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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 780 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (9 journals)
    - MECHANICS (19 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (48 journals)
    - OPTICS (90 journals)
    - PHYSICS (565 journals)
    - SOUND (20 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (565 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 226)
Advanced Science Focus     Free   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 30)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Signal Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of West University of Timisoara - Physics     Open Access  
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Physics Newsletter     Hybrid Journal  
ASTRA Proceedings     Open Access  
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Case Studies in Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation     Open Access  
Cells     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CERN courier. International journal of high energy physics     Free   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cogent Physics     Open Access  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Computational Physics     Full-text available via subscription  
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 107)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 135)
Computational Astrophysics and Cosmology     Open Access  
Computational Condensed Matter     Open Access  
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover   Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
  [SJR: 0.401]   [H-I: 9]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
   Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Mitchie Takeuchi and Miyako Taguchi: Second-generation survivors of the
           atomic bomb
    • Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Mitchie Takeuchi’s mother and grandfather survived the atomic bombing of Hiroshima 70 years ago. Miyako Taguchi’s parents survived the bombing of Nagasaki three days later. Takeuchi and Taguchi both are part of the second generation (and in Takeuchi’s case also the third generation) of hibakusha—the Japanese term for people who were exposed directly to one of the two bombings or their radioactive fallout or who were exposed while still in their mothers’ wombs. Although many hibakusha have been reluctant or unwilling to discuss the bombings with their children, some have not only talked about their experiences with family members but also become active in groups such as Hibakusha Stories—which brings survivors into New York City schools to discuss their experiences with students. In this pair of interviews, Takeuchi and Taguchi talk about what it’s like to be the child of a survivor and why they feel a responsibility to share their family stories and to speak out about nuclear weapons.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590797
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Plutonium reprocessing, breeder reactors, and decades of debate: A German
           response
    • Authors: Janberg; K.
      Pages: 10 - 13
      Abstract: Some observers believe that plutonium reprocessing is on the verge of an expansion, while others argue that the end of the practice is in sight. The risk of nuclear proliferation has always been the chief objection to reprocessing but proponents argue that today, with uranium enrichment technology more easily available, reprocessing no longer represents an efficient route toward nuclear weapons. Supporters also tout the energy security that reprocessing could provide to nations without indigenous uranium sources and the reductions in high-level nuclear waste that reprocessing might achieve. Opponents counter that reprocessing offers only marginal benefits in waste reduction and in any event makes little economic sense. Here, Klaus Janberg of Germany, Baldev Raj and P. R. Vasudeva Rao of India (2015), and Hui Zhang of China (2015) debate how nations—taking into account issues ranging from proliferation to waste to cost—should approach plutonium reprocessing.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590778
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Plutonium reprocessing, breeder reactors, and decades of debate: An Indian
           response
    • Authors: Raj, B; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.
      Pages: 14 - 17
      Abstract: Some observers believe that plutonium reprocessing is on the verge of an expansion, while others argue that the end of the practice is in sight. The risk of nuclear proliferation has always been the chief objection to reprocessing but proponents argue that today, with uranium enrichment technology more easily available, reprocessing no longer represents an efficient route toward nuclear weapons. Supporters also tout the energy security that reprocessing could provide to nations without indigenous uranium sources and the reductions in high-level nuclear waste that reprocessing might achieve. Opponents counter that reprocessing offers only marginal benefits in waste reduction and in any event makes little economic sense. Here, Klaus Janberg of Germany (2015), Baldev Raj and P. R. Vasudeva Rao of India, and Hui Zhang of China (2015) debate how nations—taking into account issues ranging from proliferation to waste to cost—should approach plutonium reprocessing.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590789
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Plutonium reprocessing, breeder reactors, and decades of debate: A Chinese
           response
    • Authors: Zhang; H.
      Pages: 18 - 22
      Abstract: Some observers believe that plutonium reprocessing is on the verge of an expansion, while others argue that the end of the practice is in sight. The risk of nuclear proliferation has always been the chief objection to reprocessing but proponents argue that today, with uranium enrichment technology more easily available, reprocessing no longer represents an efficient route toward nuclear weapons. Supporters also tout the energy security that reprocessing could provide to nations without indigenous uranium sources and the reductions in high-level nuclear waste that reprocessing might achieve. Opponents counter that reprocessing offers only marginal benefits in waste reduction and in any event makes little economic sense. Here, Klaus Janberg of Germany (2015), Baldev Raj and P. R. Vasudeva Rao of India (2015), and Hui Zhang of China debate how nations—taking into account issues ranging from proliferation to waste to cost—should approach plutonium reprocessing.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590790
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Global warming, the atmospheric brown cloud, and the changing Indian
           summer monsoon
    • Authors: Liepert, B. G; Giannini, A.
