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  Subjects -> ALTERNATIVE MEDICINE (Total: 111 journals)
Showing 1 - 15 of 15 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acupuncture & Electro-Therapeutics Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acupuncture and Related Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Acupuncture in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Advanced Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Akupunktur & Aurikulomedizin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Allgemeine Homöopathische Zeitung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Alternative & Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Alternative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alternative Medicine Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Anales de Hidrología Médica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ancient Science of Life     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Arabian Journal of Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arteterapia. Papeles de arteterapia y educación artística para la inclusión social     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Plant Pathology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Acupuncture and Chinese Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Herbal Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Journal of Music Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AYU : An international quarterly journal of research in Ayurveda     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletín Latinoamericano y del Caribe de Plantas Medicinales y Aromáticas     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Botanics : Targets and Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Cadernos de Naturologia e Terapias Complementares     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Herbal Medicines     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cognitive Neuroscience     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Complementary Therapies in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Current Traditional Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Deutsche Heilpraktiker-Zeitschrift     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Deutsche Zeitschrift für Akupunktur     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Erfahrungsheilkunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of Medicinal Plants     Open Access  
Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
Experimental and Therapeutic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Fitoterapia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Focus on Alternative and Complementary Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Global Journal of Integrated Chinese Medicine and Western Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Traditional Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Herba Polonica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Herbal Medicines Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indian Journal of Research in Homoeopathy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Traditional Knowledge (IJTK)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Innovare Journal of Ayurvedic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Integrative Medicine Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of High Dilution Research     Open Access  
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-Being     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
International Journal of Yoga     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Yoga : Philosophy, Psychology and Parapsychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ipnosi     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Acupuncture and Herbs     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Acupuncture and Meridian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Applied Arts and Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Research on Medicinal and Aromatic Plants     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Asian Natural Products Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Ayurveda and Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of AYUSH :- Ayurveda, Yoga, Unani, Siddha and Homeopathy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medical Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Complementary and Integrative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Dance Medicine & Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Evidence-Based Integrative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Fasting and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Ginseng Research     Open Access  
Journal of Health Science and Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Health Sciences Scholarship     Open Access  
Journal of Herbal Drugs (An International Journal on Medicinal Herbs)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Herbal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Herbal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Integrative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Integrative Medicine & Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Manual & Manipulative Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Medicinal Plants for Economic Development     Open Access  
Journal of Medicinally Active Plants     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Remedies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nutraceuticals and Herbal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Palliative Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Journal of the Australian Traditional-Medicine Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Traditional and Complementary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Traditional Chinese Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Yoga & Physical Therapy     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Lekovite Sirovine     Open Access  
Médecine Palliative : Soins de Support - Accompagnement - Éthique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Medical Acupuncture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Mersin Üniversitesi Tıp Fakültesi Lokman Hekim Tıp Tarihi ve Folklorik Tıp Dergisi     Open Access  
Muller Journal of Medical Sciences and Research     Open Access  
Natural solutions     Full-text available via subscription  
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Nigerian Journal of Natural Products and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
OA Alternative Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Oriental Pharmacy and Experimental Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Research Journal of Medicinal Plant     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research Journal of Pharmacognosy     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Plantas Medicinais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Internacional de Acupuntura     Full-text available via subscription  
South African Journal of Plant and Soil     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Synfacts     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Traditional & Kampo Medicine     Full-text available via subscription  
Traditional Medicine Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
World Journal of Acupuncture - Moxibustion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Yoga Mimamsa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Orthomolekulare Medizin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.582
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1744-3881 - ISSN (Online) 1744-3881
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • Effect of telerehabilitation on long-term adherence to yoga as an
           antihypertensive lifestyle intervention: Results of a randomized
           controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Schröer Sarah, Mayer-Berger Wolfgang, Pieper ClaudiaAbstractBackgroundand purpose: We aimed to investigate the adherence to yoga as an antihypertensive intervention through telerehabilitation.Materials and methodsIn a randomized controlled trial patients were consecutively enrolled and randomly assigned to intervention or control group. Both groups received standardized yoga training during three weeks of inpatient rehabilitation. The intervention group received telerehabilitation after discharge; the control group received the usual care. Data was collected at admission (t1), discharge (t2) and at follow up after six (t3) and 12 months (t4). The primary endpoint was follow-up adherence assessed in an intention-to-treat analysis.Results228 male rehabilitation patients (mean age 53.3 ± 5.8 years, mean blood pressure 139.5 ± 10.2/ 86.7 ± 8.0 mmHg) The intervention resulted in significantly increased adherence compared to control group (t3: 40.0% vs. 19.5%, p = 0.001; t4: 36.5% vs. 23.9%, p = 0.038); blood pressure and quality of life improved.ConclusionTelerehabilitation significantly improves yoga adherence maintaining achieved health benefits in the long term.
       
  • Effects of auricular acupressure on obesity in adolescents with obesity
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Hyun Su Cha, Hyojung ParkAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Adolescent obesity has been increasing globally, and intervention is important. This study examined the effects of auricular acupressure on reducing obesity in adolescents.Materials and methodsParticipants were 58 obese adolescents, divided into an experimental (n = 32) and a control group (n = 26). The study design was a randomized controlled trial. Auricular acupressure using vaccaria seeds was administered to the experimental group, while placebo auricular acupressure using vaccaria seeds was administered to the control group. Sessions continued for 8 weeks. Outcome measures included body weight, abdominal circumference, hip circumference, waist–hip ratio, body-mass index, body-fat mass, body-fat percentage, triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, serum glucose, and leptin.ResultsAdolescents in the experimental group showed significant improvement in total cholesterol levels and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels after 8 weeks compared with those in the control group (p 
       
  • Rehabilitation with a combination of scalp acupuncture and exercise
           therapy in spastic cerebral palsy
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Jing Gao, Luna He, Xuefeng Yu, Lina Wang, Haozhi Chen, Bin Zhao, Yangyun JiangAbstractPurposeTo use Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and Western approaches to improve gross motor function and activities of daily living (ADL) in children with spastic cerebral palsy.MethodsChildren were randomly divided into a treatment group, which received scalp acupuncture combined with exercise therapy and conventional rehabilitation training, and a control group, which received conventional rehabilitation training alone. Study subjects’ gross motor function (gross motor function measure-88 [GMFM-88]) and ADL were evaluated before and after therapy.ResultsGMFM-88 and ADL scores were significantly improved in both groups after therapy, but the within group differences in post- and pre-therapy GMFM-88 and ADL scores were significantly higher in the treatment group compared to the control group.ConclusionScalp acupuncture combined with exercise therapy and conventional rehabilitation training can significantly improve gross motor function and the ability to perform ADLs in children with spastic cerebral palsy compared to conventional rehabilitation training alone.
       
  • Effect of aromatherapy on post-partum complications: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Khadije Rezaie-Keikhaie, Marie Hastings-Tolsma, Salehoddin Bouya, Fahime Shojaei Shad, Mahdieh Sari, Maryam Shoorvazi, Zeinab Younes Barani, Abbas BalouchiAbstractIntroductionand purpose: Aromatherapy is a known popular method to reduce the symptoms of various physiologic processes and diseases. The aim of the study was to determine whether aromatherapy improves symptoms commonly experienced by women during the postpartum period.MethodsIn the present systematic review, four international databases (PubMed, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and Scopus) were searched from inception of databases through August 2018. References for each study were manually reviewed to ensure that relevant works were included.ResultsThirty-four (34) articles were identified with 17 studies meeting eligibility criteria and included a total of 1400 women using a variety of aromatherapies. Results demonstrated that aromatherapy can improve symptoms commonly experienced in post-partum period, including depression, stress, pain, anxiety, and fatigue.ConclusionThere are therapeutic effects in use of aromatherapy during the post-partum period. Aromatherapy, however, should be used with caution as safety concerns have not been conclusively demonstrated.
       
  • Complementary medicines use amongst elective surgery patients at a public
           tertiary hospital: A prospective observational cohort study in Australia
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Edouard Faridovich Guilmetdinov, Marwah Al-Khalaf, Jilna Bhatt, Richard Parsons, Tin Fei SimAbstractBackgroundand purpose. Complementary medicines (CM) use may result in untoward effects perioperatively. The study purpose is to identify CM pattern of use amongst elective surgery patients, and improve effectiveness of information collection relating to CM use.Materials and methodsThis is a prospective observational cohort study. CM questionnaire was administered alongside standard hospital forms at pre-admission clinic over eight weeks.Results992 patients attended pre-admission clinic; 317 patients were included in analysis. Introduction of CM questionnaire increased disclosure rate by 11.7% giving a total prevalence of 44.2%. CM use was significantly higher in females and in older patients. Top CM reported were vitamin D (12%) and omega-3 (12%). Majority of patients did not plan to withhold CM before surgery, and were not concerned about perioperative risks.ConclusionPre-admission clinics need to encourage CM disclosure. Patient education of potential risks and greater engagement of clinicians in patient assessment is required.
       
  • The effects of listening to music on the postoperative nausea and vomiting
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Funda ÇetinkayaAbstractAimTo determine the effect of music on the severity of postoperative nausea and vomiting after the laparoscopic cholecystectomy.MethodsThis study was a randomized, controlled clinical study. The subjects were randomly divided into two groups (intervention group and control group). The numerical scale of nausea was used in rating the nausea complaints of the patients and the vomiting incidence assessment form in determining the incidence of vomiting.ResultsThere were statistically significant difference between the groups in terms of the severity of nausea complaint (W = 110.826 p 
       
  • Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with asthma
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Odion Kalaci, Sandra Giangioppo, Garvin Leung, Arun Radhakrishnan, Erin Fleischer, Brian Lyttle, April Price, Dhenuka RadhakrishnanAbstractPurposeTo estimate the overall prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine and specific modalities used among children with asthma, identify predictors of use, and perceived positive or negative effects of therapies.ResultsOf the 161 children enrolled in the study, 76.4% had ever used complementary and alternative medicine. Humidifiers, air purifiers, and multivitamins were the most common modalities used. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children was associated with family use, younger child age, and disease severity, indicated by recent asthma exacerbation. The majority of participants perceived benefit from their complementary and alternative medicine use, with very few reporting negative side effects. Only 36.7% of participants reported discussing their complementary and alternative medicine use with the asthma clinic healthcare team.ConclusionsThe prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use in children with asthma is high, with the majority of families perceiving benefit from its use. This study offers clinicians a reference to inform families regarding the subjective helpfulness of various types of complementary and alternative medicine modalities that can facilitate the dialogue between health care professionals and families interested in complementary and alternative medicine use.
       
