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  Subjects -> ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (Total: 111 journals)
Showing 1 - 15 of 15 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Acupuncture in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Advanced Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Alternative & Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Alternative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alternative Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arabian Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arteterapia. Papeles de arteterapia y educación artística para la inclusión social     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Plant Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletín Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Plantas Medicinales y Aromáticas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanics : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Naturologia e Terapias Complementares     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Herbal Medicines     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cognitive Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Complementary Therapies in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Current Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Deutsche Heilpraktiker-Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Erfahrungsheilkunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Medicinal Plants     Open Access  
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Global Journal of Integrated Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Traditional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herba Polonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herbal Medicines Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Innovare Journal of Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of High Dilution Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ipnosi     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Acupuncture and Herbs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asian Natural Products Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Fasting and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ginseng Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Drugs (An International Journal on Medicinal Herbs)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Herbal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Integrative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinally Active Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Remedies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Lekovite Sirovine     Open Access  
Médecine Palliative : Soins de Support - Accompagnement - Éthique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Acupuncture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mersin Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Lokman Hekim Tıp Tarihi ve Folklorik Tıp Dergisi     Open Access  
Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research     Open Access  
Natural solutions     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Medicinal Plant     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Plantas Medicinais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Acupuntura     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Traditional & Kampo Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Traditional Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Journal of Acupuncture - Moxibustion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Orthomolekulare Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.355
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 1  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 2214-7861 - ISSN (Online) 2214-7861
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • APPLICATION OF 1H-NMR BASED METABOLITE FINGERPRINTING AND CHEMOMETRICS FOR
           AUTHENTICATION OF Curcuma longa ADULTERATED WITH C. heyneana
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic PlantsAuthor(s): Anjar Windarsih, Abdul Rohman, Respati Tri SwasonoAbstractCurcuma longa is known to have many pharmacological activities. This rhizome has the rich content in curcuminoids which curcumin is the main active component. It is important to ensure the authenticity of C. longa to avoid adulteration because it is related to the quality, efficacy, and safety of the products. Other Curcuma species such as C. heyneana have the potential to be used as adulterant because of its lower price, its strong yellow color, and its wide availability. In this study, thin layer chromatography (TLC) method was used to determine curcumin content in pure and adulterated powder of C. longa with C. heyneana. Spectroscopy proton-nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) based metabolite fingerprinting and chemometrics were employed to distinguish pure and adulterated powder of C. longa with C. heyneana. Curcumin content measured by TLC in pure C. longa and C. heyneana was found 5.63% and 0.77%, respectively. Curcumin content in adulterated C. longa with C. heyneana using adulterant concentration of 5-75 % was in the range of 5.40-1.44 %. Representative 1H-NMR spectra showed a clear difference in aromatic region between C. longa and C. heyneana. 2D NMR J-resolved confirmed curcuminoid compounds in C. longa. Principal component analysis (PCA) using 8 principal components (PC) provided a clear separation of C. longa, adulterated C. longa, and C. heyneana. The high R2 value (0.992) of PCA indicated the good of fit of the model. Orthogonal projections to latent structures-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) using 1 predictive and 5 orthogonal components provided a clear separation between C. longa and adulterated C. longa. The model has a good of fit and good of predictivity indicated by the value of R2X (0.85), R2Y (0.992), and Q2 (0.899). The results exhibited that 1H-NMR based metabolite fingerprinting and chemometrics of multivariate analysis can be applied to distinguish pure and adulterated C. longa with C. heyneana. This developed study may be applied to monitor the authenticity of medicinal plants.
