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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 784 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (9 journals)
    - MECHANICS (19 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (48 journals)
    - OPTICS (90 journals)
    - PHYSICS (569 journals)
    - SOUND (20 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (569 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 230)
Advanced Science Focus     Free   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Signal Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of West University of Timisoara - Physics     Open Access  
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Physics Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
ASTRA Proceedings     Open Access  
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Studies in Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation     Open Access  
Cells     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CERN courier. International journal of high energy physics     Free  
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cogent Physics     Open Access  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 83)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 105)
Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology     Open Access  
Computational Condensed Matter     Open Access  
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover   Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
  [SJR: 0.401]   [H-I: 9]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
   Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Cloud control: Climatologist Alan Robock on the effects of geoengineering
           and nuclear war
    • Pages: 1 - 7
      Abstract: In this interview, Rutgers University climatologist Alan Robock talks with Elisabeth Eaves from the Bulletin about geoengineering and nuclear winter. He says that geoengineering is not the solution to global warming because of its many risks and unknowns. He notes that some of the technology that would be required to implement geoengineering has not been developed and that many socio-political questions would have to be resolved before it could be put into practice. The world would have to reach agreement on a target temperature and on what entity should do the implementing. Robock’s biggest fear with regard to geoengineering is that disputes over these questions could escalate into nuclear war which in turn could cause nuclear winter, producing global famine among other effects. He goes on to describe his meeting with former Cuban President Fidel Castro and discuss the role of the arts in addressing existential threats.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581353
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • How to approach nuclear modernization?: A Chinese response
    • Authors: Yin; L.
      Pages: 8 - 11
      Abstract: Between 2014 and 2023, the United States expects to spend $355 billion to modernize its nuclear arsenal. In subsequent decades, even higher expenditures are envisioned. But Washington is far from alone in modernizing its nuclear weapons. According to researchers from the Federation of American Scientists, "all the nuclear-armed states have ambitious nuclear weapon modernization programs ... that appear intended to prolong the nuclear era indefinitely." Disarmament advocates believe such modernizations are fundamentally at odds with the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons—while weapon states argue that, as long as nuclear weapons exist, arsenals must be modernized in order to keep them safe, secure, and effective. Here, Eugene Miasnikov of Russia (2015), Matthew Kroenig of the United States (2015), and Lu Yin of China debate how—in a world where complete disarmament is nearly every nation’s stated goal but disarmament seems by no means imminent—nuclear-armed countries should approach the maintenance and modernization of their arsenals.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581354
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • How to approach nuclear modernization?: A Russian response
    • Authors: Miasnikov; E.
      Pages: 12 - 15
      Abstract: Between 2014 and 2023, the United States expects to spend $355 billion to modernize its nuclear arsenal. In subsequent decades, even higher expenditures are envisioned. But Washington is far from alone in modernizing its nuclear weapons. According to researchers from the Federation of American Scientists, "all the nuclear-armed states have ambitious nuclear weapon modernization programs ... that appear intended to prolong the nuclear era indefinitely." Disarmament advocates believe such modernizations are fundamentally at odds with the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons—while weapon states argue that, as long as nuclear weapons exist, arsenals must be modernized in order to keep them safe, secure, and effective. Here, Eugene Miasnikov of Russia, Matthew Kroenig of the United States (2015), and Lu Yin of China (2015) debate how—in a world where complete disarmament is nearly every nation’s stated goal but disarmament seems by no means imminent—nuclear-armed countries should approach the maintenance and modernization of their arsenals.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581355
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • How to approach nuclear modernization?: A US response
    • Authors: Kroenig; M.
      Pages: 16 - 18
      Abstract: Between 2014 and 2023, the United States expects to spend $355 billion to modernize its nuclear arsenal. In subsequent decades, even higher expenditures are envisioned. But Washington is far from alone in modernizing its nuclear weapons. According to researchers from the Federation of American Scientists, "all the nuclear-armed states have ambitious nuclear weapon modernization programs ... that appear intended to prolong the nuclear era indefinitely." Disarmament advocates believe such modernizations are fundamentally at odds with the goal of eliminating nuclear weapons—while weapon states argue that, as long as nuclear weapons exist, arsenals must be modernized in order to keep them safe, secure, and effective. Here, Eugene Miasnikov of Russia (2015), Matthew Kroenig of the United States, and Lu Yin of China (2015) debate how—in a world where complete disarmament is nearly every nation’s stated goal but disarmament seems by no means imminent—nuclear-armed countries should approach the maintenance and modernization of their arsenals.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581356
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • The X-37B: Backdoor weaponization of space?
