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  Subjects -> ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (Total: 111 journals)
Showing 1 - 15 of 15 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Acupuncture in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Advanced Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Alternative & Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Alternative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alternative Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arabian Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arteterapia. Papeles de arteterapia y educación artística para la inclusión social     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Plant Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletín Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Plantas Medicinales y Aromáticas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanics : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Naturologia e Terapias Complementares     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Herbal Medicines     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cognitive Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Complementary Therapies in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Current Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Deutsche Heilpraktiker-Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Erfahrungsheilkunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Medicinal Plants     Open Access  
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Global Journal of Integrated Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Traditional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herba Polonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herbal Medicines Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Innovare Journal of Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of High Dilution Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ipnosi     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Acupuncture and Herbs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asian Natural Products Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Fasting and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ginseng Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Drugs (An International Journal on Medicinal Herbs)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Herbal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Integrative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinally Active Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Remedies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Lekovite Sirovine     Open Access  
Médecine Palliative : Soins de Support - Accompagnement - Éthique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Acupuncture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mersin Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Lokman Hekim Tıp Tarihi ve Folklorik Tıp Dergisi     Open Access  
Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research     Open Access  
Natural solutions     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Medicinal Plant     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Plantas Medicinais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Acupuntura     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Traditional & Kampo Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Traditional Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Journal of Acupuncture - Moxibustion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Orthomolekulare Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

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Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.147
Citation Impact (citeScore): 1
Number of Followers: 1  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 2095-7548
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • Evaluation of outcomes reported in randomized controlled trials for herbal
           remedies for adults with chronic hepatitis C

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Yuqian Yan, Ning Liang, Shibing Liang, Yuxin Sun, Nicola Robinson, Jianping LiuAbstractBackgroundHerbal remedies have been widely utilized in treating chronic hepatitis C (CHC) worldwide. Selecting appropriate outcomes to reflect both beneficial and harmful effects is a crucial step in designing randomized controlled trials (RCTs). This study evaluated the outcomes reported in RCTs on herbal remedies for CHC with comparison to the core outcomes recommended by the Cochrane Hepato-Biliary Group (CHBG), to check the consistency of the outcomes and to provide recommendation for future researches.MethodsA systematic literature search was conducted in Western and Chinese databases to identify RCTs on herbal remedies for adults with CHC. For each trial, all the outcomes reported in the results section were collected. Comparison between trial outcomes and CHBG core outcomes were evaluated and summarized with descriptive statistics.ResultsA total of 116 RCTs involving 9154 participants were included; 27 outcomes were identified. Commonly reported outcomes included alanine aminotransferase (64 trials, 55.2%), adverse events (58 trials, 50.0%), and end-of-treatment virological response (50 trials, 43.1%). All trials indicated that the herbal remedies under investigation had a positive effect and was markedly more effective than the control. Nearly half of the trials reported that the combination of herbal medicine and antiviral drugs could ameliorate adverse events. Very few trials reported primary core outcomes relating survival and quality of life. The most frequently reported core outcomes are non-serious adverse events (54 trials, 46.6%), viral response (27 trials, 23.3%), and biochemical response (24 trials, 20.7%).ConclusionThe variation and inconsistency in trial outcomes impedes research synthesis efforts, and indicate the need for comparable outcomes through the development of core outcome sets in CHC. The low concordance of outcome reporting could be improved by following CHBG core outcomes recommendation.
       
  • Combination therapy of scalp electro-acupuncture and medication for the
           treatment of Parkinson's disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Tianyao Qiang, Cong Gai, Yuan Chai, Wandi Feng, Haojie Ma, Yi Zhang, Jing Feng, Zhenyu Guo, Ling Ma, Hongmei SunAbstractObjectiveTo summarize the current clinical evidence related to the therapeutic effects and safety of adjuvant scalp electro-acupuncture (SEA) treatment for Parkinson's disease in China.MethodsFollowing the PRISMA statement, seven electronic databases were searched to retrieve randomized controlled clinical trials that used SEA combined with medication as the treatment intervention, and medication as the control. RevMan 5.3 was used to analyze outcomes, including the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), Webster scale, effectiveness rate, and UPDRS III.ResultsNine randomized controlled trials, with certain methodological flaws and risks of bias, were included that involved 474 participants. SEA combined with medication was more effective than medication alone in overall therapeutic effects, as evidenced by total UPDRS scores (mean difference (MD): 7.15, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24 to 14.07, P = .04), Webster scores (MD: 1.60, 95% CI 0.20 to 2.99, P = .03), and effectiveness rate (risk ratio: 1.35, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.54, P 
       
  • Serum protein profile of yang-deficiency constitution in traditional
           Chinese medicine revealed by protein microarray analyses

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Shuxian Sun, Xiuping Zhang, Jiayi Ma, Cheng Ni, Xiao Ying, Ji Wang, Lingru Li, Wenlin Yuan, Xujun Heng, Jing XiaAbstractBackgroundBased on the theory of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and pre-epidemiological investigation, Professor Qi Wang classified the entire human population into nine constitutions and put forward the theory of “Nine-Constitution Medicine.” Among these constitutions, the main feature of the yang-deficiency constitution (YADC) is intolerance of the cold, which has been proven to reduce quality of life and confer susceptibility to specific diseases. Previous studies explored the genetic and transcriptional bases of YADC. In this experiment, we explored the potential mechanism of YADC using protein microarray, to deepen our understanding of its biological mechanism.MethodsSubjects identified with a YADC (n = 12) or a balance constitution (BC; n = 12) in accordance with the Classification and Determination Standards of Constitutions in Traditional Chinese Medicine were selected. Blood was collected to separate serum and protein microarray technology was used to analyze serum protein expression.ResultsThe clustering of subjects’ constitutions based on protein expression profiling largely coincided with the TCM classification. Based on false discovery rate correction (P 
       
  • Therapeutic effects of acupuncture on blood glucose level among patients
           with type-2 diabetes mellitus: A randomized clinical trial

