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  Subjects -> RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (Total: 453 journals)
    - BUDDHIST (7 journals)
    - HINDU (4 journals)
    - ISLAMIC (27 journals)
    - JUDAIC (15 journals)
    - OTHER DENOMINATIONS AND SECTS (4 journals)
    - PROTESTANT (12 journals)
    - RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (365 journals)
    - ROMAN CATHOLIC (19 journals)

RELIGION AND THEOLOGY (365 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de las Religiones     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Patristica et Byzantina     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Acta Theologica     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
AJS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Al-Masaq: Islam and the Medieval Mediterranean     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Aleph Historical Studies in Science and Judaism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Alternative Spirituality and Religion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Theology & Philosophy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 27)
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analecta Bollandiana     Full-text available via subscription  
Annali di Scienze Religiose     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annuaire de l'Ecole pratique des hautes etudes. Section des sciences religieuses     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Antiquite Tardive     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Anuario de Historia de la Iglesia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Apocrypha     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Approaching Religion     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arab Law Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arabic Sciences and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archiv für Religionsgeschichte     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Aries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arys: Antigüedad, Religiones y Sociedades     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asbury Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Philosophy: An International Journal of the Philosophical Traditions of the East     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australasian Catholic Record, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Australian Humanist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Religion Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Baha'l Studies Review     Hybrid Journal  
Biblical Interpretation A Journal of Contemporary Approaches     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203)
Bijdragen     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Black Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Buddhist Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Buddhist-Christian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bulletin d’études Orientales     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Bulletin for the Study of Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Bulletin of Medieval Canon Law     Full-text available via subscription  
Bulletin of the John Rylands Library     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cahiers d’études du religieux     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cahiers d’études du religieux. Recherches interdisciplinaires     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Catholic Historical Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Chrétiens et sociétés     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Christian Bioethics: Non-Ecumenical Studies in Medical Morality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Christian Perspectives in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Christian Spirituality and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Church Heritage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Church History and Religious Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 203)
Church History: Studies in Christianity and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 239)
Comparative Islamic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Conservative Judaism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Conspectus : The Journal of the South African Theological Seminary     Full-text available via subscription  
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Contemporary Islam     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Contemporary Islamic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Jewry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Conversations In Religion & Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 208)
Correlatio     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Critical Research on Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Critique: Critical Middle Eastern Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Crosscurrents     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de historia de España     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuestiones Teológicas     Open Access  
Cultural Encounters     Full-text available via subscription  
Culture and Religion: An Interdisciplinary Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Currents in Biblical Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Dead Sea Discoveries     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Der Islam     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dialog: a Journal of Theology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Dialogue - A Journal of Mormon Thought     Full-text available via subscription  
Die Kerkblad     Full-text available via subscription  
Die Welt des Islams     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Doctor virtualis     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
e-Theologos     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Early Christianity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
EarthSong Journal: Perspectives in Ecology, Spirituality and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Ecclesiastical Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ecclesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
El-Hikmah     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Eleutheria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Entangled Religions     Open Access  
Ephemerides Theologicae Lovanienses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Erasmus of Rotterdam Society Yearbook     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Études d’histoire religieuse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
European Journal for Church and State Research - Revue européenne des relations Églises-État     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
European Journal of Jewish Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Evangelische Theologie     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Exchange     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Expository Times     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Extrême-Orient Extrême-Occident     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fieldwork in Religion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Filosofia Theoretica : Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions     Open Access  
Franciscan Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Franciscanum. Revista de las ciencias del espíritu     Open Access  
Geschichte in Köln     Full-text available via subscription  
Harvard Theological Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 231)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Hervormde Teologiese Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hiphil     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hispania Sacra     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Journal Cover   Hervormde Teologiese Studies
  [4 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Online) 0259-9422
   Published by SciELO Homepage  [789 journals]
  • Concrete spirituality

    • Abstract: This article reflects on a number of liturgical innovations in the worship of Melodi ya Tshwane, an inner-city congregation of the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (URCSA). The focus of the innovations was to implement the understanding of justice in Article 4 of the Confession of Belhar, a confessional standard of the URCSA. The basic contention of the article is that well designed liturgies that facilitate experiences of beauty can nurture a concrete spirituality to mobilise urban church members for a justice-seeking lifestyle. After exploring the message of Article 4 of Belhar, the article analyses eight liturgical features of Melodi ya Tshwane, showing how beauty and justice interact in those acts of worship.
       