  • The effects of a relaxation intervention on nurses' psychological and
           physiological stress indicators: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Guida Veiga, Andreia Dias Rodrigues, Elsa Lamy, Marc Guiose, Catarina Pereira, José MarmeleiraAbstractThe present pilot study was designed to examine the feasibility and the effects of a psychomotor relaxation program on nurses’ psychological (burnout symptoms, affective states) and physiological stress indicators (salivary cortisol). Fifteen nurses engaged in an 8-week psychomotor relaxation program (two 20-min sessions per week) and 15 maintained their usual activities. The current study showed that the psychomotor relaxation program was feasible and well tolerated by the participants. Compared to the control group, the relaxation group showed a decrease in their levels of emotional exhaustion, depression and salivary cortisol. In the fifteenth session, salivary cortisol concentrations significantly decreased from pre-session to post-session. These results provide preliminary evidence that relaxation interventions are effective strategies for reducing the usual stress experienced by nurses, and demonstrate that a psychomotor relaxation program might be an important occupational stress-management tool for healthcare professionals.
       
  • The effect of music on the non-stress test and maternal anxiety
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Hatice Erkun Dolker, Fatma BasarAbstractObjectiveThis study aimed to determine the effect of music that was listened to by pregnant women during the non-stress test (NST) on the test result and maternal anxiety.Materials and methodsThe study utilized a non-randomized controlled trial design. Sequential sample selection method was used. The pregnant women in the experimental group listened to music during the NST (20 min).ResultsThere were significant differences between the two groups in terms of mean numbers of acceleration deceleration and reactive NST results (p = 0.001). There were statistically significant differences between the intergroup mean scores of pre- and post-music in favor of the control group (p = 0.001).ConclusionThis study concluded that music is an effective method of reducing pregnant women's deceleration numbers and increasing their acceleration numbers and reactive NST rates. The use of music during NSTs can be recommended.
       
  • Comparing the effects of massage and aromatherapy massage with lavender
           oil on sleep quality of cardiac patients: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Nesa Cheraghbeigi, Masoud Modarresi, Mansour Rezaei, Alireza KhatonyAbstractIntroductionSleep disorder is a common problem in cardiac patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of massage and aromatherapy massage on sleep quality of cardiac patients.Materials and methodsin this study, 150 subjects were randomly allocated into 1)massage, 2)aromatherapy massage and 3)control. In the massage group, the subjects received hands and feet massage using sweet almond oil. In the second group, the massage was performed on the same areas using a mixture of lavender and sweet almond oil. Data collection tool included Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Before and after the intervention, the PSQI was completed by the subjects.ResultsThere was a significant difference between the mean scores of PSQI before and after the intervention in the intervention and control groups, but this difference was not statistically significant between the two intervention groups.ConclusionMassage and aromatherapy massage can improve the sleep quality in cardiac patients.
       
  • Herbal medicine for post-stroke anxiety: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Chan-Young Kwon, Boram Lee, Sun-Yong Chung, Jong Woo KimAbstractThe study was conducted to investigate the efficacy and safety of herbal medicine (HM) for post-stroke anxiety (PSA). Through comprehensive searches, twenty randomized controlled trials were included. Meta-analysis showed that compared to the HM group, the conventional pharmacotherapy group showed significantly lower Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HAMA) score after 1 week of treatment, but not after 2, 4, and 6 weeks of treatment, and higher HAMA score after 8 weeks and 3 months of treatment. Meanwhile, compared to the conventional pharmacotherapy alone group, the HM plus conventional pharmacotherapy group showed significantly better results in HAMA score after 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks of treatment. HM group was associated with lower incidence of adverse events. Current evidence suggests that HM or HM plus conventional pharmacotherapy may be safe and effective in PSA patients within a certain time period. However, due to limited strength of evidence, definite conclusions are not possible.
       
  • Effects of a yoga nidra on the life stress and self-esteem in university
           students
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Kim Sang DolAbstractObjectivesTo assess the effects of a yoga nidra on life stress and self-esteem in university students.MethodsThis study is a non-equivalent control group pretest-posttest design. Forty university students were selected by convenience sampling, with 20 assigned to a yoga nidra group and 20 to a control group. The yoga group participated in bi-weekly, 1-h sessions of yoga nidra for 8 weeks. Life stress intensity level was measured using a 10 cm Visual Analog Scale. Self-esteem score was measured by Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale.ResultsThe yoga nidra group showed significantly decreased life stress intensity levels compared to the control group. The yoga group also showed significantly increased self-esteem scores compared to the control group.ConclusionsThese findings indicate that yoga nidra could alleviate the life stress intensity level and increase the self-esteem in university students.
       
  • Emotional freedom techniques and breathing awareness to reduce childbirth
           fear: A randomized controlled study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Pınar Irmak Vural, Ergül AslanAbstractBackgroundEmotional freedom techniques (EFT) and breathing awareness (BA) are applicable during labour. The present study aimed to determine the effectiveness of EFT and BA in the reduction of childbirth fear.Materials and methodsThis randomized controlled study included 120 pregnant women, of whom the EFT, BA and control groups. The women in the EFT and BA groups were offered their intervention in the latent, active and transition phases of labour.ResultsThere was no significant difference in the sociodemographic and obstetric factors between the groups (p > 0.05). The Subjective Units of Distress Scale in active and transition phases were significantly lower in the EFT group. The difference in the scores for the Wijma Delivery Expectancy/Experience Questionnaire (version B) between the groups was significant (p 
       
  • Characteristics of yoga and meditation users among older Australian women
           – results from the 45 and up study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Romy Lauche, David Sibbritt, Jon Adams, Holger CramerAbstractBackground and purposeYoga and meditation are predominantly utilised by healthy well-educated young women, but little is known about utilisation by older chronically ill women. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the characteristics of yoga and meditation use among middle-to-higher aged Australian women with chronic conditions.Materials and methodsThis is a sub-study of the 45 and Up Study including 1925 Australian women aged 53–95 years diagnosed with chronic conditions (asthma, depression, diabetes, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis). Information on yoga and meditation use frequencies (categories: ‘no yoga’, ‘at least once daily’, ‘at least once weekly’, and ‘at least once monthly’), self-perceived effectiveness and communication with health care providers were assessed via self-report. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify independent predictors of yoga and meditation use, using SPSS 24.0.ResultsOverall 6.8% and 10.7% of women reported the use of yoga and meditation respectively. Meditation was rarely practiced supervised (11.7%), compared to significant higher rates in yoga (53.2%). Predictors for yoga and meditation use were marital status (married/in relationship > not married/in relationship), higher health related hardiness, and higher education, whereas obesity, and diabetes decreased likelihood of use. While the majority found yoga and meditation helpful for their condition, the use was rarely monitored by or discussed with health care practitioners.ConclusionThis study finds that yoga and meditation are used by middle-to-higher aged Australian women with chronic illnesses. The lack of communication with health care providers is concerning and might hinder coordinated and effective health care around chronic illness. Further research is necessary to help understand possible concurrent health care use and thereby help inform safe, effective and coordinate health seeking amongst those with chronic illness.
       
  • Acupuncture therapy improves health-related quality of life in patients
           with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A systematic review and
           meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Po-Chun Hsieh, Mei-Chen Yang, Yao-Kuang Wu, Hsin-Yi Chen, I-Shiang Tzeng, Pei-Shan Hsu, Chang-Ti Lee, Chien-Lin Chen, Chou-Chin LanAbstractBackgroundChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is highly prevalent around the world and has a large impact on its patients, leading to a poor health-related quality of life (HRQL) and exercise capacity. Even under optimal medications, there are still many patients with poor HRQL. Body acupuncture therapy (BAT) is a non-invasive and a popular therapy. Therefore, we aimed to comprehensively analyze the effects of BAT in COPD.Materials and methodsEight electronic databases were searched. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated the effect of BAT, medication (M), and pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). The primary outcome was HRQL evaluated by St. George's respiratory questionnaire (SGRQ) or COPD assessment test (CAT).ResultsOf the 922 articles, 12 studies were included with attesting a total of 798 participants. The result obtained indicated a significant improvement that favored the BAT + M group over the M group in CAT scores (MD: −4.77; 95% CI: −6.53 to −3.01; p 
       
  • Acceptability of mindfulness-based interventions for substance use
           disorder: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Tara Bautista, Dara James, Hortensia AmaroAbstractBackgroundand Purpose: Mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) for substance use disorders (SUD) have shown promising results. However, acceptability of MBIs in the context of SUD treatment has yet to be systematically assessed across published studies. Our aims were to (a) review the literature for assessments of acceptability; (b) summarize how, when, and for whom acceptability is being measured; and (c) create suggestions for best practices in measuring acceptability of MBIs for SUD.MethodsFive databases were searched with key terms related to mindfulness, relapse prevention, and SUD.ResultsResults highlight that studies of MBIs for SUD treatment lack acceptability assessment, a consistent definition of acceptability, and standardized measurements of acceptability. Conclusion: The lack of measurement and conceptual consistency make it difficult to conclude acceptability of MBIs for SUD treatment. It is imperative that more efforts be directed toward measurement of intervention acceptability to assess whether such interventions could be taken to scale.
       
  • Use of complementary and alternative medicine among breast cancer patients
           in Hungary: A descriptive study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Andrea Sárváry, Attila SárváryAbstractBackground and purposeThis study aimed to explore the prevalence of the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) before diagnosis and during oncology therapy, and reveal the disclosure of CAM use among Hungarian breast cancer patients.Materials and methodsIn a cross-sectional survey a self-administered questionnaire was used covering patients’ demographics, oncology-related variables and various aspects of CAM use. Data were collected from 135 patients. Data analysis included descriptive analysis and Chi-square tests.ResultsThe prevalence of CAM use was 52.6% before diagnosis while it was 84.4% during therapy. The most commonly used CAM practices before diagnosis and during therapy were vitamins/minerals (37%, 60%, respectively) and herbs (31.9%, 78.5%, respectively). The frequency of CAM use before diagnosis was higher among more educated patients (p < 0.001) and those living in cities (p = 0.001) while during therapy it was higher among patients with higher income (p = 0.020). Over 40% of the patients informed their physician about each CAM practice they used.ConclusionBesides conventional medicine, CAM practices are also regarded as an important part of therapy by cancer patients. The higher frequency of CAM use during therapy and the relatively modest disclosure towards physicians indicate a greater need for patients’ education regarding CAM practices.
       
