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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1453 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (22 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (86 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (661 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (382 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (105 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (115 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (82 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (661 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access  
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ageing & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
AJOB Empirical Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
American Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 258)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
American Medical Writers Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annales des Sciences de la Santé     Open Access  
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Research In Health And Social Sciences: Interface And Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archive of Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Suicide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arquivos de Ciências da Saúde     Open Access  
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Medicine and Health     Open Access  
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 7)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Behavioral Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bijzijn     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal  
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Birat Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Boletin Médico de Postgrado     Open Access  
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
British Journal of Health Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Bulletin of the World Health Organization     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Carta Comunitaria     Open Access  
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Case Studies in Fire Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Children     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Innovación en Salud     Open Access  
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia y Salud Virtual     Open Access  
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cities & Health     Hybrid Journal  
Clinical and Experimental Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Clocks & Sleep     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
CoDAS     Open Access  
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Contraception and Reproductive Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de la Escuela de Salud Pública     Open Access  
Curare     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Design for Health     Hybrid Journal  
Digital Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Diversity of Research in Health Journal     Open Access  
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Drogues, santé et société     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Duazary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Düzce Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Enstitüsü Dergisi / Journal of Duzce University Health Sciences Institute     Open Access  
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência: Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Epidemiologic Perspectives & Innovations     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Ethics & Human Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Eurasian Journal of Health Technology Assessment     Open Access  
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Evidence-based Medicine & Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Family & Community Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 13)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Finnish Journal of eHealth and eWelfare : Finjehew     Open Access  
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Food Quality and Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers in Digital Health     Open Access  
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ganesha Journal     Open Access  
Gazi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Advances in Health and Medicine     Open Access  
Global Challenges     Open Access  
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Mental Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Global Reproductive Health     Open Access  
Global Security : Health, Science and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastane Öncesi Dergisi     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
HCU Journal     Open Access  
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 60)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Equity     Open Access  
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Health Notions     Open Access  
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Health Professional Student Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Health Prospect     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Health Psychology Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Psychology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Health Renaissance     Open Access  
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Health SA Gesondheid     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Science Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Sciences and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Security     Hybrid Journal  
Health Services Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
American Journal of Preventive Medicine
Journal Prestige (SJR): 2.164
Citation Impact (citeScore): 4
Number of Followers: 28  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0749-3797
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3177 journals]
  • Sexual Orientation Disparities in Substance Use: Investigating Social
           Stress Mechanisms in a National Sample
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Evan A. Krueger, Jessica N. Fish, Dawn M. UpchurchIntroductionSexual minorities are disproportionately more likely than heterosexuals to suffer from substance use disorders, but relatively little is known about differences in substance use disorders across diverse sexual minority subgroups. There is also limited understanding of how different social stressors account for sexual orientation disparities in substance use disorders.MethodsUsing nationally representative data collected in 2012–2013 (n=34,597), differences in past-year DSM-5 alcohol, cannabis, and tobacco use disorders were assessed across 4 sexual orientation groups (heterosexuals and 3 sexual minority subgroups, lesbian/gay-, bisexual-, and heterosexual-identified sexual minorities). This study assessed whether stressful life events mediated substance use disorder disparities between heterosexuals and each sexual minority subgroup, and whether stressful life events and lesbian, gay, and bisexual discrimination events mediated these substance use disorder differences. Analyses were conducted in 2019.ResultsFor both men and women, substance use disorders and stress experiences varied by sexual identity. For example, compared with heterosexual men, larger proportions of gay and bisexual men had a past-year alcohol use disorder. Among women, all sexual minority subgroups had higher rates of each substance use disorder than heterosexuals. For each substance use disorder, stressful life events mediated disparities between heterosexuals and sexual minority subgroups, except for heterosexual-identified sexual minority men. Both stressful life events and lesbian, gay, and bisexual discrimination mediated substance use disorder differences between sexual minority subgroups, with stronger indirect effects through lesbian, gay, and bisexual discrimination for lesbians/gay men and stronger indirect effects through stressful life events for bisexual adults, generally.ConclusionsSexual minority subgroups have a greater prevalence of substance use disorders, mediated through both stressful life events and lesbian, gay, and bisexual discrimination. More research is needed to comprehensively assess the processes underlying sexual orientation substance use disparities.
       