  • Discerning the role of faith communities in responding to urban youth
           marginalisation

    • Abstract: Urban youth marginalisation became a key consideration in scholarly and policy literature in the 1990s. This entailed a shift from an emphasis on youth in relation to activism in the struggle to overcome colonial racism - popularly known as 'the struggle against apartheid' - to an emphasis on youth as the object of social inquiry and social welfare programmes. Irrespective of how we evaluate this shift, the question in this article is how urban faith communities and youth ministry research are to respond to the agency of youth as dialogue partners - with a focus on social cohesion. This article explores this shift in scholarship on urban youth movements, especially for the period since 1994. It draws from the perspectives of my recent doctoral studies (Nel 2013) in constructing a creative dialogue with youth movements. The ultimate aim of this article is to provide a grounded basis for constructing a methodology for a postcolonial urban theology. In addition, it aims to inform the ongoing Youth at the Margins (YOMA) comparative study on the contribution of faith-based organisations to social cohesion in South Africa and Nordic Europe, with the Riverlea community, in Johannesburg, as one of the case studies.
       
  • Faith community as a centre of liberationist praxis in the city

    • Abstract: Theologians speak of the silence of churches' prophetic voice in the 'new' South Africa, whilst the country features amongst the socio-economically most unequal countries in the world, and the urban areas in particular continue to be characterised by segregation. In this context I ask: where is liberation theology? I spell out my reading of some of the recent voices in the liberationist discourse. In dialogue with these scholars I, firstly, argue for the faith community to be made a conscious centre of liberationist debates and praxis. Secondly, I do this by suggesting two theoretical building blocks (i.e. critical deconstruction and radical friendship) for local faith communities that wish to grow in a liberationist fashion.
       
  • Living in the townships: An appraisal of pentecostal social ministry in
           Tshwane

    • Abstract: This article offers an appraisal of the social ministry of Pentecostal churches through fellowship, healing and livelihood creation in the township communities of the city of Tshwane. In meeting this aim the discussion advances a thesis of these churches as agents of social support and survival of the downcast. In particular, the article attempts to show how these churches exert themselves towards establishing not only moral responsibility, but also a context where the weakest and the least privileged can learn how to survive. The squatter camp people are unique with the special challenges requiring distinctive consideration. Pentecostal churches believe that the lost people matter to God and are of importance to their congregations as well. The backyard Bible study ministries and mutual cooperation strategies are employed for mutual support. Making use of the existing empirical research data and available literature will show how Pentecostal churches in the townships support the laity and community in times of need.
       
  • Informal community-based early childhood development as a focus for
           urban public theology in South Africa

    • Abstract: This article highlights important dimensions of public theology and shows how the identified dimensions are relevant to the specific situation of informal early childhood development (ECD) facilities in a South African urban setting. The article considers the contributions and challenges of informal community-based ECD on the basis of research conducted in the Rustenburg/Phokeng area of the North West province of South Africa. It critically discusses the sociocultural discourses and legislation regulating ECD centres, by focusing on the constraints put on informal ECD service providers. It concludes by considering ways in which urban public theology should act to serve, strengthen and advocate this vitally important, yet informal, sector.
       
  • Your sister in Babylon sends her love: Towards prophetic solidarity in
           post-apartheid South Africa

    • Abstract: How does a self-respecting Christian from Galilee who now finds himself based near the seat of empire relate to power in light of his faith? How are his admonishments, especially those which relate to the public arena, to be appropriated by those living on the periphery of the empire? I reflect on these questions from the vantage point of a South Africa in which on the one hand erstwhile prophets are being haunted by the vagaries of power and on the other the Church is apparently as powerless as never before.
       
  • Jesus in the dumping sites: Doing theology in the overlaps of human and
           material waste

    • Abstract: Jesus' option for the poor should be reclaimed in a clear theological and ecclesial option for the dumping sites of our cities and towns. That is the basic proposal of this article. Reflecting upon three different dumping sites - different in size, age and history - this article will explore the central thread of material and human waste, often dealt with almost as synonymous, concentrated and overlapping in these marginal spaces. It will additionally explore the theological and ecclesial challenges, but also possible opportunities, visions and gifts presented by them. The paradoxical (and sometimes toxic) interconnectedness between waste management and sanitised cities will be considered, as well as its relation to mediating or denying human dignity. The stories of Smokey Mountain in Manila, the Zabbaleen community in Mokattam Village, Cairo, and the Hulene Dump in Maputo, will be presented as part of this reflection. They will be read as mirrors to the proliferation of similar dumping sites on the fringes of South African cities. An outline is offered for a theological-ecclesial praxis emerging from the dumping sites, as well as a retrieval of possible contributions from these sites to the broader urban public theological reflection.
       