  • Effects of virtual reality in body oscillation and motor performance of
           children with cerebral palsy: A preliminary randomized controlled clinical
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Joice Luiza Bruno Arnoni, Silvia Leticia Pavão, Fernanda Pereira dos Santos Silva, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira RochaAbstractBackground and purposeVirtual reality is an adjuvant technique to rehabilitation of children with cerebral palsy (CP). It has been gaining prominence in this field because of its accessibility and great levels of motivation it promotes in treatment. However, there is a lack of studies addressing the effects of virtual reality-based therapy on activity levels regarding postural stability, especially considering the level of evidence presented by studies addressing this issue. Therefore, we aim to evaluate the effects of intervention in body sway and gross motor function of children with CP using an active video game.Materials and methodsIn this blind randomized controlled trial, fifteen children with CP, Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) I-II, regularly attending conventional physical therapy programs, were randomly assigned to an intervention (IG:n = 7) or to a control group (CG:n = 8). In both groups, children remained attending conventional therapy. In addition, IG underwent intervention using an active video game twice a week for 45 min and eight weeks. Standing body sway was assessed using a force plate, and Gross Motor Function Measure (GMFM) dimensions D (Standing) and E (Walking, Running and Jumping) were tested.ResultsFollowing the virtual reality-based intervention, the IG only showed significant improvements in the GMFM dimensions D (p = 0.021) and E (p = 0.008). Improvements were clinically significant (D = 10.8%; E = 14.0%). For the CG, no variable analyzed showed differences after eight weeks.ConclusionsIntervention using an active video game is a promising tool that can improve the gross motor function of children with CP, GMFCS I-II.
       
  • Complementary and alternative medicine, medical liability and the proper
           standard of care
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Vera Lúcia RaposoAbstractComplementary and alternative medicine raises growing interests among population. Patients have the right to reject conventional medicine and instead look for a different treatment, even if sometimes is a placebo. However, currently this risks being a reckless decision, since the way complementary and alternative medicine is being provided leaves space for fraudulent practices, misleading information, wrong diagnosis, improper treatments and thus severe patient's injuries.This paper will discuss the standard of care to be demanded from providers of complementary and alternative medicine. The paper will sustain that it should be bound to a CAM specific standard of care, expose the reasons for this solution and describe the consequences derived therein. It will conclude that the solution to protect CAM users does not rely in the extension of conventional standard of care to CAM practitioners, but in more regulation and more control for CAM practices and CAM practitioners.
       
  • The effect of diluted lavender oil inhalation on pain development during
           vascular access among patients undergoing haemodialysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Emel Taşan, Ozlem Ovayolu, Nimet OvayoluAbstractObjectiveThe present study was conducted as a randomised controlled design in order to evaluate the effect of lavender oil inhalation on pain development during vascular access among patients undergoing haemodialysis.MethodsThe study was conducted involving a total of 60 patients receiving treatment at the haemodialysis unit of a public hospital. The data of study were collected using a questionnaire and a Visual Analogue Scale. Lavender oil inhalation containing a 1:10 ratio of lavender and sweet almond oil was prepared.ResultsThe pain mean score of the intervention group was 3.8 ± 0.3 prior to the application of lavender oil inhalation and decreased to 3.0 ± 0.2 following the inhalation application; whereas, the pain mean score of the control group increased from 5.4 ± 0.3 to 5.6 ± 0.6.ConclusionIt was observed that applying lavender oil inhalation to patients undergoing haemodialysis did decrease pain level experienced by patients during vascular access and caused no negative effects.
       
  • Non-supervised breathing exercise regimen in women with fibromyalgia: A
           quasi-experimental exploratory study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Pablo Tomas-Carus, María Garrido, Jaime C. Branco, María Yolanda Castaño, María Ángeles Gómez, Clarissa Biehl-PrintesAbstractObjectivesTo know the effectiveness and safety of non-supervised breathing exercise regimen by promoting patients' self-management, and to investigate if non-supervised breathing exercise regimen shows similar benefits to supervised regimen in improving pain and fibromyalgia (FM) impact on daily life.Material and methodsFifty-one women with FM were assigned to: supervised breathing exercise regimen group, non-supervised breathing exercise regimen group, and control group. Pain thresholds tolerance on tender points and FM impact on daily life were evaluated.ResultsAfter 12-weeks of breathing exercises statistical differences were not found between supervised and non-supervised regimen. However, supervised regimen showed additional improvements in pain thresholds tolerance and in pain-FIQ subscale.ConclusionOur results suggest that performing a non-supervised breathing exercise program could be as safe and effective as the supervised regimen. However, it was observed that there could be a tendency of supervised exercise regimen to show additional benefits in terms of pain.
       
  • The prevalence, characteristics, expenditure and predictors of
           complementary medicine use in Australians living with gastrointestinal
           disorders: A cross-sectional study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Wei C. Gan, Lorraine Smith, Erica McIntyre, Amie Steel, Joanna E. HarnettAbstractAimsTo determine the prevalence, characteristics, expenditure and predictors of complementary medicine (CM) use in Australian adults living with gastrointestinal disorders (GID).MethodsA cross-sectional study involving 2,025 Australian adults was conducted. Participants were recruited through purposive convenience sampling. Descriptive statistics were conducted to report the prevalence of people living with GIDs and their CM use, including CM products, mind-body practices and CM practitioner services. Chi-square test and independent-samples t-test were used to determine the associations between sociodemographic or health-related variables with CM use. Binary logistic regression was conducted to determine the significant predictors of CM use in GID participants. Economic data was calculated based on the mean out-of-pocket expenditure on CM.ResultsOf the 293 participants reporting a GID, 186 (63.5%) used CM products, 55 (18.8%) used a mind-body practice and 141 (48.1%) visited at least one CM practitioner in the last 12 months. Collectively, the majority of GID participants using any type of CM were female, aged 40–49 years, married and employed. The mean score for health-related quality of life was 49.6 out of 100 in GID participants and 68.2 in participants without a GID (p 
       
  • Acceptance of apitherapeutic methods in patients consulting general
           physicians or gynaecologists
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Karsten Münstedt, Deborah Funk, Thomas Riepen, Enikö Berkes, Jutta HübnerAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Apitherapists promote the medical use of products from the beehive (bee venom, propolis, pollen, honey, royal jelly, dead bees, apilarnil, wax, wax moths), the use of beehive air or therapeutic sleep on a beehive. However, little is known about how far such treatment options are perceived as acceptable by patients.MethodsPatients visiting either a family doctor in Kehl or a gynecologist in Weilburg (both in Germany) were asked to rate their knowledge of apitherapy as well as their readiness to use apitherapeutic measures.ResultsHoney and propolis represent the best-known bee products whereas beehive air and apilarnil are greatly unknown to the patients. Only honey seems to be an acceptable treatment option whereas propolis, pollen and royal jelly seem to be less acceptable. Bee venom was not considered an interesting treatment possibility and, in particular, live bee stings were considered less desirable. This study found that gender and acquaintance with a beekeeper influenced the patients’ ratings but age, education and current medical condition did not.ConclusionLive bee stings, apilarnil or the inhalation of beehive air are not appealing to the majority of patients. Before apitherapeutic methods are promoted, it seems to be important to know about patients’ willingness to tolerate such treatments. Perhaps therapy modifications can be offered which seem more acceptable.
       
  • Change in young people's spine pain following chiropractic care at a
           publicly funded healthcare facility in Canada
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Christian Manansala, Steven Passmore, Katherine Pohlman, Audrey Toth, Gerald OlinAbstractBackgroundThe presence of spinal pain in young people has been established as a risk factor for spinal pain later in life. Recent clinical practice guidelines recommend spinal manipulation (SM), soft tissue therapy, acupuncture, and other modalities that are common treatments provided by chiropractors, as interventions for spine pain. Less is known specifically on the response to chiropractic management in young people with spinal pain. The purpose of this manuscript was to describe the impact, through pain measures, of a pragmatic course of chiropractic management in young people's spinal pain at a publicly funded healthcare facility for a low-income population.MethodsThe study utilized a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected quality assurance data attained from the Mount Carmel Clinic (MCC) chiropractic program database. Formal permission to conduct the analysis of the database was acquired from the officer of records at the MCC. The University of Manitoba's Health Research Ethics Board approved all procedures.ResultsYoung people (defined as 10–24 years of age) demonstrated statistically and clinically significant improvement on the numeric rating scale (NRS) in all four spinal regions following chiropractic management.ConclusionThe findings of the present study provide evidence that a pragmatic course of chiropractic care, including SM, mobilization, soft tissue therapy, acupuncture, and other modalities within the chiropractic scope of practice are a viable conservative pain management treatment option for young people.
       
  • Healthcare providers' role regarding the safe and appropriate use of
           herbal products by breastfeeding mothers: A systematic literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Tingyun Zheng, Dongning Yao, Weijie Chen, Hao Hu, Carolina Oi Lam Ung, Joanna E. HarnettAbstractBackgroundBreastfeeding women often use herbal products to increase their milk supply. The aim of this study was to summarize the literature about the role of healthcare providers in advising breastfeeding women about herbal product use.MethodsPubmed, ScienceDirect, Web of Science, and CINAHL databases were searched for articles written in English using the Keywords: “breastfeeding” or “lactation” and “herbal medicine*“, “botanical*“, “dietary supplement*“, “natural product*“, “traditional medicine*” or “complementary medicine*“.ResultsTwenty-two articles were included in this review. A lack of inter-professional communication and guidelines, a lack of provider confidence and knowledge about the evidence for the efficacy and safety of herbal products were identified as causing a ‘gap’ between current practice and expectations of breastfeeding women seeking advice about their use herbal products.ConclusionsStrategic and collaborative efforts between key stakeholders are required to ensure the needs of women who are considering herbal product use while breastfeeding are met.
       
  • The use of aloe vera in cancer radiation: An updated comprehensive review
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Carrie-Jo E. Farrugia, Elizabeth Sutton Burke, Mariah E. Haley, Komul T. Bedi, Mona A. GandhiAbstractIntroductionMany cancer patients require radiation therapy and often experience adverse effects including erythema, itching, and pain. Aloe vera has been studied for its potential use in the prevention and treatment of radiation related adverse effects as it possesses a variety of properties and is considered an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent. Multiple controlled trials have been performed in order to evaluate the efficacy of aloe vera for the prevention and treatment of radiation side effects. Previous systematic reviews have examined the use of aloe vera for radiation-induced skin reactions, however updated literature now includes the use of aloe vera in proctitis.ObjectivesThe aim of this comprehensive review is to summarize and evaluate the use of aloe vera in patients who have undergone radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer.ResultsAloe vera may not be effective for prophylaxis or treatment of radiation adverse effects in breast cancer patients. Moderate efficacy was seen when aloe vera was used in combination with mild soap versus soap as monotherapy for the treatment of radiation skin reactions. Aloe vera may be effective when cumulative radiation doses are greater than 2,700 cGy and for acute radiation proctitis.ConclusionsThere is contradictory evidence for the use of aloe vera in the setting of radiation in regards to its efficacy in the prevention and treatment of radiation-induced adverse effects.
       
