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  Subjects -> VETERINARY SCIENCE (Total: 216 journals)
Showing 1 - 63 of 63 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Scientiae Veterinariae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Veterinaria Brasilica     Open Access  
Acta Veterinaria Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery     Hybrid Journal  
Advances in Veterinary Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Veterinary Science and Comparative Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Wildlife Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
American Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
American Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Anatomia, Histologia, Embryologia: Journal of Veterinary Medicine Series C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Animal Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 125)
Animal Feed Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Animal Reproduction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animals     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Anthrozoos : A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People & Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Archivos de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivo Brasileiro de Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Arquivos de Ciências Veterinárias e Zoologia da UNIPAR     Open Access  
Ars Veterinaria     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Atatürk Üniversitesi Veteriner Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Australian Equine Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Avances en Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Avian Diseases     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Avian Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bangladesh Veterinarian     Open Access  
BMC Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Research and Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Veterinary Institute in Pulawy     Open Access  
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Veterinary Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Case Reports in Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Ciência Animal Brasileira     Open Access  
Ciência Rural     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Companion Animal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Domestic Animal Endocrinology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Equine Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Equine Veterinary Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Equine Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ethiopian Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Eurasian Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
FAVE Sección Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Folia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Frontiers in Veterinary Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Animal Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human & Veterinary Medicine - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ILAR Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
In Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Indian Journal of Veterinary Anatomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus     Open Access  
Intas Polivet     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for Agro Veterinary and Medical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Livestock Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Veterinary Science and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Iranian Journal of Applied Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Irish Veterinary Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
İstanbul Üniversitesi Veteriner Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Animal Behaviour and Biometeorology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Animal Science and Technology     Open Access  
Journal of Avian Medicine and Surgery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Buffalo Science     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Equine Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Exotic Pet Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Experimental and Applied Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Feline Medicine & Surgery     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery Open Reports     Open Access  
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Small Animal Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Journal of the Selva Andina Research Society     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the South African Veterinary Association     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Venomous Animals and Toxins     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Veterinary Cardiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Veterinary Medical Education     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Veterinary Science & Medical Diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Zoo and Aquarium Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access  
Jurnal Medika Veterinaria     Open Access  
Kenya Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
kleintier konkret     Hybrid Journal  
Livestock     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Macedonian Veterinary Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Media Peternakan - Journal of Animal Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Medical Mycology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Medical Mycology Case Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Microbes and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
New Zealand Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
New Zealand Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Nigerian Veterinary Journal     Open Access  
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Access Animal Physiology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Pesquisa Veterinária Brasileira     Open Access  
pferde spiegel     Hybrid Journal  
Polish Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Pratique Médicale et Chirurgicale de l'Animal de Compagnie     Full-text available via subscription  
Preventive Veterinary Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
REDVET. Revista Electrónica de Veterinaria     Open Access  
Reproduction in Domestic Animals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Research & Reviews : Journal of Veterinary Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Research in Veterinary Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Research Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Revista Brasileira de Ciência Veterinária     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Higiene e Sanidade Animal     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Reprodução Animal     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Revista Ciencia Animal     Open Access  
Revista Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista Científica     Open Access  
Revista Colombiana de Ciencias Pecuarias (Colombian journal of animal science and veterinary medicine)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Complutense de Ciencias Veterinarias     Open Access  
Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Ciência em Animais de Laboratório     Open Access  
Revista de Ciências Agroveterinárias     Open Access  
Revista de Educação Continuada em Medicina Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Revista de Investigaciones Veterinarias del Perú     Open Access  
Revista de la Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de Medicina Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revista de Salud Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access  
Revista MVZ Córdoba     Open Access  
Revista Veterinaria     Open Access  
Revue Marocaine des Sciences Agronomiques et Vétérinaires     Open Access  
Revue Vétérinaire Clinique     Full-text available via subscription  
SA Stud Breeder / SA Stoetteler     Full-text available via subscription  
Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde     Hybrid Journal  
Scientific Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Scientific Journal of Veterinary Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Small Ruminant Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Sokoto Journal of Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Spei Domus     Open Access  
Tanzania Veterinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
team.konkret     Open Access  
The Dairy Mail     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Theriogenology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Topics in Companion Animal Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Trends in Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Trends in Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Veterinarian     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Turkish Journal of Veterinary and Animal Sciences     Open Access  
veterinär spiegel     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veterinária e Zootecnia     Open Access  
Veterinária em Foco     Open Access  
Veterinaria México     Open Access  
Veterinária Notícias     Open Access  
Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Veterinary and Comparative Oncology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Veterinary Clinical Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Equine Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Exotic Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Food Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Clinics of North America: Small Animal Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary Dermatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Medicine and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Veterinary Medicine International     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Medicine: Research and Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Veterinary Nurse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Veterinary Nursing Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Veterinary Ophthalmology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Veterinary Parasitology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Veterinary Parasitology : Regional Studies and Reports     Full-text available via subscription  