  • Structural transformation and democratic public spaces: Reflections on
           Habermas and the 2014 Tshwane State of the Capital City Address

    • Abstract: Judging by the immense global academic interaction with his work, Jurgen Habermas's social theory, with particular reference to structural transformation of the public sphere and democracy, is one of the most constructive models for understanding the role and function of citizens in forming healthy societies. This article investigates the recent 2014 Tshwane State of the City Address in light of Habermas's theory. Is Habermas's theory relevant to the South African urban context? Do African cities like Tshwane subscribe to the Habermasean social formula or does it understand the public sphere in ways that require an amended interpretation of what Habermas conveys? This article provides a theological-ethical perspective on this Habermasean investigation of the 2014 Tshwane 'State of the Capital City Address'.
       
  • The task of urban black public theology

    • Abstract: Twenty years after the demise of apartheid, a typical South African city remains bifurcated. The mushrooming of squatter camps, mekhukhu, in our big cities, symptomises a history that defined the majority of South Africans as sojourners and vagabonds in their motherland. Destined to die in the rural reserves after the extraction of their labour and confined to 'locations' in-between the 'city' and the rural 'home', black experience in the post-1994 city continues to be a manifestation of a life disintegrated from an integrated vision of ikhaya (oikos) - household - and urban life in democratic South Africa. By critiquing the policies of the post-1994 government on urbanisation, the article argues that for inclusion in the city, the colonial and apartheid polis is not adequate redress to the black experience of urbanisation in South Africa. The quest for the transformation of a city in order for an integrated city in the post-1994 South Africa to be achieved is ostensibly the best starting point, this article argues.
       
  • 'My city of ruins': A city to come

    • Abstract: 'My city of ruins' is the title of a song by Bruce Springsteen and will accompany a public theological reflection of imagining alternative cities. A city of ruins is either a city of ruins in the sense that it is a city in ruins. Alternatively it is a city of ruins in the sense that it is a city that is built from ruins, like a phoenix rising from the ashes. The article will reflect on the second alternative namely the poiesis of a habitable, sustainable and political space (polis) in a time when all the meta-discourses of constructing and social engineering lie in ruins (have been deconstructed). The article will focus on Derrida's ideas of deconstruction and the hope and prayer of perhaps. Springsteen's song includes the prayer: 'come on, come on, rise up!' A city of ruins prayed into existence, rising up by the call (prayer) of those longing for a liveable, sustainable city to rise up from the ruins of too many empty promises of the various political agendas. Creating and imagining a city of prayer, which involves the prayers for justice incarnate in the broken language (ruined language) of revolutions, and transformations and political construction, thus calls a city of promise into existence.
       
  • Space, place and ecology: Doing ecofeminist urban theology in
           Gauteng

    • Abstract: The basic motivation for this article is to explore the critical, yet hopeful vision which urban theologians - and specifically ecofeminist urban theologians - have for justice, reconciliation and abundance of life in urban Gauteng. This requires that urban spatiality, with its conflicting sides in a rampantly capitalist Gauteng, needs to be understood. It also requires an understanding of how urbanity and ecology may - yet so often do not - overlap. According to ecofeminist theologian Anne Primavesi, space and place needs to be understood in relation to the earth as the body of God - a web of interrelated and interconnected subjects and living beings which constitute the earth with its various ecosystems. This belies the established understanding that space and place is created mostly through the anthropocentric activity and mastery of people. Such an ecological understanding of space, place and urbanity leads to my exploration of a missiology of space as the manifestation of the presence of God in the spaces of nature and human civilisation. I conclude by proposing the practice of urban mission as making the liturgical and sacramental links between ecology, space, and the reclamation of urban space as sacred by Christian and other agents of urban activism.
       