  • Stabilization exercise versus yoga exercise in non-specific low back pain:
           Pain, disability, quality of life, performance: a randomized controlled
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): A. Demirel, M. Oz, Y.A. Ozel, H. Cetin, O. Ulger
       
  • Birth ball use for women in labor: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Alexandre Delgado, Tuíra Maia, Renato S. Melo, Andrea LemosAbstractObjectiveTo evaluate, with the best level of evidence, the possible benefits of using birth balls during labor in maternal and neonatal outcomes.MethodsThis research was made using MEDLINE/PubMed, LILCAS, CINAHL, CENTRAL, and SCOPUS databases, with no period or language restrictions. The terms "labor" and "birth ball" were used. Clinical trials (randomized and non-randomized) were included when compared a group with parturients using birth ball with control group under usual care. The following primary outcomes were: maternal outcomes: pain intensity; length of first and second stage; perineal trauma and episiotomy. Neonatal outcomes: APGAR score, admission to neonatal intensive care unit and delivery room resuscitation. The quality of evidence was evaluated by the GRADE system. Quantitative analysis through meta-analysis was also applies whenever possible.ResultsSeven studies were included. The pain outcome showed differences in the subgroups of 20/30 min on the birth ball (mean difference) −1,46; 95% Confidence Interval: 2,15 to −0,76, p 
       
  • Effect of yoga nidra on the self-esteem and body image of burn patients
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Ahmet Ozdemir, Serdar SaritasAbstractBackgroundThis study was conducted to determine effect of yoga nidra on the self-esteem and body image of burn patients.Materials and methodsThis study was performed in a quasi-experimental model with pretest and post-test control groups. The domain of the study was formed with the patients at adult burn unit of a university. One hundred ten patients participated in the study. The data were collected using the Self-Description Form, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Body Image Scale.ResultsAfter yoga practice, there was a statistically significant increase and improvement in the self-esteem and body image of the experimental group (p 
       
  • Effects of topical sesame (Sesamum indicum) oil on the pain severity of
           chemotherapy-induced phlebitis in patients with colorectal cancer: A
           randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Marzieh Beigom Bigdeli Shamloo, Morteza Nasiri, Mohammad Maneiy, Mohammad Dorchin, Faraz Mojab, Hadi Bahrami, Marzieh Sadeghzadeh Naseri, Maryam KiarsiAbstractBackground and purposeChemotherapy-induced phlebitis (CIP) is one of the most important and common complications in patients with cancer. Currently, the use of complementary methods to prevent or alleviate phlebitis symptoms has attracted great attention. In this study, we aimed to assess the effects of topical sesame oil in reducing the pain severity of CIP.Materials and methodsThis randomized clinical trial was conducted on 60 patients with colorectal cancer afflicted with CIP. Patients received, twice a day for seven consecutive days, a 5-min massage solely (as the control group) or with 10 drops of sesame oil (as the experimental group) within the 10 cm radius of the affected site. The pain severity was evaluated by the visual analog scale on the first, third, fifth, and seventh days of the intervention.ResultsMean changes of the pain severity compared to the baseline were significant on the third (P = 0.009), fifth (P 
       
  • Clients of UK healers: A mixed methods survey of their demography, health
           problems, and experiences of healing
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Emmylou Rahtz, Sue Child, Sue Knight, Sara L. Warber, Paul DieppeAbstractBackgroundHealing has not been well researched, and very little is known about who goes to healers, and what they experience.MethodsA survey of UK-based healers was undertaken with the help of The Confederation of Healing Organisations, asking healers to report on up to 20 consultations. Forms asked about the demography of healer and client, reasons for the consultation, type of healing, and outcomes. Both quantitative and qualitative data were analysed.Results278 returned forms from 39 healers (average age 58) were analysed. Healing was described as Spiritual (69%), Reiki (15%) or Energy (10%). The clients had an average age of 57, and 76% were women. The most common reasons for consulting were mental health problems and pain. 93% of the clients reported experiencing immediate benefits. Relaxation, improved wellbeing and relief of pain were often reported. In addition, 76 (27%) had some unusual sensory experiences during the session, such as feelings of warmth, seeing coloured lights, or tingling sensations. The majority of general comments about the experience were positive, and 68% made another appointment.ConclusionsOlder people, particularly older women, are the main recipients of healing in the UK, and they go for help with many problems, particularly mental health issues and pain. The majority have a positive experience, and come back for more. In addition to relief of symptoms, many have sensory experiences which could indicate that some special type of interaction was taking place between healer and healee.
       
  • Experiences of trauma-sensitive yoga among inner city youth: A
           mixed-methods feasibility study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Sarah Cochrane, Katelyn Merritt, Adelena Leon, Alexandria Vila Palacol, Sarah Siddiqui, D. Faris, Skye Barbic
       
  • Efficacy of aromatherapy with Rosa damascena in the improvement of sleep
           quality of cancer patients: A randomized controlled clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Ghazaleh Heydarirad, Armaghan Sadat Keyhanmehr, Bahram Mofid, Hossein Nikfarjad, Seyed Hamdollah Mosavat
       
  • Use of traditional medicines among pharmacists in Nigeria
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): A.S. Wada, A.I. Jatau, A.A. Bala, A. Haruna, A.M. Isa, A.S. Safiyya, A. Sha'abanAbstractBackgroundTraditional Medicine (TM) use is growing and emerging as an issue of public healthcare importance. Recently, there are increasing interest and trends of TM use among health care professionals (HCP). However, information regarding TM use among pharmacists in Nigeria is limited. This study investigates the use of TM among pharmacists in Nigeria.Materials and methodsThis study was a cross sectional study in the form of an online survey (Google Surveys). Eligible participants were pharmacists currently practicing in Nigeria. The closed-ended questionnaire was developed and validated prior to the data collection. The hyperlink to the online survey questionnaire was shared with the eligible pharmacists via social media groups belonging to pharmacists’ professional associations.ResultsA total of 262 of completed responses were received. Among the respondents, 53.2% had over 5 years of pharmacy practice experience and 48% were practicing in hospitals. 225 respondents (85.9%) have ever used TM at least once in their lifetime, while 21.3% were currently using TM at the time of the data collection. Those that used TM in the last 12 months were 47.0%, while those that used it within the last week, one month and six months were 15.4%, 10.5% and. 12.8% respectively. Herbal medicine was the most frequently used TM among the respondents (94.2%). The most common reason for using TM was for the maintenance of general well-being (38.2%). Among the TM users, 17.3% have reported experiencing an ADE-related to the TM use. Among the respondents, 44.7% felt TM is safe for use while 35.5% indicated that they will recommend TM to their patients.ConclusionTM is commonly used by a pharmacist in Nigeria particularly among those practicing in the community and hospital. This signifies an increasing acceptance of TM among healthcare professionals and a call for more education and training on TM for effective pharmaceutical care delivery.
       
  • Complementary and alternative medicine use in cancer: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Martin R. Keene, Ian M. Heslop, Sabe S. Sabesan, Beverley D. GlassAbstractBackground and purposeComplementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use in cancer is increasing. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine demographic profiles and prevalence and reasons for use in cancer patients.MethodsIn this systematic review, the databases OVID, PubMed, and Scopus were searched for studies on CAM use in cancer between 2009 and June 2018.ResultsThe results showed that an average of 51% of cancer patients used CAM. Common independent demographic characteristics associated with CAM use were younger, female cancer patients, having higher education, earning a higher income and having previously used CAM. Frequent reasons for use, grouped into themes were shown to be to influence their cancer and general health and to treat complications of the cancer or therapy.ConclusionThe review provides an insight and will serve to better inform health professionals on how this population is using CAM.
       
  • Use of Kinesio taping in lower-extremity rehabilitation of post-stroke
           patients: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Mian Wang, Zi-wen Pei, Bei-dou Xiong, Xian-mei Meng, Xiao-li Chen, Wei-jing LiaoAbstractBackgroundand purpose: The benefits of Kinesio taping (KT) in post-stroke rehabilitation have not been determined. This study aimed to evaluate its effects on lower-extremity rehabilitation in patients after a stroke.MethodsA literature search was performed using EBSCOhost, Embase, Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), PubMed, Cochrane, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), SinoMed, and Wanfang Data through June 2018. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the use of KT during lower-extremity, post-stroke rehabilitation were selected. Meta-analysis was conducted.ResultsA total of 14 RCTs of low to moderate quality were reviewed and included 783 participants. Results indicated that KT significantly improved patients’ lower extremity spasticity, motor function, balance, ambulation, gait parameters, and daily activities, with few adverse effects.ConclusionKT may have positive effects on lower-extremity, post-stroke rehabilitation. Due to the limited number and quality of the research, additional studies are needed to identify KT benefits.
       
  • Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy in Korean patients with systemic lupus
           erythematosus: A pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Hyoun-Ah Kim, Lina Seo, Ju-Yang Jung, Ye Won Kim, Eunyoung Lee, Sun-Mi Cho, Chang-Hee SuhAbstractBackgroundand purpose: The stress and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are intertwined and affecting each other. This pilot study evaluated the mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in Korean patients with SLE.Materials and methodsThe Korean version of the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) were evaluated for the effect of the MBCT in 25 patients.ResultsThe BDI-II, BAI, SWLS, and PSS before the MBCT were 24.2 ± 10.6, 19.1 ± 9.7, 14.7 ± 6.5, and 20.4 ± 3.8, respectively. Eighteen patients completed the MBCT. After the MBCT, BDI-II, BAI, and PSS improved to 17.4 ± 13.0 (p 
       
  • Feasibility evaluation of a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for
           primary care professionals in Brazilian national health system
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Pedro Henrique Ribeiro Santiago, Leonardo Rodrigues Valle Serra e Meira, Cláudia Flemming ColussiAbstractBackground and purposeIn the last decades, an increasing body of scientific studies has shown mindfulness-based interventions as efficacious for reducing stress, including among primary care professionals. Despite the strength of the evidence, mindfulness-based interventions still are not widely adopted as a clinical practice in national health systems. The aim of the present study was to conduct a feasibility evaluation of a mindfulness-based stress reduction program for primary care professionals in Brazilian national health system.Materials and methodsA pilot mindfulness program was conducted through the course of four weekly encounters in the municipality of Biguaçu with the participation of 26 primary care professionals. Data was collected through direct observations and four self-report questionnaires. The information was used to complete an evaluation matrix and reach a value judgment about the feasibility level of the components of the mindfulness-based program.ResultsThe subdimensions Integration, Demand, and Acceptability were judged as “Highly Feasible”, the subdimension Practicality was judged as “Feasible” and the subdimension Adaptation was judged as “Lowly Feasible”. The results indicated that there is a high demand for stress-reduction interventions within the context of primary care and the acceptability by the stakeholders (participants and management) was excellent. However, the two main barriers found were the need for a brief version of the program to accommodate the restrictive timetable of the primary care professionals and the low retention rates.ConclusionThe implementation of a mindfulness-based program for primary care professionals in Brazilian national health system was judged as “Feasible”. Further studies need to conduct the feasibility evaluation in other municipalities and with larger sample sizes to ensure the generalizability of these results.
       
