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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 796 journals)
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PHYSICS (580 journals)

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Journal Cover Nature Communications
  [SJR: 6.539]   [H-I: 114]   [103 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 2041-1723
   Published by NPG Homepage  [123 journals]
  • PRMT1-mediated methylation of MICU1 determines the UCP2/3 dependency of
           mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in immortalized cells
    • PRMT1-mediated methylation of MICU1 determines the UCP2/3 dependency of mitochondrial Ca<sup>2+</sup> uptake in immortalized cells

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12897

      MICU1 is a regulatory subunit of mitochondrial Ca2+ channels that shields mitochondria from Ca2+ overload. Here the authors show that MICU1 methylation by PRMT1 reduces Ca2+ sensitivity, which is normalized by UCP2/3, re-establishing mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake activity.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128972016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12897
       
  • Mechanosensory neurons control sweet sensing in
           Drosophila
    • Mechanosensory neurons control sweet sensing in <i>Drosophila</i>

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12872

      How different sensory modalities interact to control feeding is poorly understood. Here, authors show that in Drosophila, activation of labellar mechanosensory neurons causes inhibition of sweet-sensing gustatory receptor neurons, as a result, Drosophila prefer soft food at the expense of sweetness.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128722016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12872
       
  • Cortical dynamics during cell motility are regulated by CRL3KLHL21 E3
           ubiquitin ligase
    • Cortical dynamics during cell motility are regulated by CRL3<sup>KLHL21</sup> E3 ubiquitin ligase

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12810

      Although focal adhesions (FAs) and microtubules (MTs) are known to associate, the underlying regulation of this dynamic interaction is not understood. Here the authors discover that the CRL3KLHL21 E3 ubiquitin ligase localises to FAs and ubiquitinates the MT plus-tip binding protein EB1, thereby promoting MT and FA dynamics and cell migration.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128102016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12810
       
  • N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at
           a molecular crowding threshold
    • N-glycosylation enables high lateral mobility of GPI-anchored proteins at a molecular crowding threshold

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12870

      How molecular crowding affects membrane protein diffusion and function is not known. Here the authors measure diffusion of variant surface glycoprotein on trypanosomes and discover a molecular crowding threshold that limits diffusion, and find that N-linked glycans help to prevent retarding intermolecular interactions.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128702016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12870
       
  • Crystal nuclei templated nanostructured membranes prepared by solvent
           crystallization and polymer migration
    • Crystal nuclei templated nanostructured membranes prepared by solvent crystallization and polymer migration

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12804

      Conventionally porous polymeric membranes for filtration are produced by phase-separation techniques, but this process has reached saturation. Here, Li and co-workers developed a manufacturing process involving oriented green solvent crystallization and polymer migration to form high-performance membranes.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128042016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12804
       
  • Local microRNA delivery targets Palladin and prevents metastatic breast
           cancer
    • Local microRNA delivery targets Palladin and prevents metastatic breast cancer

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12868

      MicroRNAs represent potential therapeutic targets to control metastasis progression. Here the authors show that miR-96 and miR-182 regulate invasion via Palladin and demonstrate that local delivery of miR-96 and miR-182 may serve as a potential anti-metastatic drug in breast cancer.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128682016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12868
       
  • Structural basis of synaptic vesicle assembly promoted by α-synuclein
    • Structural basis of synaptic vesicle assembly promoted by α-synuclein

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12563

      α-synuclein, a protein associated to Parkinson's disease, is involved in synaptic vesicle interaction and assembly. Here, the authors use NMR spectroscopy and super-resolution microscopy to unveil the nature and molecular mechanism of α-synuclein-mediated synaptic vesicle clustering.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms125632016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12563
       
  • Dysferlin-mediated phosphatidylserine sorting engages macrophages in
           sarcolemma repair
    • Dysferlin-mediated phosphatidylserine sorting engages macrophages in sarcolemma repair

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms12875

      Sarcolemma lesions are sealed by a repair patch of lipids and proteins that prevents cell death and myopathy. Here the authors show that the "eat-me" signal phosphatidylserine is sorted from adjacent sarcolemma to the repair patch in a Dysferlin dependent process in zebrafish and human cells.

      Nature Communications, Published online: 19 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ncomms128752016-09-19
      DOI: 10.1038/ncomms12875
       
 
 
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