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Amir Hooman Kazemi, Wei Wang, Faezeh KhodaieAbstractObjectiveTo compare the therapeutic effects of acupuncture with sham acupuncture on levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) under treatment with metformin.MethodEighty participants with T2DM were allocated randomly to treatment (n = 40) and control (n = 40) groups. In addition to metformin therapy, patients in the acupuncture group received acupoint stimulation with even manipulation at 15 acupoints, and needles were retained for 20 minutes. The sham-acupuncture group was treated with very small needles inserted at a very shallow depth (3–5 mm) without manipulation at non-acupoints 1 cm around the actual acupuncture points. Both groups were treated for 14 sessions during 10 weeks of treatment. The FPG level was measured before treatment as well as after 1, 2, 4, 6 and 12 weeks of treatment. The HbA1c percentage was assessed once before treatment and once 12 weeks after treatment initiation.ResultsLevels of FPG and HbA1c in both groups were reduced significantly in comparison with baseline measurements (both P 
       
  • Study of Gong tone matching to five colors based on event-related
           potential

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Cuilan Ma, Chunhua Jia, Yiran Yuan, Yan Wang, Xiaoqian Liu, Huiwen Huang, Ning Liu, Tong Wu, Bei Zhang, Shuang ZhangAbstractObjectiveTo investigate the neural mechanism of Gong tone matching to the five colors.MethodsThe experiment was designed using event-related potential technique, following the S1→S2 paradigm, and dividing into two arms according to the Gong tone being played in harmonics or open strings. For each arm, S1 was the playing of the Gong tone, followed by S2, where subjects, based on their first reaction, were required to make a yes/no judgement to whether the tone matches to a randomly-picked color out of the five colors. During this process, the event-related potentials were recorded.ResultsGong tone played in harmonics, most participants matched it with black and cyan; while in the open strings arm, most matched it with black. The average amplitudes of P300 at PZ, FZ, and CZ points were compared. For the Gong tone played in harmonics, there was a significant difference between those who matched it with black and those who did otherwise (P 
       
  • Yinlai decoction alleviates lipopolysaccharide-induced pneumonia by
           changing the immune status of juvenile rats: A study based on network
           pharmacology

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Chen Bai, Jingnan Xu, Kaiyue Ma, Ling Huang, Shaoyang Liu, Xin Jiang, He Yu, Tiegang Liu, Xiaohong GuAbstractObjectivePediatric pneumonia is a common respiratory disease and Yinlai Decoction (YLD) is a commonly used treatment in China. We explored the anti-inflammatory mechanism of action of this traditional Chinese medicine for pneumonia.MethodsWe studied, by experimentation, the mechanism of action of YLD in treating pneumonia according to network pharmacology. By comparing YLD with dexamethasone (DXMS), we investigated the efficacy of YLD in treating pneumonia induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in juvenile rats.ResultsIn an aqueous extract of YLD, 22 chemical compounds were identified, among which 10 were related to inflammation, involving 78 target genes and 16 signaling pathways. Among them, 45 core target proteins were related to biologic processes and functions, such as response to stimuli, biologic regulation, cell communication and protein binding. Animal experiments showed that YLD relieved pulmonary inflammation and demonstrated no significant damage to the liver, spleen or kidneys of rats. YLD could regulate expression of inflammatory cytokines in serum and inflammation-related proteins in lung tissues to some extent, but its effect is less significant than that of DXMS.ConclusionsYLD protected juvenile rats against LPS-induced pneumonia, and showed fewer side effects in comparison with DXMS. YLD could be efficacious treatment for pediatric respiratory infections and even pneumonia.
       
  • Immediate analgesia effect of contralateral needling at Tiaokou (ST38) in
           patients with chronic shoulder pain: A randomized controlled exploratory
           trial

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Shangqing Hu, Shuai Zhang, Guangxia Shi, Zhongyan Wang, Tianqi Wang, Chaoqun Yan, Ping Zhou, Cunzhi LiuAbstractObjectiveTo compare the immediate effect of acupuncture at the contralateral versus ipsilateral Tiaokou (ST38) in patients with Chronic shoulder pain (CSP).MethodAltogether, 38 patients with unilateral CSP were randomly assigned to a contralateral ST38 group (Contra group) or ipsilateral ST38 group (Ipsi group). Each underwent 20 min of manual acupuncture: Contra group at the contralateral ST38, Ipsi group at the ipsilateral ST38. Primary outcome measure was the visual analog scale (VAS) score. Secondary outcome measure for assessing shoulder mobility was the Constant-Murley (CM) score, which included pain level, activities of daily living (ADL), and shoulder range of motion (ROM). These factors were assessed before and immediately after acupuncture. A value of P 
       
  • Seasonal climate effect on organ proportion and morbidity in
           “Bi-zheng” rats with kidney deficiency syndrome

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Cai Wang, Yilan Wang, Tong Wang, Dahong Ju, Hongyan Zhao, Ya Gao, Dallas Tokash, Ning ZhangAbstractObjectiveUsing the traditional Chinese medicine theory of “Bi-zheng" caused by kidney deficiency, combined with modern medical science and technology, this study assessed the relationships among organ weight, cytokines, pathological manifestations, and traditional Chinese medicine kidney deficiency syndrome in rats with rheumatoid arthritis.MethodsSixty Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly divided into normal, collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) model, and kidney deficiency arthralgia model groups. Rats in the kidney deficiency arthritis group underwent removal of the testis or ovary and administration of an inflammatory agent. Rats in the control group solely received an inflammatory agent. Type II collagen-induced arthritis was induced within 1 week of the winter solstice or summer solstice, in order to sample organs and observe the mental state, posture, fur color, activity level, excrement, body weight, and organ weight of the rats.ResultsCompared with the normal and CIA model groups, the kidney deficiency arthralgia model group showed fast and acute onset, prominent symptoms, most obvious potential joint swelling, worst general state, and least amount of weight gain. Compared with the normal group, the proportion of thymus, spleen, and adrenal glands of model rats were larger in winter, with varying degrees of hyperplasia and hypertrophy; these differences were statistically significant (P 
       