      Pages: 23 - 30
      Abstract: Much scientific discussion has focused on rising greenhouse gas emissions and changing rainfall patterns in an increasingly warmer world. In fact, preventing the worst impacts of climate change on future human well-being will mean dealing with heightened flood and drought risks. The authors explain why the complex science of the shifting rainfall patterns and intensities caused by global warming is made even more complex by increasingly extreme air pollution. The article describes how scientists now think that the so-called "atmospheric brown cloud" over India affects the summer monsoon more than global warming does. In India, agriculture, industrial productivity, and life in general depend on monsoonal downpours that bring huge amounts of water to the subcontinent, feeding rivers and aquifers and cooling the land between June and September. As bad as it sounds, the scenario in which air pollution plays a major role in climate is actually good news for developing nations such as India. Pollution control is a regional and local problem that developing nations need to address in any case because of the huge human health costs related to it. The authors also warn that once pollution is brought under control, the full extent of global warming caused by developed nations’ greenhouse gas emissions from decades ago will become more prevalent and its impacts on the Indian monsoon will be unmasked.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590802
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • The big push for renewable energy in India: What will drive it?
    • Authors: Ghosh; A.
      Pages: 31 - 42
      Abstract: India’s government has a bold goal for deploying renewable energy: 175 gigawatts of electricity-generating capacity by 2022, including 100 gigawatts of solar power. The country has a history of promoting renewable energy and a rapidly growing portfolio of solar and wind projects, but meeting the solar target alone will require a growth rate equivalent to doubling India’s installed solar capacity every 18 months. It will also require a clear understanding of the three factors that drive energy demand in India (access, security, and efficiency); new federal and state policies and incentives; innovative financing for capital investments estimated at $100 billion or more; and additional funding for manufacturing, training, and job creation. Project developers will have to grapple with the cost and availability of land, grid connections, and backup power. To meet the electricity needs of the poor and encourage rural entrepreneurship, India’s energy policies should aim for a mix of grid-connected and decentralized renewable energy sources.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590791
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Nuclear power in Ukraine: Crisis or path to energy independence?
    • Authors: Kasperski; T.
      Pages: 43 - 50
      Abstract: Ukraine is a major nuclear power, with 15 reactors that produce more than 13,000 megawatts of electricity annually. Nuclear power has become important in contemporary Ukraine as the country’s leaders seek energy independence from Russian oil and gas amid significant tensions between the two countries in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Crimea and as its proxy war in eastern Ukraine continues. Other challenges to Ukraine’s determination to expand nuclear energy production include the costly legacy of the Chernobyl disaster; bureaucratic changes that have blurred responsibilities for promotion and regulation of nuclear power; cost overruns typical for nuclear power everywhere; the aging of power stations; and uncertainty in how to deal with nuclear dependence on Russia in terms of both nuclear technologies and the nuclear fuel cycle. Yet Ukraine remains determined to produce the lion’s share of its electricity from nuclear power plants.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590793
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Small country, big challenge: Switzerland's upcoming transition to
           sustainable energy
    • Authors: Notter; D. A.
      Pages: 51 - 63
      Abstract: Switzerland has long met a good portion of its energy needs by using nuclear power. But in the wake of the accident at Fukushima, the country will have to turn elsewhere—while still remaining true to its history of self-sufficiency and energy independence. This effort is made more complicated by fears that one of its traditional energy sources, hydropower, may no longer be as reliable as in the past. But with a combination of energy conservation, greater efficiencies, alternative energy sources, the "smart grid," and the introduction of new technologies currently on the drawing board, the country may readily be able to replace the energy lost by the closing of its existing nuclear power plants. And the loss of the snowpack and glaciers (due to climate change) may not be as dire for Switzerland’s hydropower as first anticipated.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590792
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Getting North Korea wrong
    • Authors: Cumings; B.
      Pages: 64 - 76
      Abstract: The 70th anniversary of Korea’s liberation from Japan will roll around on August 15, 2015, no doubt eliciting a hailstorm of commentary—and speculation that North Korea will collapse and the two Koreas reunify. But pundits have been saying that these rosy scenarios will occur for many decades (sometimes while simultaneously calling for military action to hurry up that collapse and reunification) and the regime still remains in place. The evidence shows that the bipartisan strategy in Washington founded on the North’s coming collapse has been wrong for at least a quarter-century, and it is time to deal with the country as it is instead of dealing with it based upon our own false assumptions.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215590794
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
  • Chinese nuclear forces, 2015
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 77 - 84
      Abstract: China is the only one of the five original nuclear weapon states that is quantitatively increasing the size of its nuclear arsenal and it now is estimated to have approximately 260 warheads. The arsenal’s capabilities are also increasing as older missiles are replaced with newer ones. As China assigns a growing portion of its warheads to long-range missiles, the US intelligence community predicts that by the mid-2020s the number of warheads on missiles capable of threatening the United States could increase to well over 100. The nuclear warheads in the Chinese stockpile are intended for delivery mainly by land-based ballistic missile but also by aircraft and submarines. The current force has nearly 150 nuclear-capable land-based missiles, half of which are short-range and medium-range. China has also built two types of submarine-launched ballistic missiles, one developed for a submarine no longer considered operational and the other in the final stages of development.
      PubDate: 2015-06-30T23:51:19-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340215591247
      Issue No: Vol. 71, No. 4 (2015)
       
 
 
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