  • Functional improvements after a pilates program in adolescents with a
           history of back pain: A randomised controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Noelia González-Gálvez, Pablo J. Marcos-Pardo, María Carrasco-PoyatosAbstractBackgroundand purpose. Trunk endurance and extensibility are the main physical condition factors related to back pain. The goal was to analyse the effectiveness of a 6-week Pilates programme on trunk endurance and extensibility in adolescents with a history of back pain, determining the influence of sex.Materials and methodsFifty-two students with a history of back pain were randomly assigned to the Pilates group (PG; n = 26) or the control group (CG; n = 26). Trunk flexion (BTC test) and extension (SOR test), and hamstring extensibility (TT test) were measured.ResultsPG improved significantly BTC, SOR, and TT test. Statistical differences (p = 0.005) were found between the PG and the CG for the SOR test.ConclusionThe Pilates programme enhanced trunk endurance and extensibility in adolescents with a history of back pain. Trunk flexor endurance was better in the PG. Results were not influenced by sex.
       
  • Enhancing the Seeking Safety group intervention with trauma-sensitive yoga
           practice: A program evaluation
    • Abstract: Publication date: May 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 35Author(s): Thomas M. Murphy, Franco Dispenza, Catherine Y. Chang, Nikki Elston, Amanda Rumsey, Moneta Sinclair, Rico Curtis-DavidsonAbstractBackground and purposeThe purpose of this article is to report the results of a qualitative Utilization Focused Program Evaluation on the integration of the Seeking Safety manualized group counseling intervention with Trauma-Sensitive (TS) yoga practice at a community mental health agency. To date, there has been no evaluation of Seeking Safety and TS yoga as complementary therapies.Method and materialsQualitative data were generated from key informant interviews and focus groups, then coded and analyzed for theme and content.ResultsAnalysis of data indicate that, in this specific setting, the combination of Seeking Safety and TS Yoga was perceived by clients and clinicians as an effective complementary intervention strategy.ConclusionThe results of this qualitative evaluation are specific to the agency utilizing the interventions. By integrating Seeking Safety with TS yoga many of the inherent weaknesses of the two individual approaches were moderated.
       
  • Effects of cryotherapy in preventing oral mucositis in hematopoietic stem
           cell transplantation patients: Literature review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 23 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical PracticeAuthor(s): Ebru Baysal, Dilek Sari
       
  • Paeoniae Radix-containing herbal medicine for patients with restless legs
           syndrome: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical PracticeAuthor(s): Seungwon Kwon, Chul Jin, Seung-Yeon Cho, Seong-Uk Park, Woo-Sang Jung, Sang-Kwan Moon, Jung-Mi Park, Chang-Nam Ko, Ki-Ho ChoAbstractBackground and purposePaeoniae Radix has been used for legs discomfort such as restless legs syndrome. The aim of this review is to evaluate efficacy and safety of Paeoneia Radix-containing herbal medicine on restless legs syndrome.MethodsLiterature search was conducted on PubMed, Scopus, CENTRAL, CiNii, KTKP, OASIS, and CNKI for randomized controlled trials that evaluated the effects of Paeoniae Radix-containing herbal medicines on restless legs syndrome.ResultsTwelve studies (n = 639) were included. The overall methodological quality was low. In the herbal group, meta-analysis indicated statistically significant improvements in the total effective rate, the restless legs syndrome rating scale and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index as compared with those in the non-herbal group. Herbal treatments were found to be relatively safe.ConclusionPaeoniae Radix-containing herbal medicines maight promote improvements in restless legs syndrome. However, we are unable to draw concrete conclusions owing to limitations of the included studies.
       
  • “Effect of grape seed extract ointment on caesarean section wound
           healing: A double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial”
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 March 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical PracticeAuthor(s): Alimohammad Izadpanah, Sima Soorgi, Neda Geraminejad, Mahdi hosseiniAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Complications of the delayed recovery of cesarean section (CS) wound can include stress, discomfort, and dissatisfaction of the mother in the postpartum period. This study tried to determine the effect of grape seed extract ointment on CS wound healing.Materials and methodsThis is a double-blind, randomized, controlled clinical trial incorporating 129 women eligible for CS in eastern Iran. Participants were selected through convenience sampling method and were subsequently randomly assigned into three groups: 2.5% grape seed extract ointment, 5% grape seed extract ointment, and petrolatum. CS wound healing indices were assessed before the intervention, and 6 and 14 days after the intervention using the REEDA scale (redness, edema, ecchymosis, discharge, and approximation).ResultsThe mean scores on days 6 and 14 after intervention were respectively 2.02 ± 0.52 and 0.98 ± 0.61 in the 5% ointment group, 2.83 ± 0.54 and 1.58 ± 0.67 in the 2.5% ointment group, and 2.91 ± 0.51 and 1.55 ± 0.74 in the petrolatum group. While the mean score in the 5% ointment group was significantly different from those of 2.5% ointment and petrolatum groups (P 
       
  • Effect of expressıve touchıng on labour paın and maternal
           satısfactıon: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Rabiye Erenoğlu, Mürüvvet Başer
       
  • Acupuncture for primary trigeminal neuralgia: A systematic review and
           PRISMA-compliant meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Hantong Hu, Lifang Chen, Ruijie Ma, Hong Gao, Jianqiao FangAbstractBackground and purposeAcupuncture is increasingly used by patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia (PTN). We aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for PTN.MethodsSeven databases were searched. Risk of bias was assessed and meta-analyses were conducted. The evidence level was assessed using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE).ResultsThirty-three RCTs were included. Meta-analysis results demonstrated that the effect of both manual acupuncture (MA) and electro-acupuncture (EA) for improving response rate and recurrence rate was more significant than carbamazepine. Besides, MA achieved more significant effect on alleviating pain intensity. Moreover, acupuncture combined with carbamazepine had a more positive effect on response rate than carbamazepine alone.ConclusionsAcupuncture might have some positive effects for PTN. Nevertheless, the level of all evidence was low or very low. We could not yet draw a firm conclusion on the efficacy of acupuncture for PTN.
       
  • Acupuncture therapy for the treatment of stable angina pectoris: An
           updated meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Yuan Liu, Hao-yu Meng, Mohammad Reeaze Khurwolah, Jia-bao Liu, Heng Tang, Nan Aa, Zhi-jian YangAbstractBackground and purposeStable angina pectoris is a common symptom imperiling patients’ life quality. The purpose of this meta-analysis is to assess the effectiveness of acupuncture alone or acupuncture plus medicine for the treatment of stable angina pectoris.MethodsSeven databases were searched ranging from 1959 to February 2018. Quantitative analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was performed by RevMan 5.3 software and STATA 12.0 program, and Cochrane criteria for risk-of-bias was used to assess the methodological quality of the trials.ResultsA total of 12 RCTs involving 974 patients were enrolled in this study. The pooled results showed that both acupuncture group (RR: 0.35, P 
       
  • Expressive writing to improve resilience to trauma: A clinical feasibility
           trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Oliver Glass, Mark Dreusicke, John Evans, Elizabeth Bechard, Ruth Q. WoleverAbstractBackground and purposeTrauma is highly prevalent, with estimates that up to 90% of the U.S. population have been exposed to a traumatic event. The adverse health consequences of trauma exposure are diverse and often long-lasting. While expressive writing has been shown to improve emotional and physical health in numerous populations, the feasibility and potential effectiveness of a novel expressive writing program provided in a clinical setting to improve resilience is unknown. Our objective was to determine the feasibility and potential effectiveness of a 6-week expressive writing course provided in a clinical setting to improve resilience in individuals with a history of trauma.Materials and methodsThis prospective, observational trial of a 6-week expressive writing intervention (Transform Your Life: Write to Heal) was conducted in an academic outpatient integrative clinic. Eligible participants were a self-referred sample of 39 English-speaking adults who identified as having had a trauma, or significant emotional/physical upheaval, within the past year. Main outcome measures included: Feasibility: Enrollment, Retention in Program and Trial, Adherence. Acceptability: Adverse Events; Participant Ratings. Primary Psychological Outcome: Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC). Secondary Psychological Outcomes: Perceived Stress Scale – 10 item (PSS-10); Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D); Rumination Response Scale (RRS).ResultsAll measures of feasibility including those related to enrollment, retention, and adherence support feasibility. All measures of acceptability including adverse events and participant ratings support the intervention as being safe, well-received and personally valuable. Resilience scores increased from baseline (64.3 ± 14.40) to post-intervention (74.2 ± 13.15), t(37) = 4.61, p 
       
  • Changes in body awareness and self-compassion in clinical psychology
           trainees through a mindfulness program
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Sheila PintadoAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Health professional trainees can experience the costs of caring, thus the importance of the teaching self-care. The aim of the present study is to analyze the changes in body awareness and self-compassion in clinical psychologists in training through a mindfulness program.Materials and methodsEight clinical psychologist trainees received eight weekly sessions; qualitative analysis of participants' personal journal was conducted.ResultsFirst, participants experienced four changes: awareness in physical sensations, well-being, and the sharpening and integration of senses. Then, they relayed an increase in body awareness of unpleasant sensations and self-compassion. On completion of the eight sessions, participants reported synchronicity with others, more compassion for themselves, deepening of body awareness and changes of habits and daily patterns.ConclusionMindfulness can help improve body awareness and self-compassion. It is important to address self-care in future health professionals to prevent stress and burnout, improving self-knowledge and self-consciousness.
       
  • Effects of nonpharmacological interventions on depressive symptoms and
           depression among nursing students: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Dandan Chen, Weijia Sun, Na Liu, Jie Wang, Pingping Guo, Xuehui Zhang, Wei ZhangAbstractObjectivesWe aim to examine whether nonpharmacological interventions could effectively improve depressive symptoms and depression to provide more treatment options for nursing students.MethodsPubMed, the Cochrane Library, EMBase, Web of Science, PsycINFO, and three Chinese electronic databases were comprehensively searched for papers that were published from January 1990 through March 2018. Quality assessment, sensitivity analysis and heterogeneity were performed.ResultsIn our review, 13 controlled trials met the inclusion criteria. The meta-analysis indicated that the depressive symptoms and depression of nursing students in the intervention groups showed significantly moderate improvements compared with the control groups. Three subgroup analyses showed that mindfulness interventions and stress management programs were common and effective, short-term interventions were beneficial to depression, nonpharmacological interventions had great improvements for Asian nursing students and more rigorous researches on methodological quality are recommended.ConclusionNonpharmacological interventions can serve as promising complementary and alternative approaches in reducing the depressive symptoms and depression of nursing students.
       
