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  Subjects -> PHYSICS (Total: 750 journals)
    - ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM (8 journals)
    - MECHANICS (20 journals)
    - NUCLEAR PHYSICS (44 journals)
    - OPTICS (89 journals)
    - PHYSICS (543 journals)
    - SOUND (17 journals)
    - THERMODYNAMICS (29 journals)

PHYSICS (543 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Acta Acustica united with Acustica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Acta Mechanica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Advanced Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Advanced Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 366)
Advances in Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Exploration Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Geophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Imaging and Electron Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances In Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Synchrotron Radiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
AIP Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AIP Conference Proceedings     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Condensed Matter Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Signal Processing     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Analysis and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annalen der Physik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annales Geophysicae (ANGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annales Henri PoincarĂ©     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annales UMCS, Physica     Open Access  
Annals of Nuclear Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annals of West University of Timisoara - Physics     Open Access  
Annual Reports on NMR Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Annual Review of Condensed Matter Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Materials Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
APL Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Applied Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Applied Physics Frontier     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Physics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Applied Physics Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applied Radiation and Isotopes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Remote Sensing Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Applied Spectroscopy Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archive for Rational Mechanics and Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Astronomy & Geophysics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Astrophysical Journal Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Atoms     Open Access  
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Axioms     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Physics     Open Access  
Bauphysik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Biomedical Imaging and Intervention Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biophysical Reviews     Hybrid Journal  
Biophysical Reviews and Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
BMC Biophysics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Nuclear Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Brazilian Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Bulletin of Materials Science     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bulletin of the Lebedev Physics Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of the Russian Academy of Sciences: Physics     Hybrid Journal  
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de FĂ­sica     Open Access  
Canadian Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cells     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Journal of Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CERN courier. International journal of high energy physics     Free  
Chinese Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chinese Physics B     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics C     Full-text available via subscription  
Chinese Physics Letters     Full-text available via subscription  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Colloid Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Communications in Theoretical Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Computational Materials Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Computational Mathematics and Mathematical Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Computational Particle Mechanics     Hybrid Journal  
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription  
Computer Physics Communications     Hybrid Journal  
Contemporary Concepts of Condensed Matter Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Contemporary Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Contributions to Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COSPAR Colloquia Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cryogenics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Applied Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Diamond and Related Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Differential Equations and Nonlinear Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Doklady Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dynamical Properties of Solids     Full-text available via subscription  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists
   [6 followers]  Follow    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
     ISSN (Print) 0096-3402 - ISSN (Online) 1938-3282
     Published by Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Homepage  [1 journal]   [SJR: 0.231]   [H-I: 7]
  • Frances Crowe, 95-year-old antinuclear activist
    • Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: In this interview, legendary activist Frances Crowe looks back on 70 years of protesting against the use of nuclear weapons and nuclear energy. She describes the impact that the news of the dropping of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima had on the American public in 1945—and how she and her husband, a radiologist and physician who had educated her on the effects of radiation poisoning, then decided to take a stand against its use. Among other acts of civil disobedience, she went on to spend a month in federal prison after spray-painting "Thou Shalt Not Kill" on the casings of missile tubes at a nuclear submarine base in Rhode Island. This grandmother of five has been arrested nine times for trespassing at the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station and was arrested again on January 14, two months shy of her 95th birthday. On the eve of the publication of her book, Finding My Radical Soul, Crowe tells about growing up in the Midwest during an era of Progressive politics, her evolution as a protestor, the limits of civil disobedience, what drove her and her husband—and what continues to drive her today.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:03-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555076|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555076
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Ban the bomb?: An Australian response
    • Authors: Lennane; R.
      Pages: 10 - 13
      Abstract: Decades after several nuclear weapon states committed themselves to pursuing disarmament "in good faith" and "at an early date," frustration over the pace of disarmament is growing more conspicuous. For example, calls are emerging to establish a treaty banning nuclear weapons, essentially making outlaws of nuclear-armed nations.
      Authors from three countries—Richard Lennane of Australia, Bharat Karnad of India (2014), and Héctor Guerra of Mexico (2014)—address this question: How would prospects for disarmament be affected if non-nuclear nations established a treaty that banned nuclear weapons outright—and how might such a ban be enforced?
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555079|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555079
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Ban the bomb?: An Indian response
    • Authors: Karnad; B.
      Pages: 14 - 17
      Abstract: Decades after several nuclear weapon states committed themselves to pursuing disarmament "in good faith" and "at an early date," frustration over the pace of disarmament is growing more conspicuous. For example, calls are emerging to establish a treaty banning nuclear weapons, essentially making outlaws of nuclear-armed nations.
      Authors from three countries—Richard Lennane of Australia (2014), Bharat Karnad of India, and Héctor Guerra of Mexico (2014)—address this question: How would prospects for disarmament be affected if non-nuclear nations established a treaty that banned nuclear weapons outright—and how might such a ban be enforced?
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555078|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555078
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Ban the bomb?: A Mexican response
    • Authors: Guerra; H.