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Journal Cover Journal of Small Animal Practice
  [SJR: 0.615]   [H-I: 51]   [10 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0022-4510 - ISSN (Online) 1748-5827
   Published by John Wiley and Sons Homepage  [1612 journals]
  • Inter- and intra-operator variability in the analysis of packed cell
           volume
    • Authors: C. R. Breheny; A. Brown, I. Handel, A. G. Gow
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo identify whether inter- and intra-operator variability occurs in the measurement of canine packed cell volume and, if so, at which stage these errors occur.Materials and MethodsUndergraduate veterinary students and veterinary surgeons were recruited to measure the packed cell volumes of three samples in duplicate. Measurements from each sample were confirmed by one author, and it was then ascertained whether the error was made in the capillary preparation or reading.ResultsData were obtained from 44 students and 11 vets. A total of 25% of students made errors associated with inadequate mixing; 23% students and 9% of vets made errors consistent with incorrect reading. There was also less intra-operator variation in values within the vet group (0·027 from the mean) in comparison to the student group (−0·21 from the mean). A total of 68·2% of students and 91% of vets filled the capillary tubes outwith World Health Organisation standards of two-thirds to three-quarters full.Clinical SignificancePacked cell volume measurement is extremely useful when measuring erythroid mass, but it is crucial that the results upon which decisions are made are accurate and precise in order to manage these cases appropriately. Operator variation is a significant factor and must be addressed by proper training and following standard operating procedures.
      PubDate: 2016-11-24T03:15:26.493298-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12603
       
  • First report of canine systemic cryptococcosis owing to Cryptococcus
           gattii in Europe
    • Authors: Spyridoula Gerontiti; Ioannis L. Oikonomidis, Lambrini Kalogianni, Nektarios Soubasis, Maria Kritsepi-Konstantinou, Aristea Velegraki, Anastasia Komnenou, Eleptherios Triantafyllou
      PubDate: 2016-11-21T03:25:30.257047-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12594
       
  • Factors affecting the diagnostic utility of canine and feline cytological
           samples
    • Authors: R. Sapierzynński; M. Czopowicz, M. Ostrzeszewicz
      Abstract: ObjectivesCytology is a quick, inexpensive, minimally invasive and widely available diagnostic method, but rigorous cooperation between clinical cytopathologist and physician is necessary to obtain clinically useful results. The aim of this study was to identify factors that affect clinical usefulness of a cytological result when the cellular material was collected by a general veterinary practitioner and examined by a clinical cytopathologist.Materials and MethodsAnalysis of 100 fine-needle aspirates performed by private veterinarians and examined by the clinical cytopathologist. Factors dependent on a general veterinary practitioner who performed the biopsy such as comprehensiveness of a cover letter, number of smears sent and macroscopic appearance of smears, were included in the analysis. Patient species and location of the lesion were also included.ResultsOnly two factors turned out to favour a cytological diagnosis: good macroscopic appearance of smears and superficial location of the lesion. Nevertheless, inclusion of the medical history of a patient in a cover letter proved to help a clinical cytopathologist make clinically useful suggestions.Clinical SignificancePreparation of good quality smears and provision of a comprehensive cover letter will increase the likelihood of obtaining clinically useful cytological reports.
      PubDate: 2016-11-14T08:22:17.998726-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12598
       
  • Effects of dexmedetomidine administered at acupuncture point GV20 compared
           to intramuscular route in dogs
    • Authors: A. Pons; S. Canfrán, J. Benito, R. Cediel-Algovia, I. A. Gómez de Segura
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo compare the sedative effects produced by dexmedetomidine in dogs, administered either intramuscularly or into the Governing Vessel 20 acupuncture point.Materials and MethodsSix dogs were sedated with 125 µg/m2 dexmedetomidine injected either intramuscularly in the gluteal muscles or subcutaneously into the acupuncture point and in random order. Sedation and analgesia were assessed blindly before and after treatments at regular intervals for 90 minutes or until the dogs fully recovered. Duration and quality of sedation were assessed with a numerical sedation rating scale and a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale. Analgesia was also assessed with a numerical rating scale. Heart and respiratory rates and rectal temperatures were recorded.ResultsSedative and analgesic scores were significantly increased when dexmedetomidine was administered at the Governing Vessel 20 acupuncture point compared with the routine intramuscular route. Duration of sedation was longer in the acupuncture site injection group compared to the intramuscular group (93 ±38 and 41 ±16 minutes). Bradycardia was significantly more pronounced in the acupuncture site group than the intramuscular group, whereas respiratory rates and rectal temperatures did not differ between administration routes.Clinical SignificanceAdministration at the Governing Vessel 20 acupuncture point increased the duration and degree of sedation and analgesic effects of dexmedetomidine compared with the intramuscular route.
      PubDate: 2016-11-14T04:05:27.167792-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12601
       
