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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 764 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (8 journals)
    - MECHANICS (20 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (44 journals)
    - OPTICS (91 journals)
    - PHYSICS (554 journals)
    - SOUND (18 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (554 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 384)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Synchrotron Radiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Signal Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of West University of Timisoara - Physics     Open Access  
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics     Open Access  
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
ASTRA Proceedings     Open Access  
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cells     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CERN courier. International journal of high energy physics     Free  
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 70)
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COSPAR Colloquia Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cryogenics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Applied Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Diamond and Related Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     [SJR: 0.231]   [H-I: 7]
   [6 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
   Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Frank von Hippel, scientist in the public interest
    • Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: To introduce the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists’ special issue marking the start of its 70th year of publication, Bulletin executive director Kennette Benedict interviewed Frank von Hippel, one of the United States’ most prominent scientists in the nuclear policy arena, about his career as it evolved over decades of commitment to nuclear arms control and nonproliferation efforts. The interview includes discussion of a vast range of arms control and nonproliferation efforts that Hippel and allied scientists have been able to move toward success, including a US-Soviet agreement not to conduct nuclear tests that continues today.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563678|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/1
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Introduction: The Bulletin at the young age of 70
    • Authors: Mecklin J.
      Pages: 10 - 12
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214564143|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/10
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • American scientists as public citizens: 70 years of the Bulletin of the
           Atomic Scientists
    • Authors: Kaiser, D; Wilson, B.
      Pages: 13 - 25
      Abstract: For seven decades, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has served as a discussion forum for urgent issues at the intersection of science, technology, and society. Born in the aftermath of World War II and a roiling debate over the control of the postwar atom, the Bulletin has been a sounding board for major nuclear-age debates, from atomic espionage to missile defense. Since the end of the Cold War, the magazine has featured an expanding array of challenges, including the threat posed by global climate change. The Bulletin’s contributors have expressed their public citizenship by helping to bring the political aspects of science into proper focus. They have stood up for the political freedom of science, and sought to harness scientific knowledge to responsible ends in the political arena. Such efforts are needed now, as they were in 1945.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563679|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/13
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Scientists as celebrities: Bad for science or good for society?
    • Authors: Krauss L. M.
      Pages: 26 - 32
      Abstract: The author explores the reasons why scientists such as Albert Einstein, Richard Feynman, Carl Sagan, Stephen Hawking, and Neil deGrasse Tyson became celebrities, as well as sharing his own experience. He describes how public acclaim is often uncorrelated to scientific accomplishment and depends more on communication skills and personality traits. Nevertheless, he argues that the entire scientific community benefits when credible scientists gain a wider audience, and that celebrity is an opportunity that should not be squandered. Scientists who become recognizable have a chance and perhaps even a responsibility, which they have often exploited, to promote science literacy, combat scientific nonsense, motivate young people, and steer public policy discussions toward sound decision making.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563676|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/26
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • The Serengeti strategy: How special interests try to intimidate
           scientists, and how best to fight back
    • Authors: Mann M. E.
      Pages: 33 - 45
      Abstract: Much as lions on the Serengeti seek out vulnerable zebras at the edge of a herd, special interests faced with adverse scientific evidence often target individual scientists rather than take on an entire scientific field at once. Part of the reasoning behind this approach is that it is easier to bring down individuals than an entire group of scientists, and it still serves the larger aim: to dismiss, obscure, and misrepresent well-established science and its implications. In addition, such highly visible tactics create an atmosphere of intimidation that discourages other scientists from conveying their research’s implications to the public. This "Serengeti strategy" is often employed wherever there is a strong and widespread consensus among the world’s scientists about the underlying cold, hard facts of a field, whether the subject be evolution, ozone depletion, the environmental impacts of DDT, the health effects of smoking, or human-caused climate change. The goal is to attack those researchers whose findings are inconvenient, rather than debate the findings themselves. This article draws upon the author’s own experience to examine the "Serengeti strategy," and offers possible countermeasures to such orchestrated campaigns. It examines what responses by scientists have been most successful, and how to combat the doubt-sowing that industry has done regarding the science behind climate change and other fields.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563674|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/33
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Ending the assassination and oppression of Iranian nuclear scientists
    • Authors: Hecker, S. S; Milani, A.
      Pages: 46 - 52
      Abstract: Merely for working in their field of expertise, Iranian nuclear scientists face perils and pressures that are nothing less than Shakespearean. The question for them is, in a very real sense, "to be or not to be." In the course of the last four decades, these scientists have faced intimidation and severe punishment, including prison terms, at the hands of their own government. In recent years, at least five Iranian nuclear scientists have been the target of assassination attempts often attributed to Israeli intelligence. Regardless of their source, all such threats against scientists are morally indefensible. They offend the scientific spirit, working against the free exchange of ideas that is necessary for humanity to advance. And in the final analysis, the authors assert, these threats against scientists in Iran undermine global peace, targeting experts whose international collaboration is required to deal effectively with the nuclear risks facing the world today. Simply put, killing nuclear scientists makes reducing the threat of nuclear war harder, not easier.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214564140|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/46
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Science and policy: Crossing the boundary
    • Authors: Jamieson, D; Oreskes, N, Oppenheimer, M.