  • Comparative evaluation in treating qi-yin deficiency and phlegm stasis
           syndrome of type 2 diabetes mellitus in a rat model

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 February 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Zongchun Yang, Jing Zhao, Jinna Liu, Biyuan Liu, Ming XieAbstractObjectiveTo compare the efficacy of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), western medicine and integrative medicine in treating type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a rat model.MethodsThe T2DM rat model was established with a high-fat diet (HFD) for 35 days and a single injection of streptozotocin (STZ, 30 mg/kg). The T2DM-induced rats were divided into three groups, and treated with Yiqi Yangyin Huatan (YQYYHT) granules (3.84 g/kg per day), pioglitazone (1.35 mg/kg per day) or YQYYHT granules + pioglitazone (3.84 g/kg per day+1.35 mg/kg per day) respectively for 14 days. Clinical features and behavioral changes, as well as T2DM indicators, were recorded to evaluate therapeutics effects in each treatment group.ResultsThe T2DM rat model expressed insulin resistance (IR), with features similar to qi-yin deficiency and phlegm stasis syndrome, including decreased cyclic adenosine monophosphate/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP/cGMP) ratio, decreased levels of Na+-K+-ATPase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and increased levels of serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein (LDL-C). All three treatment groups showed significant decreases in fasting blood glucose (FBG) and fasting insulin (Fins), and improvement of TCM syndrome to different degrees. Importantly, YQYYHT improved the most of the indicators of T2DM, followed by integrative medicine and pioglitazone alone.ConclusionCompared with western medicine or integrative medicine, prescription of TCM based on syndrome differentiation may offer more advantages in the prevention and treatment of T2DM.
       
  • Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) inhibits renal reabsorption by regulating
           expression of urate transporters in fructose-induced hyperuricemia

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 January 2019Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Yu Wang, Zhijian Lin, Bing Zhang, Xiao Wang, Mengzhen ChuObjectiveHyperuricemia is an excess of urate in blood. The kidneys play important parts in urate excretion, which involves handling reabsorption and secretion. A series of urate transporters is responsible for this process: urate transporter (URAT)1, glucose transporter (GLUT)9, organic anion transporter (OAT)1 and OAT3. Excessive fructose intake may result in increased serum urate levels. Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) has been used as an edible vegetable and traditional Chinese medicine. Studies have shown that chicory is a promising anti-hyperuricemia agent and we explored the mechanism of its uricosuric effect via a renal pathway.MethodsHyperuricemia was induced in rats by administration of 10% fructose. The uricosuric effect was evaluated by determining the serum urate level. Renal excretory function was detected by the clearance rate of creatinine, clearance rate of uric acid and histology. The location and expression of URAT1, GLUT9, OAT1 and OAT3 their mRNA expression in kidneys were analyzed.ResultsChicory decreased serum levels of urate and creatinine significantly, and promoted the clearance of creatinine and urate, as well as improving renal pathologic changes due to hyperuricemia. Chicory inhibited expression of URAT1 and GLUT9 markedly in a dose-dependent manner, but showed no influence on expression of OAT1 or OAT3.ConclusionChicory might be a promising anti-hyperuricemia agent. It can promote renal excretion of urate by inhibiting urate reabsorption, which may be related to down-regulation of mRNA and protein expression of URAT1 and GLUT9.Graphical abstractImage 1
       
  • Tuina for treatment of atopic eczema in children under 14 years: A
           systematic review of randomized controlled trials

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 December 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): Chunli Lu, Xinyan Jin, Darong Wu, Sijia Zhu, Lily Lai, Jianping LiuAbstractObjectiveDue to a lack of available effective treatments for atopic eczema (AE), non-pharmaceutical therapy such as Tuina has been frequently sought after as an alternative treatment. We evaluated the benefits and harms of Tuina for children with AE under 14 years of age.MethodsWe searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on Tuina in seven Chinese and English databases from their inception to June 2018. We included children under 14 years of age with AE received Tuina alone or combined with conventional medicine. Two authors independently extracted data and used the Cochrane “Risk of bias” tool to assess the methodological quality. Effects were presented as relative risk with 95% confidence interval using RevMan 5.3. Data not suitable for statistical pooling were synthesized qualitatively.ResultsNine RCTs involving 1246 children with AE were included. The trials were at unclear or high risk of bias. Tuina manipulation in each trial was different. Compared to usual care, three trials showed greater effects of Tuina alone or combined with usual care for global symptoms and signs improvement, such as itching, and skin lesions. Four trials showed that Tuina had ≥50% improvement in symptoms and signs. Due to clinical heterogeneity, meta-analysis was not possible. At follow-up of between 4 weeks and 6 months, five trials of Tuina alone or Tuina combined with usual care showed lower rates of relapse compared to usual care alone. Four trials reported no occurrence of severe adverse events.ConclusionsLimited evidence demonstrates that Tuina may improve symptoms and signs of AE and reduce relapse rate in children
       
  • The characteristics and correlative research of “Jin Shang” associated
           with chronic neck pain in young adults based on ultrasound imaging