  • Experiences of children and parents in MiYoga, an embodied mindfulness
           yoga program for cerebral palsy: A mixed method study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Catherine K. Mak, Koa Whittingham, Roslyn N. BoydAbstractBackground and purposeA mindfulness yoga program (MiYoga) was developed and trialled with children with cerebral palsy and their parents. This mixed-method study explores the experiences of children and parents who participated in MiYoga, to assess its acceptability, feasibility and implementation.Materials and methodsOf the forty-two child-parent dyads who participated in the MiYoga randomised control trial, 19 children and 22 parents were interviewed individually in a semi-structured way about their experiences of MiYoga. Participants rated their mood on a 5-point scale before and after each session and completed short questionnaires at the end of each session.ResultsChildren and parents reported improved mood after each MiYoga session. Parents reported being more aware of their thoughts and feelings and possibly became more aware of their day-to-day mindlessness.ConclusionMiYoga significantly improved children and parents’ mood. Parents reported gains in awareness as well as challenges of adhering to the home practice.
       
  • The effect of inhalation aromatherapy with rose essential oil on the
           anxiety of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Fatemeh Fazlollahpour-Rokni, Seyed Afshin Shorofi, Nouraddin Mousavinasab, Rahman Ghafari, Ravanbakhsh EsmaeiliAbstractBackground and purposeAnxiety is one of the most common responses of patients awaiting coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery to stressful conditions before surgery. This study is intended to examine the effect of inhalation aromatherapy with rose essential oil on the anxiety of patients undergoing CABG surgery.Materials and methodsThis was a single-blind randomized clinical trial of 66 patients undergoing CABG surgery. The experimental group inhaled three drops of 4% rose essential oil for 10 minutes one night and one hour before surgery. The control group did not receive any intervention from the research team.ResultsThe level of anxiety was measured before and 30 minutes after the intervention using the Spielberger's Anxiety Inventory. Prior to surgery, an independent t-test showed that the mean score of anxiety was not significantly different between the experimental and control groups (p = 0.41). Aromatherapy with rose essential oil did not cause any significant differences in state anxiety (P = 0.41), trait anxiety (P = 0.90), and total anxiety (P = 0.69).ConclusionOur results revealed that inhalation aromatherapy with rose essential oil could not significantly reduce anxiety in CABG patients. Future research with larger sample sizes and using different concentrations of rose essential oil are needed to achieve more definitive conclusions.
       
  • Efficacy and safety of acupuncture for hypertension: An overview of
           systematic reviews
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Huimin Zhao, Dan Li, Yuling Li, Ying Yang, Yueting Liu, Jie Li, Jing MaoAbstractBackground and purposeAcupuncture is widely used in the treatment of hypertension, yet its efficacy and safety for hypertension remain controversial. This overview aimed to summarize the evidence on acupuncture for hypertension.MethodsEight databases were searched. The Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) tool and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach were performed.ResultsFifteen systematic reviews (SRs) were identified. Methodological quality and quality of evidence were unsatisfactory. Acupuncture combined with Western medicine (WM) was superior to WM in systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), efficacy rate, and traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome. Acupuncture was more effective in treating SBP and DBP than sham acupuncture plus WM. Evidence regarding the benefit of acupuncture alone for SBP and DBP, efficacy rate and TCM syndrome was inconsistent. No serious adverse effects were identified.ConclusionHigh-quality SRs and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are required.
       
  • The use of cold therapy, music therapy and lidocaine spray for reducing
           pain and anxiety following chest tube removal
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Yeşim Yaman Aktaş, Neziha KarabulutAbstractAimTo determine the effect of cold therapy, music therapy and lidocaine spray on pain and anxiety following chest tube removal (CTR).MethodsThis study was a randomized clinical trial. The participants were randomly assigned either one of four groups: control group, cold therapy, music therapy, and lidocaine spray. The primary outcome of the study was to measure pain using Visual Analog Scale. Anxiety was used as secondary outcome.ResultsThirty patients in each arm completed the study. There was no difference in pain scores between groups immediately after and 20 min after CTR (F = 2.06, p = 0.108). However, there was a significant difference between the anxiety scores of control and intervention groups 20 min after CTR (p 
       
  • Filling the gaps in contemporary maternity care: The perceptions of
           complementary medicine practitioners providing care to women during
           pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Amie Steel, Helen Hall, Helene Diezel, Jon Wardle, Jon AdamsAbstractBackground and purposeAs many as one in two women consult with a complementary medicine (CM) practitioner for pregnancy-related health care, yet little is known about the reason for such a high rate of use. This paper presents the perceptions of CM practitioners regarding the role they play within the existing maternity care system.Materials and methodsSemi-structured interviews with 23 CM practitioners were conducted and the transcripts analysed, using a Framework approach.ResultsKey themes pertaining to the perceived role of CM practitioners in maternity care emerged. (1) Becoming a maternity care provider: responding to a need and filling gaps in the system; (2) Characterising CM maternity care: Holistic, nurturing and addressing unmet health concerns and; (3) Treating health complaints neglected by conventional maternity care.ConclusionCM practitioners often acknowledge their specialist roles as part of a multidisciplinary team of practitioners rather than attempting to offer comprehensive pregnancy care.
       
  • The benefits of yoga for people living with HIV/AIDS: A systematic review
           and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Eugene M. Dunne, Brittany L. Balletto, Marissa L. Donahue, Melissa M. Feulner, Julie DeCosta, Dean G. Cruess, Elena Salmoirago-Blotcher, Rena R. Wing, Michael P. Carey, Lori A.J. Scott-SheldonAbstractBackgroundPeople living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) often experience psychological stress associated with disease management. This meta-analysis examines the benefits of yoga interventions on psychological distress among PLWHA.MethodsIncluded were studies that (a) evaluated a yoga intervention in PLWHA; (b) provided between-group or within-group changes; and (c) assessed a psychological, physiological, or biomedical outcome.ResultsSeven studies sampling 396 PLWHA (M age = 42 years, SD = 5 years; 40% women) met inclusion criteria. PLWHA who received yoga interventions reported significant improvements in perceived stress (d+ = 0.80, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.53, 1.07), positive affect (d + = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.49, 0.98), and anxiety (d+ = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.27, 1.14) compared to controls.ConclusionYoga is a promising intervention for stress management. However, the literature is limited by the small number of studies. Randomized controlled trials with objective measures of HIV-related outcomes are needed to further evaluate the benefits of yoga.
       
  • Perceived benefits and barriers to yoga participation after stroke: A
           focus group approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): A. Harris, M. Austin, T.M. Blake, M.L. BirdAbstractBackgroundand Purpose: There is increasing evidence to suggest yoga can be beneficial to health and wellbeing after stroke. The purpose of this study was to identify perceived benefits and barriers to yoga participation among adults with chronic stroke.Materials and methodsTwenty-six community dwelling adults (14 female, 12 male) who were at least 6-months post-stroke participated in four focus groups held at local stroke recovery meetings. Data was recorded and transcripts were analysed thematically.ResultsParticipants identified whole body benefits, the return of connection and feeling health in mind as the primary benefits of yoga. Perceived barriers included physical barriers to participation, cognitive challenges, environmental access, and financial limitations.ConclusionStroke survivors perceive yoga practice provides benefits in ‘connectedness’. Future interventions should recognize the importance of yoga instructor training, focus on the mind-body connection aspects of yoga, and modifying activities to safely accommodate the physical abilities of the participants.
       
  • Honey in the management of side effects of radiotherapy- or
           radio/chemotherapy-induced oral mucositis. A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Karsten Münstedt, Felix Momm, Jutta HübnerAbstractBackgroundand purpose: In spite of several trials, systematic reviews and meta-analyses, honey is not considered as a viable candidate for the prophylaxis and treatment of radiotherapy-induced oral mucositis in the practice guidelines for supportive care. The purpose of this study was to analyse the value of honey in this treatment situation based on randomized trials acknowledging the fact that manuka honey which is used in some trials distinguishes itself from other honey due to the presence of methylglyoxal.MethodsOn the basis of a literature search, we identified and analysed 17 randomized trials on the topic. Participants in these trials received radiotherapy or a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy for head and neck cancer.ResultsStudies using manuka honey found little rationale for the medicinal use of honey (n = 4) in this field, whereas trials using conventional honey presented data on its usefulness (n = 13). Thus, the type of honey may explain the divergent results of trials in this area.ConclusionConventional honey is likely to be effective in the prophylaxis and treatment of radiation- and chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis.
       
  • The effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy on the illness
           perception and Psychological Symptoms in patients with Rheumatoid
           Arthritis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Zahra Dalili, Mohammad Hossein BayaziAbstractThis study was conducted to evaluate the Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) on the Illness Perception (IP) and Psychological Symptoms (PS) for Patients in primary care with an active symptom of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). The present design is a clinical trial that uses the pre-test and post-test design with a control group. MBCT as an evidence-based psychotherapeutic intervention and Mindfulness-Based Intervention (MBI), is an 8-week course developed for patients with relapsing depression that integrates mindfulness meditation practices and cognitive therapy. This semi-experimental study was conducted using a pretest-posttest and control group. Diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of patients with RA were all patients with RA who visited the clinic of Jam Rheumatology Centers and met other inclusion criteria in Mashhad in the spring of 2018. Therefore, 28 patients were randomly selected from the diagnostic group. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group and a control group (14 individuals in each group) and then were post-tested after two months. The data were collected using the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire (IPQ-R) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21 scores) which were completed by the participants. The data were analyzed using repeated measures MANOVA. The results showed that there was a significant difference between the mean scores of pre-test (before MBI) and post-test (after MBI) in the experimental group compared to the control group, and MBCT had a significant effect on the perception of the disease and the psychological syndrome in the experimental group compared to the control group. Therefore, it can be concluded that MBCT is effective on IP and psychological syndrome and can be used as an MBI method to reduce the illness perceptions in people with RA. The future researches with longer pursuing period's efficacy continuation are suggested.
       
  • Recommendations for a culturally-responsive mindfulness-based intervention
           for African Americans
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Natalie N. Watson-Singleton, Angela R. Black, Briana N. SpiveyAbstractBackgroundAfrican Americans are at increased risk for stress-related disparities. Mindfulness-based interventions are effective in reducing adverse outcomes; yet, racial/ethnic minorities are underrepresented in these interventions. Also, the development of culturally-responsive interventions has been mostly non-existent.Materials and methodsFocus group and interview data were acquired following a four-week mindfulness intervention with African American women.ResultsUsing Brigg's (2011) mental health utilization model to guide analysis, several recommended culturally-responsive modifications emerged. Recommended modifications internal to the intervention included using African American facilitators, incorporating cultural values, using culturally-familiar terminology, and providing cultural resources. Suggested modifications to the intervention's external factors included offering the intervention within culturally-familiar settings. Individual-level factors to address were religious concerns, perceived benefits, and holistic health goals.ConclusionsThemes were used to propose a model toward the creation of a culturally-responsive mindfulness-based interventions to guide culturally-relevant treatment modifications and improve underserved communities’ engagement in these interventions.
       