  • The Association Between Gender Inequality and Sexual Violence in the U.S.
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Megan C. Kearns, Ashley Schappell D'Inverno, Dennis E. ReidyIntroductionFew societal-level factors are established as risk or protective factors for sexual violence. Traditional gender norms and gender inequality are linked to sexual violence, but much of this research was conducted internationally or is becoming outdated and may not reflect current norms in the U.S. This study expands on previously published research by examining gender inequality's association with state-level sexual violence.MethodsUsing state-level prevalence estimates published in the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey 2010–2012 State Report and the Gender Inequality Index, Pearson correlations were examined to investigate the relationship between state-level gender inequality and lifetime victimization for various types of sexual violence among U.S. female and male adults. The analysis was conducted in 2019.ResultsFindings indicate that states with a high degree of gender inequality also report higher prevalence estimates among women for rape using physical force. Gender inequality was also negatively correlated with noncontact unwanted sexual experiences among women and men. In addition, an exploratory analysis of the relationship between individual indicators of gender inequality and violence outcomes suggest that the adolescent birth rate, female government representation, and labor force participation demonstrate an association with certain state-level violence outcomes, although the patterns were inconsistent.ConclusionsAlthough this study relied on cross-sectional data, collectively, these findings suggest that gender inequality may represent an important societal-level factor associated with sexual violence among women and men. However, this relationship appears complex and requires further research. These findings have potential to inform population-level violence prevention approaches.
       
  • Social Influence in the Uptake and Use of Electronic Cigarettes: A
           Systematic Review
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Samia Amin, Adam G. Dunn, Liliana LaranjoContextE-cigarettes were introduced to support smoking cessation, but their popularity has increased among nonsmokers, challenging current perspectives on their safety and effectiveness as a public health intervention. The objective of this systematic review was to identify and synthesize current evidence on the influence of social factors on e-cigarette intentions and use.Evidence acquisitionMEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Embase were searched for studies of the effects of social factors on e-cigarette intention or use in February 2019. Studies were included if they used experimental, longitudinal, qualitative, or mixed methods designs. Advertising, social interactions, and social norms were considered as social factors; social media was considered a conduit for other social factors. Two reviewers screened all studies; bias risk was evaluated for all RCTs using the Cochrane risk of bias tool.Evidence synthesisThis review included 43 studies: 9 experimental, 11 longitudinal, 22 qualitative, and 1 mixed method. All experimental studies examined advertising and consistently showed that exposure increased intentions to use e-cigarettes. Evidence of the influence of social interactions and social norms came from longitudinal and qualitative studies, suggesting that these factors could increase e-cigarette use. Most participants were nonsmokers (81%; 22,233 of 27,303). Studies rarely considered differences in the effects of social factors on smokers and nonsmokers.ConclusionsGiven the increased popularity among nonsmokers and the potential for advertising to increase e-cigarette use, closer public health monitoring of e-cigarette uptake by nonsmokers is warranted. Future primary research should be designed to measure how social factors affect smokers and nonsmokers differently.
       
  • Sugary Drink Consumption Among Children by Supplemental Nutrition
           Assistance Program Status
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 21 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): J. Wyatt Koma, Kelsey A. Vercammen, Marian P. Jarlenski, Johannah M. Frelier, Sara N. BleichIntroductionThe Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program is the largest U.S. federally funded nutrition assistance program, providing food assistance to more than 40 million low-income Americans, half of whom are children. This paper examines trends in sugar-sweetened beverage consumption among U.S. children and adolescents by Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation status.MethodsDietary data from 15,645 participants (aged 2–19 years) were obtained from the 2003–2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination surveys. Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation was categorized as: Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participant, income-eligible nonparticipant, lower income–ineligible nonparticipant, and higher income–ineligible nonparticipant. Survey-weighted logistic regressions estimated predicted probabilities of daily sugar-sweetened beverage consumption, and negative binomial regressions estimated predicted per capita daily consumption of sugar-sweetened beverage calories. Data were analyzed in 2019.ResultsFrom 2003 to 2014, there were significant declines across all Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participation categories for sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (participants: 84.2% to 75.6%, p=0.009; income-eligible nonparticipants: 85.8% to 67.5%, p=0.004; lower income–ineligible nonparticipants: 84.3% to 70.6%, p=0.026; higher income–ineligible nonparticipants: 82.2% to 67.7%, p=0.001) and per capita daily sugar-sweetened beverage calories (participants: 267 to 182 kilocalories, p
       