  • Comparison of computed tomographic angiography and intraoperative
           mesenteric portovenography for extrahepatic portosystemic shunts
    • Authors: A. T. Parry; R. N. White
      Abstract: ObjectivesComparison of intra-operative mesenteric portovenography and computed tomographic angiography for the documentation of the portal vasculature in patients with single extrahepatic portosystemic shunts.MethodsRetrospective study of patients with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts that underwent preoperative computed tomographic angiography and intra-operative mesenteric portography. Studies were compared for identification of the intra- and extrahepatic portal vasculature.ResultsComputed tomographic angiography demonstrated all four portal vein tributaries and sub-tributaries. Intra-operative mesenteric portography inconsistently demonstrated the cranial mesenteric vein, the gastroduodenal vein (12 of 49 dogs and 0 of 10 cats), splenic vein (46 of 49 dogs and 8 of 10 cats) and caudal mesenteric vein (3 of 49 dogs and 2 of 10 cats). Computed tomographic angiography showed the intrahepatic portal vein with shunts emanating from the left gastric vein, splenocaval shunts or shunts involving the left colic vein. It showed intrahepatic portal branching in 5 of 12 patients with shunts involving the right gastric vein. Intra-operative mesenteric portography showed the intrahepatic portal vein in 29 of 59 patients but was outperformed by computed tomographic angiography in all cases except those patients with a shunt involving the right gastric vein.Clinical SignificanceIn cases that have undergone diagnostic preoperative computed tomographic angiography there is no indication for diagnostic intra-operative mesenteric portovenography before ligation. In contrast, portovenography performed “after” temporary full ligation of the shunt provides clinical useful information and might be considered an integral investigation during shunt attenuation surgery.
      PubDate: 2016-11-14T03:26:03.161306-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12596
       
  • Design of an intraocular pressure curve protocol for use in dogs
    • Authors: R. F. Sanchez; M. J. Vieira da Silva, C. Dawson
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo establish an intraocular pressure curve protocol that is safe for corneal health and detects harmful elevations of intraocular pressure outside normal clinic hours. To determine inter-user variability and if repeated measurements affect intraocular pressures.Materials and MethodsIntraocular pressures were measured in dogs with glaucoma using three protocols: Protocol 1 used applanation tonometry every 2 hours over a 24-hour period; Protocols 2 and 3 used applanation or rebound tonometry, respectively, and measured intraocular pressures every 3 hours over a 30-hour period. A total of 60 additional intraocular pressure curves from dogs with glaucoma and 20 from healthy dogs were then analysed for inter-user variability.ResultsA total of 128 intraocular pressure curves were determined in 30 dogs. Protocol 1 resulted in one ulcer in five pressure curves, Protocol 2 in one ulcer in 62 pressure curves and Protocol 3 in no ulcers in 61 pressure curves. Elevated intraocular pressures were detected on 61 occasions, of which 26 developed outside normal clinic hours. A total of 61 additional intraocular pressure curves revealed that repeated measurements had no effect on intraocular pressure.Clinical SignificanceProtocol 3, using rebound tonometry every 3 hours for 30 hours is safe corneal health and identified elevated intraocular pressures outside normal clinic hours in 12 of 30 (40%) patients that single intraocular pressure measurement during consultation hours would not have identified. Intraocular pressure curves may be recommended for clinical practice and glaucoma studies.
      PubDate: 2016-11-09T15:35:06.169129-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12600
       
  • Diagnostic contribution of cytological specimens obtained from biopsies
           during gastrointestinal endoscopy in dogs and cats
    • Authors: G. Ruiz; L. Verrot, E. Laloy, G. Benchekroun
      Abstract: ObjectivesThe aims of this study were to compare cytological samples obtained from endoscopic biopsies using “imprint” and “squash” techniques, and to evaluate the potential value of cytology compared to histology in reaching the diagnosis.Materials and MethodsEighteen dogs and five cats undergoing endoscopy for chronic gastrointestinal signs were prospectively included. Imprint and squash samples were obtained from one biopsy and then analysed. Comparison between cytology and histology was performed using Cohen's j coefficient.ResultsAppropriate samples for cytological evaluation were more often obtained with the squash technique (96% of the cases versus 68% with the imprint technique). The diagnoses obtained with cytological samples and by histology, considered as the gold standard, were compared. The same diagnosis was obtained with the squash technique in 65% of the cases. Furthermore, cytology was considered complementary to histology for gastric spiral organisms and mast cells identification.Clinical SignificanceThese results suggest that squash cytology obtained from endoscopic biopsies of the gastrointestinal tract can provide relevant and additional information to histology in dogs and cats.
      PubDate: 2016-11-09T15:31:01.534249-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12597
       
  • Gastric histiocytic sarcoma in a dog
    • Authors: J. Elliott
      PubDate: 2016-11-07T04:58:04.446802-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12602
       
  • Prevalence of spinous process impingement in thoracic vertebrae on
           radiographs of clinically-unaffected dogs
    • Authors: F. Thierry; K. Bradley, C. Warren-Smith
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo assess the prevalence of impinged spinous processes in asymptomatic dogs.MethodsOne hundred and ninety lateral thoracic radiographs of asymptomatic dogs radiographed for reasons other than spinal pain, were retrospectively reviewed by two board-certified radiologists. Images were assessed for impinged spinous processes and graded for narrowing, sclerosis or remodelling of the spinous processes.ResultsThe prevalence of impinged spinous processes in unaffected dogs was 33·2%. Seventy-five of 79 (95%) lesions were located between T8 and T11. Impingement of the spinous processes was more common in older dogs and larger dogs displayed more frequent and more severe impingement of the spinous processes compared with smaller breeds.Clinical SignificanceSpinous process impingement is common in animals with no history of spinal pain, indicating that this radiographic finding should be interpreted with caution.
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T01:10:58.516144-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12590
       
