a direct comparison of shoulder and scapular diagonal exercises has not yet been conducted. The objectives of this study were to determine the altered activation of the scapular musculature in the SDR group and to investigate which diagonal pattern of exercise effectively activates the scapular musculature.MethodsThirty-two participants (18 in the control group and 14 in the SDR group) volunteered to participate in this study. Electromyographic signals were collected from four muscles, the upper trapezius (UT), lower trapezius (LT), serratus anterior (SA), and anterior deltoid (AD), during standing performance of diagonal shoulder and scapular exercises.ResultsThe control group showed significantly lower UT activity, UT/LT ratio, and UT/SA values than the SDR group (p 
       
  • Electromyographic activity of the hip and knee muscles during functional
           tasks in males with and without patellofemoral pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Gholam Hassan Mirzaie, Abbas Rahimi, Mehrnaz Kajbafvala, Farideh Dehghan Manshadi, Khosro Khademi Kalantari, Ahmad SaideeAbstractBackgroundPatellofemoral pain (PFP) is a common overuse injury in physically active individuals. It is characterized by anterior knee, retropatellar, or prepatellar pain associated with activities that increase patellofemoral joint stress such as squatting, stair ascending and descending, running, jumping, prolonged sitting, and kneeling. The etiology of PFP is believed to be multifactorial. Recently, proximal factors have been shown to influence the biomechanics of patellofemoral joint.ObjectiveThe aim of the study was to assess hip and knee muscle activity during single leg stance and single leg squat in males with PFP and a control group without PFP.MethodsEighteen males with PFP (age 24.2 ± 4.4 years) and 18 healthy subjects as controls (age 23.5 ± 3.8 years) were included. We evaluated gluteus medius, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis oblique (VMO), and vastus lateralis (VL) electromyographic (EMG) activity. The muscle activity and reaction time of the proposed muscles were assessed during single leg stance and single leg squat tasks. Independent t-test was used to identify significant differences between PFP and control groups.ResultsNo difference in activity of the gluteus maximus muscle was found in either task (p > 0.5). Significant differences were found in activity of gluteus medius and VMO in both tasks (p  0.5).ConclusionMales with PFP demonstrated altered gluteus medius, VMO, and VL muscle activity during single leg stance and single leg squat compared to healthy subjects. Gluteus maximus activity did not show any changes between groups. Moreover, muscle recruitment patterns were different between PFP and healthy groups.
       
  • Using first bout effect to study the mechanisms underlying eccentric
           exercise induced force loss
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Orawan Prasartwuth, Roongtip Suteebut, Jitapa Chawawisuttikool, Utku S. Yavuz, Kemal S. TurkerAbstractIntroductionThe first bout of eccentric exercise is known to have a protective effect on the consequent bouts. This effect is still disputable as it is not known whether it protects muscle damage by reducing force production or by improving force recovery in the healing process. The underlying mechanisms of this protective effect have not been fully understood.ObjectivesTo determine the mechanisms of this protective effect, three different loads were used for the first eccentric bout. This was done to investigate whether the protective effect is related to the size of the load in the first bout. To determine the neural adaptations, voluntary activation was assessed and to determine the muscular adaptations, the resting twitch was measured.MethodThirty healthy participants were selectively allocated into three groups (low-, moderate- and high-load group) to match for maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) (n = 10 per group). Participants in each group performed only one of the three sets of ten eccentric (ECC) exercises of the elbow flexors (10%, 20% and 40% of MVC) as their first eccentric bout. The second bout of eccentric exercise was performed two weeks later and was identical for all the three groups, i.e., 40% ECC.ResultsThe results showed that for the first bout, MVC, voluntary activation and the resting twitch displayed significant (p 
       
