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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 737 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (7 journals)
    - MECHANICS (19 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (44 journals)
    - OPTICS (84 journals)
    - PHYSICS (537 journals)
    - SOUND (17 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (537 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Acta Physica Slovaca     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 298)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Synchrotron Radiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cells     Open Access  
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COSPAR Colloquia Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cryogenics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Applied Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Diamond and Related Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Doklady Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dynamical Properties of Solids     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [6 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
     Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.231]   [H-I: 7]
  • Elizabeth Kolbert: Covering the hot topic of climate change by going to
           the ends of the Earth
    • Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: In this interview, author and New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert talks with the Bulletin’s Dan Drollette Jr about her recently published book, The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History. She discusses how she became interested in the topic, the difficulties she found in explaining complex, interrelated topics such as climate change, invasive species, and ocean acidification, and what she hopes readers will take away from reading the book. She explains the role of a journalist as opposed to that of a scientist, saying that it is important to explain the issues to the public, if not necessarily to offer a list of specific, concrete solutions. Kolbert says she hopes that by interpreting complicated scientific evidence for the general public, her work will encourage engagement with the problems.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:30-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214538957|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214538957
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Winning the battle against emerging pathogens: A South African response
    • Authors: Bezuidenhout, L; Gould, C.
      Pages: 10 - 13
      Abstract: Technological advances in the life sciences hold out the promise of controlling or eliminating stubborn diseases. They also increase the risk that malevolent actors will learn to produce new and highly dangerous pathogens, a prospect that deeply concerns security professionals in developed countries. In the developing world, meanwhile, where many nations struggle mightily with diseases such as AIDS and malaria, public health concerns tend to focus more on the here and now—or, when it comes to emerging threats, on how to contend with natural rather than human-made pathogens.
      Authors from four countries—Oyewale Tomori of Nigeria (2014), Louise Bezuidenhout and Chandre Gould of South Africa, Maria José Espona of Argentina (2014), and Iris Hunger of Germany (2014)—explore how governments, institutions, and professionals in both the developed and developing worlds can make the world safer from emerging pathogens, whether natural or human-made.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539104|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539104
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Winning the battle against emerging pathogens: A Nigerian response
    • Authors: Tomori; O.
      Pages: 14 - 17
      Abstract: Technological advances in the life sciences hold out the promise of controlling or eliminating stubborn diseases. They also increase the risk that malevolent actors will learn to produce new and highly dangerous pathogens, a prospect that deeply concerns security professionals in developed countries. In the developing world, meanwhile, where many nations struggle mightily with diseases such as AIDS and malaria, public health concerns tend to focus more on the here and now—or, when it comes to emerging threats, on how to contend with natural rather than human-made pathogens.
      Authors from four countries—Oyewale Tomori of Nigeria, Louise Bezuidenhout and Chandre Gould of South Africa (2014), Maria José Espona of Argentina (2014), and Iris Hunger of Germany (2014)—explore how governments, institutions, and professionals in both the developed and developing worlds can make the world safer from emerging pathogens, whether natural or human-made.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539109|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539109
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Winning the battle against emerging pathogens: An Argentine response
    • Authors: Espona; M. J.
      Pages: 18 - 21
      Abstract: Technological advances in the life sciences hold out the promise of controlling or eliminating stubborn diseases. They also increase the risk that malevolent actors will learn to produce new and highly dangerous pathogens, a prospect that deeply concerns security professionals in developed countries. In the developing world, meanwhile, where many nations struggle mightily with diseases such as AIDS and malaria, public health concerns tend to focus more on the here and now—or, when it comes to emerging threats, on how to contend with natural rather than human-made pathogens.
      Authors from four countries—Oyewale Tomori of Nigeria (2014), Louise Bezuidenhout and Chandre Gould of South Africa (2014), Maria José Espona of Argentina, and Iris Hunger of Germany (2014)—explore how governments, institutions, and professionals in both the developed and developing worlds can make the world safer from emerging pathogens, whether natural or human-made.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539107|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539107
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Winning the battle against emerging pathogens: A German response
    • Authors: Hunger; I.
      Pages: 22 - 25
      Abstract: Technological advances in the life sciences hold out the promise of controlling or eliminating stubborn diseases. They also increase the risk that malevolent actors will learn to produce new and highly dangerous pathogens, a prospect that deeply concerns security professionals in developed countries. In the developing world, meanwhile, where many nations struggle mightily with diseases such as AIDS and malaria, public health concerns tend to focus more on the here and now—or, when it comes to emerging threats, on how to contend with natural rather than human-made pathogens.