  • Mission as local economic development in the City of Tshwane: Towards
           fostering a grass roots, 'glocal' alternative vision, with specific
           reference to Luke 16:19-31

    • Abstract: This article analyses and reflects missiologically on the City of Tshwane's economy, in terms of its priorities and strategies. It points out that it is to the detriment of local communities that Tshwane's economy has become a replica of the national economy which is essentially growth-focused and structured to service the global market. It also discusses possibilities for the urban church to be involved in addressing this situation as it wrestles with the question: What role can the church play towards fostering a grass roots, 'glocal' alternative vision to the current local economic system? Responding to this question, this article argues that the church, drawing from theological/missiological resources and hermeneutic insights on biblical texts, such as Luke 16:19-31, and on the concept of God's economy, can steer such an alternative vision for the economy of the City of Tshwane. It ends by demonstrating how the church can engage the issues of local economic development in a practical way, which will lead to an alternative reality where shared prosperity and inclusion are attained.
       
  • Back to where it all began ...? Reflections on injecting the
           (spiritual) ethos of the Early Town planning movement into planning,
           planners and plans in post-1994 South Africa

    • Abstract: Recent developments in South Africa in the field of planning, the domain of plans, and the world of planners, would suggest that planning and plans are viewed in a positive light, the local planning profession is in good shape, and these instruments and actors can play a meaningful role in the development and transformation of the country. In this article, these assumptions were explored through the lens of the attributes and convictions that gave birth to and drove the early 'town planning movement' in the industrial cities of North America and Western Europe. A key theme in this analysis was the role played in the early town planning movement by compassion, passion and care for progressive change, and the conviction that it was possible to do so through the application of reason, technical ability and ingenuity. Based on this analysis, the argument was put forward that, while planning, plans and planners in South Africa could potentially play a crucial part in the crafting of a different country, a number of crucial changes would need to be made. The challenges associated with effecting these changes were subsequently explored, and the article concluded with a proposal for doing so by tapping into the metaphors as deployed, and the drive and passion as displayed by those in the early town planning movement.
       
  • Pieter M. Venter's contribution to Old Testament Studies - an
           appreciation

    • Abstract: The contribution that Professor Pieter M. Venter has made to the study of the Old Testament during his academic and ecclesiastic career is reviewed. After a brief biographical introduction, the article surveys the development of his research interests, focusing specifically on his contributions to the study of wisdom literature, narratives and narratology, second temple literature, the formation of the canon, and Old Testament Theology. The review concludes with reference to his way of practising critical theology, taking full cognisance of research into the linguistic, historical critical, narratological and ideological aspects of Old Testament texts, but always with a sensitivity for the needs of the church as interpretive community.
       
  • Towards a fusion of horizons: Thematic contours for an urban public
           theological praxis-agenda in South Africa

    • Abstract: This article proposes a 'fusion of horizons' in constructing urban public theologies in South Africa. This is done through the introduction of five interrelated themes that have emerged from the on-going knowledge and idea production by a distinguishable counterpoint in contemporary scholarly, intellectual and activist engagement with the urban, in the authors' own South African context but also wider internationally. In advancing a praxis-agenda for urban public theology, the authors subsequently identify the following, albeit not exhaustive, themes: southern urbanisms and the factor of unprecedented urban migration; 'right to the city' and urbanisation from below; a reclaiming of the commons; the making of 'good cities'; and actors of faith in relation to urban social life.
       
  • Shorter or longer text in Ezekiel 6: The role of genre

    • Abstract: The text of Ezekiel continues to present some challenges to students studying it. This is in view of what one school of thought identify in the Ezekiel text as extensive redactions and revisions, whilst another school of thought is hesitant to subject the Masoretic Text (MT) to such critical analysis. Amidst these differing viewpoints, I have discussed by means of literary analysis, the possibility that chapter 6 of Ezekiel may have been intended as a prophetic poetic message, or was later edited to conform to the genre of prophetic poetry. This is in the light of the so-called repetitions or 'additions' reflected in the MT if compared against the LXX, as well as the general problems associated with the Hebrew text of Ezekiel. The findings indicate that the text of Ezekiel 6 probably already had a complete theological corpus when it left the hand of the prophet Ezekiel or those who penned his words down. However, scribes saw it necessary to restructure, organise and colour the prophetic oracle in a literary form and structure they thought was necessary. This finding could be vital for solving literary and text critical problems in Ezekiel.
       
  • Discernment (”•-) in the Old Testament

    • Abstract: Discernment is one of the concepts that urge each and everyone to think critically and anew. The concept of a never-ending spiral of thinking is very familiar in the circles of reformed churches. This concept is also known from the wisdom literature in the Old Testament. The realisation that you do not know, means approaching the ability to grasp something of wisdom. In order to find out what the Old Testament is saying about 'discern', I did a textual research on the two Hebrew words: ”•- and ”•- I apply the results of this research to the context of the church (with specific reference to the 'Nederduitsch Hervormde Kerk van Afrika' [NH Church]) attempting to find out what the church's responsibility is with regards to what is really important (i.e. discernment).
       
