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  Subjects -> ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (Total: 110 journals)
Showing 1 - 15 of 15 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acupuncture in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Advanced Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Alternative & Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Alternative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Alternative Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Arabian Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arteterapia. Papeles de arteterapia y educación artística para la inclusión social     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Plant Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine     Open Access  
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Boletín Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Plantas Medicinales y Aromáticas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanics : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cadernos de Naturologia e Terapias Complementares     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Herbal Medicines     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cognitive Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Complementary Therapies in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Current Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Deutsche Heilpraktiker-Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Erfahrungsheilkunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Medicinal Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Global Journal of Traditional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herba Polonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herbal Medicines Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Innovare Journal of Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health and Medicine     Open Access  
International Journal of High Dilution Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ipnosi     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Acupuncture and Herbs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asian Natural Products Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Ayurveda and Holistic Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Fasting and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ginseng Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine     Open Access  
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Drugs (An International Journal on Medicinal Herbs)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Herbal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Integrative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinally Active Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Remedies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Lekovite Sirovine     Open Access  
Médecine Palliative : Soins de Support - Accompagnement - Éthique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Acupuncture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mersin Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Lokman Hekim Tıp Tarihi ve Folklorik Tıp Dergisi     Open Access  
Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research     Open Access  
Natural solutions     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Medicinal Plant     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Plantas Medicinais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Acupuntura     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Traditional & Kampo Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Traditional Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Journal of Acupuncture - Moxibustion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Orthomolekulare Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.845
Citation Impact (citeScore): 3
Number of Followers: 17  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0965-2299 - ISSN (Online) 1873-6963
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3207 journals]
  • Zingiber officinale and oxidative stress in patients with ulcerative
           colitis: A randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Mehrnaz Nikkhah-Bodaghi, Iradj Maleki, Shahram Agah, Azita HekmatdoostAbstractObjectivesOxidative stress plays an essential role in ulcerative colitis (UC) initiation and severity. We aimed to investigate the effect of ginger as a well-known antioxidant agent on the quality of life, disease activity index and oxidative stress in patients with UC.MethodsForty six patients with active mild to moderate UC randomly assigned to consume 2000 mg/day dried ginger powder in 4 capsules or similar placebo capsules for 12 weeks. Disease activity index, quality of life and some oxidative stress factors were measured before, at the middle and at the end of the intervention through valid and reliable questionnaires and blood sampling.ResultsGinger reduced Malondialdehyde (MDA) significantly after 6 weeks (p = 0.003) and 12 weeks (p 
       
  • Green tea: A possibility in the therapeutic approach of inflammatory bowel
           diseases': Green tea and inflammatory bowel diseases
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Sandra Maria Barbalho, Henrique Bosso, Letícia M. Salzedas-Pescinini, Ricardo de Alvares GoulartAbstractObjectivethis review aimed to investigate the effects of green tea polyphenols (GTP) in Ulcerative colitis and Crohn´s Disease.Materials and MethodsThe databases used were MEDLINE–and EMBASE (October 2009 to September 2018). Studies that reported the use of green tea and its effects on IBD were included.ResultsTen articles were included in this review.DiscussionGTP play a role in reducing TNF-α, Interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-8, and 17; downregulate cyclooxygenase-mediated I kappa B kinase and transcription of NFκB. They regulate the pathways mediated by the Nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2, mitogen-activated protein kinases, and signal transducer and the activator of transcription 1/3, and also minimize the lipid peroxidation. Furthermore, GTP can stimulate antioxidant enzymes. These actions reduce inflammatory and oxidant patterns in IBD resulting in improvement of the disease scores.ConclusionsWe suggest that professionals and researchers take into account the use of GTP in further researches and in clinical practice in order to verify the real effects in humans.
       
  • Case Report of gastroparesis healing: 16 years of a chronic syndrome
           resolved after proximal intercessory prayer
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Clarissa Romez, David Zaritzky, Joshua W. BrownAbstractA male infant at two weeks of age was hospitalized vomiting forcefully. He had a pyloromyotomy. He did not improve with medical therapy. The diagnosis of gastroparesis was made after a nuclear medicine gastric emptying study and intestinal manometry. He required a gastrostomy tube (g-tube) and a jejunostomy tube (j-tube) for feeding. At 11 months of age, the j-tube was converted into a feeding jejunostomy with Roux-en-Y limb. For 16 years he was completely dependent on j-tube feeding. In November 2011, he experienced proximal-intercessory-prayer (PIP) at a church and felt an electric shock starting from his shoulder and going through his stomach. After the prayer experience, he was unexpectedly able to tolerate oral feedings. The g- and j-tube were removed four months later and he did not require any further special treatments for his condition as all symptoms had resolved. Over seven years later, he has been free from symptoms. This article investigates a case of PIP as an alternative intervention for resolving severe idiopathic gastroparesis when maximal medical management is not effective.
       
  • Adjuvant therapy with traditional Chinese medicine in a heart failure
           patient complicated by hospital-acquired pneumonia: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Wei-Chieh Chen, Hsiao-Mei Chuang, Jin-Long Huang, Siu-Wan Hung, Chia-I Tsai, Pin-Kuei FuAbstractObjectiveWe report a case of congestive heart failure complicated by hospital-acquired pneumonia that was successfully treated with traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and antibiotics.Clinical features and outcomeA 33-year-old man with a history of heart failure developed pneumonia during hospitalization. After the standard antibiotic therapy for 3 days, he continued to experience persistent fever and progressive cough with purulent sputum. Broad spectrum antibiotics did not relieve the fever or the purulent sputum; therefore, the patient requested TCM for integrated therapy, and was subsequently treated with a regiment of “clearing heat and damp excreting” decoction according to TCM theory. After three days of TCM combination therapy, the pneumonia patches significantly improved on chest X-ray. His sputum was obviously decreased in amount and the fever was complete remission in the 5th day of TCM adjuvant therapy.ConclusionIntegrated therapy with a “clearing heat and damp excreting” decoction may have improved hospital-acquired pneumonia in a patient comorbid with congestive heart failure. The anti-pyretic, anti-inflammatory, antitussive and diuretic effects of TCM may be responsible for the observed improvement. Further experimental studies are warranted to confirm the efficacy and mechanism of TCM action in the treatment of pneumonia.
       
  • Nano curcumin supplementation reduced the severity of diabetic
           sensorimotor polyneuropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: A
           randomized double-blind placebo- controlled clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Sara Asadi, Mohammad Saeed Gholami, Fereydoun Siassi, Mostafa Qorbani, Kianoosh Khamoshian, Gity SotoudehAbstractBackgroundDiabetic Sensorimotor Polyneuropathy (DSPN) is a common complication of diabetes mellitus. Curcumin is the most important ingredient found in turmeric which has a very high potential for eliminating free radicals and inhibiting oxidative stress as an antioxidant agent. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Nano-curcumin supplementation on the severity of sensorimotor polyneuropathy in patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).MethodThis parallel, double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted on 80 diabetic patients. Participants were allocated randomly to the intervention (n = 40) and the control group (n = 40). They received 80 mg of nano-curcumin or placebo capsules for 8 weeks. Anthropometric measurements, dietary intake, physical activity, glycemic indices and the severity of DSPN were measured before and after the intervention.ResultSupplementation of nano curcumin was accounted for a significant reduction in Glycated hemoglobin(HbA1c) (p 
       
  • Effects of osteopathic manipulative treatment on patients with multiple
           sclerosis: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Bruno Porcari, Margherita Russo, Antonino Naro, Cristian La Via, Massimo Pullia, Maria Accorinti, Rosaria De Luca, Rocco Salvatore CalabròAbstractObjectivesTo describe the effects of osteopathic manipulative treatment in patients affected by Multiple Sclerosis (MS).Design and settingThis is a pilot study involving 20 MS patients attending the IRCCS Neurolesi “Bonino-Pulejo”, Messina, Italy.InterventionThe clinical evaluation was performed before starting rehabilitation treatment (T0) and after 8 weeks of treatment (T1). The CG sample undergo a conventional rehabilitation training (CRT), 5 times/week for 60 min (for a total of 40 sessions), the EG performed the same CRT (but with a different frequency, i.e. 3 times/week, for a total of 24 sessions) and a specific OMT 2 times/week for 60 min (for a total of 16 sessions).Main outcome measuresWe analyzed the scores recorded in the following main scales: Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS), 10 m walking test (10mWT), Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HRS-A), and the Fatigue severity scale (FSS).ResultsOur data showed a reduction in the FSS score for the EG (40 ± 1,41 at T0 vs 37 ± 2,32 at T1; p = 0.04) but not in the CG (41 ± 2,41 at TO vs 39 ± 2,6 at T1) with an intergroup difference p 
       
  • Promising effects of purslane cream on the breast fissure in lactating
           women: A clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Azin Niazi, Sedigheh Yousefzadeh, Hassan Rakhshandeh, Habibollah Esmaily, Vahid Reza AskariAbstractObjectivesThe traditional uses of Portulaca oleracea L. (purslane) with anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity as well as anti-oxidants properties were expressed previously. This is a double-blind randomized clinical trial to evaluate the protective effects of purslane cream on the nipple fissure.MethodsAfter expressing the goals and methods of the study and obtaining written consent from 86 lactating women with nipple fissure, they were randomly divided into two groups: 43 in purslane cream group and 43 in lanolin ointment group. The score of nipple fissure before the intervention and on the third and eighth day after the study was measured using the Stour scale.ResultsThe mean score of left and right breast fissures in the group of treatment with lanolin group similar to the group of treatment with purslane cream showed a significant decrease at the third day and eighth day (P=0.001). Mann-Whitney test comparing mean score of the fissure between two groups showed that two groups were homogeneous before the intervention, but there was a significant difference between two groups on the third and eighth days (p 
       
  • Cyanide and lactate levels in patients during chronic oral amygdalin
           intake followed by intravenous amygdalin administration
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Jens Mani, Jochen Rutz, Sebastian Maxeiner, Eva Juengel, Dimitra Bon, Frederik Roos, Felix K.-H. Chun, Roman A. BlahetaAbstractThe natural compound amygdalin has gained high popularity among tumor patients as a complementary or alternative treatment option. However, due to metabolization of amygdalin to cyanide (HCN) following oral consumption, there could be a high risk of lactic acidosis caused by cyanide intoxication. The present retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate cyanide blood and lactate plasma levels of tumor patients (n = 55) before and after intravenous (i.v.) amygdalin infusion. All patients had also continuously ingested amygdalin tablets (3 x 500 mg/day), excepting on the days of i.v. administration. Each patient received one to five intravenous amygdalin treatments. The time period between each i.v. application ranged between 4–6 days. The initial i.v. dose was 6 mg (n = 28), 9 mg (n = 1), 15 mg (n = 1) or 18 mg (n = 25). The mean cyanide blood level before i.v. amygdalin administration was 34.74 μg/L, which increased significantly to a mean value of 66.20 μg/L after i. v. amygdalin application. In contrast, lactate decreased significantly from 1266 μmol/L pre-infusion to 868 μmol/L post-infusion. Increasing i.v. amygdalin by 1 mg was also associated with a significant increase in the cyanide level, while the lactate blood level significantly decreased. This is the first study evaluating cyanide levels under conditions employed by amygdalin administrators, i.e. after chronic oral amygdalin intake and then again after a closely subsequent intravenous amygdalin administration. Since lactate decreased, whilst cyanide increased, it is concluded that elevation of cyanide does not induce metabolic acidosis in terms of an increased lactate level.
       
  • Propolis supplementation improves glycemic and antioxidant status in
           patients with type 2 diabetes: A randomized, double-blind,
           placebo-controlled study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Fatemeh Afsharpour, Maryam Javadi, Sima Hashemipour, Yaghob Koushan, Hossein Khadem haghighianAbstractObjectivesThe prevalence of type 2 diabetes has risen dramatically in recent years. There are many different safe therapies used for diabetes and also number of natural supplements that can be used to manage diabetes. We assessed the effect of oral propolis supplementation on blood glucose, insulin resistance and antioxidant status in type 2 diabetes.MethodsWe conducted a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial for 8-week. Sixty two patients with type 2 diabetes (30–55 years of age) were randomly assigned in two group, propolis (n = 31) and placebo (n = 31). Patients were given doses of 500 mg, three times a day (1500 mg), of propolis or placebo three time a day. The fasting blood sugar (FBS), two-hour postprandial glucose (2-hp), insulin, insulin resistance (IR), hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and activity of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) were measured at the beginning and end of the study. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software.ResultsAfter two month, FBS, 2-hp, insulin, IR, HbA1c was significantly decreased in patients treated with propolis compared with placebo group (p 
       
  • Diagnoses associated with dietary supplement use in a national dataset
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Julie Friedman, Jen Birstler, Gayle Love, David KieferAbstractObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to determine if participant diagnosis, as determined by a health care provider, is associated with dietary supplement (DS) use.Design/settingSurveys from 1255 study participants aged 34–84, part of the Midlife in the US Study (MIDUS 2 Survey) Biomarker Project, were reviewed. Participant data included pharmaceutical use (prescription and over-the-counter medications (OTC)), clinical symptoms and diagnosis, and laboratory results. Associations were calculated between the above participant characteristics and DS use.Main outcome measuresFrequency of DS use for physician-reported diagnoses.ResultsOverall prevalence of DS use was 32.4%. Participants taking DS were more often female (p = .048), white (p 
       
  • Herbal preparations use in prevention and treatment of gastrointestinal
           and hepatic disorders—Data from Vojvodina, Serbia
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Maja Hitl, Neda Gavarić, Nebojša Kladar, Snežana Brkić, Isidora Samojlik, Gordana Dragović, Biljana BožinAbstractObjectiveGastrointestinal (GI) disorders are estimated to be frequent among general population. Various types of traditional and complementary therapies, primarily phytotherapy, can be used for prevention and treatment of many diseases and conditions, including GI complaints. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the patterns of use of medicinal herbs in treatment and prevention of GI disorders, together with their efficacy and safety.MethodsA prospective, repeated cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in the form of a specifically created questionnaire, filled in by consumers and/or patients in pharmacies on the territory of Autonomous Province of Vojvodina, Republic of Serbia. All data were statistically analyzed in Microsoft Excel 2007.ResultsIn the total number of 1137 patients, 10.4% declared themselves as consumers of phytopreparations for GI disorders. The most common diseases were constipation (44%) and dyspepsia (23%). The most frequently used preparations contained laxatives (with both anthraquinones and dietary fibers), artichoke and silymarin. Iberogast® was also frequently used. Pharmacists were the main source of recommendation for the most adequate herbal remedies. At the same time, phytopreparations were well tolerated, with no major side effects, and were evidently or presumably effective.ConclusionsSome mild and moderate GI disorders seem to be treated frequently with phytopreparatons. Various herbal remedies are well accepted by patients, and the phytopreparations seem to have favorable ratio of safety and efficacy. Further integration into conventional medicine will improve the quality of the products used and provide a rational plan of use of medicinal plants.
       