      Authors from four countries—Oyewale Tomori of Nigeria (2014), Louise Bezuidenhout and Chandre Gould of South Africa (2014), Maria José Espona of Argentina (2014), and Iris Hunger of Germany—explore how governments, institutions, and professionals in both the developed and developing worlds can make the world safer from emerging pathogens, whether natural or human-made.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539133|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539133
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Life after nuclear: Decommissioning power reactors
    • Authors: Lochbaum; D.
      Pages: 26 - 36
      Abstract: Since the dawn of the nuclear era, more than two dozen nuclear power reactors have been permanently shut down in the United States. At some point, the remaining 100 nuclear power reactors currently operating in the United States also must be permanently shut down. But after a reactor is no longer generating power, how will the next step, known as decommissioning, be accomplished? In theory, the process is straightforward. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires that after a nuclear facility is retired, it be decontaminated, with all its nuclear fuel, coolants, and radioactive wastes removed. Once this is completed, the owner’s license is terminated, and the site is considered to be freely available for other uses—with some restrictions, as needed, on a case-by-case basis. But if recent history is any guide, owners of a nuclear power plant that is no longer operating can take a range of approaches to accomplishing the end goal of "greenfield" status, in which the site is in the same pristine condition it was before the plant was built. There are three main approaches in real life: "do it yourself," "wait and see," and "calling in the decommissioning cavalry." A few case studies give an idea of what to expect based on the experiences so far. They do not cover every factor in decommissioning decision making but reveal some of the potential pitfalls, problems, and dangers that could accompany the upcoming wave of decommissionings.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539111|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539111
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • The Hanford cleanup: What's taking so long?
    • Authors: Niles; K.
      Pages: 37 - 48
      Abstract: The Hanford Site in southeastern Washington state is widely considered to be the most contaminated place in the Western Hemisphere. From 1944 to 1989, Hanford’s primary mission was to produce plutonium for the United States’ nuclear weapons program. In May 1989, the signing of the Tri-Party Agreement between the US Energy Department, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology marked a shift in Hanford’s mission, from plutonium production to the environmental cleanup of massive amounts of radioactive and chemical wastes. The Tri-Party Agreement laid out a 30-year cleanup plan, but things have not gone according to that plan, and the Hanford cleanup is now expected to take at least 70 years to complete. The author describes progress made during the first quarter-century of the cleanup, work yet to be done, and risks posed by the remaining wastes at Hanford. He explains why the cleanup is taking so long, costing so much, and may be headed for further litigation between two of the three signatories to the 25-year-old Tri-Party Agreement. The lessons of Hanford are that such a complex cleanup is extremely and unavoidably expensive, and that extending the cleanup over many decades increases the risk of a catastrophic event.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539115|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539115
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Contamination and community support in the aftermath of the Fukushima
           disaster
    • Authors: Itonaga; K.
      Pages: 49 - 56
      Abstract: The Japanese village of Iitate received some of the highest radiation exposures resulting from the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, particularly on March 15, 2011. Iitate, which had previously been a model eco-village, is still heavily contaminated. The village’s abundance of forested area not only makes decontamination difficult but may also cause re-contamination of areas after they are cleaned up. Before the accident, many households in Iitate had multiple generations living under one roof, but many families were forced to split up when they evacuated. Villagers are now living in dispersed housing or in temporary units constructed after the accident. Many villagers, particularly young families, have given up hope of returning to Iitate anytime soon. It will take decades for the radioactivity to naturally decay. In the meantime, the author proposes creating new settlements so that villagers can rebuild their lives and sense of community while retaining the right to return to Iitate. Villages torn apart by tsunami damage are being allowed to move to higher ground as entire communities; the author argues that Iitate and other villages devastated by radiation should have similar rights.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539861|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539861
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • It's all about the data: Responding to international chemical, biological,
           radiological, and nuclear incidents
    • Authors: Bentz, J. A; Blumenthal, D. J, Potter, B. A.