  • Volumetric-modulated arc stereotactic radiotherapy for canine
           adrenocortical tumours with vascular invasion
    • Authors: M. Dolera; L. Malfassi, S. Pavesi, S. Finesso, M. Sala, N. Carrara, S. Marcarini, G. Mazza, C. Bianchi, G. Urso
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of hypofractionated stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy in treating canine adrenal tumours with vascular invasion.MethodsA single-arm clinical study was performed. The dogs underwent total body computed tomography, brain and abdomen magnetic resonance imaging and endocrine assay. Adrenal masses were classified as cortisol-secreting adrenal tumour or non-secreting adrenal tumour. Radiotherapy treatments were delivered by hypofractionated stereotactic volumetricamodulated arc radiotherapy via a linear accelerator. The overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan–Meier method. The overall response and radio-toxicity effects were determined.ResultsNine dogs were enrolled. Three dogs were affected by cortisol-secreting adrenal tumours and the remaining dogs had non-secreting adrenal tumours. The prescribed doses ranged from 30 to 45 Gy in three or five consecutive daily fractions. The median overall survival time was 1030 days, and the overall mean reduction of the diameter and volume were ~32 and 30% respectively. The endocrine profile normalised in two dogs with cortisol-secreting adrenal tumours. Radio-toxicities were mild and self-limiting. Seven deaths were recorded during the follow-up period and two dogs were censored.Clinical SignificanceHypofractionated stereotactic volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy should be considered as a feasible and effective therapeutic option for adrenal tumours with vascular invasion.
      PubDate: 2016-10-19T04:30:33.238257-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12592
       
  • Inflammatory bowel disease versus chronic enteropathy in dogs: are they
           one and the same?
    • Authors: J. R. S. Dandrieux
      Abstract: The aim of this review is to discuss why “chronic enteropathy” might be a better term than “inflammatory bowel disease” in dogs, because the treatment and outcome of the disease is very different from that of inflammatory bowel disease in humans. The effect of food, antibiotics and immunosuppressant drugs on chronic enteropathy will be reviewed. New treatments under investigation will also be introduced. Although there are several studies evaluating treatment of chronic enteropathy in dogs, the quality and quantity of evidence supporting individual therapies remains scarce and more work is needed to improve management of this disease. Finally, new findings about dogs with chronic enteropathy complicated by protein-losing enteropathy will be discussed. Although prognosis for these dogs is poor, recent data might help improve their treatment.
      PubDate: 2016-10-16T23:50:50.388974-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12588
       
  • Topical ear treatment – options, indications and limitations of
           current therapy
    • Authors: S. Paterson
      Abstract: Topical otic products form an integral part of the overall management of otitis externa. With an ever increasing array of ear drops and cleaners to choose from, appropriate selection of therapy can be difficult. The investigation of all cases of otitis externa should consider primary and secondary causes and predisposing and perpetuating factors. This article considers topical therapy under these same broad headings and discusses, through literature review, the various properties of the components of the ear cleaning solutions and drops.
      PubDate: 2016-10-16T23:47:01.403157-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12583
       
  • Hepatic concentrations of copper and other metals in dogs with and without
           chronic hepatitis
    • Authors: Y. Cedeño; M. López-Alonso, M. Miranda
      Abstract: ObjectivesDefects in copper metabolism have been described in several dog breeds, and recently, it has been suggested that changes in other essential trace elements could be involved in the pathogenesis of hepatic disease. This study measured hepatic copper accumulation and its interactions with other essential trace and toxic metals in dogs diagnosed with chronic hepatitis.MethodsLiver samples of 20 chronic hepatitis and 20 healthy dogs were collected. Samples were acid digested, and essential metals (cobalt, copper, iron, manganese, molibdenum, selenium and zinc) and toxic metals (arsenic, cadmium, mercury and lead) were analysed by inductively–coupled plasma mass spectrometry.ResultsCopper concentrations were significantly higher in dogs affected by hepatic disease than in controls. Dogs having chronic hepatitis with liver copper concentration greater than 100 mg/kg wet weight showed statistically higher cobalt, manganese and zinc concentrations than dogs having chronic hepatitis with liver copper concentrations less than 100 mg/kg wet weight and controls. Toxic metal concentrations were low – in all cases below the threshold associated with toxicity in dogs.Clinical SignificanceDogs with chronic hepatitis not only have increased concentrations of copper in the liver but also increased concentrations of cobalt, manganese and zinc; measurement of these elements may perhaps aid in diagnosis of liver disease in dogs.
      PubDate: 2016-10-16T23:46:47.430576-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12591
       
  • NHLRC1 repeat expansion in two beagles with Lafora disease
    • Authors: I. Hajek; F. Kettner, V. Simerdova, C. Rusbridge, P. Wang, V. Palus, B. A. Minassian
      Abstract: Lafora disease is a fatal genetic disorder characterised by neurotoxic deposits of malformed insoluble glycogen. In humans it is caused by mutation in the EPM2A or NHLRC1 genes. There is a known mutation in miniature wirehaired dachshunds which has not been documented in other dog breeds, including beagles, in which the disease is relatively commonly reported. This case report describes the causative defect in two affected beagles, namely the same massive expansion as in miniature wirehaired dachshunds of a 12-nucleotide repeat sequence that is unique to the canine NHLRC1 gene. This is the first mutation described in beagles with Lafora disease, and so far the only Lafora disease genetic variant in dogs.
      PubDate: 2016-10-16T23:46:33.722832-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12593
       