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Dong Zhang, Yufeng Ma, Lili Yang, Wangyang Du, Wen Gan, Mingkang Xu, Yuru Guo, Zongting Shi, Yinze Qi, Qingpu WangAbstractObjectiveTo investigate the characteristics of “Jin Shang”, a specialized term in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory, in young adults with chronic neck pain (CNP) and investigated the correlation of “Jin Shang” with pain intensity and living disabilities using cross-section study.MethodsThe thickness of the bilateral splenius capitis and semispinalis capitis were measured by ultrasound imaging (USI) as the objective performance of “Jin Shang”. The visual analogue scale (VAS) and Northwick Park Questionnaire (NPQ) were used to assess pain intensity and living disability. The Student's t test was used to investigate the difference in neck extensor muscle (NEM) thickness between CNP patients and healthy controls. Pearson's correlation and multiple linear regression were applied to investigate the relationship between NEM thickness, pain intensity and disability.ResultsFifty-nine young adult CNP patients and 16 healthy controls were recruited in this study, in accordance with specific inclusion and exclusion criteria. The student's t test showed that in CNP patients, the thickness of the semispinalis capitis during isometric contraction was significantly thinner than that of healthy controls (P = .04). Pearson's correlation analysis also revealed significant relationships between NEM thickness, VAS, and NPQ, while multiple linear regression showed that the thickness of the NEM in CNP patients was a significant predictor of pain intensity and disability.ConclusionThere was a significant difference in the thickness of the NEM in young adults with CNP when compared to healthy controls. Alterations in the NEM thickness in both rest and contraction are moderately related to neck pain and living disabilities. Our results investigated the characteristics of “Jin Shang” using USI and revealed a correlation between “Jin Shang” and CNP symptoms, which demonstrates that NEM plays an important role in CNP.
       
  • Comparative pilot study on the effects of pulsating and static cupping on
           non-specific neck pain and local skin blood perfusion

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Yang Yang, Liangxiao Ma, Tingli Niu, Junxiang Wang, Yue Song, Yu Lu, Xuezhi Yang, Xin Niu, Ali MohammadiAbstractObjectiveTo compare the effects of pulsating and static cupping on non-specific neck pain and local skin microcirculation blood perfusion, which is a pilot study.MethodsSeventy participants with non-specific neck pain were randomized to the following groups: low-frequency pulsating cupping (LF, n = 20); high-frequency pulsating cupping (HF, n = 20); static cupping (SC, n = 20), or waiting list (WL, n = 10). The LF, HF, and SC received a bilateral 10-minute cupping treatment at Jianzhongshu (SI 15). Outcomes were pain intensity (visual analog scale, VAS), functional status (Neck Disability Index, NDI), and skin blood perfusion at the SI 15, Dazhui (GV 14), and Shenzhu (GV 12) acupoint areas, measured using Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis technology.ResultsBoth LF and HF groups showed a significant reduction in VAS scores compared with the SC group (9.00, 95% CI 1.05–16.95, P = .027; 8.75, 95% CI 0.80–16.70, P = .031). There was no significant difference in VAS scores between the LF and HF groups (P > .05) and between NDI scores measured 3 days after intervention among the four groups (P > .05). In the SI 15 area, blood perfusion in the three treatment groups was higher than that in WL group (P 
       
  • Effect of Dachaihu decoction on non-alcoholic fatty liver disease model
           rats induced by a high-fat high-sugar diet

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Lu Zhou, Jiamin Yang, Min Wang, Yushan Gao, Shujing Zhang, Yan Sun, Qian Wang, Jian Cui, Yuhang LiAbstractObjectiveTo establish an animal model consistent with the occurrence and development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) with which to assess the effects of a classical traditional Chinese medicine formula known as Dachaihu Decoction (DD) on NAFLD.MethodsSixty rats were randomized into four groups: control, model, pioglitazone hydrochloride (PH) and DD in equal. NAFLD was produced via administration of a high-fat high-sugar diet for 16 weeks in all but the control group. From the 13th week, a solution of PH or DD prepared with water was delivered via intragastric administration to the PH and DD groups; the remaining two groups received an equivalent volume of distilled water. Twelve hours from the last administration, we selected eight rats from each group in random. After anesthetization, the abdominal aorta blood and liver tissues were collected. The morphological changes were observed and the levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), fasting plasma glucose (FBG), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4), and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-кB) were tested.ResultsCompared with the control group, the levels of serum ALT, AST, TC, TG, LDL-C and FBG, and TGF-β1, TNF-α, TLR4, NF-кB in the model group all showed significant increases (P 
       
  • The protective and therapeutic effects of total flavonoids of Astragalus
           against bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis are through the enhancement
           of autophagy

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Changjun Xu, Pengfei Wang, Chang Lin, Zhu Luo, Yawei Huang, Zongjiang Zhao, Changfu YangAbstractBackgroundPreviously, we showed that total flavonoids from astragalus (TFA) had beneficial effects against transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1-mediated fibrosis, but whether these effects involved autophagy is not known. We attempt to explore the effects of TFA on autophagy in an animal model of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) induced by bleomycin, and to look for TFA components that may have an effect on autophagy.MethodsC57BL/6 mice were randomized to the sham group (SG), model group, low-dose TFA group (LDTG), and high-dose of TFA group (HDTG). The A549 cell line was treated with the TFA components including formononetin, calycosin, isorhamnetin, kaempferol, and quercetin. Lung tissues and cells were examined by histology, immunohistochemistry (anti-TGF-β1, α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), and cadherin), immunofluorescence (microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3)), hydroxyproline content, and immunoblotting (smad3, smad7, phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), α-SMA, E-cadherin, beclin-1, and LC3-II).ResultsIn vivo, TFA inhibited TGF-β1 expression and decreased collagen content in lung tissues induced by bleomycin. TFA increased autophagy following suppression of the smad pathway. In vitro, quercetin inhibited the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) of A549 cells induced by TGF-β1 through suppression of the smad pathway. Autophagy was also increased by quercetin through inhibition of the AKT/mTOR pathway, but without change in PI3K expression. Formononetin, calycosin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol had no such effects.ConclusionTFA can alleviate bleomycin-induced PF in C57BL/6 mice via enhanced autophagy. The smad and AKT/mTOR pathways are possibly involved in these effects. Quercetin was the main active compound in TFA.
       