      Pages: 57 - 68
      Abstract: After digesting lessons from US operations during the Fukushima Daiichi accident in Japan, the White House National Security Council staff created several interagency working groups to examine procedural issues associated with responding to international chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) incidents. What emerged were best practices and lessons learned designed to transform data to decisions across the many levels of government during an international CBRN incident for those people making life-saving and life-sustaining choices. Actions at both the strategic and operational levels are needed to enable a country to more effectively transfer its domestic response capabilities and infrastructure to an international consequence management response. International complications include varying organizational relationships and legal authorities; resource limitations in overseas jurisdictions; nonstandard sources and formats of information; differing public health and protection standards; and language barriers. The technical data needed for emergency personnel to safely and effectively respond to CBRN incidents are especially difficult to obtain, require specialized analytical tools to process, and demand particular procedures for sharing in an international context. Without addressing these issues up front, any country responding to a CBRN event beyond its borders may struggle to effectively respond.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539117|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539117
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • The Insurer's Fallacy and the value of nuclear weapons
    • Authors: Oelrich; I.
      Pages: 69 - 73
      Abstract: In an international confrontation, nuclear weapons can provide leverage even if they are not used. The leverage comes from threats of use or increased risk of use. When the confrontation is successfully resolved without nuclear use, exploiting this latent, potential use of nuclear weapons appears to be cost free. But in fact, some fraction of the consequence of a nuclear war should be included in the cost–benefit calculation each time the tactic is employed.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539120|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539120
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Destroying Pakistan to deter India? The problem with Pakistan's
           battlefield nukes
    • Authors: Sankaran; J.
      Pages: 74 - 84
      Abstract: How many battlefield nuclear weapons would it take for Pakistan to stop a major armored attack by the Indian army? How big would each bomb have to be? Would the cost in civilian Pakistani deaths—not to mention deaths among its own military caught on the nuclear battlefield—be so great as to make it self-defeating for Pakistan to use the bombs? At first glance, the main advantage of Pakistan’s new battlefield nuclear weapon—known as the Nasr missile—would appear to be its ability to slow down and stop an armored attack by the Indian Army inside Pakistan, before it reaches vital cities. But deeper examination reveals that deploying this particular weapon on the battlefield against an advancing Indian armored column would cause substantial deaths and injuries to Pakistani citizens, rendering its purpose moot. If there is any value to a Pakistani nuclear weapon, it lies instead in the bigger strategic picture: Its mere presence means that Pakistan has the ability to threaten India’s cities and military garrisons with retaliation in response to an Indian incursion.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539124|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539124
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Threats from space: 20 years of progress
    • Authors: Remo, J. L; Haubold, H. J.
      Pages: 85 - 93
      Abstract: It has been 20 years since planning began for the 1995 United Nations International Conference on Near-Earth Objects. The conference proceedings established the scientific basis for an international organizational framework to support research and collective actions to mitigate a potential near-Earth object (NEO) threat to the planet. Since that time, researchers have conducted telescope surveys that should, within the coming decade, answer many questions about the size, number, and Earth impact probability of these objects. Space explorations to asteroids and comets have been successfully carried out, including sample recovery. Laboratory experiments and computer simulations at Sandia National Laboratories have analyzed the effects of high-energy-density soft x-ray radiation on meteorites—which might help researchers develop a way to redirect an incoming asteroid by vaporizing a thin layer of its surface. An Action Team on NEOs, established in 2001 in response to recommendations of the Third United Nations Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, identified the primary components of NEO mitigation and emphasized the value of finding potentially hazardous NEOs as soon as possible. Recommendations from the action team are meant to ensure that all nations are aware of the NEO danger, and to coordinate mitigation activities among nations that could be affected by an impact, as well as those that might play an active role in any eventual deflection or disruption campaign.
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539125|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539125
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Slowing nuclear weapon reductions and endless nuclear weapon
           modernizations: A challenge to the NPT
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 94 - 107
      Abstract: The nuclear-armed states have large residual nuclear arsenals, and post-Cold War reductions of nuclear weapons have slowed. Meanwhile, the nuclear nations have undertaken ambitious nuclear weapon modernization programs that threaten to prolong the nuclear era indefinitely. These trends present a challenge to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty community, appearing to contradict the promises by the five NPT nuclear-weapon states to pursue a halt to the nuclear arms race and to seek nuclear disarmament. The NPT does not explicitly place limitations on modernizations, but the 2015 NPT Review Conference will have to address whether extending the nuclear arsenals in perpetuity is consistent with the obligations under NPT’s Article VI and the overall purpose of the treaty.
      Keywords: Nuclear Notebook - free to access
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214540062|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214540062
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
  • Corrigendum
    • Pages: 108 - 108
      PubDate: 2014-07-01T01:27:31-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214539075|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214539075
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 4 (2014)
       
 
 
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