  • Relationship of daily hot water bathing at home and hot water spa bathing
           with underlying diseases in middle-aged and elderly ambulatory patients: A
           Japanese multicenter cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Hiroharu Kamioka, Yasunori Mori, Katsutaro Nagata, Shigeaki Iwanaga, Masahiko Uzura, Satoru YamaguchiAbstractThe purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship of daily hot water bathing at home (DHW) and hot water spa bathing (HSPA) with the number of underlying diseases in middle-aged and elderly ambulatory patients.We defined the number of underlying diseases as the main outcome and dependent (criterion) variable. The frequency and time of DHW and the frequency of HSPA were set as explanatory variables. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed for each frequency and time, adjusted age and sex. Odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated.Among the 1261 patients who participated, there was no significant difference in age between males (n = 508, 72.8 ± 6.8 years) and females (n = 753, 73.5 ± 6.9 years). There was also no significant age difference between males (number of diseases: 2.7 ± 2.0 pts.) and females (number of diseases: 2.7 ± 2.1 pts.) in the occurrence of underlying diseases. Frequency and time of DHW were not associated with the occurrence of underlying diseases. However, compared with participants who utilized hot water spa at least once a week, the occurrence of underlying diseases was significantly associated with bathing frequency: one to three times per month (OR 2.72, 95% CI 1.63–4.52); twice or five times a year (OR 1.92, 95% CI 1.25–2.94).In conclusion, lower frequency of HSPA was significantly associated with increased risk of the occurrence of underlying diseases in middle-aged and elderly ambulatory patients. However, the relationship between proactive use of hot water spa and patients’ mental and physical support should be clarified by well-designed cohort studies.The present study was registered as UMIN000033018 by the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR) in Japan (refer: https://upload.umin.ac.jp/cgi-open-bin/ctr/ctr_view.cgi'recptno=R000037643).
       
  • Weekly assessment of number of yoga classes and amount of yoga home
           practice: Agreement with daily diaries
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Lisa A. Uebelacker, Sage Feltus, Rich Jones, Geoffrey N. Tremont, Ivan W. MillerAbstractObjective: To evaluate a weekly yoga practice assessment instrument designed to assess number of classes attended in the previous week, number of times engaged in formal home yoga practice, total number of minutes engaged in formal home yoga practice in the past week, and number of times engaged in informal home yoga practice. “Informal” practice was defined as “in the middle of other activities, you spent a few moments engaged in asanas/postures, focus on breath, body awareness, or very brief meditation, for less than 5 min at a time.” We assessed agreement between this weekly assessment and a daily home practice log.Design and setting: Seventy-two community yoga practitioners completed online daily yoga logs for 28 days as well as the weekly yoga practice assessment four times over the 28 day period.Results: We examined agreement between the two methods on the four indices of amount of weekly yoga practice. We found acceptable agreement between the two methods for number of classes, number of times engaged in formal home practice, and total number of minutes engaged in formal home practice. Agreement was lower for number of times engaged in informal practice.Conclusions: These data provide support for use of a weekly yoga practice assessment to assess number of classes attended and amount of formal but not informal home practice.
       
  • The efficacy of Xue Fu Zhu Yu prescription for hyperlipidemia: A
           meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Sheng Wang, Xin-jian QiuAbstractHyperlipidemia is rampant as a crucial risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Xue Fu Zhu Yu (XFZY), a prescription formula in traditional Chinese medicine, is well-known for treating hyperlipidemia. Herein we conducted meta-analysis and assessed the efficacy of XFZY prescription as mono or adjunctive therapy in patients with hyperlipidemia. Databases including Medline, Cochrane Library, Embase, CNKI, Wanfang Data and VIP Information were comprehensively investigated via searching keywords “Xuefuzhuyu”, “Xuefu Zhuyu”, “Xue Fu Zhu Yu”, “Xuefu-Zhuyu” or “XFZY” in combination with “hyperlipidemia” and “dyslipidemia”. Efficacy, methodological quality, and publication bias of recruited trials on XFZY prescription were also assessed. Review Manager version 5.3 software was used for statistical analysis. Twelve trials involving 1305 participants all reported in Chinese were enrolled and, based on our analysis, significant increase of efficacy in XFZY prescription groups compared to control groups was observed, and there was either significance or non-significance of differences in regulating the levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). This meta-analysis preliminarily demonstrated that XFZY prescription is effective for treating hyperlipidemia, but due to the poor methodological quality of most analyzed trials, conclusion should be cautiously summarized. Thoroughly designed, large-scale and multicenter trials are needed to estimate efficacy and safety of XFZY prescription for hyperlipidemia in the future.
       
  • The impact of yoga in medically underserved populations: A mixed-methods
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Dagmara I. Moscoso, David Goese, Gregory J. Van Hyfte, Zelda Mayer, Loretta Cain, Frances Kobiernicki, Angela Cano-Garcia, Crystal Unzueta, L. Tatiana Ormaza, Kohar JonesAbstractObjectivesWe evaluated the acceptability, access, and impact of yoga among participants in yoga classes co-located in community health centers.DesignParticipants were invited to complete a mixed-methods program evaluation consisting of a pre/post survey at their first class and structured interviews at 4 months.SettingThe study took place at two community health centers on the South Side of Chicago, IL, USA.InterventionsFour weekly 1–1.5 hour yoga classes were provided by four certified yoga instructors trained to teach to all ability levels.MeasuresOur primary outcome measures were pain and stress before and after the first class, and at 4-months. We gathered data about participant demographics, their health problems, how they accessed the classes, and motivations and barriers to attending. We also extracted themes from participants’ qualitative feedback about their experiences.ResultsOverall, 70 participants completed the initial surveys; 44 completed the 4-month interviews. A racially and ethnically diverse group of middle- and low-income adult patients and community members attended, with flyers and word of mouth the major routes to the class. A single yoga class provided statistically significant decreases in pain and stress, but these benefits were not demonstrated at the 4-month follow-up. The primary motivators for yoga class attendance were stress relief, exercise, and overall health improvement. Primary barriers included family issues, schedule, illness, and work conflicts. Primary benefits included physical benefits, relaxation, emotional benefits, and community connectedness.ConclusionsCo-locating yoga classes in community health centers provides a variety of benefits and is a viable pathway to addressing disparities in yoga access.
       
  • Pediatric natural health products recommended by chiropractic and
           naturopathic doctors in Canada
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Antony Joseph Porcino, Leslie Solomonian, Stephen Zylich, Chantal Doucet, Brian Gluvic, Sunita VohraAbstractObjectivesTo assess chiropractic (DC) and naturopathic doctors’ (ND) pediatric care natural health product (NHP) recommendations.DesignSurveys were developed in collaboration with DC and ND educators, and delivered as an on-line national survey. NHP dose, form of delivery, and indications across pediatric age ranges (from newborn to 16 years) for each practitioner’s top five NHPs were assessed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, and non-parametric tests.ResultsOf the 421 respondents seeing one or more pediatric patients per week, 172 (41%, 107 DCs, 65 NDs) provided 440 NHP recommendations, categorized as: vitamins and minerals (89 practitioners, 127 recommendations), probiotics (110 practitioners, 110 recommendations), essential fatty acids (EFAs: 72 practitioners, 72 recommendations), homeopathics (56 practitioners, 66 recommendations), botanicals (29 practitioners, 31 recommendations), and other NHPs (33 practitioners, 34 recommendations). Indications for the NHP recommendations were tabulated for NHPs with 10 or more recommendations in any age category: 596 total indications for probiotics, 318 indications for essential fatty acids, 138 indications for vitamin D, and 71 indications for multi-vitamins.ConclusionsThis is the first study documenting the pediatric NHP recommendations of two popular complementary medicine professions. Common NHPs at standard doses are the most frequently recommended products, with use and doses adjusted according to age. High-quality evidence regarding the efficacy, safety, and dosing for NHP use in children is scarce; development of evidence-informed pediatric guidelines is recommended, particularly for the most commonly used and recommended NHPs.
       
  • The perceived therapeutic benefits of complementary medicine in eating
           disorders
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Nasim Foroughi, Kevin Chen Yu Zhu, Caroline Smith, Phillipa HayAbstractObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to investigate the perception of Complementary Medicines (CMs) in community women; to identify which CM approaches people perceived as the most beneficial; and the impact of Eating Disorder (ED) symptoms on one’s perception of treatment.Design & settingElectronic and paper-based surveys were distributed to a pre-existing cohort of community women (n = 100) aged 18 years and over. The survey included questions about the perception of CMs’ benefits in EDs regarding a vignette of a women with Anorexia Nervosa (AN), and whether CMs helped the participant’s own personal health.Main outcome measureThe mental health literacy of women with regards to the recognition, evidence-based and CM treatment, and outcomes of a fictional person with AN.ResultsExercise, yoga, meditation, relaxation, vitamins and minerals, massage and creative therapy were perceived as very helpful for someone with AN and for general health. Excluding meditation, there was no significant relationship between the levels of ED symptoms and perceived helpfulness of the therapies. Positive benefits were perceived for the use of CMs for AN.ConclusionConsidering the positive regard for these approaches, empirical studies are required to test their efficacy in the treatment of EDs.
       
  • Impacts of self-care education on adverse events and mental health related
           quality of life in breast cancer patients under chemotherapy
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Zhaoxia Wang, Guimei Yin, Rufu JiaAbstractObjectiveAs a consequence of its high incidence, breast cancer has become a severe health risk in women. Chemotherapy is one of the main treatments for breast cancer, but causes a decline in life quality of patients. Self-care is a non-medical intervention and has been reported to improve the life quality of colorectal cancer patients. We aim to explore whether self-care is also effective in breast cancer.Materials and methods85 breast cancer patients under chemotherapy participated in this research, among whom 44 patients received the self-care education. The physical and mental conditions of patients before and after chemotherapy were evaluated by Anxiety Inventory, Rotterdam Symptom checklists and QLQ-C30.ResultsThe result showed that the occurrence rates of symptoms were significantly reduced after self-care measures. Anxiety Inventory and Rotterdam Symptom checklists indicated that self-care measures could improve both the physical and mental conditions of patients. The Global Quality of Life (QoL) from QLQ-C30 questionnaire further confirmed the effectiveness of self-care measures in breast cancer patients.ConclusionsBased on the results, self-care measures are effective in improving the physical and mental conditions of breast cancer patients under chemotherapy. Self-care measures play an important role in improving patients’ life quality.
       
  • Nighttime administration of high-dose, sustained-release melatonin does
           not decrease nocturnal blood pressure in African-American patients:
           Results from a preliminary randomized, crossover trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): F.F. Rahbari-Oskoui, J.L. Abramson, A.M. Bruckman, A.B. Chapman, G.A. Cotsonis, S.A. Johnson, D.L. BliwiseAbstractObjectivesThis preliminary study tested whether a high-dose, sustained-release form of melatonin reduced 24-hour blood pressure in African-Americans.DesignRandomized, placebo-controlled, crossover pilot study of 40 self-defined African-American patients with essential hypertension.Settings/locationUrban, academic medical center and associated outpatient clinics.InterventionsPatients ingested either melatonin (high dose [24 mg], sustained-release formulation] or placebo in randomized order over a 4-week period.Outcome measuresMean nighttime and daytime systolic and diastolic blood pressures, as measured with 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitors. The primary outcome was mean nighttime systolic blood pressure.ResultsThere were no statistically differences between melatonin and placebo conditions in mean nighttime or daytime systolic or diastolic blood pressures.ConclusionsIn contrast with studies in other populations, this preliminary study showed that nighttime dosing of continuous-release melatonin had no significant effect on nocturnal blood pressure in African Americans with essential hypertension when compared to placebo.
       
  • Prevalence and profile of Australian osteopaths treating older people
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Amie Steel, Brett Vaughan, Paul Orrock, Wenbo Peng, Michael Fleischmann, Sandra Grace, Roger M. Engel, David Sibbritt, Jon AdamsAbstractObjectivesTo explore the characteristics of the Australian osteopathy workforce who participate in the management of older patients with musculoskeletal complaints.DesignSecondary analysis of a cross-sectional survey of osteopaths.SettingThe Osteopathy Research and Innovation Network (ORION), an Australian practice-based research network.Main outcome measuresThe demographic, practice and treatment characteristics of osteopaths who identify as ‘always’or ‘often’ treating patients aged 65 years or over.ResultsOver half (58%) of total participants (n = 992) indicated often treating older people and this was associated with referral patterns with other health professionals and a non-urban practice location. Osteopaths providing care to older people were more likely to discuss diet/nutrition and medications, and provide pain counselling. Osteopaths who treated older adults were more likely to treat shoulder musculoskeletal disorders, degenerative spine disorders, chronic or persistent pain, and tendinopathies.ConclusionsA substantial proportion of Australian osteopaths treat older adults frequently. The potential value and impact of osteopathy in managing the health needs of an ageing population warrants close examination from both researchers and policy makers.
       
  • Impact of complementary and alternative medicine offerings on cancer
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Alexandra G. Fitzsimmons, Deborah Vollmer Dahlke, Caroline D. Bergeron, Kasey N. Smith, Aakash Patel, Marcia G. Ory, Matthew Lee SmithAbstractObjectivesThis descriptive study investigated how cancer patient characteristics and utilization of CAM resources, services, and activities at a regional cancer center were associated with patients’ understanding of their health needs, emotional health, and their ability to self-manage their condition.DesignCross-sectional questionnaire. Sixty-one patients completed a mailed 17-item paper and pencil survey about their sociodemographics, use of CAM offerings, barriers, and perceived benefits.SettingMail-based survey completed by cancer patients in a southern state.Main outcome measuresAs a result of participating in the center’s cancer support services, patients indicated if: (1) they had a better understanding of their health needs; (2) their emotional health has improved; and (3) they take better care of themselves when they are at home and in the community.ResultsParticipants reported using 0.93 (±1.20) CAM activities (e.g., yoga), 0.62 (±0.71) resources (e.g., the library), and 1.62 (±1.34) services (e.g., monthly support groups), although also reported experiencing 0.74 (±0.81) barriers (e.g., transportation) to accessing these offerings. Perceived benefits were interrelated, where those perceiving CAM offerings to improve their understanding of their health needs also perceived improved emotional health (χ2 = 27.93, P 
       
  • Receiving/declining adjuvant breast cancer treatments and involvement in
           treatment decision-making
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Eunjung Kim, M. Robyn Andersen, Leanna J. StandishAbstractObjectivesThis study compared women who received all recommended breast cancer treatments (Receivers) with those who did not (Decliners). We sought to understand women's integrative naturopathic oncology (INO) use in addition to usual conventional oncology (UCO) use, their involvement in treatment decision-making (TDM), and their satisfaction with healthcare providers.MethodsA secondary analysis was conducted using baseline data from the Breast Cancer Integrative Oncology Study that recruited 427 women from INO clinics (INO cohort) and comparison women from the Cancer Surveillance System Registry who received UCO care (UCO cohort) in Western Washington State. Self-reported data and Registry data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, t-tests, and X2 tests to compare Receivers and Decliners in demographic and disease characteristics, use of INO in addition to UCO care, involvement in TDM, and satisfaction with healthcare providers.ResultsSignificantly more Decliners were in INO cohort than UCO cohort. Decliners in INO cohort were less likely to receive radiotherapy. Women who used INO care, and Decliners, compared with Receivers, tended to be "very involved" in their TDM. No difference was found in participation congruence, correspondence between preferred and actual involvement in medical TDM, between groups. Decliners in INO cohort reported significantly less satisfaction with their conventional oncologist than Receivers in INO cohort.ConclusionsDecliners of conventional adjuvant therapies were very involved in their TDM and those Decliners who seek INO care were less satisfied with their conventional oncologist; these women may need the most attention to assure they receive the care they need.
       