  • Analysis of the electromiographic activity of lower limb and motor
           function in hippotherapy practitioners with cerebral palsy
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Mariane Fernandes Ribeiro, Ana Paula Espindula, Janaine Brandão Lage, Domingos Emanuel Bevilacqua Júnior, Luanna Honorato Diniz, Ednéia Corrêa de Mello, Alex Abadio Ferreira, Mara Lúcia Fonseca Ferraz, Vicente de Paula Antunes TeixeiraAbstractObjectiveInvestigation of the effects of hippotherapy treatment on lower limb muscle activity and gross motor function in subjects with cerebral palsy (CP), comparing them to a group of subjects with adequate motor development.MethodsEvaluation was made of seven individuals with spastic diparetic CP, average age 9.3 (±3.3) years (CP group), Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) levels I and II, and eight individuals with adequate motor development, average age 10.9 (±3.2) years (control group). The groups were submitted to 25 sessions of hippotherapy, each lasting 30 min, on a weekly basis, and the muscle activity of the lower limbs was evaluated using surface electromyography during the 1st, 10th, 20th, and 25th sessions. For the CP group, Gross Motor Function Measurement (GMFM-88) was performed before and after hippotherapy treatment.ResultsThere was higher muscle activity in the 10th session, compared to the other sessions, with greater activity of the tibialis anterior muscles, for both groups studied. After treatment, the CP group showed significant improvement in the GMFM total score, and in the scores for dimensions D and E.ConclusionHippotherapy sessions improved the muscle responses in both groups, and improved the gross motor function of the subjects with CP.
       
  • Development of a multivariate model of the six-minute walked distance to
           predict functional exercise capacity in hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Rodrigo de Assis Ramos, Fernando Silva Guimarães, Yannis Dionyssiotis, Dorothea Tsekoura, Jannis Papathanasiou, Arthur de Sá FerreiraAbstractBackgroundHypertension is associated with deterioration of musculoskeletal function and functional capacity. Existing prediction models for assessment of the 6-min walk test (6MWT) do not capture the disease-related functional capacity. This study developed a multivariate prediction model of the measured 6-min walked distance (6MWDM) in hypertension and proposed target-values based on optimal therapeutic aims.MethodsSeventy-six patients (38 men, 56.1 ± 14.3 years, systolic pressure 156.7 ± 17.5 mmHg, diastolic pressure 92.9 ± 6.9 mmHg) underwent anamnesis, physical examination, and laboratory analysis. Functional capacity was assessed using the 6MWT, being the 6MWDM considered as the dependent variable. Independent variables included sex (S, coded ‘male’ = 1, ‘female’ = 0), age (A), body height (H), body mass, mean blood pressure (MBP), and physical activity (IPAQ, coded 1–5). Target-values were derived from theoretical scenarios of optimal blood pressure and physical activity, separately and combined.ResultsPatients walked 324.5 ± 10.1 m in the average of two trials 30-min apart. Pearson's correlation coefficient showed moderate-to-weak significant associations between 6MWDM and all independent variables. The final multivariate model was 6MWDP = 611.347–4.446 × MBP + 267.630 × H – 1.511 × A + IPAQcode + Scode (adjusted R2 = 0.680, SE of bias = 6.3 m), suggesting that clinical, anthropometric, and hemodynamic information determines functional capacity. Predicted values yielded a group-average of 325 ± 87 m. Target-values under the optimal scenario resulted in 420 ± 60 m.ConclusionsSex (men), higher body height, higher physical activity, lower mean blood pressure, and lower age are independently correlated with higher 6MWDM in patients with hypertension. Target-values can be estimated for therapeutic aims related to hemodynamics and lifestyle.
       