  • Effectiveness of honey dressing in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers:
           A systematic review and meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Cui Wang, Min Guo, Nan Zhang, Gongchao WangAbstractObjectiveHoney dressing has been applied in the treatment of diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs). However, there is a lack of research showing ample evidence that honey dressing is more effective in the treatment of DFUs than other dressings. This study aimed to examine the effects of honey dressing on wound-healing process for DFUs.MethodWe searched for evidence regarding honey dressing used in the treatment of DFUs in various databases. We selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-experimental studies for meta-analysis.ResultsThe meta-analysis showed that honey dressing effectively shortened the wound debridement time, wound healing time, and bacterial clearance time; it increased the wound healing rate and bacterial clearance rate during the first one to two weeks of use.ConclusionOur findings suggest that honey dressing effectively promotes healing in DFUs. Further research is needed to elucidate these findings so that this form of treatment can be widely applied.
       
  • “I can do almost anything”: The experience of adults with type 2
           diabetes with a yoga intervention
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Herpreet Thind, Kate M. Guthrie, Santina Horowitz, Matthew Conrad, Beth C. Bock
       
  • Bone marrow aspiration concentrate and platelet-rich plasma in the
           treatment of knee osteoarthritis: A report of three cases
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Volkan Subaşı, Timur EkizAbstractThis paper presents the cases of 3 females with knee osteoarthritis. All 3 received a single bone marrow aspiration concentrate (BMAC) injection followed one month later by a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection. Compared with the baseline values, pain and functionality scores improved in all the patients. The aim of presenting these cases is to highlight that the combined use of intra-articular BMAC and PRP treatments may have positive effects on pain, functional status and quality of life in patients with knee osteoarthritis.
       
  • Massage and reflexology for post-operative cancer cystectomy patients:
           Evaluation of a pilot service
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Natalie Silverdale, Mark Wherry, Alison RoodhouseAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Radical cystectomy is a gold standard treatment for invasive bladder cancer. However the length of the operation is long and recovery is usually slow and painful. There is growing recognition of the importance of health related quality of life among patients undergoing invasive surgical procedures. In response, a massage and reflexology service was piloted and evaluated.Materials and methodsOne hour of massage, reflexology or a combination of both was provided twice to 38 cystectomy patients by a trained therapist in their acute post-operative phase (day one and day three). Self-reported concerns, well-being and pain were measured before and immediately after the therapy. Pain was measured once more in the early evening of each therapy day.ResultsSelf-reported concerns and pain were significantly reduced following the intervention on both days treatments were given. Pain was measured again on the evening of each of the intervention days, and this reduction was maintained on day one but not day three. Well-being scores were also significantly improved pre to post intervention on both day one and day three. Qualitative comments highlighted that this complementary therapy service was viewed both beneficial and relaxing. There were no significant differences between the different therapies used (massage, reflexology, or a combination of the two).ConclusionThe findings of this pilot evaluation very tentatively support the benefits of cancer cystectomy patients receiving massage and/or reflexology in their acute postoperative recovery period. There are many limitations to this evaluation. Further research utilising a randomised control methodology alongside medical, independent markers is warranted, and currently in development.
       
  • Contrasting implicit and explicit measures of attitudes to complementary
           and alternative medicines
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): James A. Green, Oulmann Zerhouni, Aurélie GauchetAbstractWe aimed to contrast implicit and explicit measures of attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicines, to determine which best predicts medicine adherence. 117 participants from Université Grenoble Alpes completed online measures of attitudes towards complementary and alternative medicines, including implicit measures (Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP); Implicit Association Test (IAT)), and explicit measures (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), modified explicit AMP); and self-reported medicine adherence (Medication Adherence Scale (MARS); Probabilistic Medication Adherence Scale (ProMAS)). AMP measures of implicit and explicit attitudes predicted beliefs toward medicine and medicines adherence. Models including implicit measures were stronger than models with explicit measures alone. Further, the AMP predicted beliefs toward medicine as well as medicine adherence, and the AMP was a stronger predictor compared to the IAT, although the IAT predicted adherence. These preliminary findings suggest that ‘hot’ implicit attitudes are a useful predictor of people's medicine choices, and that the AMP outperforms the IAT.
       
  • Mindfulness mechanisms and psychological effects for aMCI patients: A
           comparison with psychoeducation
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): E. Larouche, C. Hudon, S. GouletAbstractAmnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), an Alzheimer's disease prodrome, is characterized by cognitive and psychological symptoms, the latter aggravating prognosis. A mindfulness-based intervention (MBI) represents a promising non-pharmacological framework for Alzheimer's disease prevention. The Monitoring + Acceptance Theory (MAT) postulates that MBI improves cognition through monitoring, and psychological well-being, through acceptance. This single-blind preliminary randomized-controlled study investigated the effects of a MBI on anxio-depressive symptoms, quality of life, and memory, compared to a psychoeducation-based intervention in older adults with aMCI. The contribution of MAT components and of ruminations' reduction to intervention efficacy were examined. Participants assigned to both conditions experienced similar benefits regarding anxio-depressive symptoms and aging-related quality of life. General quality of life and memory remained unchanged. A partial support of the MAT and of ruminations reduction to the MBI's efficacy was found. The findings provide new insights on the effects and mechanisms of a MBI on aMCI symptoms.
       
  • Mindfulness for people with long-term conditions and their family
           caregivers: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Ben Parkinson, Maggie Lawrence, Evelyn McElhinney, Jo Booth
       
  • The effect of progressive muscle relaxation on cancer patients’
           self-efficacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Masoomeh Noruzi zamenjani, Behnam Masmouei, Mehdi Harorani, Rezvan Ghafarzadegan, Fahimeh Davodabady, Sima Zahedi, Zakie DavodabadyAbstractBackground and purposeSelf-efficacy is considered as one of the influential parameters affecting the health of patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of relaxation techniques on self-efficacy of patients suffering from cancer.Materials and methodsThis study was a clinical trial in which 80 patients suffering from cancer were randomly assigned to two groups of experimental and control. Data collection instruments consisted of demographic information and Strategies Used by People to Promote Health questionnaires. In the experimental group, the patients performed relaxation techniques once a day for 30 min over two months. In the control group, the patients received the routine care.ResultsA statistically significant difference was observed between the mean self-efficacy indices in the experimental group (p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in the control group (p = 0.3).ConclusionMuscle relaxation can enhance self-efficacy of cancer patients. Therefore, it can be used as an alternative method for patients who are willing to use this technique.
       
  • Gua Sha therapy for chronic low back pain: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Felix J. Saha, Gianna Brummer, Romy Lauche, Thomas Ostermann, Kyung-Eun Choi, Thomas Rampp, Gustav Dobos, Holger CramerAbstractObjectiveTo test the efficacy of Gua Sha therapy in patients with chronic low back pain.Methods50 patients with chronic low back pain (78% female, 49.7 ± 10.0 years) were randomized to two Gua Sha treatments (n = 25) or waitlist control (n = 25). Primary outcome was current pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale); secondary outcome measures included function (Oswestry Disability Index), pain on movement (Pain on Movement Questionnaire), perceived change in health status, pressure pain threshold, mechanical detection threshold, and vibration detection threshold.ResultsAfter treatment, patients in the Gua Sha group reported lower pain intensity (p 
       
  • Is spinal mobilization effective for low back pain': A systematic
           review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Kosaku Aoyagi, David Heller, David Hazlewood, Neena Sharma, Marcio dos Santos
       
  • Effect of lavender aromatherapy through inhalation on quality of life
           among postmenopausal women covered by a governmental health center in
           Isfahan, Iran: A single-blind clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Soheila Bakhtiari, Somayeh Paki, Arash khalili, Fereshteh Baradaranfard, Sorour Mosleh, Mozhgan JokarAbstractBackgroundVarious studies indicate the negative effects of menopausal symptoms and complications on the quality of life (QOL) of women. The tendency to use different methods of complementary medicine to control menopausal symptoms is increasing. In addition, lavender essential oil has been shown to have positive effects on some symptoms associated with menopause. Thus, the present study was conducted with the aim to determine the effect of lavender aromatherapy on the QOL of postmenopausal women.Materials and methodsA randomized, controlled, clinical trial was conducted on 62 postmenopausal women referred to health centers of Isfahan, Iran. The subjects were divided into two groups of control and intervention. The intervention group inhaled 2% lavender essential oil every night before bedtime for 20 minutes during one month. The control group received the placebo (distilled water) in the same manner as the intervention group. The data collection tools were the Menopause-Specific Quality of Life Questionnaire (MENQOL)and a demographic characteristics questionnaire. The results were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistical tests in SPSS software.ResultsThe independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean total score of QOL and its various dimensions (vasomotor, psychosocial, physical, and sexual dimensions) after the intervention between the aromatherapy and placebo groups (P 
       
  • Effect of yoga on physical and psychological outcomes in patients on
           chronic hemodialysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Zorica KauricKleinAbstractIntroductionPatients on chronic hemodialysis suffer from a myriad of problems associated with dialysis including increased cardiovascular disease, deconditioning, fatigue, sleep disturbances, anxiety and depression, and decreased health related quality of life. Yoga has been reported to have positive effects on distress and functional performance in patients with chronic diseases. The effect of yoga in patients on chronic hemodialysis is unknown. For the purpose of this study, papers were reviewed to determine the effect of intradialysis yoga on distress and functional performance in patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis.MethodsThis integrative review examined studies published in Pubmed, CINAHL and PsychINFO. The search terms included: yoga, hemodialysis, dialysis.ResultsTwo RCTs met the criteria. Yoga showed improvement in several outcomes including: quality of life, pain, fatigue, sleep disturbance, physical function as well as a number of biochemical variables. Further well designed RCTs need to be conducted.
       