  • Music, singing and dancing in relation to the use of the harp and the
           ram's horn or shofar in the Bible: What do we know about
           this?

    • Abstract: There are many possible approaches to describing the effects and uses of music in a particular society. It would be a mistake to assume that music in the Bible is not the cement of social life and has no liturgical significance. The present study seeks to explore how people in ancient times employed music using the harp and the ram's horn (shofar), to cope with roles that were open or never-ending in their demands. In particular, it focuses upon the role played by music in secular life as well as religious rituals, as described in the Bible. The method used was an extensive literature study of the Old and New Testament, textbooks and relevant peer reviewed journals, with a focus on both secular and religious reasons for singing, dancing and playing instruments. It was found that the Bible described the use of the harp and the ram's horn associated with singing and dancing during celebrations, for military use, as well as mourning or lamentation. It was concluded that music using different instruments, including the harp and shofar, helped people to cope with the demands of everyday life and thus played an important role in both secular life and religious rituals in biblical times.
       
  • Reimagining mission in the public square: Engaging hills and valleys in
           the African City of Tshwane

    • Abstract: This article seeks to map out the future of Christian mission in the city context. African cities like Tshwane are not only expanding, but also present the church with a new frontier that needs to be crossed without crossing geographical boundaries. This article indicates that life in the City of Tshwane is paradoxically placed. Whilst life in the valleys of Tshwane is like walking in the valley of the shadow of death, those on the high hills (the places of power) continue with their dominance and pretence as solution providers, whilst hiding the presence of those who are marginalised. This article proposes that the future of the Christian mission lies not only in identifying those powers, but also in engaging them in a transformative way so as to usher the justice and shalom of God into this highly contested space.
       
  • Nation, 'ethnic people' (das Volk), religion and the church as
           ellipse of reconciling diversity

    • Abstract: This article examines the 19th and 20th century European context wherein religion was practiced. In a 'Rip-Van-Winkle' manner it is as if this context had no influence on the Afrikaans speaking church in South Africa. The isolation, that was the result of the apartheid ideology, lead to the Afrikaans speaking church in South Africa not internalising ecumenicity. It is argued that for the church to be able to take an active role in reconciling diversity and therefore contributing to social cohesion in South Africa, the church needs to transcend being a 'nation' church. This is possible by respecting culture and diversity, while recognising the priority of salvation in Christ. This is the ellipse of being church.
       
  • Conversio ad docelitam : John Calvin on conversion and
           being a Christian

    • Abstract: This contribution describes John Calvin's understanding of what it means to be a Christian. When Calvin 'converted' to the Reformation in the early 1530s, the term 'Protestant' did not exist. There was no systematic body of doctrine or a confession you could put your signature under. So Calvin became a 'lover of Christ'. The unity with Christ was a central part of his theology but also his personal spirituality. Calvin also understood his own conversion as a 'conversio subita ad docelitam', a conversion to a 'teachable frame of mind'. Calvin's love for Christ, his love for the Word of God and a teachable frame of mind not only defined his theology, but also his piety and spirituality
       
  • Shorter or longer text in Ezekiel 6: The role of genre

    • Abstract: The text of Ezekiel continues to present some challenges to students studying it. This is in view of what one school of thought identify in the Ezekiel text as extensive redactions and revisions, whilst another school of thought is hesitant to subject the Masoretic Text (MT) to such critical analysis. Amidst these differing viewpoints, I have discussed by means of literary analysis, the possibility that chapter 6 of Ezekiel may have been intended as a prophetic poetic message, or was later edited to conform to the genre of prophetic poetry. This is in the light of the so-called repetitions or 'additions' reflected in the MT if compared against the LXX, as well as the general problems associated with the Hebrew text of Ezekiel. The findings indicate that the text of Ezekiel 6 probably already had a complete theological corpus when it left the hand of the prophet Ezekiel or those who penned his words down. However, scribes saw it necessary to restructure, organise and colour the prophetic oracle in a literary form and structure they thought was necessary. This finding could be vital for solving literary and text critical problems in Ezekiel.
       
