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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 734 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (7 journals)
    - MECHANICS (18 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (44 journals)
    - OPTICS (84 journals)
    - PHYSICS (536 journals)
    - SOUND (17 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (28 journals)

PHYSICS (536 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Acta Physica Slovaca     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 279)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Synchrotron Radiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription  
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cells     Open Access  
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Journal of Chemical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COSPAR Colloquia Series     Full-text available via subscription  
Cryogenics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Current Applied Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Diamond and Related Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Doklady Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dynamical Properties of Solids     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
   [6 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
     Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.231]   [H-I: 7]
  • In the zone? Chemical weapons and the Middle East: The Egyptian
           response
    • Authors: Saif; M. E.
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: In 2012, an effort to establish a zone in the Middle East free of weapons of mass destruction ran out of momentum. In 2013, a chemical attack in the outskirts of Damascus nearly brought about US intervention in the Syrian civil war and ultimately led to Syria’s accession to the Chemical Weapons Convention. Against this backdrop, some have suggested that the time is right to establish in the region a zone free of chemical weapons.
      Authors from three countries—Emily B. Landau of Israel (2014), Mostafa Elwi Saif of Egypt, and John Hart of the United States (2014)—explore whether a chemical-weapon-free zone in the Middle East might contribute to regional security and whether it could revitalize the initiative to rid the region of all weapons of mass destruction.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531185|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531185
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • In the zone? Chemical weapons and the Middle East: The Israeli
           response
    • Authors: Landau; E. B.
      Pages: 4 - 6
      Abstract: In 2012, an effort to establish a zone in the Middle East free of weapons of mass destruction ran out of momentum. In 2013, a chemical attack in the outskirts of Damascus nearly brought about US intervention in the Syrian civil war and ultimately led to Syria’s accession to the Chemical Weapons Convention. Against this backdrop, some have suggested that the time is right to establish in the region a zone free of chemical weapons.
      Authors from three countries—Emily B. Landau of Israel, Mostafa Elwi Saif of Egypt (2014), and John Hart of the United States (2014)—explore whether a chemical-weapon-free zone in the Middle East might contribute to regional security and whether it could revitalize the initiative to rid the region of all weapons of mass destruction.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531184|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531184
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • In the zone? Chemical weapons and the Middle East: The US response
    • Authors: Hart; J.
      Pages: 7 - 9
      Abstract: In 2012, an effort to establish a zone in the Middle East free of weapons of mass destruction ran out of momentum. In 2013, a chemical attack in the outskirts of Damascus nearly brought about US armed intervention in the Syrian civil war and ultimately led to Syria’s accession to the Chemical Weapons Convention. Against this backdrop, some have suggested that the time is right to establish in the region a zone free of chemical weapons.
      Authors from three countries—Emily B. Landau of Israel (2014), Mostafa Elwi Saif of Egypt (2014), and John Hart of the United States—explore whether a chemical-weapon-free zone in the Middle East might contribute to regional security and whether it could revitalize the initiative to rid the region of all weapons of mass destruction.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531183|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531183
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Tom Wigley: Why nuclear power may be the only way to avoid geoengineering
    • Pages: 10 - 16
      Abstract: In this interview, climate scientist Tom Wigley says that waiting to take significant action on climate change makes it more likely that geoengineering will be needed to address the problem. He advocates for research on a combination approach: climate engineering together with mitigation efforts aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Wigley says that geoengineering may become necessary to stabilize global sea level rise, because sea level has much greater inertia than temperatures in the atmosphere. He argues that the climate problem cannot be solved with renewable energy alone, and that, without turning to geoengineering, consideration of the nuclear energy pathway—in particular, resuming the development of fast reactors—should be an essential component of attempts to address the climate crisis. Wigley claims that his colleagues in climate science are generally supportive of nuclear engineering and less fearful of it than they are of geoengineering.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531174|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531174
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Geoengineering and the politics of science
    • Authors: Hamilton; C.
      Pages: 17 - 26
      Abstract: The latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) include an assessment of geoengineering—methods for removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or cooling the Earth by reflecting more of the sun’s radiation back into space. The IPCC assessment signals the arrival of geoengineering into the mainstream of climate science, and may normalize climate engineering as a policy response to global warming. Already, conservative forces in the United States are promoting it as a substitute for emissions reductions. Climate scientists are sharply divided over geoengineering, in much the same way that Manhattan Project scientists were divided over nuclear weapons after World War II. Testing a geoengineering scheme, such as sulfate aerosol spraying, is inherently difficult. Deployment would make political decision makers highly dependent on a technocratic elite. In a geoengineered world, experts would control the conditions of daily life, and it is unlikely that such a regime would be a just one. A disproportionate number of scientists currently working on geoengineering have either worked at, or collaborated with, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The history of US nuclear weapons laboratories during the Cold War reveals a belief in humankind’s right to exercise total mastery over nature. With geoengineering, this kind of thinking is staging a powerful comeback in the face of climate crisis.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:22-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531173|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531173
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Playing God: Why religion belongs in the climate engineering debate
    • Authors: Clingerman, F; O'Brien, K. J.
      Pages: 27 - 37