  • Anti-cancer activity of an ethyl-acetate extract of the fruits of
           Terminalia bellerica (Gaertn.) Roxb. through an apoptotic signaling
           pathway in vitro

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Shi Li, Ting Ye, Linjin Liang, Wenyi Liang, Ping Jian, Kun Zhou, Lanzhen ZhangAbstractObjectiveTo investigate the biochemical constituents of the fruits of Terminalia bellerica (Gaertn.) Roxb. (hereafter termed T. bellerica) and estimate the anti-cancer activity of different polar extracts.MethodsTo rapidly screen and identify the biochemical constituents of ethyl acetate (EA) extracts of T. bellerica, ultra performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-MSn) was done. The CellTiter-Blue™ cell-viability assay was used to ascertain the anti-cancer activity of different polar extracts in 10 human cancer cell lines.ResultsForty polyphenols of the EA extract of T. bellerica were characterized tentatively. The EA extract exhibited significant anti-cancer activity against ZR-75-1 cells (half-maximal inhibitory concentration = 27.33 (0.98) μg/mL) and Colo-205 cells (39.65 (2.99) μg/mL) in vitro. Treatment of ZR-75-1 cells with 20 and 60 μg/mL of the EA extract elicited dose-dependent apoptosis percentages at an early stage of 17.58 (0.74) % and at a late stage of 29.20 (1.22) %; Colo-205 cells at the same concentration of EA extract had values of 21.33 (1.03) % and 40.55 (0.34) %, respectively. Western blotting suggested that ZR-75-1 and Colo-205 cells treated with the EA extract showed a similar increasing tendency for expression of cleaved anti-poly adenosine diphosphate ribose polymerase I.ConclusionWe identified a total of 40 chemical constituents, of which 11 were first obtained from the Terminalia Linn. genus using UPLC-ESI-MSn. Meanwhile, we observe that the EA extract of T. bellerica possesses anti-cancer activity, especially against breast and colon cancers.
       
  • Analysis of new therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus based on
           traditional Chinese medicine “xiaoke” formulae

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Qian Zhang, Ranfeng Du, Xucan Hou, Zhaolei Lv, Congmin Jia, Yun WangAbstractObjectiveTo develop new therapeutic strategies for diabetes mellitus (DM) by analyzing the mechanisms of action of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) “xiaoke” formulae (TCM prescriptions for remedying xiaoke).MethodsWe characterized 291 xiaoke formulae, including the herbs contained, chemical composition, constituents' targets, and corresponding genes. Xiaoke-related genes were retrieved based on the relationships of constituents’ targets and xiaoke formulae, and a threshold of over 95.88% occurrence of each constituent target in the 291 TCM formulae served as a definition for xiaoke-related genes. Upon comparison with DM-related genes in the DisGeNET database, the genes differing in expression between cases administered TCM and synthetic drugs were explored using a TCM grammar system.ResultsThe results showed that xiaoke formulae and 14 exclusively xiaoke-related genes were significantly associated with multiple biological processes closely related to DM and diabetic complications (P 
       
  • Does the traditional Chinese medicine theory of five circuits and six qi
           improve treatment effectiveness' A systematic review of randomized
           controlled trials

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Qiaoling Tang, Yu Hao, Jia Song, Lingzhi Sun, Juan HeAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate whether the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory of five circuits and six qi (FCSQ) is beneficial in terms of improving clinical effectiveness.MethodsRandomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the clinical value of FCSQ theory were reviewed. Multiple databases (China Network Knowledge Infrastructure, Chinese Scientific Journals Database, Wanfang Data, SinoMed, Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Embase) were systematically searched from inception to June 12, 2018. Two authors independently extracted the data and performed a methodological quality assessment of the RCTs. RevMan 5.3 software was used for the data analysis. The effect sizes for the primary outcome measures were expressed as relative risks or mean differences with 95% confidence intervals.ResultsA total of 13 RCTs were selected, involving 12 types of diseases and 4695 patients. The methodological quality of the RCTs was generally low. Five studies compared the effectiveness of TCM treatments guided by FCSQ theory with conventional TCM therapies, and the remaining eight studies compared the effectiveness of TCM treatments guided by FCSQ theory with biomedical treatments. All of the RCTs reported that the effectiveness of the treatment intervention was better than that of the intervention in the control group.ConclusionBecause of many methodological problems in existing clinical studies, it remains impossible to definitively conclude that FCSQ theory can improve clinical effectiveness. It is difficult to unify the clinical application of FCSQ theory. The feasibility and repeatability of FCSQ as an intervention should be given more attention in future clinical research. Future work should also follow international norms for clinical research implementation and reporting to provide high-quality evidence for evaluating the clinical value of FCSQ theory.
       
  • Screening for blood leukocyte microRNA biomarkers responsible for
           association between qi deficiency constitution and Pi-qi-deficiency
           syndrome of chronic superficial gastritis

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Honghao Sheng, Leiming You, Xiaopu Sang, Xinhui Gao, Aijie Liu, Ting'an Li, Kunyu Li, Shen Zhang, Guangrui Huang, Ting Wang, Anlong XuAbstractObjectiveTo screen for blood leukocyte microRNA (miRNA) biomarkers responsible for the association between the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) qi deficiency constitution (QDC) and the Pi-qi-deficiency syndrome (PQDS) of chronic superficial gastritis (CSG).MethodsPeripheral blood leukocytes were separated from people of two TCM constitutions (balance and qi deficiency) and from CSG patients with PQDS. Total RNA was isolated from the leukocytes and subjected to subsequent high-throughput miRNA sequencing to identify the miRNAs that are specifically and highly expressed in persons of QDC and CSG patients with PQDS. In addition, the target genes of the associated miRNAs were predicted. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway-based enrichment analyses of these target genes were performed to further evaluate the associated miRNA candidates as potential biomarkers responsible for the association between QDC and PQDS of CSG.ResultsCompared with the control group with a balance constitution (P 1.5 or
       
  • Characteristics and achievements of the Xin'an Medical School

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Yun Pan, Jian Wang, Jianpeng Hu, Lina Wang, Zihui Li, Feifei Bu, Yinjun Wen, Ya'nan SongAbstractThe Xin'an Medical School began in the Jin Dynasty (266–420), developed in the Song Dynasty (960–1279), prospered in the Ming and Qing dynasties (1368–1911), and has been passed down to the modern era. As a school of medicine with distinct regional characteristics, it has contributed to the development of traditional Chinese medicine and exerted far-reaching influence, mainly in literature resources, medical theory, clinical application, and spiritual culture. This paper intends to discuss its academic characteristics and contribution to the development of traditional Chinese medicine, focusing on its formation, academic inheritance and innovation, overseas popularization, and integration of Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism in medicine.
       
