for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 745 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (7 journals)
    - MECHANICS (20 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (44 journals)
    - OPTICS (86 journals)
    - PHYSICS (542 journals)
    - SOUND (17 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (542 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 341)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Synchrotron Radiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Signal Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of West University of Timisoara - Physics     Open Access  
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cells     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CERN courier. International journal of high energy physics     Free  
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COSPAR Colloquia Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cryogenics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Applied Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Diamond and Related Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
   Journal TOC RSS feeds Export to Zotero [6 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
     Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.231]   [H-I: 7]
  • Jerry Brown: Climate change policy in California--and beyond
    • Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: In this interview, California Gov. Jerry Brown talks with the Bulletin’s John Mecklin on the economics of controlling greenhouse gas emissions, the difficulty of gaining Republican support for climate change action, the role of religious leaders in changing public opinion on global warming, the climate change implications of California’s high-speed rail project, and the possibility that the climate could be a major issue in the 2016 elections. The interview is part of a Bulletin special issue on California’s many-faceted policy approach to climate change.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546824|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546824
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Women and weapons: Redressing the gender gap: An Indian response
    • Authors: Kazi R.
      Pages: 8 - 11
      Abstract: In nuclear war, women would suffer at least as much as men. But women tend to be underrepresented in fields—such as high-level politics, diplomacy, military affairs, and science and technology—that bear on nuclear policy.
      Authors from four countries—Salma Malik of Pakistan (2014), Polina Sinovets of Ukraine (2014), Reshmi Kazi of India, and Jenny Nielsen of Denmark (2014)—discuss how women might gain greater influence on nuclear weapons policy and how their empowerment might affect disarmament and nonproliferation efforts.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546831|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546831
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Women and weapons: Redressing the gender gap: A Pakistani response
    • Authors: Malik S.
      Pages: 12 - 16
      Abstract: In nuclear war, women would suffer at least as much as men. But women tend to be underrepresented in fields—such as high-level politics, diplomacy, military affairs, and science and technology—that bear on nuclear policy.
      Authors from four countries—Salma Malik of Pakistan, Polina Sinovets of Ukraine (2014), Reshmi Kazi of India (2014), and Jenny Nielsen of Denmark (2014)—discuss how women might gain greater influence on nuclear weapons policy and how their empowerment might affect disarmament and nonproliferation efforts.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546830|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546830
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Women and weapons: Redressing the gender gap: A Danish response
    • Authors: Nielsen J.
      Pages: 17 - 20
      Abstract: In nuclear war, women would suffer at least as much as men. But women tend to be underrepresented in fields—such as high-level politics, diplomacy, military affairs, and science and technology—that bear on nuclear policy.
      Authors from four countries—Salma Malik of Pakistan (2014), Polina Sinovets of Ukraine (2014), Reshmi Kazi of India (2014), and Jenny Nielsen of Denmark—discuss how women might gain greater influence on nuclear weapons policy and how their empowerment might affect disarmament and nonproliferation efforts.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546829|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546829
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Women and weapons: Redressing the gender gap: A Ukrainian response
    • Authors: Sinovets P.
      Pages: 21 - 23
      Abstract: In nuclear war, women would suffer at least as much as men. But women tend to be underrepresented in fields—such as high-level politics, diplomacy, military affairs, and science and technology—that bear on nuclear policy.
      Authors from four countries—Salma Malik of Pakistan (2014), Polina Sinovets of Ukraine, Reshmi Kazi of India (2014), and Jenny Nielsen of Denmark (2014)—discuss how women might gain greater influence on nuclear weapons policy and how their empowerment might affect disarmament and nonproliferation efforts.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546828|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546828
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • California here we come?
    • Authors: Mecklin J.
      Pages: 24 - 25
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214547217|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214547217
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • California's energy and climate policy: A full plate, but perhaps not a
           model policy
    • Authors: Wara M.
      Pages: 26 - 34
      Abstract: California is a leader among states in its efforts to cut greenhouse gas emissions. Under the California Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 (Assembly Bill 32), the state has set itself on a course to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions to 1990 levels by the year 2020. In addition to its cap-and-trade program, California aims to accomplish this objective via a large assortment of complementary and overlapping policies. To a significant degree, cap-and-trade is a market-based "dessert" that follows a multicourse menu of other regulatory initiatives aimed at cutting emissions. The reduced cost-effectiveness, political costs, and regulatory costs associated with this approach make it unlikely to form a suitable model for states in which political commitment to climate action is more limited or regulatory capacity is not as great as in California.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546832|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546832
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • How California's carbon market actually works
    • Authors: Cullenward D.
      Pages: 35 - 44
      Abstract: Almost 10 years ago, California’s legislature passed Assembly Bill 32, the Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006. AB 32 set the most ambitious legally binding climate policy in the United States, requiring that California’s greenhouse gas emissions return to 1990 levels by the year 2020. The centerpiece of the state’s efforts—in rhetorical terms, if not practical ones—is a comprehensive carbon market, which California’s leaders promote as a model policy for controlling carbon pollution. Over the course of the past 18 months, however, California quietly changed its approach to a critical rule affecting the carbon market’s integrity. Under the new rule, utilities are rewarded for swapping contracts on the Western electricity grid, without actually reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. Now that the Environmental Protection Agency is preparing to regulate greenhouse gases from power plants, many are looking to the Golden State for best climate policy practices. On that score, California’s experience offers cautionary insights into the challenges of using carbon markets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546834|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546834
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Solar energy innovation and Silicon Valley
    • Authors: Kammen D. M.