      Pages: 53 - 58
      Abstract: Because of their specific knowledge, scientists are well positioned to identify environmental threats to humankind, sound the alarm, and propose and comment, at least on a general level, on potential responses. However, many policy makers and scientists believe that scientists should have no more to say about public issues than anyone else and that science can only tell us how the world is, not how it ought to be. Although there are deep differences between science and policy, the line between policy-relevant and policy-prescriptive science is under continual negotiation, and there is no uniquely "objective" way of characterizing facts. In the authors’ view, scientists should generally refrain from making recommendations in areas far from their expertise and from making categorical policy declarations, but when their expertise is relevant scientists should not be excluded from the policy process whether by external forces or by self-censorship. Scientists’ input and influence has played a key role in the past, and remains essential in shaping responses to important policy questions such as what to do about anthropogenic climate change.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563675|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/53
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Out of the nuclear shadow: Scientists and the struggle against the Bomb
    • Authors: Mian Z.
      Pages: 59 - 69
      Abstract: In this essay, adapted from his 2014 Linus Pauling Legacy Award Lecture, Zia Mian, from Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, argues that the ideas Nobel laureate Linus Pauling and other scientists struggled hard over the decades to teach the world have now become widely accepted: The world understands the danger of nuclear weapons. But in the essay, Mian argues that absent an aroused and insistent public demanding an end to nuclear weapons, which the early scientists believed was necessary to curb the nuclear danger, the prospects for nuclear disarmament in the foreseeable future appear grim. He concludes: "This is where the scientist has to step aside and the citizen has to step forward."
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563680|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/59
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • What should climate scientists advocate for?
    • Authors: Schmidt G. A.
      Pages: 70 - 74
      Abstract: In recent years, with the rise of social media, many more scientists are becoming public communicators. In politicized fields such as climate science, these communications can attract disproportionate attention. The author argues that public statements in such a situation are inevitably advocacy for some position, view, or outcome. However, rather than suggesting that scientists avoid advocacy in a misplaced attempt to remain objective, he recommends that scientists be explicit about the combination of values and science that drives their views, and discusses the ways scientists can ensure that their advocacy remains responsible.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563677|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/70
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • The ozone story: A model for addressing climate change?
    • Authors: Brune W. H.
      Pages: 75 - 84
      Abstract: At a time when there is still debate in the United States among the public and politicians about the link between climate change and the greenhouse gases expelled into the atmosphere by the activities of human beings, the author looks back to an argument from another era about a man-made pollutant and a dangerous atmospheric problem. In many ways, today’s controversy over the causes of climate change and what to do about it are reminiscent of the debate over the link between chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and the thinning of the ozone layer over 30 years ago, when the vast majority of scientists who studied the CFC problem were on one side, and industry and lobbyists were on the other. This stalemate was finally resolved only after the discovery of the ozone hole over Antarctica and the irrefutable evidence linking the ozone hole to CFCs. Only then did the major manufacturers of CFCs begin to get on board. In the end, an international agreement was signed to control CFC production, substitutes for the compounds were found and marketed by manufacturers, and the ozone hole stopped growing—and it now shows signs of repairing itself, if slowly. This collaboration has been hailed as a landmark that may have implications for how the current debate in this country will eventually play out. But was that the whole story?
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563685|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/75
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Counting nuclear warheads in the public interest
    • Authors: Norris, R. S; Kristensen, H. M.
      Pages: 85 - 90
      Abstract: Over 28 years of weapons analysis, the Nuclear Notebook column has revealed surprise nuclear activity and spot-on arsenal estimates while becoming a daily resource for scholars, activists, and journalists. The authors trace the development of the Notebook as part of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists special issue celebrating its 70th year of publication.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563684|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/85
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Is "zero" the right target for disarmament?: An Arab response
    • Authors: Assad W. A.
      Pages: 91 - 94
      Abstract: The United States and Russia have obligated themselves to pursuing complete nuclear disarmament. But despite the two countries’ treaty obligations, it’s reasonable to wonder if Russia and the United States will ever accept the constraints on power that total disarmament implies. Here, Wael Al Assad of Jordan, Li Bin of China (2015), and Sinan Ulgen of Turkey (2015) debate whether complete abolition of nuclear weapons is an appropriate goal for the disarmament movement—or whether disarmament might proceed faster if its aim were reducing stockpiles to the point that they represented only a minimum possible deterrent.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563689|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/91
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Is "zero" the right target for disarmament?: A Turkish response
    • Authors: Ulgen S.
      Pages: 95 - 97
      Abstract: The United States and Russia have obligated themselves to pursuing complete nuclear disarmament. But despite the two countries’ treaty obligations, it’s reasonable to wonder if Russia and the United States will ever accept the constraints on power that total disarmament implies. Here, Wael Al Assad of Jordan (2015), Li Bin of China (2015), and Sinan Ulgen of Turkey debate whether complete abolition of nuclear weapons is an appropriate goal for the disarmament movement—or whether disarmament might proceed faster if its aim were reducing stockpiles to the point that they represented only a minimum possible deterrent.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563688|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/95
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
  • Is "zero" the right target for disarmament?: A Chinese response
    • Authors: Bin L.
      Pages: 98 - 101
      Abstract: The United States and Russia have obligated themselves to pursuing complete nuclear disarmament. But despite the two countries’ treaty obligations, it’s reasonable to wonder if Russia and the United States will ever accept the constraints on power that total disarmament implies. Here, Wael Al Assad of Jordan (2015), Li Bin of China, and Sinan Ulgen of Turkey (2015) debate whether complete abolition of nuclear weapons is an appropriate goal for the disarmament movement—or whether disarmament might proceed faster if its aim were reducing stockpiles to the point that they represented only a minimum possible deterrent.
      PubDate: 2015-01-05T06:49:25-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214563687|hwp:resource-id:spbos;71/1/98
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 1 (2015)
       
 
 
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