  • Use of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of immune-related
           adverse events of cancer immunotherapy

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Li Hou, Liya Ju, Jing Wang, Tian Zhou, Yang Shen, Jiaqi Chi, Jean-Pierre Armand, Anlong Xu, Kaiwen HuAbstractImmune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPI) have shown considerable promise in the treatment of tumors. However, immune-related adverse events (irAEs) caused by ICPI have been reported in nearly every organ system. Whilst this represents a new challenge in the field of cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) provides benefits in the treatment of irAEs. This article reviews the studies of the treatment of immune-related gastrointestinal diseases and dermatosis with TCM and introduces the collaborative efforts between China and France in the implementation of TCM for the treatment of irAEs.
       
  • Zhang Congzheng, physician and initiator of the “school of
           purgation”

    • Abstract: Publication date: October 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 4Author(s): Yinghua Huang, Yongxuan Liang
       
  • Efficacy and safety of Sijunzi decoction for peptic ulcers: A systematic
           review and meta-analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 31 July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical SciencesAuthor(s): XiaoYu Huang, Xin Sun, Xue Yu, HuiNan QianAbstractObjectiveTo investigate therapeutic efficacy and safety of Sijunzi decoction (SJZD) for peptic ulcers (PUs) through assessment of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).MethodsFive English and four Chinese databases were systematically searched to identify eligible RCTs that investigated effect of SJZD for PUs. SJZD were used either independently or concomitantly with routine anti-ulcer treatment compared with no intervention, placebo or conventional therapy. Outcomes evaluated included ulcer healing, symptom improvement, Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication, ulcer recurrence and adverse reactions. Statistical analysis and risk of bias was evaluated by Revman 5.3.ResultsFourteen trails involving 1476 participants fulfilled the selection criteria. All trails were presented with high risk of bias. Analyses showed that modified SJZD had significant benefit on ulcer healing compared to therapy of ranitidine and sucralfate. And compared with pantoprazole or therapy of omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, adding modified SJZD enjoyed advantages. On symptom improvement, modified SJZD was significantly better than therapy of ranitidine and sucralfate and had an added benefit when supplemented to two kinds of omeprazole triple therapies or pantoprazole. Furthermore, modified SJZD showed favorable effect on Hp eradication compared to cimetidine and additional benefit also existed when complemented to these omeprazole triple therapies and therapy of omeprazole and amoxicillin. Besides, on reducing ulcer recurrence among healed patients, modified SJZD was superior than cimetidine and combination therapy of modified SJZD with therapy of omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin achieved extra effectiveness. No serious adverse events were reported.ConclusionModified SJZD, used independently or as a complementary treatment to certain conventional ulcer-healing treatment, can promote PU healing, alleviate symptoms, eradicate Hp or reduce ulcer relapse. And modified SJZD is relative safe. But it still needs more rigorous randomized controlled trails to further support the conclusion due to existence of high risk of bias and limited sample size of included trials.
       
  • Liquid-liquid extraction pretreatment samples method used for
           pharmacokinetic study of rhubarb in rats after oral administrated

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Hongmei Lin, Longfei Lin, Lingyan Xu, Yuanping Xie, Zhenzhen Xia, Qing WuAbstractObjectivePretreatment of biological samples is the most critical step in pharmacokinetic studies, especially pre-treatment of plasma samples. The pretreatment of biological samples in pharmacokinetic study of Traditional Chinese Medicines (TCM) is difficult due to the complexity of the ingredients. An organic solvent system ethyl acetate: acetone (10: 1) solution used for liquid-liquid extraction has been developed in this study and compared with the commonly used protein precipitation method.MethodsRats, Beagle dogs and humans plasma samples were adopted in this study in order to demonstrate the universality of the pretreatment method. Feasibility of this pretreatment method was also verified through its application to the pharmacokinetics of rhubarb in rats.ResultsAccording to the results of extraction recovery matrix effect, it was indicated that the liquid-liquid extraction methods with new organic solvent might be suitable for variety of structures of compounds and various types of plasma samples. The pharmacokinetic study result showed that the developed pretreatment method could successfully be used for simultaneous determination of three active compounds modin, emodin-8-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (EDG) and rhein in rat plasma with high sensitivity, accuracy, and recovery by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Conclusion: The pretreatment method of liquid-liquid extraction methods with new organic solvent could be successfully applied for multi-component pharmacokinetics of TCM.
       
  • Study on the regulation of brain–gut peptide by Shenling Baizhu San in
           functional diarrhea rats

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Yuan Li, Weiyue Zhang, Jie Ma, Mindan Chen, Bingqi Lin, Xi Yang, Feng Li, Xudong Tang, Fengyun WangAbstractObjectiveTo explore the therapeutic mechanism of Shenling Baizhu San (SLBZS) on functional diarrhea (FDr) by studying the brain–gut axis and related neuropeptides.MethodsSixty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the control group, model group, SLBZS-treated group and Montmorillonite Powder-treated group (MP-treated group) (n = 15/group). Rats received gavage after the establishment of functional diarrhea. An equal volume of SLBZS solution and Montmorillonite Powder (MP) solution was administered to the SLBZS-treated group and MP-treated group, respectively, and an equal volume of distilled water was administered to the control group and the model group. The chemical components and targets related to SLBZS were identified from the Traditional Chinese Medicine Systems Pharmacology Database and Analysis Platform (TCMSP) and Traditional Chinese Medicine Integrated Database (TCMID). The effective chemical components were screened based on oral bioavailability (OB) and drug like-index (DL), and their biological functions were analyzed by GlueGO. Based on this screening, the expression of Cholecystokinin (CCK) and Ghrelin in the hypothalamus of rats was detected by real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and western blotting.ResultsIn this study, 72 effective components and 190 core targets of SLBZS were screened. SLBZS may regulate smooth muscle contraction, energy metabolism and other biological processes. The results of RT-PCR showed that in the model group, the expression of CCK mRNA (P = .001) and Ghrelin mRNA (P = .000) increased significantly. Compared with the model group, CCK mRNA (P = .007) and Ghrelin mRNA (P = .001) levels in SLBZS-treated rats were decreased significantly. The results of western blotting showed that in the model group, the protein expression of CCK (P = .001) and Ghrelin (P = .000) increased significantly. The protein levels of CCK (P = .001) and Ghrelin (P = .005) in the SLBZS-treated group were decreased significantly compared with the model group.ConclusionSLBZS improved functional diarrhea by regulating the brain–gut axis. Changes in the expressions of brain–gut peptide, CCK and Ghrelin might explain the pathogenesis of functional diarrhea related to brain–gut peptide and gastrointestinal hormone.
       