  • Mani (216-276 CE) and Ethiopian enoch

    • Abstract: Mani (216-276 CE) lived in a world where many ideas contributed to his unique theology. In the scriptural legacy of Mani seven of his books show influence of Ethiopian Enoch. These books are identified in this article and the use of Enochic material in those books is discussed. The Manichaean myth is briefly discussed and used to propose that Enochic influence can mainly be found in the way First Enoch depicted characters and presented the cosmos. Mani adopted his ideas mainly from the Book of the Watchers (1 En 1-36), the Book of Parables (1 En 37-71) and the Astronomical Book of Enoch (72-82) where evil beings and cursed places are depicted.
       
  • On the role of Susanna in Susanna: A Greimassian
           contribution

    • Abstract: This article addresses the highly disputed distribution of roles in the story of Susanna. Susanna consists of a number of actors of whom only a few such as Susanna, the two elders, the Jewish people and Daniel are directly related to the central action of the story. With regard to the roles of these actors in the story however, a question arises: Who is the subject of the story of Susanna? Most scholars question the attribution of the role of subject to Susanna. Their contention however, has not yet been sustained by convincing evidence stemming from the use of a suitable method. This study attempts to fill this gap by using the Greimassian approach to narratives, as refined by Everaert-Desmedt. The approach comprises three levels of analysis: the figurative, the narrative and the thematic. The contribution focuses only on the narrative level of analysis, particularly on the actantial model because the main role of this structure is to reveal different functions of actors called here actants. It is the contention here that following the actantial model of the Greimassian approach of analysis, Susanna emerges as the subject of the main concern of the story.
       
  • 'The woman was deceived and became a sinner' - a literary-theological
           investigation of 1 Timothy 2:11-15

    • Abstract: In 1 Timothy 2:11-15 women are forbidden to teach and have authority over men in the church. The ground for this instruction is the creation account in Genesis 2 that asserts the priority of Adam over Eve in the order of creation. The second reason for the instruction is the deception of Eve according to the account of the Fall in Genesis 3. This pericope has elicited arguments between advocates of egalitarianism and complementarianism revolving over the issues of grammar, the context of the Ephesian church with regard to false teachings and the comparison of this text with the other writings of Paul, for those that subscribe to the authorship of Paul. The contention of this article is that verse 15 provides a major clue as to how this text should be understood. In addition, the author's rhetoric in this text is interrogated with regard to the text's own internal literary and theological logic. In this regard, the author is found to be inconsistent in his outlook, for the grace that was poured out abundantly on him: a blasphemer, a persecutor and a violent man and on account of his ignorance and unbelief (1 Tm 1:12-16) is apparently, being denied women on account of Eve's deception.
       
  • The kingdom of God: Utopian or existential?

    • Abstract: The kingdom of God was a central theme in Jesus' vision. Was it meant to be understood as Utopian as Mary Ann Beavis views it, or existential? In 1st century CE Palestine, kingdom of God was a political term meaning theocracy suggesting God's patronage. Jesus used the term metaphorically to construct a new symbolic universe to legitimate a radical new way of living with God in opposition to the temple ideology of exclusivist covenantal nomism. The analogies of father and king served as the root metaphors for this symbolic universe. They are existential root metaphors underpinning the contextual symbolic universe of God's patronage in reaction to the collapse of the patronage system which left peasants destitute. Jesus' paradoxical use of the metaphor kingdom of God had a therapeutic value and gave the concept new meaning. The initial motivation for proclaiming God's patronage originated in Jesus' primary identity formation by Mary as single parent and was reinforced in his secondary identity formation by John the Baptist. From these results can be concluded that kingdom of God was not meant to be understood as utopian, but existential. In order to clarify the meaning of kingdom of God and God's patronage for the 21st century, demythologisation and deconstruction can be helpful especially by highlighting the existential meaning of the kingdom of God.
       
  • The effect of misapplied religious practices in some alternative
           religious groups

    • Abstract: The positive impact that religion generally has on human beings has been suggested by different studies. However, it cannot be assumed that religion always contributes to the well-being of believers. Religious systems can be misused, resulting in people being spiritually and even physically hurt and harmed. This study investigates certain aspects of some alternative religious group in order to determine the impact it has on the well-being of the members of these groups. It was found that people are drawn to these groups because of the challenges they present, the display of true love amongst members and the 'message' of an authoritative charismatic leader that resonates with them and convinces them to become part. As time pass, members were challenged with questionable aspects that appear in the activities and teaching of these groups. Obtaining clarity on these concerns was strongly discouraged by the culture and other members of the group, resulting in members suppressing doubts and emotions. Adherence to the tenets of the group then occurred as a result of peer pressure and out of fear instead of true conviction. The study concludes that most of the respondents in the study reported that their experience in these groups did not contribute to their well-being, and emotionally, they struggled to adapt to society and other religious groups after leaving the group.
       