      Abstract: Religion will play an important role in public perceptions of geoengineering—the intentional manipulation of the planet’s environment to counteract anthropogenic climate change. Religious leaders and scholars can therefore be valuable contributors to the geoengineering debate that has already begun among scientists, engineers, and policy makers. The authors offer four reasons why religion should be part of this debate: Religion is fundamental to how most human beings and societies understand themselves and their place in the world; religion can both challenge and justify scientific authority; religious narratives and symbols can provide frames for understanding geoengineering; and religion offers vocabulary for moral debate. Scholars of theology, ethics, and religious studies can act as mediators between the scientific and faith communities, providing a critical voice in understanding how religion affects the climate conversation, and in engaging a wider public.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:23-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531181|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531181
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Swimming upstream: Engaging the American public early on climate
           engineering
    • Authors: Carr, W; Yung, L, Preston, C.
      Pages: 38 - 48
      Abstract: Calls for public participation in climate engineering research and governance have appeared in numerous scientific and policy reports on the topic, indicating a desire for transparency and public oversight. But meaningful public engagement can require more of scientists and regulatory agencies than many realize. Over the past several decades, researchers and practitioners have developed many different methodologies to enable citizens to productively engage with experts and policy makers about emerging scientific and technological issues such as climate engineering. In fact, the United Kingdom has already convened several public participation exercises on climate engineering. Now is the time for federal agencies in the United States to start similar processes. The public is ready to discuss climate engineering. Are American scientists and decision makers ready to reciprocate?
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:23-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531180|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531180
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Breeder reactors: A possible connection between metal corrosion and sodium
           leaks
    • Authors: Pillai, S. R; Ramana, M. V.
      Pages: 49 - 55
      Abstract: Many countries have long pursued fast neutron breeder reactors, which create more fissile fuel than they consume, because of the expectation that the world will run out of the low-cost uranium used for fuel in most commercial nuclear power reactors. Despite billions of dollars spent on research and development, however, fast neutron reactors have proven unreliable and are frequently shut down due to leaks of their sodium coolant. Different reactors around the world have experienced this leakage problem, indicating that it may have fundamental causes, rather than being a symptom of poor manufacture or operational deficiencies. One possible cause is a series of chemical interactions between the carbon contained in the metallic components of these reactors and the sodium used to cool reactors; these interactions can cause a system’s metal parts to corrode, eventually leading to leaks. If true, this mechanism carries significant negative implications for the safety of these reactors and their economic viability.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:23-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531178|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531178
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Are medical radioisotopes contributing to global nuclear insecurity?
    • Authors: Sher; G. S.
      Pages: 56 - 64
      Abstract: Nuclear medicine requires the use of medical radioisotopes for a wide variety of procedures, which have saved millions of lives. The most commonly used medical radioisotope is technetium 99 m, which is usually derived from the molybdenum created in medical research reactors fueled with above-average levels of enriched uranium. But the number of these reactors has declined to a handful of widely scattered facilities, at the same time as there is increasing concern over the risks of shipping large amounts of highly enriched uranium fuel—often enriched as high as 90 percent, a level considered "weapons grade"—over long distances. One solution tried in the past was to convert research reactors to use lower levels of enriched uranium. An alternative may be to use particle accelerators in place of reactors for producing molybdenum. Another possibility would be for medical practitioners to switch to some other, yet-to-be-determined, non-fission-produced isotopes. In either case, much more research will be needed, along with funding and support from the public and private sectors.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:23-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531176|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531176
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • Treasure Island cleanup exposes Navy's mishandling of its nuclear past
    • Authors: Smith, M; Mieszkowski, K.
      Pages: 65 - 78
      Abstract: For decades before it was selected for closure, the Treasure Island Naval Station in San Francisco Bay overhauled military ships and housed nuclear war academies that used radium, plutonium, and cesium 137 in their training courses. The Navy knew for years that those materials were not always in safe hands. But it did not acknowledge that history publicly, and as a result, workers preparing for civilian redevelopment may have inadvertently spread radioactive material around the island, The Center for Investigative Reporting (CIR) has found in a year-long investigation co-published by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on its open website, www.thebulletin.org, and here in its subscription journal. With the naval station decommissioned, the city of San Francisco has set its sights on erecting a second downtown on Treasure Island, with plans for apartments for 20,000 residents, commercial development, and open space. But the CIR investigation—based on wide-ranging document reviews and interviews—has confirmed the detection of significant levels of radioactive contamination on the island during preparations for redevelopment. Rather than conduct a more systematic radiation survey, CIR reporters found, the Navy engaged in bureaucratic warfare with health regulators and joined the city of San Francisco in telling 2,000 civilians already living on the island that they need not worry about exposure.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:23-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531186|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531186
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
  • The B61 family of nuclear bombs
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 79 - 84
      Abstract: The Obama administration has approved an upgrade to the B61 nuclear bomb that will, through use of a new tail kit assembly, become a guided standoff nuclear bomb. If the upgrade—the 12th modification of the original B61 design—is pursued as planned, the US Air Force will obtain the low-yield, precision-guided nuclear weapon it first sought in the 1990s, despite concerns that it could increase the likelihood of use. The weapon’s overall price tag is expected to exceed $10 billion, with each B61-12 estimated to cost more than the value of its weight in gold.
      PubDate: 2014-05-01T02:03:23-07:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214531546|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214531546
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 3 (2014)
       
 
 
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