    • Authors: Ghoshroy; S.
      Pages: 19 - 29
      Abstract: After spending 674 days in space, the military space plane known as the X-37B returned to Earth in October 2014. But no one really knows what its purpose was, or what it had been doing all that time, leading to all kinds of guessing in the popular press. Photos show something that looks like a baby space shuttle, and television newscasts suggested it could be a space bomber or a satellite meant to spy on other satellites. Using publicly accessible documents, the author attempts to piece together the plane’s likely mission, and writes that the X-37B illustrates the United States’ continuing interest in militarizing space and, possibly, weaponizing it in the future. He argues that such an approach inadvertently harms the security of the United States’ own space assets.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581360
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • The more the merrier: Time for a multilateral turn in nuclear disarmament
    • Authors: Smetana, M; Ditrych, O.
      Pages: 30 - 37
      Abstract: At three minutes to midnight on the Bulletin’s Doomsday Clock, the time has come to consider constructive steps on the multilateralization of nuclear arms control negotiations that lead toward disarmament. After explaining the context of and existing obstacles to such a multilateral turn, the authors propose constructive but realistic steps: first, initiating a debate on a reduction-cum-freeze deal that would include unilaterally declared moratoria on new nuclear weapons by lesser nuclear-armed states alongside further arsenal reductions by the United States and Russia; and second, preparing the institutional ground by moving forward with debates over arms control terminology, trust-building, and development of verification measures, not only by the nuclear weapon states but by non-nuclear weapon states and civil society organizations as well.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581362
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • The dilemma of nuclear energy in space
    • Authors: Remo; J. L.
      Pages: 38 - 45
      Abstract: Nuclear energy, used in weapons as well as for electricity generation, has the potential to destroy life on Earth. But it also has the potential to save life as we know it. Currently, nuclear explosives are the only technology with the capability to deflect, on relatively short notice, a large asteroid fragment or comet headed for a collision with Earth. However, a number of international treaties prohibit the use of nuclear explosives in space. The peaceful and critically effective use of nuclear energy to prevent a civilization-threatening collision is at odds with its potential for inducing a catastrophic thermonuclear war on Earth. The author uses the Fermi paradox—if there are extraterrestrial civilizations in our galaxy, why haven’t they communicated with us?—to examine the dichotomy of whether nuclear explosives are a barrier or a path to long-term human survival.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581359
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Can nuclear weapons fallout mark the beginning of the Anthropocene
           Epoch?
    • Authors: Waters, C. N; Syvitski, J. P. M, Gałuszka, A, Hancock, G. J, Zalasiewicz, J, Cearreta, A, Grinevald, J, Jeandel, C, McNeill, J. R, Summerhayes, C, Barnosky, A.
      Pages: 46 - 57
      Abstract: Many scientists are making the case that humanity is living in a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene, but there is no agreement yet as to when this epoch began. The start might be defined by a historical event, such as the beginning of the fossil-fueled Industrial Revolution or the first nuclear explosion in 1945. Standard stratigraphic practice, however, requires a more significant, globally widespread, and abrupt signature, and the fallout from nuclear weapons testing appears most suitable. The appearance of plutonium 239 (used in post-1945 above-ground nuclear weapons tests) makes a good marker: This isotope is rare in nature but a significant component of fallout. It has other features to recommend it as a stable marker in layers of sedimentary rock and soil, including: long half-life, low solubility, and high particle reactivity. It may be used in conjunction with other radioactive isotopes, such as americium 241 and carbon 14, to categorize distinct fallout signatures in sediments and ice caps. On a global scale, the first appearance of plutonium 239 in sedimentary sequences corresponds to the early 1950s. While plutonium is easily detectable over the entire Earth using modern measurement techniques, a site to define the Anthropocene (known as a "golden spike") would ideally be located between 30 and 60 degrees north of the equator, where fallout is maximal, within undisturbed marine or lake environments.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581357
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Uranium supplies: A hitch to China's nuclear energy plans? Or not?