  • Efficacy of individualized homeopathic treatment of insomnia:
           Double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): James Michael, Subhas Singh, Satarupa Sadhukhan, Arunava Nath, Nivedita Kundu, Nitin Magotra, Susmit Dutta, Maneet Parewa, Munmun Koley, Subhranil SahaAbstractBackgroundInsomnia is the most common sleep-related complaint associated with impaired day-time functioning, reduced quality of life, increased morbidity and substantial societal cost. We evaluated whether individualized homeopathy (IH) could produce significant effect beyond placebo in treatment of insomnia.MethodsIn this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, two parallel arms trial, 60 patients were randomized to receive either IH/verum or control/placebo (1:1). Patient-administered sleep diary (6 items; 1: latency to fall asleep, 2: minutes awake in middle of night, 3: minutes awake too early, 4: hours spent in bed, 5: total sleep time in hours, and 6: sleep efficiency) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) were taken as the primary and secondary outcomes respectively, measured at baseline, and after 3 months.ResultsFive patients dropped out (verum: 2, control: 3). Intention to treat sample (n = 60) was analyzed. Trial arms were comparable at baseline. In the verum group, except sleep diary item 3 (P =  0.371), rest of the outcomes improved significantly (all P 
       
  • Timing of oral feeding changes in premature infants who underwent
           osteopathic manipulative treatment
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): L. Vismara, A. Manzotti, A.G. Tarantino, G. Bianchi, A. Nonis, S. La Rocca, E. Lombardi, G. Lista, M. AgostiAbstractBackgroundThe delayed transition from gavage-to-nipple feeding is one of the most significant factors that may prolong hospital length of stay (LOS). Osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) has been demonstrated to be effective regarding LOS reduction, but no investigations have documented its clinical validity for attaining oral feeding.ObjectivesTo assess OMT utility regarding the timing of oral feeding in healthy preterm infants.DesignPreliminary propensity score-matched retrospective cohort study.SettingData were extrapolated from the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Del Ponte Hospital in Varese, Italy, during the period between March 2012 and December 2013.InterventionsTwo propensity score-matched groups of healthy preterm infants aged 28+0 to 33+6 were compared, observing those supported with OMT until hospital discharge and control subjects.Main outcome measuresDays from birth to the attainment of oral feeding was the primary endpoint. Body weight, body length, head circumference and LOS were considered as secondary endpoints.ResultsSeventy premature infants were included in the study as the control group (n = 35; body weight (BW) = 1457.9 ± 316.2 g; gestational age (GA) = 31.5 ± 1.73 wk) and the osteopathic group (n = 35; BW = 1509.6 ± 250.8 g; GA = 31.8 ± 1.64 wk). The two groups had analogous characteristics at study entry. In this cohort, we observed a significant reduction in TOF (-5.00 days; p = 0.042) in the osteopathic group with a greater effect in very low birth weight infants.ConclusionsThese data demonstrate the utility and potential efficacy of OMT for the attainment of oral feeding. Further adequately powered clinical trials are recommended.
       
  • Association of traditional Chinese medicine body constitution and
           moderate-to-severe cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Ming-Hsien Yeh, Chiu-Hui Chao, Malcolm Koo, Chiu-Yuan Chen, Chia-Chou Yeh, Te-Mao LiAbstractBackground and purposeFatigue is one of the most prevalent adverse events reported by cancer patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between traditional Chinese medicine body constitution (TCMBC) and moderate-to-severe cancer-related fatigue in cancer patients.Materials and methodsA cross-sectional study was conducted on cancer patients recruited from a regional hospital in southern Taiwan. The association between TCMBC, measured using the Constitution in Chinese Medicine Questionnaire (CCMQ) and moderate-to-severe cancer-related fatigue (based on the Taiwanese version of the Brief Fatigue Inventory score ≥ 4) was evaluated using multiple logistic regression analysis.ResultsOf the 170 participants, 37 (21.8%) had moderate-to-severe fatigue. Yang-deficiency (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 3.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.50–8.40) and Qi-deficiency (aOR = 2.84, 95% CI = 1.18–6.82) TCMBC were significantly associated with moderate-to-severe cancer-related fatigue.ConclusionTCMBC could be used as a clinical tool to identify cancer patients prone to experience moderate-to-severe cancer-related fatigue, and to provide Chinese medicine practitioners a basis for selecting an appropriate treatment approach based on TCMBC.
       
  • “Will you draw me a pelvis'ˮ Dynamic neuro-cognitive imagery
           improves pelvic schema and graphic-metric representation in people with
           Parkinsonʼs Disease: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Amit Abraham, Ariel Hart, Ruth Dickstein, Madeleine E. HackneyAbstractBackgroundBody schema (i.e., the mental representations of the body), vital for motor and cognitive functions, is often distorted in people with Parkinsonʼs disease (PD). Deficits in body, and especially pelvic, schema can further exacerbate motor and cognitive deficits associated with PD. Such deficits, including those in graphic and metric misjudgments, can manifest in drawing tasks. Mental imagery is a recommended approach for PD rehabilitation with potential for ameliorating body schema.ObjectiveTo investigate the effect of a two-week dynamic neuro-cognitive imagery (DNI) training versus in-home learning and exercise control (learning/exercise) on pelvic schema and graphic representation (i.e., drawing height and width).DesignTwenty participants with idiopathic PD (Hoehn&Yahr I-III; M age: 65.75 ± 10.13) were randomly allocated into either a DNI or a learning/exercise group. Participants were asked to complete the “Draw Your Pelvisˮ test in which they drew their pelvis at pre- and post-intervention. Drawings were assessed for pelvic schema score and drawing dimensions (i.e., height and weight).InterventionDNI anatomical and metaphorical imagery focusing on pelvic anatomy and biomechanics.ResultsNo difference (p > .05) was detected at baseline between drawn pelvis height and width. Following intervention, improvements were greater in the DNI group for pelvic schema (p 
       
  • Effects of laser acupuncture in a patient with a 12-year history of facial
           paralysis: A case report
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Gil Ton, Li-Wen Lee, Yi-Hung Chen, Cheng-Hao Tu, Yu-Chen Lee
       
  • Acupuncture for treatment of anxiety, an overview of systematic reviews
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Meixuan Li, Xin Xing, Liang Yao, Xiuxia Li, Wenbo He, Meng Wang, Huijuan Li, Xiaoqin Wang, Yangqin Xun, Peijing Yan, Zhenxing Lu, Biao zhou, Xinmin Yang, Kehu YangAbstractPurposeTo evaluate the methodological quality and summarize evidence of important outcomes of systematic reviews (SRs)/Meta analyses (MAs) of acupuncture for anxiety.MethodsWe conducted a comprehensive literature search for SRs/MAs in PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane library, Chinese Biomedical Databases (CBM), Wanfang database and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) until November 30, 2018. Three reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the reviews according to the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews 2 (AMSTAR-2), the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the quality of evidence. In the pre-experiment, we used the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) to assess reviewer agreement, the ICC value for overall score was 0.978.ResultsTen reviews were included. The assessment results of AMSTAR-2 showed that the methodological quality of all included studies was critically low. The lowest score were item “provide a list of excluded studies and justify the exclusions” and item “report sources of funding for the included studies”, none of studies provided information about the above two items, followed by the “providing a priori design” item with only two (20%) studies conforming to this item. For GRADE, of the 7 outcomes, high quality evidence was provided in only 1 (14.3%), moderate in 2 (28.6.7%), and low in 4 (57.1%).ConclusionAlthough most of the included reviews indicated that acupuncture group was more effective than control group in the treatment of anxiety, more importantly, the methodological quality of the included reviews and the quality of evidence were low. More high-quality evidence is needed to determine whether acupuncture is more effective than other treatments.
       
  • Weight control and physical exercise in people with multiple sclerosis:
           Current knowledge and future perspectives
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Motahare Mokhtarzade, Hamid Agha-Alinejad, Robert W. Motl, Raoof Negaresh, Julien S. Baker, Philipp ZimmerAbstractThere is extensive data supporting a high prevalence of both overweight and obesity status in people with multiple sclerosis, and increases in body mass index has been associated with an increased risk of multiple sclerosis. Body composition may influence the course, treatment and management of multiple sclerosis. One proposed strategy for managing overweight and obesity status and associated secondary effects in people with multiple sclerosis involves increasing the levels of physical activity. In fact, increased levels of physical activity affect various physiological (endurance capacity, strength, balance) and biological processes (fat oxidation, insulin sensitivity, anti-inflammation, neurotrophic factors) which are known to be dysfunctional in multiple sclerosis and which may worsen with increases in obesity. When designing personalized exercise programs it should be kept in mind that current exercise recommendations for people with multiple sclerosis should exceed energy expenditure recommendations to efficiently counteract weight gain. Therefore, it is necessary to consider body composition as a primary endpoint in experimental studies. In addition, designing guidelines for weight control or weight loss in people MS is needed. The most comprehensive weight management guidelines are outlined in the American College of Sports Medicine Position Statement, which recommends between 150–250 min per week of moderate-intensity physical activity for preventing weight gain, and between 225–420 min per week of moderate-intensity physical activity for weight loss. These recommendations seem applicable for people with multiple sclerosis.
       
  • Comparative efficacy of Chinese herbal injections for angina pectoris: A
           Bayesian network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Kaihuan Wang, Jiarui Wu, Xiaojiao Duan, Dan Zhang, Xi Lin, Sixuan Zhang, Mengwei Ni, Shuyu Liu, Ziqi Meng, Xiaoyan Gao, Peng Tan, Yonggang LiuAbstractObjectiveThe severity of angina pectoris has been recognized. It is believed that Chinese herbal injections have an outstanding clinical effect on this condition. This network meta-analysis was devised to investigate the comparative efficacy of eight Chinese herbal injections (Ciwujia injection, Dazhuhongjingtan injection, Huangqi injection, Shenfu injection, Shengmai injection, Shenmai injection, Shenqi Fuzheng injection, Yiqifumai injection) in the treatment of angina pectoris.MethodsA literature search was performed in PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library, Chinese Biological Medicine Database, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, Wanfang Database, and Chinese Scientific Journal Database from their inception to June 25, 2018. A pre-designed eligibility criterion was utilized in this network meta-analysis, and a methodological quality analysis was conducted. Data analysis was performed by WinGUGS 1.4.3, Stata 13.0 and TSA software, and the odds ratio or mean difference with the 95% credible interval was reported for symptomatic improvement, electrocardiography improvement, fibrinogen, triglyceride and cholesterol. The ranking probability of interventions in various outcomes was also utilized.ResultsA total of 73 randomized controlled trials with 6639 patients were identified. Integrating network meta-analysis results, Shenqi Fuzheng injection plus western medicine therapy and Shenmai injection plus western medicine therapy were shown to be more efficacious than other therapies. In addition, Huangqi injection plus western medicine therapy and Shenmai injection plus western medicine therapy performed well in improving the haemorheology index and serum lipid parameters.ConclusionsEligible Chinese herbal injections plus western medicine therapy might have a better impact on angina pectoris patients than western medicine therapy alone. While this study had limitations, the findings should be interpreted with caution. In addition, more high-quality randomized controlled trials with a large sample must be conducted to support this study.
       
  • Effect of coenzyme Q10 supplementation on fatigue: A systematic review of
           interventional studies
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Sanaz Mehrabani, Gholamreza Askari, Maryam Miraghajani, Rahele Tavakoly, Arman ArabAbstractAimsA number of studies have examined the beneficial effects of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on fatigue in different population, but the findings have been inconclusive. Herein, we systematically reviewed available interventional studies to elucidate the overall effects of CoQ10 supplementation on fatigue among adolescent and adult population.MethodsPubMed, Cochrane's library, Science direct, Scopus, Google scholar and ISI web of science databases were searched for all available literature until April 2018 for studies assessing the effects of CoQ10 supplementation on fatigue. The Cochrane bias assessment tool were used to assess the quality of studies.ResultsA total of 16 studies out of 1316 met our inclusion criteria and included in our systematic review. Among included studies 10 of them showed significant beneficial effects (p 
       
  • How does yoga reduce stress' Embodied cognition and emotion highlight
           the influence of the musculoskeletal system
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Alisha L. Francis, Rhonda Cross BeemerAbstractYoga is an increasingly popular activity, perhaps because of its association with stress reduction and relaxation – an association that is generally supported by empirical evidence. Understanding of the mediating variables is, however, limited. Given that, the purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical perspective that encourages systematic research regarding the relationship between yoga, stress, and musculoskeletal activity. This embodied perspective parallels popular interest in the mind-body connection and emphasizes the influence of body position on thinking as well as emotion. Those influences take on added meaning in the context of the Cognitive Appraisal Theory and the Biopsychosocial Model of Challenge and Threat. Investigations of embodied cognition suggest that yoga may reduce stress by affecting the way individuals appraise stressors. The combination of body position and common components of yoga practice may also contribute to that effect, particularly when considering thoughts about the self and feelings of confidence. Findings regarding embodied emotion make a similar contribution to understanding the implications of previous research findings and common yoga practices. Considering yoga and stress from an embodied perspective also highlights the role of the musculoskeletal system in the stress process, leading to the question of whether yoga influences stress by directly influencing the musculoskeletal system, indirectly by influencing awareness of that system, or through a combination of the two. Those questions, in turn, highlight the importance of expanding investigations of psychological processes, body position, musculoskeletal activity during yoga, and the interactions between those variables.
       
  • Shengmai injection as an adjunctive therapy for the treatment of chronic
           obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Xingyue Huang, Xiaojiao Duan, Kaihuan Wang, Jiarui Wu, Xiaomeng ZhangAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the clinical efficacy of Shengmai injection for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) through an evidence-based approach.MethodsRandomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effect of Shengmai injection on COPD were included in this study. Seven electronic databases were searched to obtain eligible studies. The quality of the included RCTs was evaluated according to the Cochrane Risk of Bias Assessment Tool. When appropriate, meta-analysis of the data was conducted by RevMan 5.3 software and Stata 13.0 software. The relative risk (RR) or mean difference (MD) and 95% confidence interval (CIs) were reported for dichotomous or continuous outcomes, respectively. Sensitivity analysis was performed to verify the independence of the results. Funnel plots and the Begg and Egger tests were implemented to determine the potential publication bias.ResultsUltimately, 23 RCTs were included, involving 1804 participants. Meta-analysis showed that the combination of Shengmai injection and western medicine (WM) could achieve a better effect than WM alone in terms of improving the clinical total effective rate (RR = 1.20, 95% CIs: 1.15–1.24), pulmonary function (FEV1(L): MD = 0.41, 95% CIs 0.32 to 0.49; FEV1(%): MD = 6.21, 95% CIs: 2.72–9.71), blood gas index (PaO2: MD = 6.13, 95% CIs: 2.93–9.32; PaCO2: MD=-6.2, 95% CIs: -11.63 to -0.77), immunoglobulin levels (IgG: MD = 3.55, 95% CIs: 3.10–3.99; IgA: MD = 0.34, 95% CIs: 0.31to 0.38; IgM: MD = 0.35, 95% CIs: 0.27 to 0.42), C-reactive protein levels (MD = −8.05, 95% CIs: −10.11 to −6.00) and the lung rale disappearance time (MD = −2.57, 95% CIs: -3.19 to -1.95). Additionally, the CAT score, mMRC and average hospitalization time were also reduced significantly by Shengmai injection plus WM. Among 11 RCTs that mentioned safety issues, 6 RCTs found no adverse events, and the other 5 RCTs reported the details of adverse events.ConclusionShengmai injection may positively influence COPD in combination with WM. However, firm conclusions could not be draw due to the low quality of the evidence. Further high-quality studies are still required to test the efficacy of Shengmai injection for this condition.
       