      Pages: 18 - 21
      Abstract: Decades after several nuclear weapon states committed themselves to pursuing disarmament "in good faith" and "at an early date," frustration over the pace of disarmament is growing more conspicuous. For example, calls are emerging to establish a treaty banning nuclear weapons, essentially making outlaws of nuclear-armed nations.
      Authors from three countries—Richard Lennane of Australia (2014), Bharat Karnad of India (2014), and Héctor Guerra of Mexico—address this question: How would prospects for disarmament be affected if non-nuclear nations established a treaty that banned nuclear weapons outright—and how might such a ban be enforced?
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555077|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555077
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • The nuclear weapons dismantlement problem
    • Authors: Alvarez; R.
      Pages: 22 - 28
      Abstract: In preparation for the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) review conference next year, the United States reports great progress in physically dismantling its nuclear weapons—a foundation for a key pillar of the treaty, which aims, ultimately, to reduce and eventually eliminate the arsenals of the world’s nuclear powers. The US Government Accountability Office (GAO), however, presents a very different picture. The US government’s statements about nuclear weapons dismantlement "may be misleading," the GAO concluded in a 2014 report, finding that the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), which oversees dismantlement within the Energy Department, "does not track the actual date that dismantled weapons were retired" and "will not dismantle some weapons retired prior to fiscal year 2009, but will reinstate them," causing the US nuclear stockpile to grow. Moreover, the Obama administration seeks to cut dismantlement funding and plans to halt dismantlement altogether after 2022, until new and costly nuclear warhead production facilities are established, tentatively in the early 2030s. Until nuclear dismantlement policies are reformed, disposal of unneeded nuclear weapons and their components will continue to be an afterthought, with huge costs looming in the future. Without reform, dismantlement will remain a mismanaged process kept in the shadows, except when it is burnished for display at NPT review conferences.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555082|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555082
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Reforming the US nuclear weapons enterprise
    • Authors: Harvey; J. R.
      Pages: 29 - 38
      Abstract: Management and governance problems within the nuclear weapons enterprise are complex and cross jurisdictional boundaries. These problems have been repeatedly studied and are the target of yet another study, coming to completion as this article was being written. The studies agree on many of the steps that must be taken if the US nuclear weapons complex is to be reformed. What the government needs now is leadership determined to actually implement the necessary changes within the NNSA, its labs and plants, and the Energy Department for reform to succeed. Successful implementation requires the creation of champions who are empowered to effect real change, and institutionalized means of monitoring progress on implementation. Once the recommendations of the latest study are issued, Congress should establish an independent group to monitor progress on implementation.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555080|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555080
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • A realignment commission for national labs: How to downsize America's
           bloated and unsecure nuclear weapons complex
    • Authors: Dennett; L.
      Pages: 39 - 47
      Abstract: US national laboratories and nuclear weapons facilities use or store nuclear material for scientific research as well as weapons production and upgrading and should therefore be protected by the best security systems available. But a decades-long series of accidents, failures, and embarrassments shows that weapons-complex security has been astonishingly lax. One long-overdue solution to these security problems involves the reassessment and consolidation of facilities in the complex. Consolidation would reduce the number of terrorist targets, cut the costs of maintaining numerous facilities, and decrease security costs and vulnerabilities at the national labs and other nuclear weapons facilities, creating a smaller, smarter weapons complex to support a post-Cold War nuclear mission. An independent realignment commission for national labs—patterned after the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission used to close unneeded military bases after the Cold War—would offer a real opportunity for much-needed downsizing, consolidation, and security improvements in the nuclear weapons complex.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555081|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555081
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Why America should move toward dry cask consolidated interim storage of
           used nuclear fuel
    • Authors: Rosner, R; Lordan, R.
      Pages: 48 - 62
      Abstract: Despite the recommendations of the 2012 Blue Ribbon Commission Report, the US government has made no substantial progress toward the permanent, or even temporary, consolidated storage of used 1 civilian nuclear fuel. To complicate matters, a November 2013 decision by the United States Court of Appeals (2013) in Washington, DC eliminated the very fee designed to finance used-fuel storage—which had accumulated over $30 billion so far—introducing a further obstacle (Nuclear Energy Institute, 2014a). It was not supposed to be this way. The 1982 Nuclear Waste Policy Act bound the federal government by law to take custody of all civilian waste from power companies for final disposal, under the assumption that the waste would be permanently stored in a deep geological repository at Nevada’s Yucca Mountain and overseen by the Energy Department. The Act obligated the US government to begin accepting waste by 1998, but the government was unable to fulfill this promise, forcing it to remunerate the utility companies for continuing to store the waste and assume liability. This situation cannot continue. As a solution, the commission argues that the US government should establish a widely distributed series of regional, government-run sites that would take in the used fuel from the cooling pools of several reactors, thereby consolidating the interim storage of used fuel and putting this nuclear waste into stronger, safer, more secure, more manageable—and ultimately more affordable—dry casks, as a first step toward ultimate disposal. Dry casks have withstood earthquakes and floods, and are designed to withstand the heat of fires and the impact of airplanes; the 100-ton structures are hard to steal or damage, and require no cooling systems or power supplies. These are some of the many reasons why making the transition to dry cask-based interim storage should be made as quickly as possible, regardless of one’s opinion of civilian nuclear power.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555107|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555107
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Out of control: Why mandatory international reporting is needed for
           radioactive sources and materials
    • Authors: Moore; G. M.