    • Authors: Zhang; H.
      Pages: 58 - 66
      Abstract: China will triple the number of nuclear power plants it has in operation by 2020 according to official plans, and the country’s nuclear fleet will increase 20-fold by 2050 under some not-yet-approved proposals. But how and where will China get the uranium to fuel them all? Will China need to resort to breeder reactors and reprocessing, with all the proliferation problems they incur? Or is there another way? The author suggests that between China’s domestic uranium mining, uranium purchased on the international market, and uranium mined by Chinese-owned companies overseas, China could meet even the most ambitious target, thus avoiding the troublesome and dangerous path of reprocessing.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581358
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Could low-enriched uranium be used in naval reactors? Don't ask the
           Navy
    • Authors: Moore; G. M.
      Pages: 67 - 75
      Abstract: Naval propulsion reactors account for the largest non-weapons use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in the world. The largest stores of naval propulsion fuel are in the United States, the Russian Federation, and the United Kingdom. Using low-enriched uranium (LEU) for naval propulsion reactors would allow a significant reduction in non-weapons stocks of HEU and would have significant positive impacts on global nonproliferation and counterterrorism efforts. The US Navy holds the largest declared stock of HEU for propulsion purposes, and HEU-fueled reactors power all US submarines and aircraft carriers. In 1995 and again in 2014, the Navy reported to Congress on the potential for using reactors fueled with LEU instead of HEU. The Navy’s reports to Congress in both years are lacking in substantive analysis and transparency and arguably do not provide the straightforward assessment that Congress requested. The 1995 report provided Congress with a very negative assessment of the use of LEU and offered little hope that the Navy would consider LEU-fueled reactors. In 2013, Congress asked the Navy to provide an update to its 1995 report; in response, the Navy produced only a very brief analysis in 2014. Because the congressional mandate was for an update of the 1995 report, both reports need to be examined to determine the Navy’s current position on LEU use. Sadly, that position appears to have changed little over almost 20 years, despite advances in LEU use by other navies. However, the 2014 report does indicate that the Navy might be willing to support further studies of LEU use. While an optimist might see that as a change to the Navy’s adamant desire to continue to use HEU in naval reactors, a pessimist would view the Navy’s statements as a reflection of the desire to disingenuously use LEU studies to maintain the health of the service’s research and development programs. Congress should commission qualified experts to conduct an impartial review, at classified and unclassified levels, of naval LEU use.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581361
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Hot potato in South Korea: The spent nuclear fuel storage dilemma
    • Authors: Kang, J; Kim, S.-W, Lee, B.-C.
      Pages: 76 - 83
      Abstract: Storage facilities are filling up at South Korea’s nuclear power plants, making spent fuel management a hot-button issue. But so far, attempts to create additional storage sites have foundered, largely because of a failure to consult with communities that would be affected, and because of widespread belief that nuclear power plants and storage facilities in South Korea are not safe. In recent surveys, the authors found that these communities might respond positively to educational efforts that explain how spent nuclear fuel could be safely stored.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215582518
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
  • Russian nuclear forces, 2015
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 84 - 97
      Abstract: Russia is modernizing its strategic and nonstrategic nuclear warheads. It currently has 4,500 nuclear warheads, of which roughly 1,780 strategic warheads are deployed on missiles and at bomber bases. Another 700 strategic warheads are in storage along with roughly 2,000 nonstrategic warheads. Russia deploys an estimated 311 ICBMs that can carry approximately 1,050 warheads. It is in the process of retiring all Soviet-era ICBMs and replacing them with new systems, a project that according to Moscow is about halfway complete. The outgoing ICBMs will be replaced by the SS-27 Mod. 1 (Topol-M), the SS-27 Mod. 2, two follow-on versions of the SS-27 which are still in development, and a new liquid-fuel "heavy" ICBM. Following technical problems, the Russian Navy is also rolling out its new Borey-class nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine. Russia’s upgrades to its nuclear arsenal help justify modernization programs in other nuclear weapon states, and raise questions about Russia's commitment to its obligations under the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty to reduce and eliminate nuclear weapons.
      PubDate: 2015-05-01T00:40:45-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215581363
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 3 (2015)
       
 
 
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