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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 736 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY (2 journals)
    - MECHANICS (5 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (28 journals)
    - OPTICS (53 journals)
    - PHYSICS (623 journals)
    - SOUND (11 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMIC (14 journals)

PHYSICS (623 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Acoustical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Acoustics Today     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (7 followers)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (15 followers)
Acta Mechanica Sinica     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
Acta Physica Slovaca     Open Access   (3 followers)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (10 followers)
Advanced Electromagnetics     Open Access   (9 followers)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (29 followers)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (199 followers)
Advances in Acoustics and Vibration     Open Access   (16 followers)
Advances In Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (6 followers)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (12 followers)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (7 followers)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (13 followers)
Advances in Nonlinear Optics     Open Access   (2 followers)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (2 followers)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (4 followers)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (6 followers)
Advances in Synchrotron Radiation     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (4 followers)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (27 followers)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (2 followers)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (3 followers)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (8 followers)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Annual Review of Fluid Mechanics     Full-text available via subscription   (11 followers)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
APL : Organic Electronics and Photonics     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
APL Materials     Open Access   (1 follower)
Applied Acoustics     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Applied Mathematics and Mechanics     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (9 followers)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access  
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (22 followers)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (5 followers)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (5 followers)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (11 followers)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Applied Thermal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Atmospheric and Oceanic Optics     Hybrid Journal  
Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables     Hybrid Journal  
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (22 followers)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (14 followers)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (11 followers)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (4 followers)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (7 followers)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (4 followers)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Building Acoustics     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (34 followers)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Cells     Open Access  
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (23 followers)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (21 followers)
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (15 followers)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists    [5 followers]  Follow    
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
     Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.231]   [H-I: 7]
  • Eric Schlosser: Uncovering nuclear weapons history from the ground up
    • Pages: 1 - 8
      Abstract: In this interview, author and investigative journalist Eric Schlosser talks with the Bulletin about his recently published book Command and Control. He explains why he decided to tell the history of America's nuclear arsenal "from the bottom up," largely through interviews with ordinary people who were tasked with developing and safely deploying nuclear weapons. Schlosser describes some of the safety issues that have plagued the nuclear weapons program, and he expresses frustration that many government documents exposing these very issues—some dating as far back as the Cold War—have not yet been made public. He recommends increased spending on training and maintenance of aging nuclear weapons, but says that the main purpose of his book is not to push a particular policy but rather to encourage public debate about nuclear weapons and to raise questions about their current military purpose.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523244|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/1
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • The Nepali response: How to energize women
    • Authors: Gyawali; D.
      Pages: 9 - 12
      Abstract: Lack of access to modern energy services represents a pressing problem in the developing world, not least for women. Many poor women spend much of their time on menial work that could be performed much more easily if energy were available, and safety concerns often prevent women from going out at night where there are no streetlights. Children suffer too—more than 50 percent of the developing world’s children attend primary schools that lack electricity, and this can lead to markedly worse educational outcomes. Access to modern energy services might be improved through, among other approaches, establishing small-scale hydroelectric projects, facilitating the use of home solar systems, or providing grid electricity (which itself might be produced either with conventional fuels or through renewable means). Three authors—Kalpana Sharma of India (2014), Dipak Gyawali of Nepal, and Corinne Hart of the United States (2014)—discuss which methods of expanding energy access show most promise for improving the lives of the developing world’s poor women and children.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523253|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/9
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • The Indian response: How to energize women
    • Authors: Sharma; K.
      Pages: 13 - 16
      Abstract: Lack of access to modern energy services represents a pressing problem in the developing world, not least for women. Many poor women spend much of their time on menial work that could be performed much more easily if energy were available, and safety concerns often prevent women from going out at night where there are no streetlights. Children suffer too—more than 50 percent of the developing world’s children attend primary schools that lack electricity, and this can lead to markedly worse educational outcomes. Access to modern energy services might be improved through, among other approaches, establishing small-scale hydroelectric projects, facilitating the use of home solar systems, or providing grid electricity (which itself might be produced either with conventional fuels or through renewable means). Three authors—Kalpana Sharma of India, Dipak Gyawali of Nepal (2014), and Corinne Hart of the United States (2014)—discuss which methods of expanding energy access show most promise for improving the lives of the developing world’s poor women and children.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523255|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • The US response: How to energize women