  • A descriptive analysis of shoulder muscle activities during individual
           stages of the Turkish Get-Up exercise
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Eric St-Onge, Andrew Robb, Tyson A.C. Beach, Samuel J. HowarthAbstractThe Turkish Get-Up (TGU) is a complex and multi-planar exercise; the performer begins in a supine lying position, progresses toward upright standing through a series of 7 stages while holding a mass overhead in one hand, and returns to the original supine lying position through a reversal of the same 7 stages. A descriptive analysis of shoulder muscle activity during the TGU may provide insight toward its use in training and rehabilitation contexts. Our objectives were to: (1) describe the activity patterns from a subset of muscles that span the glenohumeral joint during individual stages of the TGU, and (2) interpret these patterns through comparisons between left- and right-side muscles, and between the up and down phases of the TGU. Twelve individuals with at least one-year experience performing the TGU were included in this study. Surface electromyographic (EMG) recordings were bilaterally obtained from 8 glenohumeral muscle groups while participants performed ten trials of the TGU with a kettlebell in their right hand. Instants representing the start and end of each TGU stage were identified from a synchronized video for each trial, and EMG activities for each muscle were integrated over the duration of each stage. Average integrated EMG and within-participant coefficients of variation were calculated. Overall, the greatest muscular demand occurred during the second (press to elbow support) and fifth (leg sweep) stages. Activities from muscles on the ipsilateral side to the kettlebell (right-side) were greater during stages when the contralateral upper limb did not contribute to supporting the body; however, contralateral (left-side) muscles were invoked during stages when the non-kettlebell-bearing forearm or hand contributed to supporting the body. The results suggest the importance of training both phases of the TGU to gain the most benefit from the exercise and highlights the asymmetric nature of the exercise, which may be particularly relevant for athletes engaged in activities with rotational demands.
       
  • Immediate effects and one-week follow-up after neuromuscular electric
           stimulation alone or combined with stretching on hamstrings extensibility
           in healthy football players with hamstring shortening
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Luis Espejo-Antúnez, María Carracedo-Rodríguez, Fernando Ribeiro, João Venâncio, Blanca De la Cruz-Torres, Manuel Albornoz-CabelloAbstractObjectiveTo assess the immediate and mid-term (after 7 days) effects of electric current combined with simultaneous muscle stretching (EME technique) per comparison to the isolated use of the same current (without applying simultaneous muscle stretching), over the hamstring extensibility in football players with hamstring shortening, and to estimate the clinical benefit of the interventions according to the muscular extensibility.MethodsForty-eight participants were randomized to receive one session of EME technique (n = 26) or one session of the electrical current (EC) alone (n = 22). The measurement of the hamstrings extensibility through the active knee test was carried out before and immediately after each intervention and one week later.ResultsA significant interaction group x time was observed (F2,84 = 7.112, p = 0.001; partial eta squared = 0.145). The hamstrings extensibility changed significantly immediately after the EME technique (147.3° ± 16.4° to 153.5° ± 14.2°, p  0.05). One week after the intervention no significant differences were found to the baseline values in both groups. The number needed to treat to prevent one new case of hamstring shortening was 3.ConclusionThe combination of electric current with simultaneous stretching is an effective technique to acutely increase the hamstring extensibility of football players with hamstring shortness.
       
  • Regarding: Update on fascial nomenclature - An additional proposal by John
           Sharkey MSc, Clinical Anatomist
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Robert Schleip, Sue Adstrum, Gil Hedley, Carla Stecco, Can A. Yucesoy
       
  • Regarding: Update on fascial nomenclature-an additional proposal by John
           Sharkey MSc, Clinical Anatomist
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): John Sharkey
       
  • Corrigendum to ‘Reliability of digital photography for assessing lower
           extremity alignment in individuals with flatfeet and normal feet types’
           [J. Bodyw. Mov. Ther. 21 (2017) 704–710]
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Zinat Ashnagar, Mohammad Reza Hadian, Gholamreza Olyaei, Saeed Talebian Moghadam, Asghar Rezasoltani, Hassan Saeedi, Mir Saeed Yekaninejad, Rahimeh Mahmoodi
       
  • We shall not cease from exploration
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Sasha Chaitow
       
  • A new era for the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Jerrilyn Cambron
       