  • Yiqi Huoxue Decoction attenuates ischemia/hypoxia-induced oxidative stress
           injury in H9c2 cardiomyocytes

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Fanghe Li, Shuwen Guo, Hui Wang, Xiaolou Huang, Xiaobo Tan, Qian Cai, Qi Zhang, Chunguo Wang, Jinghong Hu, Wangou LinAbstractObjectiveYiqi Huoxue Decoction (YQHX) has been widely used for clinical treatment of ischemic heart disease. While oxidative stress plays a key role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease, the function and molecular mechanism underlying antioxidative protective effects of YQHX on H9c2 cardiomyocytes against ischemia/hypoxia (I/H) have yet to be well clarified.MethodsH9c2 cells were subjected to 12 h of hypoxia with serum-free conditions and then treated with or without YQHX (100–400 μg/mL). Cell viability was examined using a CCK-8 assay. Maleic dialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were detected using commercial kits. Intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential were measured using fluorescence microscopy and confocal laser-scanning microscopy, respectively. Ultrastructural details of mitochondria in H9c2 cells were observed using transmission electron microscopy. The antioxidative protective pathway was assessed by measuring mRNA and protein expression of Nrf2 and HO-1, as well as AMPK activation.ResultsI/H injury gradually induced oxidative stress. Treatment with YQHX significantly increased cell viability and reversed I/H-induced oxidative stress, including reducing the production of oxidative stress products (ROS and MDA), increasing SOD levels, improving mitochondrial morphology, and increasing mitochondrial membrane potential. YQHX was also observed to increase I/H-induced expression of Nrf2 and HO-1, and the activation effects of YQHX were blocked by an AMPK inhibitor. In addition, HPLC analysis showed that YQHX contained two active antioxidative constituents (calycosin and ferulic acid).ConclusionThe results suggest that anti-oxidative effects exerted by YQHX in H9c2 cardiomyocytes may be linked to upregulation of the AMPK-mediated Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.
       
  • Impact of meteorological factors on the incidence of influenza in Beijing:
           A 35-year retrospective study based on Yunqi theory

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Hong Wang, Xuan Zhang, Zhili Gao, Ling Han, Zhongdi Liu, Long Yan, Mingyue Li, Juan HeAbstractObjectiveTo analyze the impact of meteorological factors on the incidence of influenza based on the Yunqi theory in Beijing area, and to establish an effective forecast model.MethodsMonthly data on the incidence of influenza from 1970 to 2004 and daily data on the meteorological factors (including daily averages of temperature, wind speed, relative humidity, vapor pressure, and daily total precipitation) from 1966 to 2004 were collected and processed under the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) theory of six qi. A back-propagation artificial neural network was then performed to analyze the data.ResultsThe highest incidence of influenza occurs in the sixth qi (the period of December and January), which is characterized by dryness and coldness. Altogether six models were successfully established. Climatic data used were of the same year, one year prior, two years prior, and three years prior to the influenza data respectively. The last two models involve climatic data of the previous three years plus the current year and of the past four years plus the current year. Finally, we determined the fifth model has the highest forecast accuracy (49%).ConclusionsMeteorological factors can exert an influence on the incidence of influenza, which corresponds to TCM theory that “the pestilence occurred three years after the abnormal climatic changes”. This study may generate interest among the public health community and other TCM theories can be applied so that public health measures can be taken to prevent and control influenza, particularly during the winter months.
       
  • Efficacy and safety of Sijunzi Decoction for peptic ulcers: A systematic
           review and meta-analysis

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Xiaoyu Huang, Xin Sun, Xue Yu, Huinan QianAbstractObjectiveTo investigate the therapeutic efficacy and safety of Sijunzi Decoction (SJZD) for peptic ulcers (PUs) through the assessment of randomized controlled trials (RCTs).MethodsFive English and four Chinese databases were systematically searched to identify eligible RCTs that investigated the effect of SJZD for PUs. SJZD was used either independently or concomitantly with routine anti-ulcer treatments and compared with no intervention, placebo, or conventional therapy. Outcomes evaluated included ulcer healing, symptom improvement, Helicobacter pylori (Hp) eradication, ulcer recurrence, and adverse reactions. Statistical analysis and risk of bias was evaluated by Revman 5.3.ResultsFourteen trials involving 1476 participants fulfilled the selection criteria. All trials were presented with a high risk of bias. Analyses showed that modified SJZD had significant benefit on ulcer healing compared with ranitidine and sucralfate and triple therapy with omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin. Compared with this omeprazole triple therapy and therapy using pantoprazole, the addition of modified SJZD was superior. Regarding symptom improvement, modified SJZD was significantly better than ranitidine and sucralfate and had an added benefit when supplemented with either of two omeprazole triple therapies (omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin, and omeprazole, levofloxacin and furazolidone) or pantoprazole. Furthermore, modified SJZD had a favorable effect on Hp eradication compared with cimetidine and additional benefit was noted when complemented with either of the two omeprazole triple therapies or therapy consisting of omeprazole and amoxicillin. Modified SJZD was superior at reducing ulcer recurrence among healed patients compared with cimetidine. Modified SJZD with triple-drug regimen comprising omeprazole, amoxicillin and clarithromycin was also found to be more effective at reducing ulcer relapse compared with the triple therapy alone. No serious adverse events were reported.ConclusionModified SJZD, used independently or as a complementary treatment to conventional ulcer-healing treatments, promoted PU healing, alleviated symptoms, eradicated Hp, and reduced ulcer relapse. Modified SJZD was relatively safe. However, rigorous randomized controlled trials are required to provide further support for these effects because of the high risk of bias and limited sample size of the included trials.
       