  • Information for CME Credit—Adherence to Cervical Cancer Screening
           Guidelines Among Women Aged 66–68 Years in a Large Community-Based
           Practice
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • Ettinger de Cuba SA, Bovell-Ammon AR, Cook JT, et al. SNAP, young
           children's health, and family food security and healthcare access. Am J
           Prev Med. 2019;57(4)525–532
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • U.S. Immigration Law Enforcement Practices and Health Inequities
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6Author(s): Paul J. Fleming, Nicole L. Novak, William D. Lopez
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence Screening and Intervention: The American College
           of Preventive Medicine Position Statement
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6Author(s): Tanya M. Phares, Kevin Sherin, Suzanne Leonard Harrison, Connie Mitchell, Randall Freeman, Kate LichtenbergThe purpose of this paper is to produce a position statement on intimate partner violence (IPV), a major sociomedical problem with recently updated evidence, systematic reviews, and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force guidelines. This position statement is a nonsystematic, rapid literature review on IPV incidence and prevalence, health consequences, diagnosis and intervention, domestic violence laws, current screening recommendations, barriers to screening, and interventions, focusing on women of childbearing age (15–45 years). The American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) recommends an integrated system of care approach to IPV for screening, identification, intervention, and ongoing clinical support. ACPM only recommends screening that is linked to ongoing clinical support for those at risk. ACPM recommends greater training of clinicians in IPV screening and interventions and offers health systems and research recommendations.
       
  • Information for CME Credit—Prevalence of Disability and Disability Types
           by Urban–Rural County Classification—U.S., 2016
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • CME Announcement
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6Author(s):
       
  • Payment Structures That Support Social Care Integration With Clinical
           Care: Social Deprivation Indices and Novel Payment Models
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6, Supplement 1Author(s): Alison N. Huffstetler, Robert L. PhillipsThe U.S. lags behind other developed countries in the use of indices and novel reimbursement models to adjust for social determinants of health (SDH) in medicine. This may be due in part to the inadequate body of research regarding outcomes after implementation of healthcare payments designed to address SDH. This perspective article focuses on four models employed both internationally and domestically to outline the implementation, successes, limitations, and research needed to support national application of SDH models. A brief history of prior models is introduced as a primer to the current U.S. system. Internationally, the United Kingdom and New Zealand employ small area indices to adjust healthcare dollar allocation based on increased social need in an area. Despite published evidence of disparate health outcomes based on SDH, research is limited on the association of SDH indices, subsequent increased reimbursement, and improved healthcare equity. In the U.S., the Massachusetts Managed Care Organization assesses and addresses social needs within communities served by Medicaid. Unsurprisingly, there is evidence of overlap between those with worse health outcomes and those with high social need. However, implementation in Massachusetts is too recent to demonstrate reduced healthcare disparities. Within Minnesota, Hennepin Healthcare System initiated a novel Medicaid waiver that provides extended services to high-need patients under a partial capitation reimbursement program. These services, including increased access to primary care, have promising results in financial improvement of the system, but have not yet demonstrated patient-oriented outcomes. The association between high social risk and poor medical outcomes has been established globally; however, healthcare payment policies designed to respond to this relationship generally lack evidence of affecting outcomes. U.S. policymakers are demonstrating increasing interest in requiring capture of SDH in health care, creating accountability for addressing SDH, paying differentially for patients with increased social risk, or all three. In countries with a legacy of adjusting healthcare payments for social risk, more robust evaluation of associated effects could be helpful. Payers, states, or health systems making similar resource commitments should build in robust longitudinal evaluations of outcomes to inform evolution of their payment policies.Supplement informationThis article is part of a supplement entitled Identifying and Intervening on Social Needs in Clinical Settings: Evidence and Evidence Gaps, which is sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Kaiser Permanente, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
       
  • Improving Social Needs Intervention Research: Key Questions for Advancing
           the Field
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6, Supplement 1Author(s): Caroline M. Fichtenberg, Dawn E. Alley, Kamila B. MistrySpurred by accumulated evidence documenting how social determinants of health shape health outcomes as well as the push for better value, the healthcare sector is embracing interventions that address patients’ health-related social needs. An increasing number of healthcare organizations and payers are experimenting with strategies to identify needs and connect patients to resources that address identified needs with the goal of improving health outcomes, reducing avoidable utilization of costly health services, and improving health equity. Although many studies link social factors to health, relatively little published research exists about how the healthcare sector can effectively intervene to help identify and address social needs. This paper summarizes emerging evidence and identifies key areas where more research is needed to advance implementation and policy development. Although some healthcare-based social needs interventions have been shown to improve health and reduce avoidable utilization, important gaps remain in terms of comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness of social needs intervention approaches. Additionally, the field would benefit from an increased understanding of mechanisms of action to maximize practitioners’ ability to tailor interventions. More research is also needed to guard against unintended consequences and ensure these interventions reduce health inequities. Finally, implementation science research should identify supports and incentives for adoption of effective interventions. Focusing both public and private research efforts on these evidence gaps can help advance identification of interventions that maximize both health equity and healthcare value.Supplement informationThis article is part of a supplement entitled Identifying and Intervening on Social Needs in Clinical Settings: Evidence and Evidence Gaps, which is sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Kaiser Permanente, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
       