  • Effects of cereal beta-glucan consumption on body weight, body mass index,
           waist circumference and total energy intake: A meta-analysis of randomized
           controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Jamal Rahmani, Ali Miri, Raminta Černevičiūtė, Jacqueline Thompson, Nurun Nisa de Souza, Rehena Sultana, Hamed Kord Varkaneh, Seyed Mohammad Mousavi, Azita HekmatdoostAbstractBackground & objective(s)Obesity is a worldwide epidemic and a common medical condition associated with a variety of chronic diseases. Cereal beta-glucans are soluble fibers with potential health benefits. A number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the effect of cereal beta-glucan consumption on weight, but these results have not been summarized in a meta-analysis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cereal beta-glucan consumption on body weight, body mass index, waist circumference and a total energy intake.MethodsStudies were identified using MEDLINE/PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane databases. Screening of relevant articles and references was carried out until December 2018. There were no language restrictions. This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed using the Preferred Items for Reporting of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines.ResultsTwenty eligible studies were identified and analyzed. Our study found a significant reduction in body weight and body mass index (BMI) following beta-glucan consumption (weighted mean difference [WMD]: −0.77 kg, 95% CI: −1.49, −0.04) and (WMD: −0.62 kg/cm2, 95% CI: −1.04, −0.21), respectively. There was no significant effect on waist circumference and energy intake. A subgroup analysis showed that a beta-glucan dose of ≥ 4 g/day lead to an increase in energy intake.ConclusionThe findings of this study indicates that cereal beta-glucan consumption seems to decrease body weight and BMI, but has no effect on waist circumference and energy intake.
       
  • Barberry (Berberis vulgaris L.) is a safe approach for management of lipid
           parameters: A systematic review and meta‐analysis of randomized
           controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Amir Hadi, Arman Arab, Ehsan Ghaedi, Nahid Rafie, Maryam Miraghajani, Marzieh KafeshaniAbstractObjectiveWe performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy of barberry supplementation on plasma lipid concentration in adult population.MethodsThe search included PubMed, Scopus, ISI Web of Science, Cochrane library, and Google Scholar (up to October 2018) to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) investigating the effects of barberry supplementation on serum lipid parameters. Mean Difference (MD) was pooled using a random-effects model.ResultsMeta-analysis on 5 RCTs with 339 participants indicated that barberry supplementation significantly decreased the levels of total cholesterol (MD: -23.58 mg/dl, 95% CI: -31.00 to -16.16, P ≤ 0.001), triglyceride (MD: -29.16 mg/dl, 95% CI: -42.91 to -15.41, P ≤ 0.001), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD: -13.75 mg/dl, 95% CI: -19.31 to -8.20, P ≤ 0.001) whereas changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (MD: 3.40 mg/dl, 95% CI: -0.06–6.87, P = 0.054) was not statistically significant.ConclusionThis systematic review and meta-analysis suggested the efficacy of barberry supplementation on lipid parameters. However, further large-scale studies are needed to confirm these results.
       
  • Baduanjin exercise for low back pain: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Huanan Li, Di Ge, Siwen Liu, Wei Zhang, Jingui Wang, Jinhua Si, Jingbo ZhaiAbstractIntroductionLow back pain (LBP) is one of the most common public health concerns worldwide. Baduanjin is very popular and widely practiced for the management of LBP. This study aims to systematically investigate the efficacy and safety of Baduanjin exercise for patients with LBP.MethodsThe PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Web of Science Core Collection, CBM, CNKI, WANFANG and VIP databases were searched from inception to August 2018 to identify potentially eligible studies. Risk of bias was assessed with the Cochrane collaboration’s tool. All statistical analyses were conducted with the RevMan 5.3 software.ResultsNine studies involving 519 patients were included in this systematic review. Our meta-analysis showed that Baduanjin was associated with a small improvement in pain relief compared with general exercise (MD= -0.50, 95% CI: -0.86 to -0.15, P = 0.005). One trial indicated that Baduanjin was superior to routine drug (ibuprofen) in alleviating pain, and the effect was moderate (MD= -1.04, 95% CI: -1.52 to -0.56, P 
       
  • The impact of cinnamon on anthropometric indices and glycemic status in
           patients with type 2 diabetes: A systematic review and meta-analysis of
           clinical trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Nazli Namazi, Kajal Khodamoradi, Seyed Peyman Khamechi, Javad Heshmati, Mohammad Hossein Ayati, Bagher LarijaniAbstractBackground and aimsThere is some evidence regarding the positive effects of cinnamon on metabolic status in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, they are conflicting. In the present study, we aimed to systematically review the effects of cinnamon on glycemic status and anthropometric indices in patients with T2DM.MethodsFive electronic databases including PubMed/Medline, SCOPUS, Web of Sciences, EMBASE, and the Cochrane library were searched until 31 February 2018 with no language limitation. Randomized clinical trials that examined the effects of cinnamon on at least fasting blood sugar (FBS) were included. Other glycemic parameters and anthropometric indices were also extracted. A random effects model with DerSimonian and Laird method was used for pooling the effect sizes.ResultsFinally, 18 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Supplementation with cinnamon reduced FBS by −19.26 mg/dL (95% CI: −28.08, −10.45; I2:96.5%; p = 0.0001) compared to placebo. However, the effects of cinnamon on HbA1C (−0.24%; 95% CI: −0.48, −0.01; I2: 76.8%, p = 0.0001), body weight (−0.46, 95%CI: −1.87, 2.30; I2:0%; p = 0.79), body mass index (WMD: −0.05 kg/m2; 95% CI: −0.52, 0.42; I2: 0%; p = 0.91), and waist circumference (WMD: −0.53 cm; 95% CI: −3.96, 2.81; I2: 0%; p = 0.66) were not significant. Additionally, cinnamon did not change the serum levels of insulin and insulin resistance significantly.ConclusionSupplementation with cinnamon can reduce serum levels of glucose with no changes in other glycemic parameters and anthropometric indices. However, due to high heterogeneity findings should be interpreted with great caution.
       
  • Bee products and the treatment of blister-like lesions around the mouth,
           skin and genitalia caused by herpes viruses—A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Karsten MünstedtAbstractObjectivesTo assess the value of bee products with respect to antiviral efficacy against herpes viruses.DesignA systematic review was done using the JUSTfind System of the Justus-Liebig-University Gießen and Scopus.ResultsThree trials on honey and 6 trials on propolis were conducted. Each trial provided evidence that these two bee products are interesting alternatives to acyclovir, especially propolis, which was found to be superior to acyclovir in 4 trials.ConclusionsThe evidence from these trials suggests that propolis is the best of all natural possibilities in the treatment of herpetic skin lesions, especially those related to HSV-1. Future studies should analyse if propolis could be an adjunct to treatment with acyclovir. For lesions in the oral cavity, honey could be an interesting alternative.
       
  • Probiotics, prebiotics, and low FODMAP diet for irritable bowel syndrome
           – What is the current evidence'
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Soo Liang Ooi, Dianne Correa, Sok Cheon PakAbstractIrritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. While the pathogenesis is not clearly understood, current research points to the role of the gut microbiome and alterations in the diversity of the microbiota. Probiotics, prebiotics, and low FODMAP diet are therapeutic means associated with modification of the gut microbiome for the alleviation of IBS symptoms.This narrative review assesses the current evidence on the efficacy of these treatment options based on findings from recent systematic reviews and meta-analyses published from October 2013 to October 2018.There is a general agreement in the 11 included systematic reviews and meta-analyses that probiotic therapy is safe and can be effective in improving overall IBS symptom scores and abdominal pain in the general IBS population. Nonetheless, conflicting findings remain and no recommendation on the specific species/strains or combination can be made.Short-term restriction of FODMAP in the diet can improve IBS symptoms as per the findings of 7 systematic reviews and meta-analyses, even though the quality of the evidence remains questionable. Inappropriate use of the low FODMAP diet can potentially impact health negatively. As such, a low FODMAP diet is only recommended as a second line treatment guided by qualified clinicians with specialized training.Despite preclinical studies of some prebiotics demonstrated the potential use in improving gut microbiome and intestinal inflammatory response, the beneficial effect of prebiotics for IBS remains theoretical. Two systematic reviews found no evidence to support the clinical use of prebiotics for IBS.
       
  • The effect of synbiotics in improving Helicobacter pylori eradication: A
           systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Makan Pourmasoumi, Ameneh Najafgholizadeh, Amir Hadi, Fariborz Mansour-Ghanaei, Farahnaz JoukarAbstractBackgroundHelicobacter pylori is a common human infection, presenting in half of the world’s population. The failure of the Helicobacter pylori eradication rate necessitates the assessment of new options. The aim of the present meta-analysis was therefore to assess the role of synbiotics in Helicobacter pylori eradication therapy.MethodsA comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Knowledge up to June 2018 to identify all randomized controlled trials assessing the effect of synbiotics on the treatment of Helicobacter pylori. A random-effects model was applied for pooling analysis to compensate for the heterogeneity of included studies. The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool was applied to assess potential bias risks.ResultsA total of 6 randomized controlled trials were found which assessed the effect of synbiotics on Helicobacter pylori eradication rate. The pooled effect size of the intention-to-treat showed that synbiotics can improve eradication rate (RR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.15–1.43; I2 = 0%). Also, common adverse events resulting from antibiotics therapy were significantly reduced by adding synbiotics to conventional antibiotics treatments (RR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.25–0.90; I2 = 36%). However, no difference in eradication rate was observed from per-protocol treatment between intervention and control groups (RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.69–1.16; I2 = 88%).ConclusionThe present systematic review and meta-analysis suggested synbiotics might improve Helicobacter pylori eradication rates, and reduce adverse effects. However, these findings assessed a low number of studies, and further high-quality studies are needed to confirm these results.
       
  • Effects of Royal jelly on metabolic variables in diabetes mellitus: A
           systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Vahid Maleki, Hamed Jafari-Vayghan, Sevda Saleh-Ghadimi, Mahsa Adibian, Sorayya Kheirouri, Mohammad AlizadehAbstractDiabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders in the world. This systematic review was conducted with focus on the current knowledge on the effect of royal jelly on metabolic variables in diabetes mellitus. PubMed, Scopus, Embase, ProQuest and Google Scholar databases were searched from inception until June 2018. All clinical trials and animal studies that evaluated the effects of royal jelly on diabetes mellitus, and were published in English-language journals were eligible. Studies that provided insufficient outcomes were excluded. Out of 522 articles found in the search, only twelve articles were eligible for analysis. Seven studies showed a significant reduction in FBS, and one reported HbA1c decrease following royal jelly supplementation. Although royal jelly supplementation resulted in significant reductions in HOM A-I R in three studies, the findings on insulin levels were controversial. In addition, royal jelly substantially improved serum levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, HDL, LDL, VLDL and Apo-A1 in diabetes mellitus. In addition, royal jelly resulted in a decrease oxidative stress indicators and increase antioxidant enzymes levels. In conclusion, royal jelly could improve glycemic status, lipid profiles and oxidative stress in diabetes mellitus. However, exploring the underlying mechanisms warrants further studies.
       
  • Case report: The use of medical yoga for adolescent mental health
    • Abstract: Publication date: April 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 43Author(s): Ina StephensAbstractMental health issues are epidemic among youth in the United States today. Recent studies suggest that up to 50% of all teenagers have complaints related to stress, anxiety, and/or depression. This problem is accompanied by an unprecedented rise in the rates of child and teen suicide in the United States. In response to this epidemic, the American Academy of Pediatrics is recommending universal depression screening for all teens. Medications are available to ameliorate mental health disorders, and many can be safely used in the primary care setting. However, many of these medications have unwanted side effects or may not be familiar to the primary care physician. For these reasons and others, primary care physicians require additional approaches to respond to the challenges imposed by a growing number of patients requiring mental health support. Medical Yoga Therapy, prescribed by a physician with special yoga therapy training, offers a safe and effective way to serve the patient with physical or mental challenges disabilities. Medical Yoga therapy is an individualized and personal approach to the patient, and it may be integrated with any current therapy or medical regimen. Here, evidence for medical yoga is reviewed in the context of an adolescent patient with a common disorder. Yoga practices, with particular focus on mindfulness, offer a safe and effective intervention for a growing number of pediatric patients.
       
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine Interventions for Perioperative
           Symptoms: A Comparative Effectiveness Study
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Samuel Attias, Elad Schiff, Ibrahim Matter, Gideon Sroka, Bluma Nae, Zahi Arnon, Noah Samuels, Ofra Grinberg, Eran Ben-Arye
       
  • The effects of Chinese herbal medicines for treating diabetic foot ulcers:
           A systematic review of 49 randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Ying Wang, Hui-Juan Cao, Li-Qiong Wang, Chun-Li Lu, Yu-Qian Yan, Hao Lu, Kang Zhang, Hui-Min Zhang, Jian-Ping LiuAbstractObjectiveTo assess the effects and associated risks of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU).MethodsWe systematically searched seven electronic databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) about Chinese herbal medicines for treating diabetic foot ulcers. The methodological quality of RCTs was assessed by the Cochrane risk of bias tool. Data was synthesized using review manager (RevMan) 5.3. Meta-analysis was conducted if the data were available. A summary of finding table was generated by GDT online.ResultsForty-nine RCTs, all conducted in China, involving 3646 participants were included. Most of the included trials had unclear or high risk of bias. Twenty-six trials could be pooled in five Meta-analyses, the remaining trials could not be pooled due to the obvious clinical heterogeneity. Only low evidence showed CHM therapy may have 42% to 60.4% participants healed completely after treatment, approximately twice (RR 1.42 to 1.76) as much as the healed rates in conventional therapy (or plus hot water foot bath) group. Majority of the included trials reported benefit of CHM group on shortening healing time (4 to 23 days) and reducing ulcer wound size (at least 2 cm2). No serious adverse events were reported related to the medication in all trials.ConclusionWeak evidence showed benefit of CHM as add-on treatment of conventional therapy on increasing number of ulcer heals in patients with DFU. That's about twice the healing rate of the conventional treatment (or plus hot water foot bath) group. With insufficient information, we could not draw confirmative conclusion on safety of CHM administration. These findings need to be tested in further large, rigorous trials.
       
  • Intervention Fidelity Monitoring of Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT)
           for Persons with Pulmonary Hypertension
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Tania Von VisgerAbstractBackgroundSystematic and consistent dose delivery is critical in intervention research. Few studies testing complementary health approach (CHA) interventions describe intervention fidelity monitoring (IFM) and measurement.ObjectiveTo describe methodological processes in establishing and measuring consistent dose, delivery, and duration of a multi-component CHA intervention.MethodsAdults with pulmonary hypertension received six weekly, 1-hour Urban Zen Integrative Therapy (UZIT) sessions. A total of 78 sessions were delivered and 33% of these sessions were audited. Intervention dose (time allocated to each component), intervention consistency (protocol adherence audits), and intervention delivery (performance and sequence of components) were captured using remote video observation and review of the recorded video. IFM audits were performed at the beginning (n = 16), middle (n = 5), and end (n = 5) of the study.ResultsUZIT interventionists adhered to the intervention protocol (99.3%) throughout the study period. Interventionists delivered UZIT components within the prescribed timeframe: 1) Beginning: gentle body movement (18.9 ± 5.8 min.), restorative pose with guided body awareness meditation (21.3 ± 2.7 min.), and Reiki (22.8 ± 3.1 min.); 2) Middle: gentle body movement (15.9 ± 1.5 min.), pose/body awareness meditation (30.1 ± 6.5 min.), and Reiki (30.1 ± 7.0 min.); 3) End: gentle body movement (18.1 ± 3.6 min.), pose/body awareness meditation (35.3 ± 6.4 min.), and Reiki (34.5 ± 7.0 min.). Essential oil inhalation was delivered during UZIT sessions 100% of the time. Interventionists adhered to treatment delivery behaviors throughout the study period: beginning (98.86%), middle (100%), and end (100%).DiscussionIn this pilot study, we demonstrated that the dose, consistency, and delivery of multi-component CHA therapy can be standardized and monitored to ensure intervention fidelity.
       