  • Gangsterism on the Cape Flats: A challenge to 'engage the powers'

    • Abstract: One of the most pressing issues in the urban ghettos of the Cape Flats is that of gangsterism and the discourse of power and powerlessness that is its lifeblood. Media coverage over the past two years was littered with news on gangsterism as the City of Cape Town struggles to contain what some labelled a pandemic. It is a pandemic that is closely tied to a deprivation trap of poverty, marginalisation, isolation, unemployment and, ultimately, powerlessness. The latter concept of powerlessness and its interplay with these factors constituted the main thrust of this article as it explores the concept of power (and powerlessness) as deeply relational with the economic, psycho-social and spiritual dimensions. It is proposed that Kingdom power challenges the status quo within such contexts and offers the church an alternative framework within which to engage prophetically.
       
  • The value of ritual theory for pastoral care in times of grief

    • Abstract: In this article the focus is on ritual theory and its relevance for pastoral care during the grief process. For these purposes the first task at hand is finding an appropriate description of what ritual implies, especially in the context of pastoral care. It includes studying different descriptions from different study fields to provide a broad theoretical view of ritual and to identify relevant perspectives. This view is narrowed to ritual as performance as well as legitimisation of experience. Concerning the pastoral aspect of grief care the research mainly focuses on the work of the Dutch practical theologian, Corja Menken-Bekius and the American practical theologian David Hogue. Menken-Bekius' works on ritual from a clinical pastoral perspective while Hogue gives a neuropsychological perspective. Included in the processing of these two views are the works of anthropologist, Roy Rappaport and psychologist, Onno Van der Hart. Finding a description of ritual is not an easy task. The one offered is created with careful consideration of the inclusions and exclusions within the 'idea' of ritual. Meaning is subjective when it comes to ritual. A general meaning might be ascribed to a specific ritual, yet each individual might have a different experience and might attach different meanings. This happens unwittingly and unwillingly. What is found to be important in the rituals proposed in this article, is the ability of rituals to provide a framework of order within a situation of chaos and that it also creates a moment of remembrance.
       
  • A pastoral psychological approach to domestic violence in South
           Africa

    • Abstract: South Africa suffers a scourge of domestic violence. Colonial oppression upset the delicate balance between 'discipline' and 'protection' in traditional cultures. The full consequence of a patriarchal mindset of male control is unleashed on girls and women. The aim of this article is to investigate how the cycle of domestic violence can be broken and what role pastoral counsellors can play with regard to both victims and offenders in order to prevent history from repeating itself. The article also investigates the extent to which legislation has succeeded in protecting individuals. Pastoral care and counselling comprise both spiritual and emotional support. The combination of two counselling methods compatible with religious themes such as 'hope' and 'new life', namely logotherapy (Victor Frankl) and narrative pastoral counselling, is presented as an effective response to domestic violence.
       
  • Die Christusnarratief in die film As it is in heaven

    • Abstract: In this article the public-theological motives in the film As it is in heaven is analised to demonstrate the film producer Kay Pollack's ideal to communicate through the film that people should live their lives here and now authentically without seeking excuses for being happy. In this article the principles of narratology is applied in the analysis of the film's plot, characterisation, plotted time and narrated spaces. It is also argued that the protagonist in the film can be regarded as a 'Christ-figure' and that the film conveys a 'Christ narrative' in a secularised context. Societal issues such as emotional abuse and violence against children, women, people with disability and animals constitute building blocks of the narrative. Ecclesiastical hypocrisy and outdated sexual values endorsed by the institutional church are replaced by a choir consisting of common people which leads a whole world to sing in harmony.
       
