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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 774 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (8 journals)
    - MECHANICS (19 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (46 journals)
    - OPTICS (91 journals)
    - PHYSICS (563 journals)
    - SOUND (18 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (563 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 407)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Signal Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of West University of Timisoara - Physics     Open Access  
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics     Open Access  
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Physics Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
ASTRA Proceedings     Open Access  
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cells     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CERN courier. International journal of high energy physics     Free  
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 79)
Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology     Open Access  
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COSPAR Colloquia Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cryogenics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover   Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
  [SJR: 0.401]   [H-I: 9]   [6 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
   Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Henry Jacqz: A student of climate change
    • Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: In this interview, Tufts University sophomore Henry Jacqz talks with the Bulletin about the Massachusetts-based group Students for a Just and Stable Future and its efforts to spur action on climate change. Jacqz describes the nationwide campaign to divest university endowments from the top publicly traded fossil fuel companies, and explains why he sees the financial case against divestment as a feeble one—and the moral case in favor of divestment as a slam dunk. He also describes student efforts to push for bolder action on climate at all levels of government, including student senates and the Massachusetts state Legislature and governor's office. Jacqz talks about the best ways to communicate the divestment narrative to the public, and the challenge of convincing students that they can have a meaningful impact on the climate dialogue. His group hopes to make politicians aware that students care a great deal about climate, and to spark public discussion about the pollution impacts and social inequities caused by fossil fuel companies that remain committed to intensifying climate change.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571896
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Limit missile defense--or expand it?: A Chinese response
    • Authors: Riqiang; W.
      Pages: 9 - 12
      Abstract: Since 2002, when the United States withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, the international arms control regime has included no limits on missile defense. Washington wants to keep it that way, insisting that it "will continue to reject any negotiated restraints on US ballistic missile defenses." Many experts believe that missile defense undermines strategic stability; but some argue that missile defense can play a role in denuclearization. Here, Wu Riqiang of China, Tatiana Anichkina of Russia (2015), and Oliver Thränert of Germany (2015) debate whether arms control arrangements should include limits on missile defense—or whether advances in missile defense should be encouraged because they might contribute to disarmament.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571900
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Limit missile defense--or expand it?: A German response
    • Authors: Thranert; O.
      Pages: 13 - 16
      Abstract: Since 2002, when the United States withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, the international arms control regime has included no limits on missile defense. Washington wants to keep it that way, insisting that it "will continue to reject any negotiated restraints on US ballistic missile defenses." Many experts believe that missile defense undermines strategic stability; but some argue that missile defense can play a role in denuclearization. Here, Wu Riqiang of China (2015), Tatiana Anichkina of Russia (2015), and Oliver Thränert of Germany debate whether arms control arrangements should include limits on missile defense—or whether advances in missile defense should be encouraged because they might contribute to disarmament.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571902
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Limit missile defense--or expand it?: A Russian response
    • Authors: Anichkina; T.
      Pages: 17 - 20
      Abstract: Since 2002, when the United States withdrew from the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty, the international arms control regime has included no limits on missile defense. Washington wants to keep it that way, insisting that it "will continue to reject any negotiated restraints on US ballistic missile defenses." Many experts believe that missile defense undermines strategic stability; but some argue that missile defense can play a role in denuclearization. Here, Wu Riqiang of China (2015), Tatiana Anichkina of Russia, and Oliver Thränert of Germany (2015) debate whether arms control arrangements should include limits on missile defense—or whether advances in missile defense should be encouraged because they might contribute to disarmament.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571903
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Sea level rise and climate change exiles: A possible solution
    • Authors: Byravan, S; Rajan, S. C.
      Pages: 21 - 28
      Abstract: Will rising sea levels cause mass migrations of people from low-lying, impoverished equatorial areas into regions of higher ground—and if so, what will their reception be by their hosts? What can world leaders do to prepare for the population shifts likely to come from sea level rise already under way from the current high levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere? Building upon existing international law, such as the 1954 Refugee Convention, the work of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, and Articles 3.1 and 4.8 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the authors look into the social effects of sea level rise caused by global warming on human populations and underscore the need to have a protocol that provides rights to climate exiles.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571904
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Uncertain seas, uncertain future for nuclear power
    • Authors: Kopytko; N.
      Pages: 29 - 38
      Abstract: Many nuclear power plants were situated next to the ocean to have ready access to huge volumes of water, and sometimes they were built on land that was not very high above mean sea level. These characteristics may cause problems if ocean levels rise the one or two meters that most climatologists project as a result of climate change. The core of the problem resides in nuclear power’s dependence on two things: water and off-site power. Operating and safely shutting down a nuclear power plant require large supplies of cooling water, as well as the power to operate the control panels and the pumps that circulate the water. The Fukushima Daiichi accident happened after the facility lost its connection to the electrical grid and floodwaters caused the backup diesel generators to fail. While an earthquake caused the tsunami that led to the situation, a severe storm coupled with rising sea levels could have the same end result, especially in low-lying areas suffering from increased erosion caused by climate change. Off-site power losses, or "station blackouts," have long been a commonly recognized risk at nuclear power plants. Backup systems have worked in the past, but dramatically rising sea levels, more frequent and intense storms, and the associated erosion that goes with them could make backup electrical systems problematic. To complicate the situation, the same storm and flood that affects a given power plant also interferes with the plant’s communication and transportation networks, hampering the ability of personnel to respond to any crisis at the facility. At a minimum, climate change and the resulting rise in sea level will lead to concerns about the safety and cost of nuclear power plant operation and construction.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571905
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Understanding the water crisis in Africa and the Middle East: How can
           science inform policy and practice?
    • Authors: Islam, S; Susskind, L.