       
  • Simultaneous quantification of allantoin and steroidal saponins in yam
           (Dioscorea spp.) powders
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic PlantsAuthor(s): Vincent Lebot, Benjamin Faloye, Eric Okon, Badara GueyeAbstractWild yams (Dioscorea spp.) are medicinal plants rich in secondary metabolites of pharmacological interest, mostly allantoin and steroidal saponins. Their natural populations are overexploited and endangered. Cultivated yams could represent an alternative source of metabolites if interesting varieties could be selected. The objectives of the present study were to develop an HPTLC protocol for the simultaneous quantification of allantoin and steroidal saponins in dried yam powders, to compare species and varieties originating from distant geographical origins and to assess their potential as a source of secondary metabolites. Overall, 1151 accessions belonging to six cultivated species were analysed (1000 acc. from Nigeria, and 146 acc. from Vanuatu) and were compared to five commercial powders of wild yam (D. villosa). Allantoin, dioscin, gracillin, protodioscin, protogracillin and five unknown saponins were quantified. Dioscorea villosa powders varied in content and composition, with allantoin ranging from 0.23 to 22.35 mg/g (DW) and total saponins from 37.36 to 129.97 mg/g. Allantoin was present in the six species, with highest values in D. bulbifera bulbils (20.38 mg/g) and D. cayenensis tubers (17.12 mg/g). Steroidal saponins were quantified in three species, D. cayenensis, D. esculenta and D. rotundata, but were absent in D. alata, D. bulbifera and D. dumetorum. Mean total saponins contents were 42.15 mg/g in D. cayenensis, 17.65 mg/g in D. esculenta and 17/44 mg/g in D. rotundata, with accessions presenting very high values in D. cayenensis (78.31 mg/g) and D. rotundata (69.65 mg/g). For both allantoin and saponins, variation was observed within tubers and the tuber peel was richer than the flesh. Cultivated yam species represent a sustainable source of allantoin and steroidal saponins which could be further increased through conventional breeding.
       
  • Phenolic compounds from Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels leaves: Extraction and
           membrane purification
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Upasna Balyan, Satya Pal Verma, Biswajit SarkarAbstractA hybrid process consisting of extraction and microfiltration was proposed in this study for producing purified, clear and stable aqueous phenolic extract from jamun (Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels) leaf. Response surface methodology was successfully used for optimization of extraction conditions. Pseudo-first order kinetic model successfully described the extraction of total polyphenols from jamun leaves, with the activation energy determined as 9.5 kJ/mol based on the Arrhenius model. The kinetic constants were used to study the kinetic and thermodynamic compensations of extraction of TPC from jamun leaves. Applying the statistical criterion, the kinetic and thermodynamic compensations were concluded to be real and the extraction process was controlled by entropy. A total of ten phenolic compounds including six phenolic acids (tannic acid, gallic acid, ellagic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid) and four flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, quercetin and myricetin 3-O-rhamnoside) were identified and quantified in jamun leaf extract obtained under optimum extraction conditions. The selection of appropriate membrane in the microfiltration step was a critical aspect. To observe the effect of membrane pore size on the permeate flux and permeate quality, leaf extracts were then microfiltered using four different microfiltration membranes (0.1, 0.22, 0.45, and 0.8 μm) under batch concentration mode. The flux decline was successfully described by the Hermia’s cake filtration model. The stability of clarified extract was investigated at 4 °C for 45 days. The 0.45 μm microfiltration membrane was suggested for the clarification of jamun leaf extract in order to achieve high flux, polyphenol recovery, extract purity and improved storage stability.
       
  • Pharmacognostic characterization and development of standardization
           parameters for the quality control of Entada africana Guill. & Perr
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Michael Frimpong Baidoo, Evelyn Asante-Kwatia, Abraham Yeboah Mensah, George Henry Sam, Isaac Kingsley AmponsahAbstractThis study focused on establishing standard parameters for the identification and quality control of an indigenous medicinal plant, Entada africana through macro and micro-morphological, physicochemical and phytochemical evaluation of the leaf and stem bark. Microscopy of the whole leaf revealed wavy and straight walled epidermal cells, hypostomatic paracytic stomata, an arch shaped collaterally closed vascular bundle, collenchyma, sclerenchyma and palisade cells. Prismatic calcium oxalate crystals, stone cells, fibres, pitted and scalariform xylem vessels were also identified in the microscopy of powdered samples. Phytochemical screening revealed the presence of glycosides, saponins, tannins, flavonoids, coumarins, triterpenes and sterols. Physiochemical parameters such as the moisture content, ash content, mineral content, solvent soluble extractives and pH of edible extracts were determined. Fluorescence analysis and UV fingerprints were also developed for the methanol extracts. The current results provide necessary information for the correct identification and quality assessment of E. africana crude drug or herbal products containing the plant.