  • The Effects of Physical Activity on Cancer Prevention, Treatment and
           Prognosis: A Review of the Literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Diego Lugo, Alma L. Pulido, Christos G. Mihos, Omar Issa, Mike Cusnir, Sofia A. Horvath, Jeffrey Lin, Orlando SantanaAbstractIntroductionThe World Health Organization has reported that approximately 35% of cancer-related deaths are attributed to modifiable risk factors. Among the most important risk factors amenable to modification are obesity and lack of physical activity. The purpose of this article is to review the current evidence of the benefits of physical activity in various types of cancer.MethodsA PubMed search for the key words “physical activity and cancer” as well as “exercise and cancer” was used to identify all indexed publications on this topic for potential utilization in this review. One MET was defined as the amount of oxygen consumed while a person is sitting quietly and is about 3.5 mL O2/kg body weight/min. MET represents the ratio of the working metabolic rate to the resting metabolic rate.ResultsRoutine physical activity was found to be associated with a reduced incidence of several of the most common malignancies, including colon, breast, lung, and endometrial cancer as well as many others. Physical activity also appears to reduce all-cause mortality and cancer-related mortality among patients with breast and colon cancer, and may improve the functional status and quality of life for these patients during cancer therapy.ConclusionsThe benefits of physical activity in the prevention and progression of cancer patients are multiple. However, the strength of the available evidence is limited by the observational nature of most studies. Given the probable improvement in prevention, mortality, and quality of life with structured physical activity in different malignancies, it is important that healthcare providers discuss physical activity programs with their cancer patients. Larger randomized trials are recommended.
       
  • Echinacea for the prevention and treatment of upper respiratory tract
           infections: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Sholto David, Rebecca Cunningham
       
  • “Evaluation of the Effect of Roasted lentil flour (lentil savigh) as a
           Functional Food in Menstrual Bleeding Reduction”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 18 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Malihe Shafiee, Akram Heidari, Hora Amouzegar, Samira Khani, Fateme NojavanAbstractBackgroundMenorrhagia is a regular menstrual cycle lasting more than seven days and/or blood loss over 80 mL per cycle. One of the herbs recommended in Iranian traditional medicine for menorrhagia treatment is lentil savigh, which is the flour made from roasted lentil (Lens culinaris medic).MethodsThe current randomized clinical trial was conducted on 54 patients within the age range of 18 to 50 years randomly divided into two groups. The treatment group took three 10-gram lentil savigh sachets in the morning. The control group was treated with 500 mg tranexamic acid capsule every eight hours, both from the first day of menstruation for seven days. Patient's bleeding was evaluated by the pictorial blood loss assessment chart (PBAC), before and in each of the three treatment cycles. Quality of life was evaluated by the menorrhagia questionnaire (MQ) at the beginning and the end of the study for each patient.ResultsThe mean (SD) of PBAC scores significantly decreased before and after three cycles from 383.5(163) to 222.1(128.6) in the lentil savigh group (P 
       
  • A Pilot Study of Mindful Walking Training on Physical Activity and Health
           Outcomes among Adults with Inadequate Activity
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Lu Shi
       
  • Device and Non-Device-Guided Slow Breathing to Reduce Blood Pressure: A
           Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Ashish Chaddha, Daniel Modaff, Christopher Hooper-Lane, David A. FeldsteinAbstractObjectivesInterest is increasing in nonpharmacological interventions to treat blood pressure in hypertensive and prehypertensive patients at low cardiac risk. This meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assesses the impact of device-guided and non-device-guided (pranayama) slow breathing on blood pressure reduction in these patient populations.MethodsWe searched PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Web of Science, BIOSIS (Biological Abstracts) Citation Index and Alt HealthWatch for studies meeting these inclusion criteria: randomized controlled trial or first phase of a randomized cross-over study; subjects with hypertension, prehypertension or on antihypertensive medication; intervention consisting of slow breathing at ≤10 breaths/minute for ≥5 minutes on ≥3 days/week; total intervention duration of ≥4 weeks; follow-up for ≥4 weeks; and a control group. Data were extracted by two authors independently, the Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool assessed bias risk, and data were pooled using the DerSimonian and Laird random effects model. Main outcomes included changes in systolic (SBP) and/or diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and/or decreased antihypertensive medication.ResultsOf 103 citations eligible for full-text review, 17 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Overall, slow breathing decreased SBP by -5.62 mmHg [-7.86, -3.38] and DBP by -2.97 mmHg [-4.28, -1.66]. Heterogeneity was high for all analyses.ConclusionsSlow breathing showed a modest reduction in blood pressure. It may be a reasonable first treatment for low-risk hypertensive and prehypertensive patients who are reluctant to start medication.Condensed AbstractThis meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials assesses the impact of device-guided and non-device-guided (pranayama) slow breathing on blood pressure reduction in hypertensive and prehypertensive patients who are at low cardiac risk. Overall, slow breathing decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) by -5.62 mmHg [-7.86, -3.38] and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by -2.97 mmHg [-4.28, -1.66]. Heterogeneity was high for all analyses. Slow breathing showed a modest reduction in blood pressure and may be a reasonable first treatment for low-risk hypertensive and prehypertensive patients who are reluctant to start medication.
       
  • Effect of soy milk consumption on glycemic status, blood pressure,
           fibrinogen and malondialdehyde in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver
           disease: a randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Zahra Maleki, Shima Jazayeri, Omid Eslami, Farzad Shidfar, Agha Fatemeh Hosseini, Shahram Agah, Hamed NorouziAbstractObjectiveDiet plays a critical role in the management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Studies on the NAFLD's experimental models have reported that soy had positive effects on the improvement of metabolic parameters. However, there is a lack of clinical trials regarding the efficacy of whole soy foods. Therefore, this study was conducted to determine the effect of soy milk on some of the metabolic characteristics in patients with NAFLD.MethodsSixty-sex patients diagnosed with NAFLD were included in this randomized, parallel, controlled trial and were randomly assigned to either the soy milk or control group. Both groups received a 500-deficit calorie diet plan. Also, patients in the soy milk group consumed 240 ml/day soy milk for 8 weeks. Fasting blood sugar (FBS), serum insulin, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β%, and QUICKI as well as serum malondialdehyde (MDA), plasma fibrinogen, and blood pressure (BP) were measured at the beginning and end of the study.ResultsAfter 8-weeks of intervention, soy milk group had a greater significant reduction in serum insulin(-3.44 ± 5.02 vs. -1.09 ± 3.77 µIU/ml, P = 0.04), HOMA-IR (-0.45±0.64 vs -0.14 ± 0.47, P = 0.03), systolic ( -3.81±4.15 vs -1.48±2.93 mmHg, P = 0.01) and diastolic (-2.39±2.80 vs. -0.94±2.76 mmHg, P = 0.04) BP, and also, a significant increase in QUICKI (0.02± 0.032 vs. 0.008±0.018, P = 0.04) compared to the control group. While, changes in the FBS, HOMA-β%, fibrinogen, and MDA were not significantly different between the study groups.ConclusionA low-calorie diet containing soy milk had beneficial effects on serum insulin, HOMA-IR, QUICKI, and BP in patients with NAFLD.
       
  • Response to Middleton KR et als. Yoga and SLE
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 28 February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Jennifer Lee, Christian A. Pineau, Deborah Da Costa, Ann E. Clarke, Paul R. Fortin, Carolyn Neville, Autumn Neville, Sasha Bernatsky
       
  • The Effect of Quercetin on Iron Overload and Inflammation in
           β-thalassemia Major Patients: A Double-blind Randomized Clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 26 February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Zohreh Sajadi Hezaveh, Azita Azarkeivan, Leila Janani, Sharieh Hosseini, Farzad ShidfarAbstractObjectivesThe aim of this study was to determine whether quercetin can reduce iron overload and inflammation in thalassemic patients.MethodsEighty four patients were recruited to this study and randomly assigned to two groups: 42 patients received a 500 mg/day quercetin tablet and 42 others took a 500 mg/day starch placebo for 12 weeks. Demographic, anthropometric and biochemical evaluation were performed.ResultsANCOVA analysis revealed that compared to the control group, quercetin could reduce high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) (P = 0.046), iron (p = 0.036), ferritin (p = 0.043), and transferrin saturation (TS) (p = 0.008) and increase transferrin (p = 0.045) significantly, but it had no significant effect on total iron binding capacity (TIBC) (p = 0.734) and tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) (p = 0.310).ConclusionsQuercetin could ameliorate the iron status in thalassemia major, but its effect on inflammation is indistinctive.
       
  • Treatment of Hyperemesis Gravidarum with Anthroposophic Complex Therapy in
           3 Case Reports
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in MedicineAuthor(s): Evelyne Kloter, Gisa Gerstenberg, Tanja Berenyi, Bernadette Gollmer, Christine Flüger, Ulrike Klein, Jutta Eberhard, Angela Kuck, Ursula WolfAbstractBackgroundHyperemesis gravidarum (HG) is generally characterized by intractable nausea and vomiting which interferes with daily life. As the cause of HG has not yet been clearly identified, conventional medicine therapies address only the symptoms. Conventional treatment is also effective for a comparatively short time and may have unfavorable side effects. Given that the condition affects more than 1% of pregnant women, there is significant need for effective long-lasting treatments with limited side effects.Case reportsThis paper is based on three case reports of pregnant women suffering from HG. They received inpatient treatment based exclusively on anthroposophic approaches at the Paracelsus Hospital Richterswil, Switzerland. Treatments were selected individually based on the specific patient profiles and included infusion therapy with Nux vomica, Solum uliginosum compositum and Bryophyllum pinnatum as well as art therapy (wet-on-wet painting), eurythmy therapy and rhythmical massage therapy. Anthroposophic complex therapies induced an improvement in symptoms of nausea and vomiting within one week in all three cases.ConclusionAnthroposophic complex therapy is a valuable option in the treatment of HG. Well-tolerated and long-lasting, it represents a holistic and causal approach that does not only address symptoms.
       
  • Almond oil for patients with hyperlipidemia: A randomized open-label
           controlled clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Mohammad Javad Zibaeenezhad, Parham Ostovan, Seyed Hamdollah Mosavat, Mahmood Zamirian, Armin AttarAbstractBackgroundCardiovascular diseases currently account for nearly half of non-communicable diseases. It was shown that enjoying a handful of nuts every day can significantly reduce the risk of developing heart diseases as they contain a variety of nutrients and other bioactive substances contributing to lowering the risk of heart diseases and controlling the cholesterol. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of almond oil on the lipid profile of patients with hyperlipidemia.MethodsNinety-seven patients were divided into the intervention (n = 49) and control (n = 48) groups. The intervention group received 10 ml of almond oil two times daily for 30 days. There was no intervention for the control group. The serum lipoproteins were measured before and after the study.ResultsThe total cholesterol and LDL levels decreased significantly in the intervention group (treatment difference = -16.12 ± 26.16, P = 0.009; treatment difference = -20.88 ± 18.4, p 
       
  • Psychophysical and psychophysiological effects of heat stimulation by
           electric moxibustion
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Beomku Kang, Won-Mo Jung, Hyejung Lee, Younbyoung ChaeAbstractObjectivesTraditional moxibustion might be not safe due to the excessive heat stimulation or toxic chemical components involved. Electric moxibustion (EM), which has been recently developed as an alternative, offers adjustable and constant heat stimulation. This study aimed to investigate the psychophysical and psychophysiological responses to EM heat stimulation.MethodsTwenty-seven healthy volunteers received two different levels of heat stimulation using EM. High-temperature (HT) and medium-temperature (MT) heat stimulations were randomly delivered at the TE5 acupoint on the left or right arm. Participants rated the intensity and the spatial information of the heat sensations immediately after each EM stimulation. Local blood flow around the acupoint was measured with Laser Doppler perfusion imaging before and after heat stimulation.ResultsBoth HT-EM and MT-EM induced considerable heat sensations and enhanced local blood flow around the acupoints. HT-EM resulted in greater heat sensation compared to MT-EM. HT-EM induced a higher increase in local blood flow around the stimulation site compared to MT-EM. No remarkable adverse effects were noted.ConclusionTwo different levels of EM heat stimulation induced two different levels of heat sensations and enhanced local blood flow. This preliminary study suggests that the newly developed EM can be further applied to examine the effectiveness of moxibustion in clinical trials.
       
  • A randomised controlled trial of Lavender (Lavandula Angustifolia) and
           Lemon Balm (Melissa Officinalis) essential oils for the treatment of
           agitated behaviour in older people with and without dementia
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Karen Watson, Deborah Hatcher, Anthony GoodAbstractObjectiveLavender and Lemon Balm essential oils are popular in the management of older person agitation due to their ease of application, minimal side effects and low interaction with concurrent medications. This study addressed limitations in the literature to evaluate and compare effectiveness of Lavender and Lemon Balm essential oils on the agitated behaviour of older people with and without dementia living in residential aged care facilities [RACFs].MethodsForty-nine nursing home residents with dementia (n=39) and without dementia (n=10) exhibiting agitation participated in this study. Participants were randomised to a counterbalanced, repeated measures design experiment that tests the treatments Lavender, Lemon Balm, and Placebo (Sunflower oil). Treatments were administered once daily for two-weeks followed by a two-week washout period before commencing the subsequent treatment. All participants trialed all three treatments over a 10-week period. Data were collected on the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) and Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI).ResultsA significant difference was shown when essential oils effect were compared between the cognitive groups. Post hoc analysis reports Lemon Balm more effective in reducing NPI agitation (p = .04) and CMAI physical non-aggressive behaviour (PNAB) (p = .02) in residents without dementia. Lemon Balm less effective in reducing NPI irritability (p = 0.01) and Lavender more effective in reducing CMAI PNAB (p = 0.04) in dementia.ConclusionThe findings support an opposing effect of Lemon Balm and Lavender in reducing agitated behaviour between the participant cognitive groups. There was no reduction in agitation with treatments when compared to placebo independent of cognitive groups.
       
  • Black elderberry (Sambucus nigra) supplementation effectively treats upper
           respiratory symptoms: A meta-analysis of randomized, controlled clinical
           trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Jessie Hawkins, Colby Baker, Lindsey Cherry, Elizabeth DunneAbstractUpper respiratory symptoms are often treated with over the counter drugs, antibiotics, and antiviral medications. Due to concerns about safety and efficacy, there is a demand for an alternative solution. Black elderberry (Sambucus nigra) has been used to treat cold and flu symptoms, but there are no large-scale studies or meta-analyses. This meta-analysis quantifies the effects of elderberry supplementation and evaluates moderators including vaccination status and the underlying pathology.This analysis included a total of 180 participants and evaluates moderators such as vaccination status and cause of the upper respiratory symptoms.Supplementation with elderberry was found to substantially reduce upper respiratory symptoms. The quantitative synthesis of the effects yielded a large mean effect size. These findings present an alternative to antibiotic misuse for upper respiratory symptoms due to viral infections, and a potentially safer alternative to prescription drugs for routine cases of the common cold and influenza.
       