  • Pilates exercises and quality of life of patients with chronic kidney
           disease
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Zahra Rahimimoghadam, Zahra Rahemi, Zohre Sadat, Neda Mirbagher AjorpazAbstractBackground and purposeThere is a need to investigate the effects of pilates exercises on the quality of life (QOL) of patients with chronic kidney diseases (CKD). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of pilates exercises on the QOL of CKD patients.Materials and methodsFor this randomized controlled clinical trial, we enrolled 50 CKD patients. The participants were randomly assigned to experimental (n = 25) and control (n = 25) groups. Modified classical pilates exercises were performed by the experimental group three times a week over a 12-week period. The Quality of Life Short Form (KDQOL-SF) questionnaire was completed by all participants at the beginning of the trial and two months after completion of the intervention. Data analysis was conducted using Chi-square, independent t-test, and paired t-test.ResultsThere were significant increases in the scores of QOL dimensions in the experimental group after the intervention (p ≤ 0.05). Comparison of the mean differences at the beginning and two months after the study in the two groups showed that the scores related to QOL dimensions in the experimental group were significantly greater than the control group (p ≤ 0.05).ConclusionThe findings indicated the pilates exercises can be valuable for improvement of CKD patients’ QOL.
       
  • The effects of Inquiry-Based Stress Reduction (IBSR) on mental health and
           well-being among a non-clinical sample
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Eric Smernoff, Inbal Mitnik, Shahar Lev-ariAbstractBackgroundMental problems are highly common among the general population. Mind-body interventions were found to be highly effective in treating them. The current study assessed the effect of Inquiry-Based Stress Reduction (IBSR) meditation on psychological parameters in a general population sample.MethodsNinety-seven Participants enrolled in a 28-day workshop and completed a set of self-administered measures before and after the workshop. Outcome measures included Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI–II), Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomology-Self Report (QIDS-SR16), Outcome Questionnaire OQ-45.2, The Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Form (STAI), State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory (STAXI) (State), Subjective Happiness Scale (SHS), Eating Attitudes Test (EAT).ResultsBDI scale decreased significantly before and after the intervention. QIDS scale improved significantly from T1 to T2 (p 
       
  • The effects of qigong on neck pain: A systematic review
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Joe Girard, Ava GirardAbstractBackground and purposeNeck pain is a common musculoskeletal condition that affects a large portion of the population. It is not known if qigong affects neck pain. The purpose of this review is to systematically review the effects of qigong in subjects with neck pain.MethodsA systematic review of literature indexed in the following databases: PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, Physiotherapy Evidence Database, and SportsDiscus, was conducted and methodologically graded using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale (PEDro).ResultsFive studies satisfied criteria and were included in this review. The majority of included studies found that qigong had a significant effect on neck pain or disability (95% CI). Qigong was not generally more effective than exercise therapy groups.ConclusionThe findings of this systematic review indicate that qigong might have a beneficial effect in some individuals with neck pain, although not necessarily more effective than therapeutic exercise.
       
  • Yoga led by a physical therapist for individuals with Essential Tremor: An
           explorative pilot study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Natalie E. Vance, Elizabeth A. Ulanowski, Megan M. DanzlAbstractPurposeThe purpose of this pilot study is to evaluate the outcomes for individuals with Essential Tremor (ET) who participate in a community-based yoga class, led by a neurologic physical therapist.MethodsSix subjects with ET completed an 8-week intervention consisting of weekly 1-h yoga classes (in the Vinyasa style) guided by an instructor (200-h registered yoga teacher, physical therapist, and neurological resident).ResultsFive subjects demonstrated improvements on the Tremor Research Group Essential Tremor Rating Scale (mean 15.3%, range 8.3–34.7%). The mean improvement on the Fullerton Advanced Balance Scale was 10.8% (range 2.5–20%). Five subjects maintained pre-intervention anxiety levels (“very low”) while one reported increased anxiety secondary to a non-study related factor. Minimal improvements were noted in the McGill Quality of Life Questionnaire.ConclusionThis pilot study offers support for further examining the benefits of integration of yoga into an exercise program for individuals with ET and specific suggestions for future research are offered. There were no adverse events with participation in yoga.
       
  • Green tea as an adjunctive therapy for treatment of acute uncomplicated
           cystitis in women: A randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Zahra Kheirabadi, Mitra Mehrabani, Farhad Sarafzadeh, Fatemeh Dabaghzadeh, Negar AhmadiniaAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Different in vitro studies have reported the antimicrobial effects of green tea catechins and also their synergistic effects with trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole against E. coli. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of green tea as an adjunctive therapy to standard antimicrobial treatment in women with acute uncomplicated cystitis.Materials and methodsIn this blinded randomized trial, 70 patients were assigned to receive four 500 mg capsules of green tea or starch as placebo daily for three days along with trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole. The presence of acute uncomplicated cystitis symptoms was recorded and urinalysis was performed.ResultsWomen in the green tea group showed a statistically significant decrease in the prevalence of cystitis symptoms and a statistically significant improvement in the urinalysis results except for hematuria after 3 days of treatment.ConclusionGreen tea was an effective adjunct to trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole to treat acute uncomplicated cystitis in women.
       
  • A meta-analysis of the effectiveness of yoga-based interventions for
           maternal depression during pregnancy
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Qin Xiang Ng, Nandini Venkatanarayanan, Wayren Loke, Wee-Song Yeo, Donovan Yutong Lim, Hwei Wuen Chan, Wen-Shan SimAbstractPrompt and effective treatment of maternal depression during pregnancy is important as it is an independent predictor of negative maternal and fetal outcomes. Yoga is an increasingly popular non-pharmacological modality. This study thus aimed to undertake a meta-analysis of the efficacy of yoga-based interventions for maternal depression during pregnancy. A total of 8 clinical studies were systematically reviewed, and 6 studies with a total of 405 pregnant mothers were included in the final meta-analysis. Applying per-protocol analysis and a random-effects model, the pooled standardized mean difference (SMD) from baseline depressive score was −0.452 (95% CI: −0.816 to −0.880, P = 0.015), supporting a statistically significant beneficial effect of yoga-based interventions on mood. Overall, yoga-based interventions are a promising non-pharmacological option, however, most trials examined were preliminary, recruited only participants with mild depression, did not blind study participants and had relatively small sample sizes. Larger randomized, controlled trials should be encouraged.
       
  • Yoga in primary health care: A quasi-experimental study to access the
           effects on quality of life and psychological distress
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Sara B. Ponte, Carolina Lino, Bruno Tavares, Beatriz Amaral, Ana Luísa Bettencourt, Tatiana Nunes, Catarina Silva, Luisa Mota-VieiraAbstractBackgroundand purpose: Yoga is growing in popularity, but its benefits and integration into primary care remain uncertain. Here, we determine yoga effects on quality of life and psychological distress, and evaluate the feasibility of introducing yoga at primary care level.Materials and methodsThis is a prospective, longitudinal, quasi-experimental study, with an intervention (n = 49) and a control group (n = 37). Yoga group underwent 24-weeks program of one-hour sessions. Our primary endpoint was quality of life and psychological distress, as well as satisfaction level and adherence rate.ResultsParticipants reported a significant improvement in all domains of quality of life and a reduction of psychological distress. Linear regression analysis showed that yoga significantly improves psychological quality of life (p = 0.046).ConclusionYoga in primary care is feasible, safe and has a satisfactory adherence, as well as a positive effect on psychological quality of life of participants.
       
  • Effect of yoga on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and insulin resistance in
           non-diabetic offspring of type-2-diabetes parents: A randomized controlled
           study
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Satish G. Patil, Manjunatha R. Aithala, Govindanagouda V. Naregal, Amarnath G. Shanmukhe, Shalmon S. ChopadeAbstractObjectiveThe present study was aimed to determine the effect of yoga program on cardiac autonomic dysfunction and insulin resistance in non-diabetic offspring of diabetes parents.MethodsA randomized passive-controlled study was conducted on 64 non-diabetic offspring of type-2-diabetes parents (mean-age:25.17years). Yoga group participants received yoga training for 8 weeks. Heart-rate variability (HRV) indices: low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF) and LF/HF ratio; fasting blood glucose (FBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and insulin resistance (IR) were estimated at baseline and after 8-weeks of intervention.ResultsWe found a significant decrease in LF (p = 0.005), LF/HF ratio (p = 0.004), IR (p 
       
  • The effectiveness of progressive muscle relaxation and interactive guided
           imagery as a pain-reducing intervention in advanced cancer patients: A
           multicentre randomised controlled non-pharmacological trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Giulia De Paolis, Alessia Naccarato, Filomena Cibelli, Andrea D'Alete, Chiara Mastroianni, Laura Surdo, Giuseppe Casale, Caterina MagnaniAbstractBackground and purposeInteractive guided imagery (IGI) and progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) are complementary therapies with a recognised positive effect on cancer pain relief. This multicentre randomised controlled trial was designed to assess the adjuvant effect of PMR−IGI in alleviating pain in a sample of hospice patients with terminal cancer.Materials and methodsA total of 104 patients were randomised to two groups. Group A patients (n = 53) were administered the Revised Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale (ESAS-r) and the numerical rating scale (NRS) for pain immediately prior to (T1) and 2 h following an individual PMR−IGI session (T3). Group B patients (n = 51) received usual care and were assessed using the same tools. Acute pain episodes and rescue analgesics over the following 24 h were recorded.ResultsThe Pain Intensity Difference (NRS at T3-NRS at T1) was 1.83 in group A and 0.55 in group B and was significant in both groups (p 
       
  • The effect of a kind of whey protein (Ma'oljobon) on Insomnia: A
           randomized clinical trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: February 2019Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice, Volume 34Author(s): Maryam Navabzadeh, Fataneh Hashem-Dabaghian, Asie Shojaii, Toba Kazemi, Javad Hadinia, Taraneh Ghods, Roshanak Ghods
       
  • A 12-week Baduanjin Qigong exercise improves symptoms of ankylosing
           spondylitis: A randomized controlled trial
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 December 2018Source: Complementary Therapies in Clinical PracticeAuthor(s): Yu Xie, Feng Guo, Yueyang Lu, Yunke Guo, Gang Wei, Lu Lu, Wei Ji, Xian QianAbstractBackground and purposeTherapeutic exercises are considered effective treatments for ankylosing spondylitis(AS). Current study aimed to evaluate efficacy and safety of Baduanjin qigong, a traditional Chinese exercise, for treatment of AS in a pilot RCT setting.Materials and methodsA total of 60 patients were randomly assigned, at a 1:1 ratio, to receive a 12-week Baduanjin qigong training(exercise group) or maintain their current lifestyle(no-treatment group). As primary outcomes, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index(BASDAI) and other AS symptoms were assessed at baseline and end of treatment period.ResultsA total of 46 patients completed the study. At the end of treatment period, although total BASDAI scores were not statistically different, reduced scores were observed in the exercise group, compared to no-treatment group, with respect to fatigue(P = 0.03), intensity(P = 0.04) and duration(P = 0.01) of morning stiffness; exercise group also exhibited higher patient global assessment scores(P = 0.04).ConclusionBaduanjin qigong exercise appeared to improve AS symptoms.
       
 
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