  • Social Determinants as a Preventive Service: U.S. Preventive Services Task
           Force Methods Considerations for Research
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6, Supplement 1Author(s): Alex H. Krist, Karina W. Davidson, Quyen Ngo-Metzger, Justin MillsThe body of research on social determinants of health is rapidly accumulating. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is conducting evaluations to consider the inclusion of screening and counseling for social risks as a clinical preventive service. Yet, for many social risks, evidence is still likely needed before the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force can recommend universal screening or counseling. This manuscript offers a brief review of the social determinants of health that may be germane to the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, the methods the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force uses to evaluate relevant evidence, and current evidence gaps for social risks. Key methods for making clinical preventive service recommendations are applied for considering the integration of social and clinical care. These methods include determining the certainty of the evidence, assessing the net benefit, defining appropriate prevention frameworks, defining health outcomes versus intermediate outcomes, fully assessing the harms, and defining to what populations and care contexts the evidence applies. This road map for research is intended to spark ingenuity and purpose in the next generation of research studies, thereby ensuring that future recommendations to address and prevent social risks in primary care are informed by high-quality evidence.Supplement informationThis article is part of a supplement entitled Identifying and Intervening on Social Needs in Clinical Settings: Evidence and Evidence Gaps, which is sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Kaiser Permanente, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
       
  • Healthcare Sector Activities to Identify and Intervene on Social Risk: An
           Introduction to the American Journal of Preventive Medicine Supplement
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6, Supplement 1Author(s): Laura M. Gottlieb, Karen DeSalvo, Nancy E. Adler
       
  • Acknowledgments
    • Abstract: Publication date: December 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, Volume 57, Issue 6, Supplement 1Author(s):
       
  • Drug Decriminalization: A Matter of Justice and Equity, Not Just Health
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Hakique N. Virani, Rebecca J. Haines-Saah
       
  • Breast Cancer Screening via Digital Mammography, Synthetic Mammography,
           and Tomosynthesis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 November 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Ethan O. Cohen, Olena O. Weaver, Hilda H. Tso, Karen E. Gerlach, Jessica W.T. Leung
       
  • Health Warnings on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages: Simulation of Impacts on
           Diet and Obesity Among U.S. Adults
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 October 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Anna H. Grummon, Natalie R. Smith, Shelley D. Golden, Leah Frerichs, Lindsey Smith Taillie, Noel T. BrewerIntroductionOverconsumption of sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) is a significant contributor to obesity. Policymakers have proposed requiring health warnings on SSBs to reduce SSB consumption. Randomized trials indicate that SSB warnings reduce SSB purchases, but uncertainty remains about how warnings affect population-level dietary and health outcomes.MethodsThis study developed a stochastic microsimulation model of dietary behaviors and body weight using the 2005–2014 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys, research on SSB health warnings, and a validated model of weight change. In 2019, the model simulated a national SSB health warning policy's impact on SSB intake, total energy intake, BMI, and obesity among U.S. adults over 5 years. Sensitivity analyses varied assumptions about: (1) how warning efficacy changes over time, (2) the magnitude of warnings’ impact on SSB intake, and (3) caloric compensation.ResultsA national SSB health warning policy would reduce average SSB intake by 25.3 calories/day (95% uncertainty interval [UI]= −27.0, −23.6) and total energy intake by 31.2 calories/day (95% UI= −32.2, −30.1). These dietary changes would reduce average BMI by 0.64 kg/m2 (95% UI= −0.67, −0.62) and obesity prevalence by 3.1 percentage points (95% UI= −3.3%, −2.8%). Obesity reductions persisted when assuming warning efficacy wanes over time and when using conservative estimates of warning impact and caloric compensation. Benefits were larger for black and Hispanic adults than for white adults, and for adults with lower SES than for those with higher SES.ConclusionsA national SSB health warning policy could reduce adults’ SSB consumption and obesity prevalence. Warnings could also narrow sociodemographic disparities in these outcomes.
       
  • Expanding Diabetes Prevention: Obstacles and Potential Solutions
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 October 2019Source: American Journal of Preventive MedicineAuthor(s): Michael Bergman
       
 
 
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