  • Effects of low-power laser auriculotherapy on the physical and emotional
           aspects in patients with temporomandibular disorders: A blind, randomized,
           controlled clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Manuel da Fonseca Rodrigues, Marisa Lupes Rodrigues, Kimberly Suellen Bueno, Janaina Paula Aroca, Veridiana Camilotti, Mauro Carlos Agner Busato, Márcio José MendonçaAbstractObjectivesThis study evaluated the effects of low-power laser auriculotherapy (LA) on the physical and emotional symptoms of patients with temporomandibular disorders (TMDs), in comparison with occlusal splints (OS).DesignRandomized, blinded, prospective, non-inferiority clinical trial.InterventionsThe patients received OS (control group) or LA (experimental group).Main outcome measuresFollowing the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) guidelines, patients with TMD were evaluated by using axes I and II of the Research Diagnostic Criteria for RDC-TMD. Both intra- and intergroup quantitative variables were analyzed with ANOVA (p 
       
  • Study of the mechanisms of action of the hypoalgesic effect of pressure
           under shock waves application: A randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Alberto García-Muntión, Loris Godefroy, Hugo Robert, Daniel Muñoz-García, César Calvo-Lobo, Ibai López-de-Uralde-VillanuevaAbstractObjectiveTo determine if the perceived pain intensity during the application of shock waves (SWs) is a determinant mechanism in producing hypoalgesic changes in pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) in asymptomatic individuals.DesignA randomised, single-blind controlled trial [NCT03455933].SettingUniversity.ParticipantsSixty-three asymptomatic individuals.InterventionsParticipants were randomised into three groups: 1-SWs causing mild pain (SW-DP); 2-SWs generating moderate pain (SW-MP); and 3-cold pressor test (CPT).Main outcome measurementsBefore and after the intervention, the PPT was evaluated bilaterally at the following points: lateral epicondyle, median nerve in the flexure of the elbow, and tibia.ResultsThe results showed differences between various groups over time for all PPTs assessments, due to the existence of statistically significant differences in the interaction group x times (dominant arm lateral epicondyle [P 
       
  • Should acupuncture, biofeedback, massage, Qi gong, relaxation therapy,
           device-guided breathing, yoga and tai chi be used to reduce blood
           pressure': Recommendations based on high-quality systematic reviews
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Jian-fei Niu, Xiao-feng Zhao, Han-tong Hu, Jia-jie Wang, Yan-ling Liu, De-hua LuAbstractBackgroundThis review aims to rate the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendations in high-quality systematic reviews of non-drug therapies. Hypertensive patients who are resistant or non-adherent to antihypertensive drugs may be easier to manage if they choose alternative non-drug therapies for hypertension, based on this review.MethodsP: Adults (>18 years), except pregnant women, with essential hypertension. I: Cupping, moxibustion, acupuncture, acupoint stimulation, yoga, meditation, tai chi, Qi gong, Chinese massage, massage, spinal manipulation, biofeedback, device-guided breathing therapy, aromatherapy, music therapy, and relaxation approaches. C: 1. No treatment. 2. Sham therapy. 3. Conventional treatment, including antihypertensive drugs and lifestyle modification (e.g., exercise). O: 1. Change in the incidence of cardiovascular death. 2. Change in the incidence of myocardial infarction. 3. Change in the incidence of stroke. 4. Change in blood pressure (BP). 5. Efficacy rate of BP lowering. 6. Adverse effects (review specific). S: Systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials, including meta-analyses and assessments of the methodological quality/risk of bias.Information sourcesCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects, Cochrane library, PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Chinese Scientific Journal Database were searched. The bibliographies of the included articles were also searched for relevant systematic reviews. GRADE criteria were used to rate the quality of evidence in systematic reviews considering 6 factors, including risk of bias.ResultsThis review ultimately included 13 systematic reviews of 14 non-drug therapies (acupuncture, wet cupping, Baduanjin, blood letting, auricular acupuncture, music, massage, Qi gong, moxibustion, relaxation therapies, biofeedback, device-guided breathing, yoga and tai chi) based on the inclusion criteria. The quality of evidence was generally low, and weak recommendations were given for most therapies except massage and acupuncture plus antihypertensive drug. Based on the analyzed evidence, massage and acupuncture plus antihypertensive drug could benefit people who want to lower their BP and do not have contraindications for massage and acupuncture plus antihypertensive drug.Discussion/StrengthThe GRADE approach makes this review a unique reference for people who are considering the grade of quality of evidence in systematic reviews, the balance of desirable and undesirable consequences and the strength of recommendations to decide which intervention should be used to reduce BP.LimitationsMany non-drug therapies were excluded due to the low methodological quality of their systematic reviews, and only 14 therapies were evaluated in this review. As no patient-important outcomes were reviewed, surrogate outcomes were used to rate the strength of recommendations. This approach may cause a decrease in evidence quality according to GRADE, but we argue that this is appropriate in the context of this review.
       
  • Can increasing the prevalence of vegetable-based diets lower the risk of
           osteoporosis in postmenopausal subjects' A systematic review with
           meta-analysis of the literature
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Ling-Feng Zeng, Wei-Yi Yang, Gui-Hong Liang, Ming-Hui Luo, Ye Cao, Hong-Yun Chen, Jian-Ke Pan, He-Tao Huang, Yan-Hong Han, Di Zhao, Jiong-Tong Lin, Sen-Rong Hou, Ai-Hua Ou, Zi-Tong Guan, Qi Wang, Jun LiuAbstractObjectivesSeveral epidemiological investigations have assessed the association between vegetable-based diet intake (VDI) and risk of osteoporosis in postmenopausal subjects (OPS), but the outcomes have been inconsistent. We performed a review of the updated literature to evaluate this correlation.MethodsWe searched for relevant studies published in September 2018 or earlier. Two researchers conducted eligibility assessment and data extraction. Discrepancies were resolved through consultation with a third expert. Pooled odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).ResultsTen studies, which included 14,247 subjects, were identified. On comparing the highest category of VDI consumption with the lowest category of VDI consumption, the pooled OR for OPS was 0.73 (95% CI = 0.57–0.95), i.e., participants with a higher intake of vegetables had a 27% (95% CI = 5–43%) lower risk of OPS. Significant benefits were found on subgroup analyses of case-control studies (OR, 0.61 [95% CI, 0.48–0.78]), but not on subgroup analyses of cross-sectional studies (OR, 0.82 [95% CI, 0.57–1.16]). The synthesized effect estimates were in the direction of decreased risk of OPS on subgroup analyses of the femoral region (OR, 0.57, 95% CI = 0.41–0.80) and the lumbar spine (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.38–0.81), but not on subgroup analyses of the calcaneus (OR = 0.85, 95% CI = 0.33–2.16) and the lumbar and/or femoral region (OR = 1.04, 95%CI = 0.79–1.38). Positive results were observed on pooled analyses of the Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) measurement method (OR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.54–0.95]), but not on pooled analyses of the Standardized Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) measurement method (OR, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.33–2.16]). This might have resulted from a type II error due to wide confidence intervals and less number of included studies.ConclusionThis meta-analysis seemingly confirms that higher consumption of VDI was associated with a lower risk of OPS. Taken together, these results highlight the need for future high-quality design-based trials on quantified vegetable intake and OPS.
       
  • Brain activity in patients with deficiency versus excess patterns of major
           depression: A task fMRI study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Yong-zhi Wang, Yu Han, Jing-jie Zhao, Yi Du, Yuan Zhou, Yan Liu, Yin-feng Zhang, Li LiAbstractObjective:Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may experience a series of emotional and mental problems accompanied by characteristic clinical symptoms. Depressive patients often have emotional recognition disorders, but the reasons remain unclear. Though a great many functional abnormalities have been observed in the brains of depressed patients, such abnormalities are not often related to clinical symptoms. Currently in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), syndrome differentiation for the MDD mainly consists of excess pattern (EP), and deficiency pattern (DP). EP and DP emphasize balance-regulation thought processes, and are widely used in diagnosis of diseases including depression, anxiety, insomnia, and other emotional disorders. We hope that syndrome differentiation in TCM can combine clinical symptoms and brain function more effectively. The present study investigated altered patterns and different association of brain activation in MDD patients with EP and DP during a facial emotion discrimination task with fMRI.Methods:A total of 45 patients (20 with EP and 25 with DP) and 18 normal controls participated in this study. Whole-brain functional scans were collected for each subject. Different patterns of brain activation and association during the facial emotion discrimination task were analyzed statistically.Results:Comparing all the MDD patients with the normal controls, there were no significant differences for sad vs. neutral condition or for happy vs. neutral condition (corrected p >  0.05). One-way ANCOVA showed significant differences in the left inferior frontal gyrus, the left insula, and the left caudate for sad vs. neutral condition across the DP, EP and NC groups (corrected p 
       
  • Neural network analysis of Chinese herbal medicine prescriptions for
           patients with colorectal cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Yu-Chuan Lin, Wei-Te Huang, Shi-Chen Ou, Hao-Hsiu Hung, Wie-Zen Cheng, Sheng-Shing Lin, Hung-Jen Lin, Sheng-Teng HuangAbstractTraditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) is an experiential form of medicine with a history dating back thousands of years. The present study aimed to utilize neural network analysis to examine specific prescriptions for colorectal cancer (CRC) in clinical practice to arrive at the most effective prescription strategy. The study analyzed the data of 261 CRC cases recruited from a total of 141,962 cases of renowned veteran TCM doctors collected from datasets of both the DeepMedic software and TCM cancer treatment books. The DeepMedic software was applied to normalize the symptoms/signs and Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) prescriptions using standardized terminologies. Over 20 percent of CRC patients demonstrated symptoms of poor appetite, fatigue, loose stool, and abdominal pain. By analyzing the prescription patterns of CHM, we found that Atractylodes macrocephala (Bai-zhu) and Poria (Fu-ling) were the most commonly prescribed single herbs identified through analysis of medical records, and supported by the neural network analysis; although there was a slight difference in the sequential order. The study revealed an 81.9% degree of similarity of CHM prescriptions between the medical records and the neural network suggestions. The patterns of nourishing Qi and eliminating dampness were the most common goals of clinical prescriptions, which corresponds with treatments of CRC patients in clinical practice. This is the first study to employ machine learning, specifically neural network analytics to support TCM clinical diagnoses and prescriptions. The DeepMedic software may be used to deliver accurate TCM diagnoses and suggest prescriptions to treat CRC.
       
  • Pediatric perioperative measures of sleep, pain, anxiety and anesthesia
           emergence: A healing touch proof of concept randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Laura E. James, Michele M. Gottschlich, Judith K. Nelson, Lois C. Cone, John E. McCallAbstractBackground and purposeThe purpose of this study was to determine the impact of healing touch (HT) on sleep, anxiety, anesthesia emergence and pain.MethodsHT, sham HT, control with an aide (CP) and control groups without the presence of an aide (CNP), underwent polysomnography (PSG) preoperatively. The Yale Preoperative Anxiety Scale (YPAS) score was obtained preoperatively before medications were given and in the preoperative surgery area. Sedation score, anesthesia emergence score and vital signs were recorded. Pain scores were determined by the Observation Pain Assessment Scale (OPAS) postoperatively and at time of discharge. Preoperative laboratory blood was drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP), glucose, cortisol and vitamin D25 levels as indicators of stress and anxiety, and a HT satisfaction survey was given.ResultsThirty-nine patients consented to participate and were randomly assigned to HT (9), HT sham (12), CP (7) and CNP (11) groups. Mean patient age was 13.0 years, and no significant group differences were found for age, sex, race or patient procedure, categorized as laser, burn reconstruction and plastic surgery reconstruction. Additionally, no significant group differences were detected for any of the PSG parameters, YPAS scores, OPAS scores, medications, anesthesia emergence score, bloodwork or satisfaction survey score. CRP, glucose and cortisol levels were higher in the CNP group, suggesting that pediatric patients undergoing elective surgeries may benefit from more pre-operative support, possibly by HT.ConclusionsAlthough no tracked parameters showed statistically significant findings, anecdotal HT benefits included enhanced relaxation and sounder sleep.
       
  • Chinese herbal medicine reduces acute hepatitis exacerbation in patients
           with hepatitis B virus infection: A case-control study in Taiwan
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Wan-Ling Chen, Ching-Heng Lin, Chun-Che Huang, Chia-I TsaiAbstractObjectivesLittle information is available about the impact of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) treatment on acute exacerbation of hepatitis. This study aimed to assess the risk of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma in HBV patients with and without CHM use.Design and settingThis population-based case-control study used data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database from 2000 to 2013. Newly diagnosed HBV patients had acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma as the case group, while another patients had no acute exacerbation of hepatitis and cirrhosis and hepatoma as the control group. To correct the differences in sociodemographic factors and Western medication use between the two groups, propensity score matching was used at a 1:1 ratio, and resulted in a comparison of 1306 and 805 patients per group, respectively.Main outcome measuresOccurrence of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma.ResultsOverall rate of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma was 7.9% and 4.8%, respectively. Patients receiving CHM had a significantly lower risk of acute exacerbation of hepatitis (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] =0.20, 95% confidence interval [95%CI]: 0.13–0.31) and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma (aOR = 0.29, 95%CI: 0.18–0.49) than those not receiving CHM after adjusting for relevant covariates. However, no dose-dependent relationship was exhibited for either incidence of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and cirrhosis and hepatoma.ConclusionThese findings highlight that the use of CHM was associated with a significantly reduced risk of acute exacerbation of hepatitis and subsequent cirrhosis and hepatoma in patients with HBV. Future research could further explore the benefit of CHM therapies for treatment of acute hepatitis exacerbation.
       
  • Intra-articular ozone therapy efficiently attenuates pain in knee
           osteoarthritic subjects: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Ali Noori-Zadeh, Salar Bakhtiyari, Roghayeh Khooz, Karimeh Haghani, Shahram DarabiAbstractObjectivesOzone (O3) gas is being used for chronic pain relief in knee osteoarthritis (KOA). However, there are controversies whether this gas can be medically useful in KOA pain treatments. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of intra-articular ozone therapy for pain relief in KOA subjects using a systematic review and meta-analysis and standardized mean difference (SMD) as the effect size.MethodUsing specialized biomedical online databases of Pubmed Central, Pubmed, Medline, Google scholar, Scopus and Embase databases without the beginning date restriction until July 2018, the systematic review retrieved 10 studies for meta-analysis after fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria.ResultsAnalysis of Q and I2% indices showed a high heterogeneity in the selected studies (2600.330 and 99.654, respectively), thus, the random-effects model was chosen for SMD calculation. The primary analysis for the main hypothesis found that the weighted pooled effect size for the impact of intra-articular ozone therapy for pain reduction was as follows: SMD= −28.551 (95% confidence interval, −32.553 to −24.549). The P-value for the significance of the combined SMD examined by the z-test was 0.000 and thus, it was clearly considered statistically significant.ConclusionThis meta-analysis presents evidence that intra-articular ozone therapy is an effective way for chronic pain management in KOA.
       
  • Feasibility of home exercises to enhance the benefits of tango dancing in
           people with Parkinson’s disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Giovanni Albani, Giuseppe Veneziano, Clara Lunardon, Calogero Vinci, Alessandra Daniele, Federico Cossa, Alessandro MauroAbstractBackgroundA style of dance called tango translates clinical practice into a new philosophy and rehabilitative approach for individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD). The style of dance mixes music, self-generated and external cued strategies and social and emotional recovery. In recent years, there has been an increase in the number of studies reporting health benefits for people diagnosed with PD who dance tango. However, there are some organisational limitations to people participating in dance classes, including having trained Tango teachers, an appropriate space for dancing, and schedule that allows for participants with motor inabilities.MethodsThis pilot study involved the observation of PD patients who completed four days of home exercise plus a tango dance lesson each week for five weeks.ResultsTen PD patients improved their quality of life, their motor score on the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and their kinematic performances.ConclusionsWe propose a protocol of exercises that has been derived from the tango dance and that can be performed in a patient’s home.
       