  • Biochemical evaluation of the effects of storage on feline erythrocytes
    • Authors: J. A. Heinz; M. B. Pashmakova, C. R. Wilson, M. C. Johnson, H. M. Minnard, M. A. Bishop, J. W. Barr
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo describe the biochemical changes that occur during storage of feline packed red blood cells.MethodsFeline packed red blood cells were obtained from the manufacturer via overnight delivery immediately following collection. Bag spikes were placed using aseptic technique and samples were drawn on days 1, 4, 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35. Sodium, potassium, chloride, glucose, lactate, pH and ammonia were measured at each time point. Aerobic and anaerobic bacterial cultures were submitted following collection on day 35.ResultsThere were statistically significant increases in the median concentrations of lactate and ammonia within the first 2 weeks of storage to a concentration of 12·38 mmol/L and 447·96 µmol/L, respectively. Glucose concentrations decreased significantly by day 28 to a mean of 1·86 mmol/L. Median sodium and chloride concentrations increased throughout the course of storage to a concentration of 158·20 and 131·00 mmol/L, respectively. Mean potassium concentrations decreased to a concentration of 2·40 mmol/L.Clinical SignificanceThese results show that biochemical derangements within feline packed red blood cells are progressive, with some alterations, such as lactate and ammonia, occurring early within the storage periods, while others, including glucose and electrolytes, are slower to develop. Additional prospective research evaluating the clinical effects of these biochemical alterations is required.
      PubDate: 2016-10-14T07:26:12.059202-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12585
       
  • Comparison of bacterial cultures of the larynx between dogs with laryngeal
           paralysis and normal dogs
    • Authors: J. Ganjei; A. Langenbach, G. Watrous, J. Hodgson
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo document the most common types of bacteria isolated from the canine larynx and to compare isolates, degree of growth and susceptibility patterns between dogs with laryngeal paralysis and dogs with normal laryngeal function.MethodsLaryngeal swabs were collected from each patient and submitted for bacterial culture and susceptibility testing. Dogs with laryngeal paralysis (n=23) underwent a unilateral arytenoid lateralisation and control dogs (n=24) underwent an elective orthopaedic procedure. Results of the cultures were compared between groups.ResultsBacterial organisms isolated from the larynx were similar to those normally found in the oropharynx, trachea and lungs. The most common bacteria isolated from the larynges of all dogs were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species and Pasteurella species. Pure colonies were more commonly seen in dogs with laryngeal paralysis while mixed colonies were more commonly seen in control dogs. Antimicrobial resistance was similar between study and control dogs.Clinical SignificanceThe laryngeal flora appears to contain bacteria that are commonly isolated from the oropharynx, trachea and lungs. Differences in antimicrobial susceptibility were not identified between study and control dogs.
      PubDate: 2016-10-13T23:26:22.13462-05:0
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12586
       
  • Application of xenogeneic anti-canine distemper virus antibodies in
           treatment of canine distemper puppies
    • Authors: P. C. Liu; C. A. Chen, C. M. Chen, C. H. Yen, M. H. Lee, C. K. Chuang, C. F. Tu, B. L. Su
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe clinical feasibility of passive immunotherapy has not been demonstrated in dogs naturally infected with canine distemper. In this study, porcine anti-canine distemper virus IgG and F(ab′)2 antibody fragments were used to treat infected puppies.MethodsA total of 41 naturally infected puppies (age Äsix months) exhibiting severe respiratory signs, but lacking neurological signs, were enrolled in the study. Twenty-five puppies were treated with a combination of IgG or F(ab′)2 antibody fragments (Group 1) and supportive therapy and 16 puppies received routine supportive care only (Group 2).ResultsThe survival rate of dogs in Group 1 (19/25; 76%) was significantly higher than that in Group 2 (5/16; 31·3%) (P
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T04:50:41.9484-05:00
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12557
       
  • Use of accelerometry to investigate physical activity in dogs receiving
           chemotherapy
    • Authors: J. Helm; A. McBrearty, S. Fontaine, R. Morrison, P. Yam
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo perform a preliminary study to assess whether single-agent palliative or adjuvant chemotherapy has an impact on objectively measured physical activity in dogs.MethodsFifteen dogs with neoplasia (treatment group) wore ActiGraph™ accelerometers for 5-day periods before, during and after receiving single-agent, adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. Mean 5-day total physical activity and time spent in three different intensities of activity (sedentary, light-moderate and vigorous) before, during and after receiving chemotherapy were compared to a group of 15 healthy dogs (control group). Results were also compared within the treatment group across time.ResultsPrior to chemotherapy, treated dogs tended to be less active than control dogs. Treatment group dogs were slightly more active at restaging than they were prior to treatment but had similar activity levels to control dogs. Marked effects of chemotherapy on physical activity were not detected. Physical activity was slightly lower in treated dogs during chemotherapy when compared to control dogs but there was a slight increase in physical activity of treated dogs during chemotherapy when compared with pretreatment recordings. There was little change in the mean 5-day total physical activity between treated dogs during chemotherapy and at restaging but a mild decrease in time spent sedentary and increase in time spent in light-moderate activity at this comparison of time points.Clinical SignificanceSingle-agent, adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy had minimal impact on physical activity levels in dogs with neoplasia.
      PubDate: 2016-10-05T23:55:58.770589-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12587
       