  • The future of the three mainstream Afrikaans Churches

    • Abstract: The union of the three mainstream Afrikaans Churches encompasses inter alia a mutual origin, a mutual socio-historical contextualism, a mutual language experience and mutual Articles of Faith. These bonds form the foundation for greater cooperation and may even lead to future church unification. The Conventus of Reformed Churches is an exciting initiative that has developed over the last two decades. This organisation unites some 15 churches with a reformed background. Do the three Afrikaans mainstream churches take church unification seriously? Historically the Nederduitsche Hervormde Kerk van Afrika (NHKA) in particular was cautious about church unification. The Interdenominational Church Council (TKR) presents a basis for cooperation, but the question arises as to the structure that would be supported by the three churches. Mainly after 1994 the Afrikaner started redefining its own identity. The tendency is that the three churches will decrease in size as the three are all losing members. The three Afrikaans mainstream churches definitely need one another, and in future this interdependency probably will increase. That is why it is important to focus on common ground and not on differences. Bearing the church unification of the Protestant Church in the Netherlands (PCN) in mind, together we can look forward to a bright future in the 21st century.
       
  • Prayer Book Catechism: Past its sell-by date?

    • Abstract: The Book of Common Prayer (BCP) is the first introduction to Anglican belief and liturgy for many. More specifically, the Book of Common Prayer of 1662 contains the traditional catechism of the Church of England, enjoining catechumens to receive training and instruction in basic doctrines and Christian living. This takes place in the contexts of the liturgy and the more comprehensive doctrinal statements of the 39 Articles of Religion. Anglican religion traditionally allowed its members to verbalise their faith in both ritual and confession, thus serving the church and not so much life in the world. A revisit of the intentions of the catechism within its historical and prayer book contexts will show that it essentially expresses lasting truths of the Christian faith. In a world increasingly divorced from particular Christian expressions, the Anglican Church needs to rethink its particular use of the catechism for its continued relevance in meeting the questions and challenges Anglicans face daily.
       
  • The practical guidelines on the impact of mahadi [bride price]
           on the young Basotho couples prior to marriage

    • Abstract: This article investigates and provides guidelines to the negative impact of mahadi on the Basotho youth before they may marry. It is important to note that marriage is one of the main parts of the life cycle amongst the Basotho and not only joins a man and a woman together, but is also considered to unite the members of the respective families of the married couple into one family. This union of two families comes into effect when the process of negotiation of the mahadi is initiated. The negotiation for mahadi is, in other words, the first stage of bonding two families together. In the hope of gaining a better understanding and results, the writer searched for a qualitative method to conduct the research.
       
  • A clash of gods - Conceptualising space in Daniel 1

    • Abstract: Applying cognitive linguistics to the text of Daniel 1 is a useful exegetical aid for a better understanding of the narrative. Studying the author's use of 'spatial markers' such as 'Jerusalem', 'Babylon', 'temple' and some other spatial features, makes it possible to reconstruct the narrative into a 'cognitive spatial frameset'. In this particular exegetical frameset, Daniel 1 can be described as a narrated confrontation between Yahweh and the gods of Babylon. Within this conflict between deities, Daniel, the divine agent becomes a spatial embodiment of Yahweh's power and authority to act inside a hostile, non-Israelite environment and at the same time undermines the authority of the Babylonian gods.
       
  • Towards understanding (religious) (in)tolerance in education

    • Abstract: In recent years, schools and education authorities world wide have been paying increasing attention to issues surrounding diversity and religious (in)tolerance. The term 'tolerance' is, however, clouded by considerable confusion and vagueness. This article seeks to contribute to recent scholarly attempts at understanding (religious) tolerance and the term that denotes it. After a brief semantic analysis of the term 'tolerance', arguments concerning the onticity of tolerance as phenomenon or entity are discussed. By examining its onticity we explore and explain some of the essential features of tolerance. The article ends with a brief discussion of some of the implications of our examination that we foresee for (religion) education.
       
  • Four-dimensional conversion for spiritual leadership development: A
           missiological approach for African churches

    • Abstract: The process of a four-dimensional conversion and/or transformation strives in helping the leadership of an organisation, especially such as the church, with practical ways that may lead to the development of an effective leadership by observing the four important aspects of human spirituality as elaborated on in the article. The spiritual, intellectual, moral and socio-political dimensions of the transformation can be catered for so that the complete inner being of humans, as well as their social and political attitudes and behaviours, can equally be transformed to maximum spiritual, personal and socio-political profitability. Mutombo-Mukendi demonstrates that the need for a spiritual leadership that can contribute to an effective transformation of Africa is dire, both for the church and the larger community. The real challenge is how to develop such leadership. This article provides intentional and practical ways that may lead to the development of the needed leadership. Four-dimensional transformation of people can be planned and carried out both in the church arena and in the surrounding communities. Skills development and transfer can also take place when skilled people from the church work with unskilled people from the community.
       
 
 
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