  • Effects of light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) on cardiopulmonary and
           hemodynamic adjustments during aerobic exercise and glucose levels in
           patients with diabetes mellitus: A randomized, crossover, double-blind and
           placebo-controlled clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Cristina de Oliveira Francisco, Thomas Beltrame, Richard L. Hughson, Juliana Cristina Milan-Mattos, Amanda Magdalena Ferroli-Fabricio, Benedito Galvão Benze, Cleber Ferraresi, Nivaldo Antônio Parizotto, Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato, Audrey Borghi-Silva, Alberto Porta, Aparecida Maria CataiAbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) on cardiopulmonary adjustments and muscle oxygenation dynamics during transition to moderate exercise, as well as in glucose and lactate levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Sixteen individuals with T2DM (age 55.1±5.4 years) performed four separate tests receiving LEDT or placebo in random order, at intervals of at least 14 days. A light-emitting diode array (50GaAIAs LEDs, 850nm, 75mW per diode) was used to perform LEDT bilaterally on the quadriceps femoris and triceps surae muscles for 40s at each site. After, a moderate cycling exercise was performed and oxygen uptake, muscular deoxyhemoglobin, heart rate and cardiac output were measured. Lactate and glucose levels were measured before LEDT/placebo and after the exercise. The LEDT decreased the glucose levels after the exercise compared with values before LEDT (173.7±61.0 to 143.5±53.5 mg/dl, P=0.02) and it did not affect the cardiopulmonary and hemodynamic adjustments in exercise, as well as lactate levels in both groups. In conclusion, the LEDT in combination with moderate exercise acutely decreased the glucose levels in men with T2DM.
       
  • Development of a yoga module targeting cardiovascular health for patients
           with post-myocardial left ventricular dysfunction in India
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Srihari Sharma, Subramanya Pailoor, Nidhi Choudhary Ram, Smeeta ShresthaAbstractBackgroundYoga is known to contribute towards cardiovascular health. This paper describes the development of a need-based yoga program which is suitable to be integrated into the cardiac rehabilitation of post-myocardial infarction patients with left ventricular dysfunction.Materials and MethodsBased on the assessment of the need of the patients, literature review, and expert opinion, a yoga module was developed using the qualitative method of inquiry. The program included warm-up exercises, yogic asanas, pranayama, meditation and counseling sessions. A structured questionnaire eliciting comments on the contents was given independently to ten experts working in the field of health and yoga for validation. The final module was derived after incorporating the suggestions of the experts.ResultsUsing the raters' expertise in cardiology and yoga practice, the practices which constitute the module were optimized. Majority of the experts (raters) agreed with the duration of 1 h training for 1month under supervision as adequate for subsequent practice at home. There was a 0.786 inter-rater reliability estimated using the interclass coefficient (ICC) and 0.789 internal consistency of the questions, measured using Cronbach's alpha. Both values indicate "good" reliability and consistency of the yoga module.ConclusionThe developed yoga module was found to be acceptable. Future randomized control trials will be necessary to validate the effectiveness of this module and if the module demonstrates to be effective by clinical studies, it may add a therapeutic option in the rehabilitation of patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction, which can be applied in the hospitals and community level.
       
  • The use of herbal medicines amongst outpatients at the University of
           Ilorin Teaching Hospital (UITH), Ilorin, Kwara State – Nigeria
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Yusuf Ghazali, Ibrahim Bello, Adeola Kola-MustaphaAbstractBackgroundIn Africa, particularly Nigeria, there is an increasing interest in natural product remedies with a basic approach towards nature. This research studies the prevalence of use, pattern of use and awareness of outpatients at the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria on the use of herbal medicines.MethodologyBased on an informed consent, semi-structured questionnaires were used to collect data from a total of 112 outpatients attending different outpatient clinics of the hospital about the use of herbs. This sample size was derived from the Kish formula. Data obtained were analyzed by IBM SPSS Statistics software V23 and inferences made accordingly.ResultsAll (100.00%) of the outpatients were familiar with herbal medicines, 67.86% had used herbal medicines in the past and 25.00% were currently taking herbal medicines as at the time of study. It was also found that 54.35% of the respondents use herbal medicines in no specific dose, 47.83% use the herbs with various additives, and 39.13% take their herbs concurrently with orthodox medicines. A total of 13.73% of the respondents prefer to use herbs when sick and another 35.29% prefer a combination of herbs and orthodox medicines.ConclusionsMost of the patient-respondents prefer to include herbal medicines in their therapies. It is concerning that over one-third of the respondents concomitantly use herbal and orthodox medicines, some others use the herbs inappropriately. More efforts should be geared towards ensuring general improved use of herbal medicines.
       
  • Tai Chi practice on prefrontal oxygenation levels in older adults: A pilot
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): William W.N. Tsang, K.K. Chan, Cecelia N. Cheng, Fanny S.F. Hu, Clarence T.K. Mak, Joey W.C. WongAbstractObjectiveThe role of exercise in preventing or delaying age-related cognitive decline is an important focus of rehabilitation. Tai Chi (TC) is a traditional Chinese exercise that has been found to improve cognitive function. However, the mechanism underlying this improvement is still unknown. We compared the effects of TC practice (mind-body exercise) and arm ergometry (AE; body focused exercise) on prefrontal cortex activity between TC practitioners and non-practitioners.DesignThis cross-sectional study included 16 older female subjects (8 TC practitioners and 8 non-practitioners). The practitioners had each practiced TC for at least 7 years. Prefrontal cortex activity was measured using the prefrontal oxygenation level obtained with near-infrared spectroscopy. During the spectroscopy measurement, the participants performed TC, after watching a video of 12-form seated Yang Style TC, and AE in a subsequent session.ResultsWe found significantly greater changes in the levels of oxyhemoglobin (HbO2; p = 0.022) and total hemoglobin (cHb; p = 0.002) in the TC condition compared with the AE condition in all participants. In the TC practitioner group, a similar trend was shown in the change of HbO2 (p = 0.117) and cHb (p = 0.051) when practicing TC versus AE. However, in the non-practitioner group, we found a statistically greater change in cHb (p = 0.005) but not in HbO2 (p = 0.056).ConclusionThe older adults had higher brain activity when practicing TC compared with AE, and a significant effect was observed in the non-practitioner group. These pilot results may provide insight into the underlying mechanism of the effectiveness of TC practice in preventing cognitive decline in older adults.
       
  • Feasibility of yoga as a complementary therapy for patients with type 2
           diabetes: The Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C) study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): B.C. Bock, H. Thind, J.L. Fava, S. Dunsiger, K.M. Guthrie, L. Stroud, G. Gopalakrishnan, M. Sillice, W. WuAbstractObjectivesThis study:Healthy Active and in Control (HA1C), examined the feasibility and acceptability of yoga as a complementary therapy for adults with Type-2 Diabetes (T2DM).DesignA 2-arm randomized clinical trial comparing Iyengar yoga with a supervised walking program.SettingHospital based gym-type facility and conference rooms.InterventionsParticipants were randomized to a 12-week program of either; (1) a twice weekly Iyengar yoga, or (2) a twice-weekly program of standard exercise (SE).Main Outcome MeasuresPrimary outcomes assessed feasibility and acceptability, including enrollment rates, attendance, study completion, and participant satisfaction. Secondary outcomes included HbA1c, physical activity, and measures of diabetes-related emotional distress, self-care and quality of life (QOL). Assessments were conducted at baseline, end of treatment, 6-months and 9-months post-enrollment.ResultsOf 175 adults screened for eligibility, 48 (30 women, 18 men) were eligible and enrolled. The most common reasons for ineligibility were orthopedic restrictions, HbA1c levels  42. Session attendance was high (82% of sessions attended), as was follow-up completion rates (92%). Program satisfaction rated on a 5-point scale, was high among both Yoga (M = 4.63, SD = 0.57) and SE (M = 4.77, SD = 0.52) participants. Overall 44 adverse events (26 Yoga, 18 SE) were reported. Of these, six were deemed “possibly related” (e.g., neck strain, back pain), and 1 “probably related” (ankle pain after treadmill) to the study. Yoga produced significant reductions in HbA1c. Median HbA1c at 6 months was 1.25 units lower for Yoga compared to SE (95% CI: -2.54 -0.04).Greater improvements in diabetes self-care, quality of life, and emotional distress were seen among Yoga participants than among SE participants. Increases in mindfulness were seen in Yoga but not in SE.ConclusionsThe yoga intervention was highly feasible and acceptable, and produced improvements in blood glucose and psychosocial measures of diabetes management.
       
  • Effects of dual-task aquatic exercises on functional mobility, balance and
           gait of individuals with Parkinson's disease: A randomized clinical trial
           with a 3-month follow-up
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Adriano Zanardi da Silva, Vera Lúcia IsraelAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate the effects of dual-task aquatic exercises on functional mobility, balance and gait of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD).DesignA randomized, single-blind trial was used. Twenty-eight (28) individuals met the inclusion criteria and were randomized in the Experimental Group (EG) and Control Group (CG). EG was subjected to a dual-task aquatic exercise program, twice a week for 10 weeks. Each session lasted 40 min, in a heated pool (33 °C). The individuals were assessed at the beginning (AS1), after an exercise program (AS2), and after a three-month follow-up (AS3). Functional mobility (“Timed Up & Go” Test, and “Five Times Sit to Stand” Test), balance (Berg Balance Scale) and gait (Dynamic Gait Index) were verified.Results25 individuals were analyzed (14 EG and 11 CG). There was a time-group effect of the EG when compared to the CG: TUG (p = 0.03 and p = 0.015 to AS2 and AS3), FTSST (p = 0.001 and p = 0.004, for AS2 and AS3), BBS (p = 0.002 and p = 0.002, for AS2 and AS3), DGI (p = 0.001 and p = 0.003, for AS2 and AS3).ConclusionsThe suggested dual-task aquatic exercise program was able to improve functional mobility, balance and gait of individuals with PD, which shows that such type of exercise is a promising possibility of therapy.
       
  • Home practice and quality of life among patients with neurofibromatosis
           randomized to a mind-body intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): C.J. Funes, E.L. Zale, C.M. Luberto, A.M. VranceanuAbstractObjectivesThe purpose of this study was to summarize home practice in patients with neurofibromatosis (NF) randomized to an 8-week group mind-body intervention, the Relaxation Response Resiliency Program for NF (3RP-NF). We further examined the association between home practice and changes in four domains of quality of life (QoL).MethodsData are derived from a single-blind RCT of the 3RP-NF (N = 31) delivered via videoconferencing versus an attention placebo control. 3RP-NF participants submitted weekly home practice logs to the group leader prior to each weekly session, which included information regarding their engagement of relaxation response (RR)-eliciting skills and appreciation skills. Physical, psychological, social and environmental QoL were measured at baseline, post-intervention and at a 6-months follow up.ResultsParticipants reported engaging in home practice of RR-eliciting skills on average 28.55 days (SD = 10.79) and appreciation skills on average 24.39 days (SD = 13.48) over the 49-day treatment period. Participants reported an average of 383.42 (SD = 274.38) minutes of RR-eliciting skills home practice and an average of 49.13 (SD = 41.90) appreciations skills home practice. A significant association was observed between frequency of RR-eliciting skills home practice and physical QoL at the 6-month follow-up (r = .383, p = .034).ConclusionsParticipants with NF are able and willing to practice RR-eliciting skills and appreciation skills outside of treatment sessions. Frequency of RR-eliciting skills home practice may be associated with improvement in physical QoL. Future research should replicate these efforts with larger samples, and attempt to identify additional factors that predict optimal response to mind-body interventions other than home practice.
       
  • Self-evaluation by community older adults on the applicability of the
           healthy beat acupunch exercise program
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Hsiao-Ting Tung, Kuei-Min Chen, Ching-Teng Yao, Chang-Chih Kuo, Hui-Fen HsuAbstractObjectives To evaluate the applicability of the Healthy Beat Acupunch (HBA) exercise program for older adults at community care centers and to explore their perceived impacts and suggestions for program protocol after six months of HBA exercises.Design & setting This prospective and descriptive study recruited 113 older adults from four community care centers.Intervention The HBA exercises were conducted 3 times a week, 40 min per session, for six months.Main outcome measures The program evaluation focused on four criteria: simplicity, safety, suitability, and helpfulness of the three phases of the HBA program using a 10-point ladder scale. The semi-structured interviews were focused on the participants’ exercise experiences, perceived impacts on their health, and suggestions for the HBA program protocol.Results The average scores of the four criteria in each phase of the program ranged between 9.59 and 9.98 points. Participants reported an increase in their limb flexibility (n = 31) and that they were more relaxed (n = 26) and more energetic (n = 26) after engaging in the HBA exercises. Most of the participants suggested that the HBA program should be offered three times a week, 40 min per session, with 30 people in a group, and led by instructors who were professional, hardworking, easygoing, and enthusiastic, regardless of gender and age.Conclusions The HBA program was rated at a high level of simplicity, safety, suitability, and helpfulness by community older adults, which indicated that the program was considered as appropriate and applicable for the older population.
       
  • Complementary medicine use and health literacy in older Australians
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Caroline A Smith, Esther Chang, Gisselle GallegoAbstractObjectivesto investigate whether complementary medicine (CAM) use is associated with health literacy levels and decision self-efficacy.Designa cross-sectional survey was distributed to men and women aged 65 years and older who participated in a randomised control trial (N = 153) in Sydney, Australia.ResultsOne hundred and fifty-three people completed the survey of those 66% were females and the mean age was 76 years. Most participants used or were currently using CAM in the past 12 months (75%). The most common source of CAM information were GPs. Participants with higher levels of social support were found more likely to use CAM accessed over the counter (OTC). Participants reporting lower health literacy skills with appraising health information were more likely to use CAM delivered by CAM practitioners. Participants with higher levels of health literacy relating to the domain - “ability to actively engage with health care providers” - were found to use OTC CAM. No relationship was found between participants’ decision-making self-efficacy and use of CAM accessed from a CAM practitioner or OTC.ConclusionsCAM is used by older Australians to maintain their health. Use of CAM was not associated with decision self-efficacy and health literacy. However, CAM users who have less skills with appraising information are possibly more likely to access their CAM from trusted sources such as a CAM practitioners.
       
  • Use of a ‘pose rate’ to quantify yoga
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Bethany Forseth, Caitlyn HauffAbstractObjective: To develop a method that describes the physical activity completed during yoga, and to use this method to compare three different yoga video categories: weight loss, beginner, and stress relief/meditation.Design: This study conducted content analysis of commercially available yoga videos in which pre-determined characteristics of yoga routines were recorded. Outcome measures included the yoga routine characteristics of: duration of each yoga routine, number of completed poses, body position of each pose, and pose rate.Results: Twenty-two routines from yoga videos were analyzed. Duration of routine between the three different categories was not significantly different. There were significant differences between the video categories based on the characteristics of total number of poses and the pose rate, with weight loss routines having the highest values compare to beginner routines and stress relief/meditation (total number of poses: 74.1, 34.3, 25.6 poses, p 
       
  • The effect of frankincense (Boswellia serrata, oleoresin) and ginger
           (Zingiber officinale, rhizoma) on heavy menstrual bleeding: A randomized,
           placebo-controlled, clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Razieh Eshaghian, Mohammad Mazaheri, Mustafa Ghanadian, Safoura Rouholamin, Awat Feizi, Mahmoud BabaeianAbstractObjectivesTo evaluate the effect of frankincense (Boswellia serrata, oleoresin) and ginger (Zingiber officinale, rhizoma) as complementary treatments for heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) among women of reproductive age.DesignRandomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial.SettingGynecology outpatient clinics.InterventionsPatients with HMB (n = 102) were randomly assigned to three groups. All patients received ibuprofen (200 mg) and either frankincense (300 mg), ginger (300 mg), or a placebo, which contains 200 mg anhydrous lactose as the filling agent and was similar in appearance to the two other drugs. Patients received the medications three times a day for seven days of the menstrual cycle, starting from the first bleeding day and this was repeated for two consecutive menstrual cycles.Main outcome measuresAmount and duration of menstrual bleeding and quality of life (QOL).ResultsDuration of menstrual bleeding was decreased in the frankincense (−1.77 ± 2.47 days, P = 0.003) and ginger (−1.8 ± 1.79 days, P = 0.001) groups, but not in the placebo group (−0.52 ± 1.86 days, P = 0.42). Amount of menstrual bleeding was decreased in all (P  0.05). More improvement in QOL was observed in the frankincense (−25.7 ± 3.1; P 
       
  • Predictors of and barriers to adherence in a 16-week randomised controlled
           trial of Bikram yoga in stressed and sedentary adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Zoe L. Hewett, Kate L. Pumpa, Caroline A. Smith, Paul P. Fahey, Birinder S. CheemaAbstractBackgroundBikram yoga may enhance health outcomes in healthy adults and those at risk for chronic disease, however, challenges remain in achieving optimal adherence to this practice. This study investigated factors influencing adherence to a 16-week Bikram yoga intervention in stressed and sedentary adults.MethodsExperimental group participants (n = 29) were instructed to attend 3–5 Bikram yoga classes weekly for 16 weeks. Baseline demographics, behaviours and health measures were investigated as predictors of adherence. Barriers were assessed via documentation of adverse events, and exit survey responses.ResultsParticipants (38.2 ± 10.1 years) were predominantly overweight-obese (83%), female (79%), and attended 27 ± 18 classes. Higher adherence was associated with older age (p = 0.094), less pain (p = 0.011), fewer physical limitations (p = 0.011), poorer blood lipid profile, and higher heart rate variability (HRV; total power, (p = 0.097)). In multi-variable analysis, three variables: age (β = 0.492, p = 0.006), HRV (β = 0.413, p = 0.021) and pain (β = 0.329, p = 0.048) remained predictors of adherence. Difficulty committing to the trial, lack of enjoyment and adverse events were barriers to adherence.ConclusionsThese findings should be considered in the development of future Bikram yoga trials to facilitate higher levels of adherence, which may enhance health outcomes and inform community practice. Future trials should investigate and address additional barriers and facilitators of Bikram yoga practice.
       