  • Use of accelerometry to investigate physical activity in dogs receiving
           chemotherapy
    • Authors: J. Helm; A. McBrearty, S. Fontaine, R. Morrison, P. Yam
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo perform a preliminary study to assess whether single-agent palliative or adjuvant chemotherapy has an impact on objectively measured physical activity in dogs.MethodsFifteen dogs with neoplasia (treatment group) wore ActiGraph™ accelerometers for 5-day periods before, during and after receiving single-agent, adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy. Mean 5-day total physical activity and time spent in three different intensities of activity (sedentary, light-moderate and vigorous) before, during and after receiving chemotherapy were compared to a group of 15 healthy dogs (control group). Results were also compared within the treatment group across time.ResultsPrior to chemotherapy, treated dogs tended to be less active than control dogs. Treatment group dogs were slightly more active at restaging than they were prior to treatment but had similar activity levels to control dogs. Marked effects of chemotherapy on physical activity were not detected. Physical activity was slightly lower in treated dogs during chemotherapy when compared to control dogs but there was a slight increase in physical activity of treated dogs during chemotherapy when compared with pretreatment recordings. There was little change in the mean 5-day total physical activity between treated dogs during chemotherapy and at restaging but a mild decrease in time spent sedentary and increase in time spent in light-moderate activity at this comparison of time points.Clinical SignificanceSingle-agent, adjuvant or palliative chemotherapy had minimal impact on physical activity levels in dogs with neoplasia.
      PubDate: 2016-10-05T23:55:58.770589-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12587
       
  • The use of disposable skin staples for intestinal resection and
           anastomosis in 63 dogs: 2000 to 2014
    • Authors: J. M. Rosenbaum; B. R. Coolman, B. L. Davidson, M. L. Daly, J. F. Rexing, A. E. Eatroff
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo describe the use of disposable skin staples for intestinal resection and anastomosis in dogs and report associated dehiscence and mortality rates.MethodsRetrospective evaluation of medical records of dogs that underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis using disposable skin staples between 2000 and 2014. Data regarding patient signalment, indication for surgery, location of the resection and anastomosis, number of procedures performed, evidence of peritonitis at the time of surgery, surgeon qualifications, dehiscence, and mortality were obtained from the medical records. Mortality was defined as failure to survive beyond 10 days following resection and anastomosis.ResultsThe overall mortality rate of patients undergoing intestinal resection and anastomosis was 12·7% (8/63). The most common indication for resection and anastomosis was neoplasia (20/63 [31·7%]), followed by foreign body removal (19/63 [30·2%]). The overall dehiscence rate was 4·8% (3/63). No difference in mortality associated with indication for surgery, whether multiple procedures were performed, surgeon qualifications, or evidence of peritonitis at the time of surgery was identified.Clinical SignificanceIn this retrospective study, the overall mortality and dehiscence rates using disposable skin staples were similar to previously reported outcomes following resection and anastomosis.
      PubDate: 2016-10-05T23:55:42.407291-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12584
       
  • The use of disposable skin staples for intestinal resection and
           anastomosis in 63 dogs: 2000 to 2014
    • Authors: J. M. Rosenbaum; B. R. Coolman, B. L. Davidson, M. L. Daly, J. F. Rexing, A. E. Eatroff
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo describe the use of disposable skin staples for intestinal resection and anastomosis in dogs and report associated dehiscence and mortality rates.MethodsRetrospective evaluation of medical records of dogs that underwent intestinal resection and anastomosis using disposable skin staples between 2000 and 2014. Data regarding patient signalment, indication for surgery, location of the resection and anastomosis, number of procedures performed, evidence of peritonitis at the time of surgery, surgeon qualifications, dehiscence, and mortality were obtained from the medical records. Mortality was defined as failure to survive beyond 10 days following resection and anastomosis.ResultsThe overall mortality rate of patients undergoing intestinal resection and anastomosis was 12·7% (8/63). The most common indication for resection and anastomosis was neoplasia (20/63 [31·7%]), followed by foreign body removal (19/63 [30·2%]). The overall dehiscence rate was 4·8% (3/63). No difference in mortality associated with indication for surgery, whether multiple procedures were performed, surgeon qualifications, or evidence of peritonitis at the time of surgery was identified.Clinical SignificanceIn this retrospective study, the overall mortality and dehiscence rates using disposable skin staples were similar to previously reported outcomes following resection and anastomosis.
      PubDate: 2016-10-05T23:55:42.407291-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12584
       
  • Multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii
           complex infection outbreak in dogs and cats in a veterinary hospital
    • Authors: S. Kuzi; S. E. Blum, N. Kahane, A. Adler, O. Hussein, G. Segev, I. Aroch
      Abstract: BackgroundMembers of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause severe outbreaks in humans, and are increasingly reported in animals.Objective and MethodsA retrospective study, describing a severe outbreak in dogs and cats caused by a multidrug resistant member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a veterinary hospital, between July 2010 and November 2012.ResultsThe study included 19 dogs and 4 cats. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex bacteria were isolated from urine (9 animals), respiratory tract (11), tissues (3) and blood (1). The most common infection-associated findings included fever, purulent discharge from endotracheal tubes, hypotension, and neutropaenia. Infections led to pneumonia, urinary tract infection, cellulitis and sepsis. Infection was transmitted in the intensive care unit, where 22 of 23 animals were initially hospitalised. The mortality rate was 70% (16 of 23 animals), and was higher in cases of respiratory infection compared to other infections. Aggressive environmental cleaning and disinfection, with staff education for personal hygiene and antisepsis, sharply decreased the infection incidence.Clinical SignificanceHealth care-associated outbreaks with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in dogs and cats are potentially highly fatal and difficult to eradicate, warranting monitoring, antiseptic techniques and judicious antibiotic use.
      PubDate: 2016-10-05T23:50:43.852356-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12555
       
  • Multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii
           complex infection outbreak in dogs and cats in a veterinary hospital
    • Authors: S. Kuzi; S. E. Blum, N. Kahane, A. Adler, O. Hussein, G. Segev, I. Aroch
      Abstract: BackgroundMembers of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex cause severe outbreaks in humans, and are increasingly reported in animals.Objective and MethodsA retrospective study, describing a severe outbreak in dogs and cats caused by a multidrug resistant member of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in a veterinary hospital, between July 2010 and November 2012.ResultsThe study included 19 dogs and 4 cats. Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex bacteria were isolated from urine (9 animals), respiratory tract (11), tissues (3) and blood (1). The most common infection-associated findings included fever, purulent discharge from endotracheal tubes, hypotension, and neutropaenia. Infections led to pneumonia, urinary tract infection, cellulitis and sepsis. Infection was transmitted in the intensive care unit, where 22 of 23 animals were initially hospitalised. The mortality rate was 70% (16 of 23 animals), and was higher in cases of respiratory infection compared to other infections. Aggressive environmental cleaning and disinfection, with staff education for personal hygiene and antisepsis, sharply decreased the infection incidence.Clinical SignificanceHealth care-associated outbreaks with multidrug resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-Acinetobacter baumannii complex in dogs and cats are potentially highly fatal and difficult to eradicate, warranting monitoring, antiseptic techniques and judicious antibiotic use.
      PubDate: 2016-10-05T23:50:43.852356-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12555
       
  • Uromodulin gene variants and their association with renal function and
           blood pressure in cats: a pilot study
    • Authors: R. E. Jepson; H. R. Warren, H. M. Syme, J. Elliott, P. B. Munroe
      Abstract: ObjectivesIn humans, genome-wide association studies have identified variants in the uromodulin gene (UMOD) associated with blood pressure and renal function. This study aimed to evaluate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms at the UMOD locus with renal function and blood pressure in cats.MethodsWe retrospectively identified cats aged 14 years that had participated in a geriatric monitoring program, and from which stored DNA samples were available, from a computerised database. We then measured the association of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in the feline UMOD gene with renal function and systolic blood pressure as continuous variables and, also, the dichotomous outcome of azotaemic chronic kidney disease and systemic hypertension.ResultsEight intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms, one 1372 base pairs upstream from UMOD and two exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated in 227 cats with renal and blood pressure data. An analysis of 188 cats found four single nucleotide polymorphisms to be significantly associated (P
      PubDate: 2016-10-04T00:25:49.533377-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12582
       
  • Uromodulin gene variants and their association with renal function and
           blood pressure in cats: a pilot study
    • Authors: R. E. Jepson; H. R. Warren, H. M. Syme, J. Elliott, P. B. Munroe
      Abstract: ObjectivesIn humans, genome-wide association studies have identified variants in the uromodulin gene (UMOD) associated with blood pressure and renal function. This study aimed to evaluate the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms at the UMOD locus with renal function and blood pressure in cats.MethodsWe retrospectively identified cats aged 14 years that had participated in a geriatric monitoring program, and from which stored DNA samples were available, from a computerised database. We then measured the association of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms in the feline UMOD gene with renal function and systolic blood pressure as continuous variables and, also, the dichotomous outcome of azotaemic chronic kidney disease and systemic hypertension.ResultsEight intronic single nucleotide polymorphisms, one 1372 base pairs upstream from UMOD and two exonic single nucleotide polymorphisms were evaluated in 227 cats with renal and blood pressure data. An analysis of 188 cats found four single nucleotide polymorphisms to be significantly associated (P
      PubDate: 2016-10-04T00:25:49.533377-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12582
       