    • Authors: Hart; C.
      Pages: 17 - 20
      Abstract: Lack of access to modern energy services represents a pressing problem in the developing world, not least for women. Many poor women spend much of their time on menial work that could be performed much more easily if energy were available, and safety concerns often prevent women from going out at night where there are no streetlights. Children suffer too—more than 50 percent of the developing world’s children attend primary schools that lack electricity, and this can lead to markedly worse educational outcomes. Access to modern energy services might be improved through, among other approaches, establishing small-scale hydroelectric projects, facilitating the use of home solar systems, or providing grid electricity (which itself might be produced either with conventional fuels or through renewable means). Three authors—Kalpana Sharma of India (2014), Dipak Gyawali of Nepal (2014), and Corinne Hart of the United States—discuss which methods of expanding energy access show most promise for improving the lives of the developing world’s poor women and children.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523254|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/17
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • The floor of the world
    • Authors: Scarry; E.
      Pages: 21 - 35
      Abstract: This book excerpt argues that the growth of nuclear weapons technology has concentrated the power to kill entire populations in the executive branch and made the US president effectively an elected monarch. A president, a Congress, or a Supreme Court could remedy this situation, but unless they act, the author writes, the US population will have to reacquire its powers of self-government by insisting on a re-establishment of the constitutional and social compacts under which the United States was founded.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523242|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/21
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Prologue to catastrophe
    • Authors: Independent Investigation Commission on the Fukushima Nuclear Accident; Fujiyoshi, M.
      Pages: 36 - 41
      Abstract: In this article, a worker at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station gives his eyewitness account of what happened there on March 11, 2011, in the immediate wake of a massive earthquake and tsunami that caused three of the station’s reactor cores to melt.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523240|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/36
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • National security and academia: Regulating the international circulation
           of knowledge
    • Authors: Krige; J.
      Pages: 42 - 52
      Abstract: Recent protests against the exclusion of Chinese scientists from an international conference held in the United States only scratch the surface of the formal and informal system of controls now in place to limit the access of foreign visitors to knowledge production at US research sites. American officials have enforced these controls with increasing rigor since 9/11 in response to charges of illicit data acquisition, notably by Chinese nationals. The "deemed export" rule is a particularly controversial instrument that officials have invoked to the detriment of scientific openness. It chips away at the freedom to do basic and applied unclassified research with foreign students, imposing tight restrictions on mundane research practices of knowledge sharing. An analysis of official documents, as well as interviews with research engineers and managers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, lays bare the concerns in academia over the impact of these tighter rules on the educational enterprise. It is impossible to stop all leaks of sensitive information abroad. Security lies in selectively building high walls around particularly sensitive knowledge in a climate of openness.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523249|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/42
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • America, awash in nuclear weapons materials
    • Authors: Gronlund, L; MacDonald, E.
      Pages: 53 - 67
      Abstract: The United States maintains huge stockpiles of plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) for weapons use—far larger than needed for any conceivable military contingency. After disposing of the plutonium it has designated as excess to military requirements, the United States will retain enough for some 10,000 nuclear weapons. After disposing of HEU it has deemed excess, the United States will have enough for 10,000 to 16,000 nuclear weapons. Though still grossly oversized, the US nuclear arsenal has dropped to somewhat fewer than 5,000 weapons, including those in reserve. The United States should declare all fissile material above the amount needed for 5,000 weapons as excess to military needs and dispose of it expeditiously. To reduce the risk that terrorists could steal and use US plutonium to make a nuclear weapon, the United States should directly dispose of excess plutonium rather than using it to fuel reactors.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523250|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/53
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Battlefield weapons and missile defense: Worrisome developments in nuclear
           South Asia
    • Authors: Rajaraman; R.
      Pages: 68 - 74
      Abstract: Two recent developments in South Asia have increased the risk of an accelerated arms race between India and Pakistan. One development is Pakistan’s introduction of the Nasr missile, a very-short-range, "tactical" nuclear weapon that threatens India’s conventional forces and could also tempt other countries to develop battlefield-usable nuclear weapons. The other development is India’s announcement that it plans to use its nascent ballistic missile defense program to protect the civilian populations of Delhi and Mumbai, which would weaken Pakistan’s strategy of deterrence by threatening civilian casualties. Although these two developments occurred in response to other perceived threats and are not directly connected, both have introduced new and more dangerous dimensions to the South Asian nuclear scene.
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523558|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/68
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
  • Russian nuclear forces, 2014
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 75 - 85
      Abstract: Russia has taken important steps in modernizing its nuclear forces since early 2013, including the continued development and deployment of new intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBMs), construction of ballistic missile submarines, and development of a new strategic bomber. As of March 2013, the authors estimate, Russia had a military stockpile of approximately 4,300 nuclear warheads, of which roughly 1,600 strategic warheads were deployed on missiles and at bomber bases. Another 700 strategic warheads are in storage along with roughly 2,000 nonstrategic warheads. A large number—perhaps 3,500—of retired but still largely intact warheads await dismantlement.
      Keywords: Nuclear Notebook - free to access
      PubDate: 2014-03-03T07:32:36-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214523565|hwp:resource-id:spbos;70/2/75
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 2 (2014)
       
 
 
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