  • Immediate effects of kinesio taping on pain and postural stability in
           patients with chronic low back pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Seyda Toprak Celenay, Derya Ozer KayaAbstractObjectivePostural control of patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) is usually impaired. Effects of treatment applications on postural stability have not been well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate effects of kinesio taping on pain and postural stability in patients with CLBP.MethodsOne hundred and one patients with CLBP (age: 53.00 (10.69) years, body mass index (BMI): 31.52 (5.57) kg/m2) were included in this study. Kinesio taping was applied on paravertebral muscles and sacrum with muscle and ligament techniques. Postural stability was assessed with Biodex Balance System® (USA) both at static and dynamic mode in bilateral standing position. The base was set “static” for static mode, and set between“12-1” for dynamic mode. Pain intensity was evaluated with the pain section (0–5 points) of Oswestry Disability Index, including ten items (pain, personal care, lifting, walking, sitting, standing, sleeping, sex life, social life, travelling), pre- and post-application.ResultsThe static overall (pre: 1.49 (1.15), post: 1.25 (1.11)) and antero-posterior (pre: 0.96 (0.86), post: 0.74 (0.59)), dynamic overall (pre: 3.12 (2.26), post: 2.73 (2.44)) and medio-lateral postural sway scores (pre: 1.62 (1.12), post: 1.24 (0.75)), and pain (pre: 2.00 (0.00–5.00), post: 1.00 (0.00–4.00)) decreased after the application (p  .05).ConclusionsKinesio taping may immediately improve postural stability and decrease pain of patients with CLBP.
       
  • Predictors of functional improvement in people with chronic low back pain
           following a graded Pilates-based exercise programme
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Leyla Baillie, Catherine J. Bacon, Claire M. Hewitt, Robert W. MoranAbstractBackgroundSeveral studies have investigated subgroups of patients with low back pain (LBP) most likely to benefit from Pilates or movement control exercises, but none have determined prognostic factors specifically for chronic LBP. This prospective cohort study aimed to determine predictors of change in disability in people with chronic LBP following a Pilates-based exercise programme and reports summarised integrated prediction statistics to aid clinical utility for determination of subgroups likely to benefit or not benefit from treatment.MethodsHealthy adults (n = 55) with non-specific chronic LBP undertook a graded 6-week programme involving two 1-hour Pilates sessions/week (1 mat and 1 equipment-based) led in small groups by a trained Pilates instructor. Predictors of change in Patient-Specific Functional Scale (PSFS) were identified through regression analysis and used to develop clinical prediction statistics.ResultsClinically important improvement (n = 14 of 48 analysed) was predicted by four variables: gradual rather than sudden onset of LBP, PSFS 24.5 kg/m2. Presence of ≥3 improved probability of success from 29% to 73%. Failure to improve (n = 18) was predicted by three variables: sudden onset of low back pain, patient-specific functional score ≥3.7, and difference between left and right active straight leg raise>7°. Presence of all three increased probability of failure from 38% to 80%.ConclusionsA combination of five, easily measured variables were able to predict disability outcome following a graded programme of Pilates-based exercises in people with chronic LBP. Two common movement deficits were inversely related to positive changes in function which may call into question the structural mechanism of improvements observed.Trial RegistrationAustralian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12616001588482
       
  • Joint mobilization and static stretching for individuals with chronic
           ankle instability – A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Chase M. Feldbrugge, Megan M. Pathoomvanh, Cameron J. Powden, Matthew C. HochAbstractObjectiveTo complete preliminary analysis regarding the effects joint mobilization timing during a 4-week calf stretching intervention on clinician-oriented and patient-oriented outcomes in individuals with chronic ankle instability (CAI). Additionally, a secondary objective was to examine the combined effect of joint mobilization and calf stretching.DesignRandomized two-group pretest posttest design.SettingLaboratory.ParticipantsTen adults (age = 24.4 ± 4.7years; height = 172.1 ± 11.3 cm; weight = 76.2 ± 17.1 kg) with self-reported CAI participated.InterventionsParticipants completed outcome measures at three collection sessions (baseline, pre-intervention, and post-intervention). Participants were randomized into either into an early-mobilization or late-mobilization group in which they completed a joint mobilization intervention during the first or last 2 weeks of a 4-week calf stretching intervention.Main outcome measuresOutcome measures included: dorsiflexion ROM, dynamic postural control, single-limb postural control, Disablement in the Physically Active Scale (DPA), Foot and Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM), and Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ). Wilcoxon Sign Rank Tests examined pre-intervention to post-intervention differences for each dependent variable. Mann-Whitney U tests examined differences between early-mobilization and late-mobilization groups. Alpha was set a priori at p  .095). FAAM-Activities of Daily Living, DPA, FABQ-Physical Activity, and dorsiflexion ROM were significantly improved at post-intervention compared to pre-intervention (p  .057).ConclusionPreliminarily results suggest the timing of joint mobilization when used in conjunction with calf stretching does not effect treatment efficacy. However, the combination of joint mobilization and calf stretching can improve dorsiflexion ROM and self-reported function in individuals with CAI. Improvements from the combined intervention are similar to previously reported effects of isolated joint mobilization or stretching.
       