  • Correlation between Tibetan and traditional Chinese medicine body
           constitutions: A cross-sectional study of Tibetan college students in the
           Tibet Autonomous Region

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Hui Luo, Ouzhu Ciren, Shujuan Hou, Qi WangAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the correlation between the body constitution types of Tibetan medicine and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).MethodsThe cluster sampling method was employed to recruit participants from a university in the Tibet Autonomous Region. Tibetan medicine and TCM questionnaires were respectively used to assess the participants' constitution information. Descriptive statistics were applied to analyze the baseline and constitution characteristics of the participants. Two-factor correlation analysis and the paired chi-square test were applied to analyze the correlation between Tibetan and TCM constitution types.ResultsData from 466 Tibetan students were analyzed. The mean scores of the rlung, mkhris pa, and bad kan constitution types in Tibetan medicine were 43.2 (11.1), 42.1 (10.1), and 45.0 (8.0), respectively; participants with the three-factor convergence body constitution type accounted for 13.7% of the whole population. Among the TCM constitution types, qi stagnation was the most common (21.5%), followed by the balance type (16.5%); the other constitutions detected were qi deficiency, yin deficiency, and yang deficiency. The rate of consistency for the identification of the three-factor convergence constitution in Tibetan medicine and the balance constitution in TCM was 89.1%, with a Kappa coefficient of 0.57 (P > .05). The rlung constitution in Tibetan medicine was associated with the yin deficiency, yang deficiency, and blood stasis constitutions in TCM. The mkhris pa constitution in Tibetan medicine was associated with the damp heat and yin deficiency constitutions in TCM. The bad kan constitution in Tibetan medicine was associated with the phlegm dampness, qi deficiency, and yin deficiency constitutions in TCM.ConclusionThere is a correlation between the body constitution types of Tibetan medicine and TCM. The reliability and validity of the Questionnaire for Tibetan Medicine Constitution requires improvement, and more studies with larger sample sizes and more varied populations are warranted to verify the correlation between Tibetan medicine and TCM constitutions.
       
  • Liu Wansu, physician and initiator of the “Cold School”

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Yinghua Huang, Yongxuan Liang
       
  • Case report: Treating Guillain–Barré syndrome with
           acupuncture–moxibustion and traditional Chinese Medicine patent
           prescription (Jingui Shenqi Pill)

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Yingying Zang, Yongji Qin, Yi Li, Zhaoyang WangAbstractBackgroundGuillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute demyelinating polyneuritis in which the immune system attacks part of the peripheral nervous system. About two-thirds of GBS patients have a history of acute infection before developing GBS. Immunotherapy and supportive therapies are widely used to treat GBS; however, one in three patients experiences neurologic sequelae. In China, acupuncture–moxibustion has shown unique benefits for the treatment of neurological diseases and has a wide range of applications in neurology.Case presentationWe treated an elderly Russian female patient diagnosed with GBS. The chief complaints were upper limb weakness, lower limb paralysis, and inability to self-care. The traditional Chinese medicine diagnosis was flaccidity syndrome (Wei Zheng). After 5 weeks of acupuncture and moxibustion combined with Chinese patent medicine treatment, the patient's limb muscle strength was significantly improved and her ability to self-care was largely restored.ConclusionThe present findings demonstrated that acupuncture and moxibustion combined with Chinese patent medicine can alleviate muscle weakness caused by GBS. However, clinical randomized controlled trials are warranted to verify the precise clinical efficacy.
       
  • Cantharidin suppresses HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cell proliferation and
           migration by changing the cytoskeleton structure

    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences, Volume 5, Issue 3Author(s): Xin Zhang, Tongtong Sui, Qixiang Ma, Haozhen Shao, Xiaowei Hu, Honghao Sheng, Zhitao Ma, Guangbin LuoAbstractBackgroundCantharidin (CTD), a natural toxin produced from Chinese blister beetles, has extensive anti-tumor activity. The present study investigated the effect of CTD on a human colon cancer cell line to elucidate potential new insights regarding the mechanism(s) through which CTD exerts its anti-tumor effects.Materials and methodsThe inhibitory effect of CTD on human colon cancer HCT116 cells was evaluated using the IncuCyte ZOOM™ analyzer. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V-FITC/PI assay and cell cycle was evaluated with flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining. Alterations in F-actin microfilaments were analyzed by FITC-phalloidin staining and morphological changes were evaluated with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Cell migration assay was carried out to investigate the effects of CTD on migration of HCT116 cells in vitro.ResultsCTD exhibited a significant growth inhibitory effect on HCT116 cells accompanied by an increase in G2/M phase cells, without a significant effect on apoptosis. CTD-treated cells also exhibited a dramatic collapse in their microfilament network and a significant reduction in cell adhesion.ConclusionCTD inhibits growth by increasing G2/M phase cells and decreasing S phase cells, revealing that CTD exerts a significant growth inhibitory effect primarily through an inhibition of cell cycle progression (a cytostatic effect). Moreover, a negative effect on cell migration may also constitute a contributing factor to its anti-tumor potential. These findings suggest the potential use for developing CTD as a novel anti-cancer therapy that targets metastasis Giving full play to CTD may inhibit tumor transfer.
       
 
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