      Pages: 63 - 72
      Abstract: No international agreement currently requires reporting the loss of control of even the most dangerous radioactive sources and materials. Rising concerns about the potential use of these materials by terrorists or criminals (for example, by using explosives to disperse radioactivity with a "dirty bomb"), as well as the potential for international movement of materials, makes the loss of control of strong radioactive sources and materials a vital concern to all countries. This article makes the case for a binding international agreement that would mandate international reporting of the loss of control of the two highest-strength categories of sources and materials, as defined by the International Atomic Energy Agency. No current agreements meet the need for mandatory reporting, although the underlying basis for an agreement already exists. The burdens of such an agreement on any state would be minimal, and all states should be interested in pursuing such an agreement. Agreement to a binding international convention would be an ideal state "gift" for the final Nuclear Security Summit, scheduled to take place in Washington in 2016.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555111|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555111
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • A warning about Pakistan's illusion of power
    • Authors: Rehman; I. A.
      Pages: 73 - 78
      Abstract: The following article is the English translation of the introduction to a 2014 book in Urdu, Taqat ka Sarab (Illusion of Power), edited by A. H. Nayyar, which aims to educate Pakistanis about the attitudes of their leadership toward nuclear weapons. In his introduction, I. A. Rehman explains that Pakistan’s people have come to believe that the successful acquisition of nuclear capability means that their nation’s security is forever ensured. Meanwhile, the politicians who ordered nuclear tests—and the scientists and government functionaries who helped create the nuclear weapons—have used the mere presence of this nuclear weaponry as the justification for demanding not only public recognition and honor but also the right to unlimited authority for ruling over Pakistan. Consequently, free discussion and honest opinion about nuclear weapons have been nearly prohibited, under the premise that any such talk poses a basic threat to national security.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555110|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555110
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Engineering thinking in emergency situations: A new nuclear safety concept
    • Authors: Guarnieri, F; Travadel, S.
      Pages: 79 - 86
      Abstract: The lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident have focused on preventive measures designed to protect nuclear reactors, and crisis management plans. Although there is still no end in sight to the accident that occurred on March 11, 2011, how engineers have handled the aftermath offers new insight into the capacity of organizations to adapt in situations that far exceed the scope of safety standards based on probabilistic risk assessment and on the comprehensive identification of disaster scenarios. Ongoing crises in which conventional resources are lacking, but societal expectations are high, call for "engineering thinking in emergency situations." This is a new concept that emphasizes adaptability and resilience within organizations—such as the ability to create temporary new organizational structures; to quickly switch from a normal state to an innovative mode; and to integrate a social dimension into engineering activities. In the future, nuclear safety oversight authorities should assess the ability of plant operators to create and implement effective engineering strategies on the fly, and should require that operators demonstrate the capability for resilience in the aftermath of an accident.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555109|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555109
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Post-Fukushima energy paths: Japan and Germany compared
    • Authors: Feldhoff; T.
      Pages: 87 - 96
      Abstract: Japan’s March 2011 triple disaster of earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown shattered the country’s nuclear-dependent energy policy. Questions about the long-term consequences of Fukushima still linger, but a political and economic re-evaluation of the costs and benefits of this high-risk technology is long overdue. Concerns about the future role of nuclear power are part of the larger international debate about energy security and climate change. Germany is frequently seen as leading the way toward a clean-energy future with its nuclear exit and renewables expansion, but both Japan and Germany have managed to maintain a secure energy supply with dramatically reduced—or even zero—nuclear power since 2011. A comparison of similarities and differences between Japan and Germany helps to explain each country’s responses to Fukushima and to draw out key lessons for future energy systems. Energy policies that scrutinize vested interests of the industry and allow for more decentralized energy systems, relying on more renewable energy sources and more programs for emissions reductions, are key in shaping the inevitable big shift.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555108|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555108
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
  • Israeli nuclear weapons, 2014
    • Authors: Kristensen, H. M; Norris, R. S.
      Pages: 97 - 115
      Abstract: Although the Israeli government neither confirms nor denies that it possesses nuclear weapons, it is generally accepted by friend and foe alike that Israel is a nuclear-armed state—and has been so for nearly half a century. The basis for this conclusion has been strengthened significantly since our previous estimate in 2002, particularly thanks to new documents obtained by scholars under the US Freedom of Information Act and other openly available sources. 1 We conclude that many of the public claims about the size of the Israeli nuclear arsenal are exaggerated. We estimate that Israel has a stockpile of approximately 80 nuclear warheads for delivery by two dozen missiles, a couple of squadrons of aircraft, and perhaps a small number of sea-launched cruise missiles.
      PubDate: 2014-11-03T00:28:04-08:00
      DOI: 10.1177/0096340214555409|hwp:master-id:spbos;0096340214555409
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 6 (2014)
       
 
 
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