  • Setting a research agenda for pediatric complementary and integrative
           medicine: A consensus approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Sunita Vohra, Liliane Zorzela, Kathi Kemper, Arine Vlieger, Shay PintovAbstractBackgroundPediatric use of complementary medicine (CM) is common and offers numerous research questions about diverse therapies and conditions. Although research priorities for pediatric CM have been identified, there was a need to update in light of the rapid evolution of the field.MethodsBuilding on previous work, we conducted an international, consensus-based 4-step modified Delphi process to develop and refine a pediatric CM research agenda, including on-line questionnaires and an in-person meeting. Participants included health care professionals, researchers, and educators.ResultsWe received 376 responses; participants included conventional and CM providers, researchers, educators, administrators, and policy-makers from 15 countries (Australia, Bangladesh, Belgium, Canada, China, Germany, India, Israel, Italy, New Zealand, Norway, Sri Lanka, The Netherlands, United Kingdom, and United States). While it was recognized that each region must set their own priorities based on use, access, and expertise, a “minimum set” for a pediatric CM research agenda was identified.After three rounds of surveys, participants identified the highest priorities for pediatric CM research as: (i) safety of CM therapies for infants, children, and adolescents; (ii) conditions for which CM use is highly prevalent and for which conventional medicine lacks safe, cost-effective therapies; iii) therapies/therapists to be examined for quality and reproducibility of interventions, comparative and cost effectiveness, dose, etc.; and iv) identification of relevant outcomes and outcome measurement tools.ConclusionsThe results of our study identify that “first do no harm” is the leading research priority for pediatric CM research, followed by more research on effectiveness of CM therapies for conditions not safely and effectively treated with conventional care. In order to improve pediatric health care, interdisciplinary collaborative approaches are needed between CM and conventional providers and researchers.
       
  • Associations of yoga practice, health status, and health behavior among
           yoga practitioners in Germany—Results of a national cross-sectional
           survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Holger Cramer, Daniela Quinker, Karen Pilkington, Heather Mason, Jon Adams, Gustav DobosAbstractBackgroundWhile yoga can improve health-related variables and health behavior, different yoga styles and practice components appear to be associated with specific health outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore the connection between yoga use, health, and health behaviors across different yoga styles.MethodsA cross-sectional anonymous online survey (n = 1,702; 88.9% female; 93.3% German nationality; mean age 47.2 ± 10.8 years; 58.2% yoga teachers) assessed yoga practice characteristics, health-related variables and health behavior. The survey was distributed in Germany only but not limited to German participants.ResultsAshtanga yoga (15.7%), Hatha yoga (14.2%), and Sivananda yoga (22.4%) were the most commonly practiced yoga styles; participants practiced for a mean of 12.7 ± 10.0 years. Most participants had good to excellent (96.1%) overall health; 87.7% reported improved health since starting yoga. Controlling for sociodemographic and clinical factors, health-related variables were mainly associated with frequency of yoga postures practice (p 
       
  • Aerobic physical activity and salivary cortisol levels among women with a
           history of breast cancer
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): M. Lambert, J. Brunet, M.-E. Couture-Lalande, C. BielajewAbstractBackgroundPhysical activity (PA) helps reduce cancer-related symptoms and improves overall functioning for women with and without a history of breast cancer (BC). Few researchers have examined the associations between PA and physiological stress measures. The aim of this study was to determine whether aerobic PA was associated with diurnal and reactive cortisol patterns, and whether these associations differed for women with and without a history of BC.MethodsParticipants were 25 women with a history of BC and 23 women without a history of BC who self-reported aerobic PA frequency. To assess diurnal cortisol patterns, participants provided five saliva samples collected on two consecutive days at the following times: upon awakening, 30 min after waking, 12 PM, 4 PM, and 9 PM. To measure reactive cortisol patterns, participants provided seven saliva samples collected before, during, and after doing the Trier Social Stress Test.ResultsCortisol patterns differed statistically based on women’s cancer history, whereby women without a history of BC had significantly higher overall cortisol reactivity to an acute stressor, and a marginally significant (p = .05) cancer experience by aerobic PA interaction was observed when analyzing diurnal cortisol data.ConclusionsFindings suggest that PA may not have the same effect on women with and without a history of BC.
       
  • The effect of an oral ginger supplementation on NF-κB concentration in
           peripheral blood mononuclear cells and anthropomorphic data of patients
           with type 2 diabetes: A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled
           clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Niyaz Mohammadzadeh Honarvar, Meysam Zarezadeh, Masoud Khorshidi, Motahareh Makhdoomi Arzati, Mir Saeed Yekaninejad, Mina Abdollahi, Mohammad Effatpanah, Rezvan Hashemi, Ahmad SaedisomeoliaIntroductionThe complications of diabetes are extensive which can be caused by excessive oxidative stress, inflammation and impaired insulin system. Plant-sourced bioactive compounds can reduce inflammation and oxidative stress. The aim of present study was to determine the effect of ginger supplementation on diabetic complications.MethodsThe present study is a randomized double blind clinical trial which is conducted with 48 diabetic patients. The participants were randomly divided into two intervention and placebo groups which were received 2 g ginger powder and 2 g wheat flour respectively for 10 weeks. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) concentration and anthropometric measurements were evaluated at the baseline and at the end of study.ResultsThe effect of ginger supplementation on hip circumference was marginal and there was no significant effect on BMI and waist circumference. Mean NF-κB p65 concentrations were reduced in ginger supplementation group, however, the amount was not statistically significant.ConclusionGinger supplementation had significant effects on anthropometric evaluations. Ginger supplementation decreased mean NF-κB concentration in comparison with placebo, however the significance level was marginal. In order to achieve reliable information, more researches should be complemented with uptake of other diagnostic tools.Graphical abstractGraphical abstract for this article
       
  • Acupuncture for treatment of insomnia: An overview of systematic reviews
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Wenbo He, Meixuan Li, Liqian Zuo, Meng Wang, Lili Jiang, Houqian Shan, Xue Han, Kehu Yang, Xuemei HanAbstractPurposeTo evaluate the reliability of the methodological quality and outcome measures of systematic review (SR) /meta-analysis (MA) of acupuncture for insomnia.MethodsWe conducted a comprehensive literature search for SRs with MAs in seven international and Chinese databases. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of the reviews according to the Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews 2 (AMSTAR-2), the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to rate the quality of evidence.ResultsThirty-four reviews were included. The AMSTAR-2 score showed that most of the included studies were of low methodological quality and included only two high-quality literatures. The lowest score were the item 10 (all the studies didn't report on the sources of funding for the studies included in the review), item 7(32 studies didn't provide a list of excluded studies and justify the exclusions) and item 3 (27 studies didn't explain their selection of the study designs for inclusion in the review).ConclusionMost of the reviews included suggested that the acupuncture group was more effective than the control group in the treatment of insomnia, but the methodological quality of most of the studies and the quality of evidence were low.
       
  • Acupuncture for the treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss: A
           systematic review and meta-analysis: Acupuncture for SSNHL
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Shanwen Chen, Mei Zhao, Jianxin QiuAbstractBackgroundAcupuncture as an alternative treatment method is widely used in the treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss(SSNHL) in China. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the clinical efficacy of acupuncture for the management of SSNHL patients.Materials and MethodsThe PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, China National Knowledge Infrastructure and WanFang databases were searched. Searches were performed on April 27, 2018 and without language and publication year restrictions. We collected and analyzed the randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of acupuncture for the treatment of SSNHL patients to assess its efficacy and safety. The RevMan5.3 software was used for analysis. The fixed-effects model can be applied to calculate the risk ratio (RR) or weighted mean difference (WMD) if the chi-square test shows there was no significance of heterogeneity (p > 0.10, I2
       
  • Predictive factors of complementary and alternative medicine use in the
           general population in Europe: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Albin Guillaud, Nelly Darbois, Benoît Allenet, Nicolas PinsaultAbstractAimTo identify predictive factors of CAM use in the general population in Europe.MethodsWe performed a systematic review to summarize and analyse the published data on factors predictive of CAM use by the general population in Europe. The Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Google Scholar, PsycInfo, PubMed and the Web of Science databases were systematically searched up to August 2, 2018. We selected observational studies (case-control, cohort and cross-sectional) of adults conducted in Europe. Risk of bias was determined using the ROBINS-I tool recommended by the Cochrane Group.ResultsOver six thousand articles were identified of which 49 met our inclusion criteria. Twenty three studies investigated the consultation of CAM practitioners, five looked at the use of CAM products, one concerned CAM practices and twenty studied combinations of these. Female gender and self-reported chronic disease are predictive factors of CAM practitioner use. In contrast, marital status is not a predictive factor for consulting a CAM practitioner. Female gender is also a predictive factor of CAM product use. For all other factors investigated, no clear conclusions could be drawn.ConclusionWe found no clear specificity of the use of CAM practitioners versus conventional health practitioners. Other directions of public health research should be explored, rather than assuming that there is specificity.
       
  • Literature review of liver injury induced by Tinospora crispa associated
           with two cases of acute fulminant hepatitis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Wei-Te Huang, Ching-Yeh Tu, Fen-Yu Wang, Sheng-Teng HuangAbstractIntroductionSpecies of Tinospora are used as herbal remedies for the treatment of various diseases with very few toxic effects having been reported. Tinospora cordifolia (TCF) has been reported to effectively prevent hepatotoxicity. However, there are an increasing number of cases revealing that Tinospora crispa (TCP) might have the negative effect of inducing hepatotoxicity. Because of the similar leaves, people may mistake TCP for TCF, and consume it with the purpose of protecting liver function.ObjectiveFind out the misusing level of TCP and TCF and which chemical compound in TCP might induce hepatotoxicity.MethodsWe report two cases of acute fulminant hepatitis associated with chronic use of TCP. Given that the two herbs were misidentified in these two reports, we investigated the frequency of erroneous identification by using three keywords (“Guduchi”, “Tinospora cordifolia”, “Tinospora crispa”) to search images from the Google Images database. To further clarify the influence of liver function between TCP and TCF, we searched PubMed (up to 29 July 2018) for relevant publications on clinical trials or case reports.ResultsBased on web review, over 35 percent of websites failed to accurately identify these two herbs. The different effects on liver function between TCP and TCF were compared through literature review. It indicated that TCF exerted liver protection, TCP had a contrary effect, suggesting its cis-Clerodane-type furano-diterpenoids might be an important factor of inducing hepatotoxicity.ConclusionsWe concluded that people might cause hepatic injury or even death without correctly identifying these two Tinospora species.
       
  • Effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum Zeylanicum) supplementation on serum
           C-reactive protein concentrations: A meta-analysis and systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Natalia Vallianou, Catherine Tsang, Mohsen Taghizadeh, Amirhossein Davoodvandi, Sadegh JafarnejadAbstractObjective: The effect of cinnamon (Cinnamomum Zeylanicum) on serum C-reactive protein (CRP), an acute phase protein commonly used as a marker of inflammation, is uncertain. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis of published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of cinnamon to determine the effect on levels of serum CRP, relative to controls.Design: Studies were identified by a search of electronic databases including PubMed, Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and Scopus before August 2018. Combined and stratified analyses were used. Weighted mean differences (WMD) and its 95% confidence interval were estimated for net change in serum CRP by using random-effects model. The heterogeneity of meta-analysis was assessed by χ2 and I2 test.Results: Six studies were identified, and data from 285 participants were included. Pooled analysis showed significant reductions in serum CRP (WMD: −0.81 mg/L, 95% CI: −1.36 to −0.26, p = 0.004), with significant heterogeneity between selected studies. Improvements in sub-group analysis were observed when baseline CRP levels were greater than 3 mg/dL, and in trials of>12 weeks duration. Doses
       
  • Rikkunshito for upper gastrointestinal symptoms: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Nobuaki Hoshino, Daisuke Nishizaki, Koya Hida, Kazutaka Obama, Yoshiharu SakaiAbstractBackground: Upper gastrointestinal symptoms are major issues in various diseases such as postgastrectomy syndrome and functional dyspepsia. These symptoms cannot be fully controlled in such conditions and result in poorer quality of life. Rikkunshito has been traditionally used in Japan to relieve these symptoms. This systematic review assessed the efficacy and safety of rikkunshito for relieving upper gastrointestinal symptoms.Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and ICHUSHI. Randomized controlled trials comparing rikkunshito to alternative drugs for the treatment of upper gastrointestinal symptoms were searched without language restriction. Two review authors independently assessed the literature and extracted data from identified studies. The risk of bias in each study was assessed.Results: Twenty-four studies with a combined total of 2175 participants were included in this review. Rikkunshito did not significantly relieve upper gastrointestinal symptoms when compared with other treatments via the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (standardized mean difference, −0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], −0.31 to 0.17; P =  0.59), while it significantly relieved the symptoms on a 5-point scale (mean difference, −0.38; 95% CI, −0.55 to −0.21; P 
       
  • A review of complementary therapies with medicinal plants for
           chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Medicine, Volume 42Author(s): Bei-Yu Wu, Chun-Ting Liu, Yu-Li Su, Shih-Yu Chen, Yung-Hsiang Chen, Ming-Yen TsaiAbstractIntroductionChemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a progressive, prolonged, and often irreversible side effect of many chemotherapeutic agents. The development of neuropathic pain is still poorly managed by clinically available drugs at present.MethodsIn this mini-review, we summarized the current knowledge of pathobiology for CIPN, and selected evidence on the application of complementary therapies in experimental studies.ResultsMedicinal plants are considered to be the most common complementary therapy modalities for CIPN. Therefore, we identified ten medicinal herbal extracts as well as their phytochemicals, and three herbal formulas. Multiple complementary therapies have been used and studied for decades, and their effects against CIPN are focus on anti-oxidative activity. However, there is still controversial due to the diverse manifestations of different antineoplastic agents and complex drug interactions.ConclusionsNovel therapies or drugs that have proven to be effective in animals require further investigation, so confirmation of their efficacy and safety will require time.
       
 
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