       
  • Intraspecific variability of wild thyme (Thymus serpyllum L.)
           occurring in Poland
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Katarzyna Bączek, Ewelina Pióro-Jabrucka, Olga Kosakowska, Zenon WęglarzAbstractThe purpose of the study was to assess the variability between 16 wild thyme populations introduced into ex situ conditions, in terms of morphological traits and chemical profiles. The observations were carried out on 2-year-old plants. Total content of essential oil and phenolic compounds (flavonoids, phenolic acids and tannins) was determined according to Polish Pharmacopoeia 6th. The composition of essential oil was carried out by GC/MS and GC/FID. Populations differed in respect of examined traits, i.e.: plant’s height (from 50 to 90 mm), plant diameter (from 21.3 to 53.0 cm), length of stems (from 8.1 to 20.5 cm). Fresh mass of herb per plant ranged from 36.0 to 307.0 g, while dry mass from 15.63 to 73.11 g (CV 55.0 and 47.5%, respectively). Total content of essential oil varied from 0.23 to 0.97%. Three chemotypes were distinguished within investigated populations: geranyl acetate + β-terpineol + β-myrcene, geranyl acetate + β-terpineol + borneol and pure linalool type. The total content of phenolic compounds ranged, as following: flavonoids (0.17–0.26%), tannins (0.57–1.32%), phenolic acids (0.28–0.61%). To sum up, investigated populations differed significantly in respect of developmental features as well as content and composition of identified compounds. Obtained results may be used in future works on selection and breeding of wild thyme, providing a high-quality raw material characterized by specific chemical composition and pharmacological activity.
       
  • Biochemical and phylogenetic analysis of Eugenia and Syzygium species from
           Mauritius
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): V. Mala Ranghoo-Sanmukhiya, Yovishca Chellan, Joyce Govinden- Soulange, Isa A. Lambrechts, J. Stapelberg, B. Crampton, Namrita LallThe Myrtaceae represents a plant family with several species having important medicinal virtues. In view of these properties four Syzygium species namely S. latifolium, S. commersonii, S. coriaceum, S. petrinense and two Eugenia species namely E. pollicina and E. pyxidata were studied. Phytochemical analysis showed that the methanol extracts had higher content of total phenolics and total flavonoids than the hexane extracts. The in vitro antioxidant activity evaluated using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and Ferric reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) assays was significant. The antibacterial activity of the extracts against Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli was also promising. Species studied displayed significant tyrosinase inhibitory activity with S. petrinense having the highest activity. Interestingly, when the expression analysis of the tyrosinase cDNA in mouse melanocyte cells was studied it was observed that the methanolic Syzygium extracts inhibited melanogenesis by upregulating or downregulating the tyrosinase gene. Phylogenetic analysis of the ribosomal DNA sequences showed the genetic uniqueness of each plant species reflecting in their unique biological activity. Bioprospecting of endemic Mauritian Eugenia and Syzygium could be envisaged against acne vulgaris, skin hyperpigmentation and possible exploitation as phytotherapeutics.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • The U.S. import demand for spices and herbs by differentiated sources
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Ly Nguyen, Lam T. Duong, Rao S. MentreddyAbstractThis research applies the Rotterdam model to estimate U.S. import demand for source-differentiated spices and herbs and medicinal plants. The price structure indicates that U.S. import demand for both, spices and herbs are inelastic, with demand responding the most to import prices of herbs from North America and the least to import prices of herbs from Asia and Africa. Asian herbs and medicinal plants are dominant and can substitute for the other sources in the U.S. market, whereas, North America is the largest provider of spices and significantly substitutes for spices from other regions. Expenditure elasticities reveal that herbs and medicinal plants from Asia and spices from South America have the most to gain from an expansion in the U.S. herbs and spices market. The U.S. preference trend for both, spices and herbs as well as medicinal plants from Asia is decreasing, whereas, it is increasing from all other regions.