  • Therapeutic heat and cold around the elbow on the response of median
           neurodynamic test 1
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Winora Conchita Gomes, Kavitha Vishal, Ganesh BalthillayaAbstractObjectiveTo compare the effects of the application of therapeutic heat and cold on the mechanical response of the median nerve neurodynamic testing.DesignSingle-blinded randomized crossover trial.Methodology56 asymptomatic university students (mean age = 21.82 ± 1.64 years) of either gender with a limited elbow extension range of motion during a Median Neurodynamic Test 1 were recruited. Each subject was administered 3 testing conditions on separate days with a 24-hr washout period. The interventions included 1) therapeutic moist heat around the elbow, 2) therapeutic cold around the elbow and 3) no thermal agent as a controlled condition. Outcome measure of elbow extension range of motion at the onset of pain and submaximal pain were recorded before the intervention, immediately after the removal of the thermal agents (20th min) and at 2 subsequent readings of 30 min and 1 hour after the removal of the thermal agent.ResultsThere was a significant effect of using a thermal agent with time on the elbow range of motion at the onset of pain [F(2,165) = 3.622, p = 0.029] and submaximal pain[F(2,165) = 3.841, p = 0.023] at the 20th min. A posthoc comparison indicated that at the 20th min the mean elbow range at the onset of pain and submaximal pain for the therapeutic heat condition (mean = 33.5, S.D = 13.37 and mean = 16.80, S.D = 12.99 respectively) was significantly different than the no thermal agent condition (mean = 40.17, S.D = 12.34 and mean = 23.4, S.D = 13.82 respectively). However, therapeutic cold condition did not significantly differ from both the other conditions.ConclusionTherapeutic heat causes an immediate increase in elbow extension range of motion during a Median Neurodynamic Test1 and testing post the application of thermal agents can alter the test response.
       
  • Comparison of manipulation and stabilization exercises in patients with
           sacroiliac joint dysfunction patients: A randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: January 2019Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 23, Issue 1Author(s): Fahimeh Kamali, Mehdi Zamanlou, Ali Ghanbari, Abbass Alipour, Soha BervisAbstractBackgroundManual therapy and exercise therapy are two common treatments for low back pain. Although their effects have been discussed in several studies, the superiority of one over the other for patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction is still unclear.ObjectivesThe aim of this study was to compare the effects of manipulation (M) and stabilization exercises (S) in patients with subacute or chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction.MethodsThe participants in this randomized controlled trial study were patients with subacute or chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction for more than 4 weeks and less than 1 year. A total of 40 patients were randomized with a minimization method to the M (n = 20) or S (n = 20) group; 15 patients in each group received treatment. The treatment program lasted 2 week in group M and 4 weeks in group S. Pain and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were recorded before and immediately after the treatment period.ResultsBoth groups showed significant improvement in assessed pain and ODI (P  0.05).ConclusionsDespite the improvements seen after both manipulation and stabilization exercise therapies in patients with sacroiliac joint dysfunction, there was no significant between-group difference in the treatment effects. This result suggests that neither manual therapy nor stabilization exercise therapy is superior for treating subacute or chronic sacroiliac joint dysfunction.
       