      Pages: 45 - 53
      Abstract: The growth of the solar energy industry depends on a strong relationship between science and engineering innovations, a vibrant financing and manufacturing sector, and cycles of policy design and advancement. The mixing pot of academic research and industrial entrepreneurship that is Silicon Valley, along with the strong overarching suite of environmental policies in place in California, work together to drive the solar energy industry. Together, they will keep the region a leader in a fast-changing industry as China, Europe, and other areas build their clean energy sectors. The globalized nature of solar energy is essential to building the energy sector needed as one vital element of a sustainable society.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546837|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546837
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • California: Beyond cars?
    • Authors: Turrentine T.
      Pages: 54 - 61
      Abstract: Despite—or because of—California’s vaunted love affair with the automobile, the state could become a leader in the development of new, climate change–friendly transport. Electric cars, hybrid vehicles, plug-in electric hybrids, robotic cars, vehicles powered by natural gas or other fuels, car sharing, bike sharing, and the matching of unused vehicle space with potential passengers are just some of the ideas on the near horizon in the Golden State.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546838|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546838
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Adapting to climate change in California
    • Authors: Davis, F. W; Chornesky, E. A.
      Pages: 62 - 73
      Abstract: Many aspects of the Californian approach to controlling the greenhouse gases that cause climate change now have a sufficient track record to provide potential models or lessons for national and even international action. In comparison, the state’s efforts on climate change adaptation, although multifaceted, are less well developed and thus far have focused largely on information sharing, impact assessments, and planning. Still, adaptation could advance more quickly in California than in many other regions, given relatively high public awareness and concern, extensive scientific information, a strong tradition of local and regional planning, and some enabling policies and institutions. Much more political support and sufficient financing will have to be mustered at state and local levels to enable new projects and initiatives to cope with sea level rise, water management, and ecosystem adaptation, not to mention public health and other key areas of concern. Even so, California’s initial efforts to adapt to unavoidable changes in climate may offer insights for other governments that will, inevitably, need to fashion their own adaptation strategies.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546839|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546839
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Improving UN planning for a humanitarian response to a nuclear detonation
    • Authors: Borrie J.
      Pages: 74 - 85
      Abstract: The United Nations has consistently supported the elimination of nuclear weapons, frequently referring to the effects of the 1945 bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Despite awareness of the severe effects of the use of nuclear weapons on targeted or adjacent populations, at a practical level the UN system has not specifically planned how it would respond to assist the victims of nuclear weapons. Moreover, the current humanitarian system is largely unprepared for the special challenges of such an event. This is significant for three reasons: First, the probability of the explosion of a nuclear weapon in populated areas may be low, but such an event is not impossible; there are many ways nuclear weapons might be detonated, either deliberately or inadvertently, with severe humanitarian consequences. Second, in assisting the victims, the UN-coordinated humanitarian system could put its own personnel at risk. Third, although any humanitarian response would at least in part be only palliative, and prevention remains the only adequate response, organizations within the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement have already begun considering these issues and the UN needs to be ready to work with them. There are many ways in which the humanitarian system could better prepare for the challenges that even a single nuclear explosion would pose, and such preparation is consistent with the UN’s mission and the secretary-general’s recent call for all feasible steps to be taken to avoid systemic humanitarian failures.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546840|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546840
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Senior soldiers: The thin gray line
    • Authors: Allenby B. R.
      Pages: 86 - 95
      Abstract: The confluence of deep cultural, social, and demographic trends with technological change can create conditions to which fundamental aspects of military organization and structure must rapidly adjust. Nomadic steppe warriors with composite bows and stirrups changed balances of power from China to Western Europe and throughout the Middle East; corned gunpowder and naval cannon technology, combined with powerful commercial, religious, and imperialistic forces, made the world a European realm for centuries; nuclear weapons have made civilization-level wars unthinkable (if not, unfortunately, impossible). Today a similar adjustment becomes necessary, as demographic shifts change the worker pools that the military will need to draw on, and technology increasingly removes the warrior from direct combat, changing fundamentally the types of skills that the military will need to cultivate, from the aggression, emotion, and physical stamina of youth to the judgment, wisdom, and patience of older age.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214546841|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214546841
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
  • Worldwide deployments of nuclear weapons, 2014
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 96 - 108
      Abstract: As of mid-2014, the authors estimate that there are approximately 16,300 nuclear weapons located at some 98 sites in 14 countries. Roughly 10,000 of these weapons are in military arsenals; the remaining weapons are retired and awaiting dismantlement. Approximately 4,000 are operationally available, and some 1,800 are on high alert and ready for use on short notice. The largest concentrations of nuclear weapons reside in Russia and the United States, which possess 93 percent of the total global inventory. The United States today stores nuclear weapons at 18 sites, including 12 sites in 11 states in the United States and another six sites in five European countries. There is considerable uncertainty about the number of Russian nuclear weapons storage sites, but the authors estimate that Russia today stores nuclear weapons permanently at 40 domestic locations.
      PubDate: 2014-09-01T00:36:49-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214547619|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214547619
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 5 (2014)
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014