       
  • Improving production of plant secondary metabolites through biotic and
           abiotic elicitation
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Menaka Thakur, Sujata Bhattacharya, Prem Kumar Khosla, Sunil PuriPlants need to counter continuous threats posed by the environment, such as pathogen attacks (fungi, viruses, insects, nematodes) and harsh physical conditions (drought, salinity, temperature, exposure to UV radiation). Plants recognize the threat signals through their receptors and sensors and activate defense responses to stabilize against these stresses. The responses include accumulation of secondary metabolites. Enhanced synthesis of secondary metabolites, called elicitation ensures the survival, persistence and competitiveness of the plant. Secondary metabolites include volatile oils, flavonoids, alkaloids, glycosides, tannins, resins etc that have been successfully exploited for vital sources for food additives, flavors, and industrially important pharmaceuticals. The improved production of the secondary metabolites through elicitation has unlocked a new area of research that could have significant economic benefits for the pharmaceutical and therapeutic (including neutraceutical) industry. The present review discusses about the different elicitation methods through various biotic (proteins, carbohydrates, plant growth promoting rhizobacteria, fungus, hormones) and abiotic elicitors (heavy metals, low and high temperature, light, salt, drought) that could bring about increased yield of secondary metabolites especially in medicinal plants beneficial to the medicinal and aromatic industry.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Radiofrequency cold plasma treatment enhances seed germination and
           seedling growth in variety CIM-Saumya of sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.)
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Rajesh Singh, Priyanka Prasad, Ram Mohan, Mahesh K. Verma, Birendra KumarRadiofrequency room temperature plasma method is a newly emerging physical seed treatment method for enhanced germination of various crops. The stimulatory effect of plasma exposure on sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) has been investigated. It is an oil-bearing aromatic crop cultivated in Indonesia, Egypt, Morocco, France, India, Greece, USA, and Hungary. Cold plasma seed exposure with different RF power such as T2 (30 W), T3 (90 W), T4 (150 W), T5 (210 W) and T6 (270 W) was applied to work out its effect on seed. The T4 (150 W) cold plasma treatment had the highest stimulatory effect on germination and vigor among all the studied doses of treatments. Increase in the germination and seedling vigor of sweet basil might be a consequence of the increases in water uptake, seed reserve mobilization and depletion rate at T4 treatment.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Thermal processing conditions affect in vitro immunostimulatory activity
           of Aloe vera juice
    • Abstract: Publication date: March 2019Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 12Author(s): Shaik A. Hussain, Vidhu Yadav, Srinu Reddi, Girdhari R. Patil, Ram R.B. Singh, Suman KapilaAloe vera is known for its immunomodulatory effects. Aloe juice is regarded as health drink. Aloe juice is subjected to thermal processing to preserve its quality. In the present study, effect of heat treatment and concentration on immunostimulatory activity of Aloe vera juice was assessed through in vitro lymphocyte proliferation activity and phagocytic activity. Aloe vera juice was subjected to different heat treatments viz. 70 °C/10 min, 80 °C/10 min, and 121 °C/15 min. Applied heat treatment had no significant (p > 0.05) effect on lymphocyte proliferation activity of Aloe juice. However, with an increase in the concentration (>1 μL), sterilized (121 °C/15 min) Aloe vera juice showed reduction in lymphocyte proliferation activity. Control Aloe juice samples obtained highest phagocytosis (%) values compared to the heat treated samples. At higher temperature processing (80 °C/30 min and 121 °C/15 min) and concentrations (300 μl) a significant (p 
       
  • Antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory potential of Stevia
           rebaudiana leaves: effect of different drying methods
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Roberto Lemus-Mondaca, Antonio Vega-Gálvez, Pilar Rojas, Karina Stucken, Carla Delporte, Gabriela Valenzuela-Barra, Rosa J. Jagus, María Victoria Agüero, Alexis PastenTo evaluate the effect of drying methods on Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni quality, the content of bioactive compounds, antioxidant capacity, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity of Stevia leaves dehydrated by seven different methods was compared. Polyphenols and antioxidant capacity increased in all dried samples where Freeze (FD) and shade drying (SH) resulted in the highest and infrared drying (IR) in the lowest values. All Stevia leaf extracts presented antimicrobial activity towards Listeria innocua although IR and convective drying (CD) inhibition was longer (48 h). Except from IR, all extracts reduced inflammation in AA treated mice, where vacuum dried (VD) and microwave dried (MW) were the strongest. MW, sun dried (SD) and SH stevia were the most effective against phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (TPA)-induced inflammation. This work provides evidence on how drying processes affect the content and activity of Stevia bioactive compounds. Selection of a specific drying method for Stevia leaves can now be chosen based on the intended application, such as preparation of functional foods enriched in bioactive compounds or antioxidant capacity (FD and SH leaf extracts), or as natural extracts with high antimicrobial (IR and CD leaf extracts) and anti-inflammatory activity (MW leaf extracts).Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Effect of process parameters on aqueous extraction of thymol and other
           phytonutrients from herbal seed Ajwain (Trachyspermum ammi L.)
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Amit Jain, Sourav Sengupta, Sirshendu DeAbstractAjwain (Trachyspermum ammi L.) is a therapeutic herbal spice with many benefits and a good source of phytonutrients. The optimum process conditions were evaluated for aqueous extraction of phytonutrients from ajwain. Seed to water ratio (0.25 to 1 g/mL), extraction time (10 to 60 min) and extraction temperature (30 °C to 60 °C) were selected as independent variables and their effects on the concentration of protein, thymol, total solids and antioxidant activity were examined. The linear and combined effects of independent process variables on quality parameters were analyzed by response surface methodology. The second-order polynomial model was generated by analysis of variance for each response and its significance and adequacy were judged statistically by the coefficient of determination, the coefficient of variance, lack of fit test and adequate precision. Numerical optimization was carried out to evaluate the optimum operating conditions subject to maximum thymol concentration and antioxidant activity and minimum concentration of protein and total solids, and optimum conditions evaluated as: seed to water ratio: 0.30 g/mL, extraction time: 16 min and extraction temperature: 52 °C. At the optimal conditions, 2.1 mg of thymol was extracted per kg of ajwain seeds. Eigenvalue analysis was also undertaken to corroborate the findings from numerical optimization. The numerically optimized result was validated with experimental results by conducting a separate set of experiments and observed that the experimental results are within the range of ±10% of the generated numerical optimization results, thereby confirming the optimum conditions.