  • The addition of neurodynamic exercises to extension-oriented exercises
           among patients with chronic back-related leg pain: A study protocol
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 November 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Luis F. Sousa Filho, Marta M. Barbosa Santos, Jader P. de Farias Neto, Walderi M. da Silva JuniorAbstractBackgroundPatients with back-related leg pain exhibit nociceptive and neuropathic characteristics. Few studies have investigated the combination of interventions considering these characteristics.ObjectivesTo investigate if the addition of neurodynamic exercises (EEN) to extension-oriented exercises (EE) promotes additional benefits in individuals with back-related leg pain and a directional preference.MethodsPatients will be randomized to either EE or EEN. Patients from both groups will receive 7 sessions over 3 weeks. Low back and leg pain, function, quality of life, disability, and global perceived effect will be evaluated at baseline, 3 weeks after randomization and 1-month follow-up. A linear mixed model will be used for outcomes analysis.
       
  • Impact of yoga on psychopathologies and quality of life in persons with
           HIV: A randomized controlled study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 27 October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Asha Kuloor, Sony Kumari, Kashinath MetriAbstractBackgroundEvidence suggests that individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often exhibit poor physical and mental health, which contributes to a reduced Quality of Life (QoL). Yoga is a form of alternative therapy that has positive influences on general health and QoL.ObjectivesThis study examined the effects of yoga on i) anxiety, depression, and psychological well-being and ii) QoL among individuals with an HIV positive status.MethodologySixty individuals with HIV-positive (aged 30–50 years) from rehabilitation centres across Bangalore were randomly assigned to the yoga intervention group (n = 30; 11 men) or the wait-listed control group (n = 30; 10 men). Participants in the yoga group underwent 8 weeks of intense yoga practice performed an hour a day for 5 days a week. The yoga practice consisted of physical postures, breathing practices, relaxation techniques, and meditation. Participants in the wait-listed control group followed their normal routine. Anxiety, fatigue, depression, and QoL were assessed twice for all subjects in each group – once at the start of the study to establish a baseline and once more at the end of the 2-month study period to assess any changes. Data analysis was performed on the assessments using SPSS software version 10.ResultsBetween group analysis demonstrated that a significantly different reduction in anxiety (p 
       
  • The management of shoulder impingement and related disorders:
           A systematic review on diagnostic accuracy of physical tests and manual
           therapy efficacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Tiziano Innocenti, Diego Ristori, Simone Miele, Marco TestaAbstractBackgroundDiagnostic accuracy of physical tests and effectiveness of musculoskeletal rehabilitation of shoulder disorders are still debated.ObjectivesTo investigate diagnostic accuracy of physical tests, efficacy of physiotherapy and coherence between target of assessment and intervention for shoulder impingement and related disorders like bursitis, rotator cuff and long head biceps tendinopathy and labral lesions.MethodsA systematic search of four databases was conducted, including RCTs and cross-sectional studies. Cochrane Risk of Bias and QUADAS-2 were adopted for critical appraisal and a narrative synthesis was undertaken.Results6 RCTs and 2 cross-sectional studies were appraised. Studies presented low to moderate risk of bias. There is a lack of evidence to support the mechanical construct guiding the choice of physical tests for diagnosis of impingement. Manual techniques appear to yield better results than placebo and ultrasounds, but not better than exercise therapy alone. Discrepancy between the goal of assessment strategies and the relative proposed treatments were present together with high heterogeneity in terms of selection of patients, type of endpoints and follow-ups.ConclusionsMusculoskeletal physiotherapy seems to be an effective treatment for patients with shoulder pain although it is still based on weak diagnostic clinical instruments. The adoption of more functional and prognostic assessment strategies is advisable to improve coherence between evaluation and treatment.
       