      Pages: 39 - 49
      Abstract: When it comes to conflicts over the allocation of freshwater supply, who bears the burden, at what cost, and at what scale are important questions. While science can contribute to resolution of certain water allocation disputes, more scientific certainty will not resolve most water allocation controversies. Water stress in Africa and in the Middle East—particularly in the Nile Basin—is likely to lead to a range of conflicts, not because there is not enough scientific information to go around, but for other reasons. Water stress is likely to emerge as an increasingly important concern because population growth, current allocation practices, unchecked demand, and underinvestment in infrastructure are not being appropriately addressed. An effective way to resolve water crisis is to reframe conflicting needs and uses of water as opportunities for joint decision-making about this shared resource. The authors use the Nile Basin to illustrate how such informal problem-solving and decision-making can be initiated.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571906
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Why are there no big nuke protests?
    • Authors: Wilson; W.
      Pages: 50 - 59
      Abstract: The antinuclear movement has fluctuated between gigantic (in the 1980s) and almost nonexistent (the 1970s, now). What accounts for these remarkable variations? Is it possible to identify the factors that touched off the remarkable surges in participation in the 1960s and 1980s? If it were possible, could such factors be put into play today?
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571912
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • The paradox of dominance: The age of civilizational conflict
    • Authors: Allenby; B. R.
      Pages: 60 - 74
      Abstract: American dominance of conventional military capabilities has forced potential competitors to explore asymmetric responses. Some of these, such as cyber conflict capabilities, may appear primarily tactical, but taken together with emerging strategic doctrines such as Russian "new generation warfare" or Chinese "unrestricted warfare" and unpredictable and potent technological evolution, an arguably new form of warfare—"civilizational conflict"—is emerging. This does not mean that current strategic and operational doctrine and activities are obsolete, but it does mean that a new conceptual framework for conflict among cultures is required, within which such more traditional operations are developed and deployed.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571911
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • On fear and nuclear terrorism
    • Authors: Weiss; L.
      Pages: 75 - 87
      Abstract: Fear of nuclear weapons is rational, but its extension to terrorism has been a vehicle for fear-mongering that is unjustified by available data. The debate on nuclear terrorism tends to distract from events that raise the risk of nuclear war, the consequences of which would far exceed the results of terrorist attacks. And the historical record shows that the war risk is real. The Cuban Missile Crisis and other confrontations have demonstrated that miscalculation, misinterpretation, and misinformation could lead to a "close call" regarding nuclear war. Although there has been much commentary on the interest that Osama bin Laden, when he was alive, reportedly expressed in obtaining nuclear weapons, evidence of any terrorist group working seriously toward the theft of nuclear weapons or the acquisition of such weapons by other means is virtually nonexistent. The acquisition of nuclear weapons by terrorists requires significant time, planning, resources, and expertise, with no guarantees that an acquired device would work. It requires putting aside at least some aspects of a group’s more immediate activities and goals for an attempted operation that no terrorist group has accomplished. While absence of evidence does not mean evidence of absence, it is reasonable to conclude that the fear of nuclear terrorism has swamped realistic consideration of the threat.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571909
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Reshaping science: The trouble with the corporate model in Canadian
           government
    • Authors: Douglas; H.
      Pages: 88 - 97
      Abstract: Since taking office in 2006, Prime Minister Stephen Harper has transformed science in Canada, particularly for government scientists. The author describes and assesses these changes, from revised communication policies for government scientists, to the closure of scientific facilities and offices, to the altered landscape for science funding. In these changes, one can see an importation of a corporate model into governance, with government practices streamlined to ensure near-exclusive focus on the particular agenda of the government. But democracies should not be run like corporations; they require greater openness and acceptance of divergent interests within government science. In particular, government research is often crucial to the assessment of government actions and policies, and citizens require access to this information to be able to assess their government at times of election. The author articulates four implementable principles that can help maintain science’s important place in democratic governance.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571907
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • Climate change: Why the conspiracy theories are dangerous
    • Authors: Douglas, K. M; Sutton, R. M.
      Pages: 98 - 106
      Abstract: Uncertainty surrounds the public understanding of climate change and provides fertile ground for conspiracy theories. Typically, such conspiracy theories assert that climate scientists and politicians are distorting or hijacking the science to suit their own purposes. Climate change conspiracy theories resemble other conspiracy theories in some respects, but in others they appear to be quite different. For example, climate change conspiracy theories appear to be motivated by the desire to deny or minimize an unwelcome and threatening conclusion. They also appear to be more contentious than other types of conspiracy theories. Perhaps to an unparalleled extent, people on both sides of the issue champion climate change conspiracy theories. Finally, more than other conspiracy theories, those concerning climate change appear to be more politically loaded, dividing opinion across the left-right continuum. Some empirical evidence suggests that climate change conspiracy theories may be harmful, steering people away from environmentally friendly initiatives. They therefore present a significant challenge for governments and environmental organizations that are attempting to convince people to take action against global warming.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571908
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
  • US nuclear forces, 2015
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 107 - 119
      Abstract: As of early 2015, the authors estimate that the US Defense Department maintains about 4,760 nuclear warheads. Of this number, they estimate that approximately 2,080 warheads are deployed while 2,680 warheads are in storage. In addition to the warheads in the Defense Department stockpile, approximately 2,340 retired but still intact warheads are in storage under the custody of the Energy Department and awaiting dismantlement, for a total US inventory of roughly 7,100 warheads. Since New START entered into force in February 2011, the United States has reported cutting a total of 158 strategic warheads and 88 launchers. It has plans to make some further reductions by 2018. Over the next decade, it also plans to spend as much as $350 billion on modernizing and maintaining its nuclear forces.
      PubDate: 2015-03-02T05:12:08-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215571913
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 2 (2015)
       
 
 
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