  • Magnetic resonance imaging, treatment and outcome of canine vertebral
           chondrosarcomas. Six cases
    • Authors: P. F. P. Roynard; A. Bilderback, C. Falzone, J. D. Stefanacci, G. B. Cherubini
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo report the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging features, treatments and outcomes of canine vertebral chondrosarcoma.Materials and MethodsRetrospective review of medical records of dogs with confirmed vertebral chondrosarcoma and magnetic resonance imaging of the lesions, from four different veterinary referral institutions.ResultsA total of six dogs were included in this report. In all cases, magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lobulated mass involving the dorsal vertebral compartment, markedly hyperintense with few foci of hypointensity on T2‐weighted images, iso to hypointense on T1‐weighted images with contrast enhancement after gadolinium administration. Intralesional surgical resection was performed in three dogs and medical management in one, two dogs were euthanased and all lesions were submitted for histopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging findings correlated with histological findings of a low tumour grade. Rapid clinical improvement was noted after surgery but two of three dogs had local regrowth.Clinical SignificanceChondrosarcomas show local aggressiveness and resistance to conventional radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and so prognosis depends on feasibility of en bloc resection. Magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful in establishing a presumptive diagnosis and prognosis based on the feasibility of surgical resection.
      PubDate: 2016-09-14T07:35:50.610462-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12554
       
  • Retrospective characterisation and outcome of canine idiopathic mesenteric
           purulent lymphadenitis and lymph node abscesses at a teaching hospital
           from 2005 to 2015
    • Authors: S. Salavati Schmitz
      Abstract: BackgroundIdiopathic purulent mesenteric lymphadenitis or lymph node abscessation, even though rare in dogs, are important diseases in which rapid diagnosis and treatment is critical. This study aimed to characterise the typical features of these conditions in dogs.Material and MethodsArchived records from 2005 to 2015 were retrospectively evaluated for the occurrence of idiopathic purulent mesenteric lymphadenitis or lymph node abscesses in dogs. History, physical and clinicopathological abnormalities, diagnostic tests performed, treatment and outcome were reviewed.ResultsA total of 14 cases with histopathologic and/or cytologic confirmation were identified. Typically, there were gastrointestinal signs including abdominal pain and elevated body temperature. Blood analysis revealed non-specific inflammatory changes including elevated C-reactive protein. Half of the bacterial cultures from lymph nodes showed growth of various bacteria. A primary cause was not identified in any case. Out of 14 cases, 10 cases underwent surgery and all dogs were discharged from the hospital. Three suffered from a relapse between 1 and 5 months after discharge but were successfully managed with antibiotics.Conclusion and Clinical RelevanceIdiopathic purulent mesenteric lymphadenitis or lymph node abscessation are infrequent but clinically important diseases. Surgical, symptomatic and antibiotic treatment led to resolution of clinical signs in the evaluated cases. Thorough and standardised diagnostic workup and treatment of future cases are necessary to investigate possible pathogeneses and optimal therapeutic options. Outcome was favourable overall.
      PubDate: 2016-09-14T07:35:41.168888-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12551
       
  • Correction of neonatal stifle luxation in a 35‐day‐old
           cockatiel (Nymphicus hollandicus)
    • Authors: Marco Luparello; Laura Faraci, Marco Di Giuseppe, Lorenzo Crosta
      PubDate: 2016-09-12T07:01:00.766584-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12552
       
  • Use of dual‐phase contrast computed tomography for evaluation of the
           normal canine male genital tract
    • Authors: H. Dirrig; R. Drees, R. Lam
      Abstract: ObjectivesTo evaluate the use of dual‐phase contrast‐enhanced computed tomography for the depiction of the features of the male genital tract, highlighting differences between entire and neutered dogs.MethodsComputed tomography exams of 23 entire and 23 neutered male dogs with no history of urogenital disease were included in this retrospective study, with exams acquired pre‐, 30 and 98·9 ±27·4 seconds after intravenous contrast administration. The genital structures were subjectively evaluated for visibility, contrast enhancement and enhancement pattern and differences between entire and neutered dogs were described. Objective measurements of attenuation and size of the prostatic tissue were acquired.ResultsThe root, body and glans of the penis could be evaluated in all dogs and appeared larger in entire dogs, though objective measurements could not be reliably made because these structures are small and curved. There was contrast enhancement of the cavernous structures, most reliably in the bulb and corpus spongiosum and most frequently in entire dogs in the delayed post‐contrast phase. In entire dogs, the small testicular vessels most commonly had a vermiform shape in the early post‐contrast phase, and a homogeneous appearance in the delayed phase. Sternal recumbency with the coxofemoral joints extended improved visibility of the genital structures.Clinical SignificanceDual‐phase contrast‐enhanced computed tomography is useful for depiction of the structures of the male genital tract, with the early phase especially highlighting the vascular and the delayed phase the cavernous structures.
      PubDate: 2016-09-03T01:00:32.847651-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12550
       
  • Officers Page
    • Pages: 578 - 578
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T01:12:21.578977-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12511
       
  • Never mind the length, feel the quality
    • Authors: M. S. Kent
      Pages: 579 - 579
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T01:12:20.739932-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12595
       
  • Officers Page
    • Pages: 655 - 655
      PubDate: 2016-10-26T01:12:22.163644-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12520
       
 
 
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