  • Walking meditation promotes ankle proprioception and balance performance
           among elderly women
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 25 October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Apsornsawan Chatutain, Jindarut Pattana, Tunyakarn Parinsarum, Saitida LapanantasinAbstractBackgroundAge-related change of proprioception affects body balance among the elderly. Walking meditation (WM)—a mindfulness practice—involves focusing on leg movements while walking slowly, possibly improving brain processes for perception and balance adjustments. This study investigates the WM's effects on ankle proprioception and balance among the elderly.MethodsFifty-eight women aged 69.25 ± 6.06 were randomized into control (n = 29) and WM (n = 29) groups. The WM group engaged in 8 weeks of WM practice (30 min/day, 3 days/week). The absolute angular error of the ankle reposition test (AAE) was measured by an electrogoniometer. The balance performance was evaluated using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Functional Reach Test (FRT), and Timed Up and Go test (TUG). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc test and BBS with nonparametric statistics.ResultsAt baseline, the WM group's AAE, BBS, FRT, and TUG were 4.2 ± 1.6°, 51.3 ± 4.1 points, 21.7 ± 5.7 cm, and 11.1 ± 2.5 s, respectively, whereas those of the control group were 3.6 ± 2.0°, 51.0 ± 5.0 points, 21.6 ± 5.2 cm, and 10.2 ± 3.1 s, respectively. Post-training, WM group showed significant decrease in AAE (2.4 ± 0.9°) and displayed improvements in BBS, FRT, and TUG (55.4 ± 0.9 points, 29.1 ± 5.8 cm, and 8.1 ± 1.1 s, respectively) (p 
       
  • Injury in yoga asana practice: Assessment of the risks
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 24 October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement TherapiesAuthor(s): Christine Wiese, David Keil, Anne S. Rasmussen, Rikke OlesenAbstractBackgroundThe risk of injury from modern yoga asana practice is poorly characterized in the scientific literature, but anecdotal reports in the lay literature and press have posed questions about the possibility of frequent, severe injuries.DesignWe performed a cross-sectional survey of yoga asana participants assessing their experience with yoga-related injury, using a voluntary convenience sample.ResultsA total of 2620 participants responded to our survey. Seventy-nine percent were between ages 31 and 60 and 84% were female. The majority of respondents lived in North America or Europe. Forty-five percent of participants reported experiencing no injuries during the time they had been practicing yoga. Of those who did experience an injury from asana practice, 28% were mild (e.g., sprains or nonspecific pains not requiring a medical procedure, with symptoms lasting less than 6 months) and 63% were moderate (e.g., sprains or nonspecific pains not requiring a medical procedure, with symptoms lasting from 6 months to 1 year). Only 9% of those reporting injuries (4% of the total sample) had a severe injury. The strongest predictors for increased probability of reporting an injury over a lifetime of yoga practice were greater number of years of practice (p 
       
  • New applications of fascial findings in high-performance human movement
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Matt Wallden
       
  • Sub occipital myofascial release technique for the treatment of
           cervicogenic headache
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Amir Massoud Arab, Ebrahim Ramezani
       
  • Anisotropic elastic properties of the fascia lata during muscle
           contraction at different intensities - a shear wave elastography study
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Shun Otsuka, Xiyao Shan, Yasuo Kawakami
       
  • Biceps brachii fascia movement during eccentric muscle contractions of the
           elbow flexors in relation to muscle damage
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Wing Yin Lau, Kazunori Nosaka
       
  • Increases in biceps brachii fascia thickness after eccentric exercise of
           the elbow flexors
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Kazunori Nosaka, Wing Yin Lau
       
  • Improvement of functional ankle properties following supplementation with
           specific collagen peptides in athletes with chronic ankle instability
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Patrick Dressler, Dominic Gehring, Denise Zdzieblik, Steffen Oesser, Albert Gollhofer, Daniel König
       
  • Results of osteopathic treatment of patients with paroxysmal atrial
           fibrillation
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Anastasia Tabina, Ekaterina Leleka, Dr. Kirill Mazalskiy
       
  • A case study of fascial manipulation method as a treatment for pain,
           atrophy, and skin depigmentation after pes anserine bursa corticosteroid
           injection
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Andrew Creighton, Antonio Stecco, Amy Whitelaw, Daniel Probst, Devyani Hunt
       
  • Influence of fascial manipulation on range of motion, pain, and functions
           in individuals with chronic shoulder pain
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Prabu Raja, Shruti Poojary
       
  • Myofascial release improves pain and disability in non-specific chronic
           low back pain: A randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Volume 22, Issue 4Author(s): Maria Dolores Arguisuelas Martinez, Juan Francisco Lisón Párraga, Daniel Sánchez Zuriaga, Isabel Martinez-Hurtado, Julio Doménech Fernández
       
 
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