       
  • Testing the influence of digestate from biogas on growth and volatile
           compounds of basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and peppermint (Mentha x piperita
           L.) in hydroponics
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Domenico Ronga, Federica Pellati, Virginia Brighenti, Katia Laudicella, Luca Laviano, Maamar Fedailaine, Stefania Benvenuti, Nicola Pecchioni, Enrico FranciaIn this study, a digestate was evaluated for the first time as a sustainable alternative to the conventional growing medium and the nutrient solution in the hydroponic production of aromatic species. Basil (Ocimum basilicum L.) and peppermint (Mentha x piperita L.) were assessed at crop vegetative stage with five fully expanded leaves. Four combinations, i.e. agriperlite (AG) + standard solution (SS), AG + liquid digestate (LD), solid digestate (SD) + SS and SD + LD, were compared. The SD used as the growing medium increased all the investigated agronomical traits, apart the harvest index and shoot dry weight height ratio, that showed the same values compared to agriperlite, on basil and peppermint, respectively. The LD used as the nutrient solution performed as well as the SS on basil and peppermint production, except for the percentage of emergence and total dry weight of basil, showing lower and higher values compared to SS, respectively. Shoot dry weight was the most important agronomical parameter and both basil and peppermint displayed high values using the SD as the growing medium. However, basil recorded the highest dry matter value using SD + LD, while peppermint showed similar values using SD + SS and SD + LD.As regards the volatile compounds of both species, the percentage relative amount of sesquiterpenes was found to be higher under SD + LD and SD + SS conditions in comparison to AG + SS and AG + LD, where the content of monoterpenes and allyl phenol derivatives was higher.SD and LD appear to be sustainable and suitable growing medium and nutrient solution for basil and peppermint grown in hydroponics. Further studies are needed to investigate the influence of the treatments also in advanced developmental stages of the crops, appropriate for the production of plants with high yield and quality.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Soxhlet extraction of phenolic compounds from Vernonia cinerea leaves and
           its antioxidant activity
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Oluwaseun R. Alara, Nour H. Abdurahman, Chinonso I. UkaegbuAbstractRecently, discovering natural antioxidants have gained more interest due to the fact that most infectious ailment, namely cardiovascular disorder, diabetes and cancer are associated with free radical cells. Thus, the extraction of phenolic compounds from Vernonia cinerea leaves through Soxhlet extraction method was studied. The effects of extraction time (1–4 h), feed-to-solvent (1:10–1:25 g/mL) and ethanol concentration (20–80% v/v) on the yield of extract, total phenolic content (TPC) and total flavonoid content (TFC) were examined. Moreover, the phenolic compounds and functional groups in the extract at maximum conditions were identified using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Quadrupole Time of Flight (LC–Q–TOF–MS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR), respectively. The antioxidant activity of the extract was as well investigated. The experimental results showed that the highest yield of extract (10.01 ± 0.85% w/w), TPC (53.96 ± 1.45 mg GAE/g d.w.) and TFC (30.09 ± 0.44 mg QE/g d.w.) were achieved using extraction time of 2 h, feed-to-solvent of 1:20 g/mL and ethanol concentration of 60% v/v. However, the extract reflected good antioxidant activity.
       
  • Genotypic variation in Acmella paniculata across different
           phytogeographical ranges of Northeast India inferred through ISSR & SCoT
           based markers
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Debmalya Das Gupta, Pallabi K. Hui, Hui TagPresent study is intended to find out genotypic variation in Acmella paniculata distributed across larger phytogeographical ranges and along different altitudinal gradient of Northeast India using ISSR and SCoT markers. Acmella paniculata (Wall. ex DC.) R.K. Jansen (family Asteraceae) is an important medicinal herb distributed worldwide in both tropical and subtropical regions. A total of 98 individuals of A. paniculata belonging to 10 natural populations spots were sampled from different altitudinal gradient of 03 major phytogeographical ranges of Northeast India, and the genotypic variation within and among the populations were inferred using ISSR and SCoT markers. In the ISSR marker based study, a total of 429 loci were obtained in which 178 loci were monomorphic and 251 loci were polymorphic showing 58% polymorphism. In the SCoT based marker study, a total of 791 amplification products were scored of which 588 were polymorphic, exhibiting 74% polymorphism. The PIC value of ISSR and SCoT marker system were 0.67 and 0.83 respectively. The Rp value of the ISSR primers were ranging from 4.120 to 7.22, whereas it was 5.24 to 9.20 for the SCoT primers. Jaccard’s coefficient of similarity were ranging from 0.1082 – 0.7325 in case of ISSR, whereas it was 0.1366 – 0.9253 for SCoT markers. GST values showed high genetic diversity among the populations. The average similarity matrix was used to generate a tree for cluster analysis by UPGMA method. Cluster analysis have shown that the populations sampled from all high altitude regions of the 03 major phytogeographical ranges of Northeast India have formed distinct sub-clustering pattern. AMOVA revealed that variation among the populations were significantly higher (83%) than within the populations (16%).Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • The European Herb Growers Association (EUROPAM) position on drying
           (dehydration) factors for medicinal and aromatic plants (MAPs)
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Johannes Novak, on behalf of the European Herb Growers Association (EUROPAM)
       
  • Fruit characters and physico-chemical properties of roselle (Hibiscus
           sabdariffa L.) in Thailand—A screening of 13 new genotypes
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Siriphan Sukkhaeng, Somnuk Promdang, Uthaiwan Doung-ngernThirteen roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.) genotypes were identified originating from 8 generations with phenotypic selection. The fruit characters, fresh and dry weight of calyxes and physico-chemical properties were evaluated to identify each genotype and compared with two commercial cultivars. There were differences in fruit characters among the 13 roselle genotypes, especially regarding variation in the calyx color from white to purple and a larger fruit size than in the commercial cultivars. The yield based on the fresh weight and dry weight of calyx categorized nine genotypes in the high yield group which was higher than for the commercial cultivars. The physico-chemical properties of roselle calyx extracts indicated that the pH ranged from 2.26 to 2.47 and the total titratable acidity ranged from 21.60 to 36.00 g malic acid/100 g dry weight. Six roselle genotypes had significantly higher anthocyanin content than the commercial cultivars and these six genotypes had a positive correlation with pH and a negative correlation with L* (lightness) and b* (yellowness) values. The highest anthocyanin contents were 1948.43 mg/100 g dry calyx and 1181.80 mg/100 g dry epicalyx. In conclusion, the 13 new roselle genotypes had greater potential than the two commercial cultivars as they could be used as good sources of anthocyanin extract and high yielding roselle.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Changes in biochemical components in Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. leaves
           infected with Fusarium proliferatum (Matsushima) Nirenberg
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Shubhi Avasthi, Ajay K. Gautam, Rekha BhaduariaAloe vera (L.) Burm. f., an important medicinal plant suffers with a huge loss in its yield due to the attack of number of fungal pathogens. The aim of the present study was to analyze the biochemical changes in A. vera infected by Fusarium proliferatum (Matsushima) Nirenberg causing leaf spot disease in plant. Artificially infested leaves were examined to study the effect of fungal pathogen on chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, total chlorophyll, total soluble sugar, total phenols, total anthraquinones, total flavanoids and vitamin E. Results showed a significant decrease in the contents of chlorophyll-a, chlorophyll-b, total chlorophyll and total soluble sugar in infested leaves as compared to control leaves. Whereas, total phenolics, total anthraquinones, total flavonoid and vitamin E contents were significantly increased in infested leaves as compared to control. Changes in the concentration of biochemical were directly associated with the adverse effect of pathogen during the progression of infection on A. vera leaves.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Inter and intra-specific molecular and chemical diversity of elite
           accessions of aromatic grasses Cymbopogons
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2018Source: Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants, Volume 11Author(s): Pankhuri Gupta, Anand Mishra, Anju Yadav, Sunita S. DhawanAbstractCymbopogon is an aromatic grass belongs to Poaceae family. To detect the polymorphism among seventeen accessions of Cymbopogons for genetic diversity in total, 20 RAPD primers and 16 microsatellite primers were used. 18 RAPD and 14 ISSR primers responded well and provided reproducible polymorphism 81.3% and 87.4%. PCs were able to explain 79.2% of the total variability. The Mantel test shows strong significant correlation (r = 0.80) between two similarity matrices calculated using both molecular analysis systems. Different species of Cymbopogon showed many variations in essential oil yield (0.4%–1.4%) as well as GC and GC/MS analyses for the identification of many constituents like neral, geranial, citronellal and geraniol. The present study was successful in predicting genetic and chemical diversity of the population of Cymbopogons.
       
 
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