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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1278 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (18 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (87 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (509 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (379 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (106 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (99 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (80 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (509 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access  
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access  
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
AJOB Primary Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 175)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
American Medical Writers Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Research In Health And Social Sciences : Interface And Interaction     Open Access  
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 6)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Best Practices in Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bijzijn     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Bulletin of the World Health Organization     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Studies in Fire Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Children     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access  
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access  
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CoDAS     Open Access  
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Curare     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Digital Health     Open Access  
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Full-text available via subscription  
Duazary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência: Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription  
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidence-based Medicine & Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Family & Community Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Health and Human Rights     Free   (Followers: 8)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal  
Health Professional Student Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health Prospect     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Health Psychology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Health Renaissance     Open Access  
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Health SA Gesondheid     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Science Reports     Open Access  
Health Sciences and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Services Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Health, Culture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare in Low-resource Settings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HERD : Health Environments Research & Design Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Highland Medical Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Hispanic Health Care International     Full-text available via subscription  
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Home Health Care Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Hospitals & Health Networks     Free   (Followers: 2)
IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IMTU Medical Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Indian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inmanencia. Revista del Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos (HIGA) Eva Perón     Open Access  
Innovative Journal of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
interactive Journal of Medical Research     Open Access  
International Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Behavioural and Healthcare Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Circumpolar Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of E-Health and Medical Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Health Geographics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Health Policy and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Professions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Promotion and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Health Sciences Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Healthcare Delivery Reform Initiatives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 | Last

Journal Cover Annals of Global Health
  [SJR: 0.716]   [H-I: 49]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2214-9996
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3031 journals]
  • Healthy People, Healthy Ecosystems

    • Authors: Keith Martin; Philip J. Landrigan
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Improvements to human health and well-being over the last 50 years have been extraordinary. Life expectancy has nearly doubled. Infant mortality has plummeted. Many of the ancient infectious diseases have been quelled. We are surrounded by myriad devices and conveniences that make our lives easier than those of any previous generation. But these great gains have come at an enormous cost, a cost that we are only beginning to comprehend. To achieve these gains, we have been unsustainably stripping the earth of its resources, degrading the planet's ecosystems, and destroying our life support systems.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.003
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Collaborative Governance in Primary Health Care Facilities, Western Kenya:
           What is the Influence from the Community?

    • Authors: J.C. Sitienei; M. Nangami, L. Manderson
      Pages: 3 - 4
      Abstract: Community participation in governance refers to the collective involvement and engagement of people in decision making, either individually or collectively, in assessing their needs and organizing strategies to meet those needs to a desired performance. There is inadequate evidence on interest, level of influence and effects of participation on facility performance. This study sought to explore the structures, intrests and level of influnce of collaborative level representatives in provision of primary care services in Uasin Gishu County
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.007
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Competing Solutions to Arsenic Contamination of Groundwater in Araihazar,
           Bangladesh: A Cost-Benefit Analysis

    • Authors: M. Lopez Mendez; A. Juárez Armenta
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Exposure to arsenic from drinking water and food has been associated with cancer, skin lesions, developmental effects, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and neurotoxicity. Since the 1990s arsenic contamination in Bangladesh has attracted much attention given its magnitude: about 45 million people were exposed to concentrations above the standard of the World Health Organization. This suggests that preventive measures could be a more efficient strategy to address the problem than investing in treating the adverse health-effects of chronic arsenic exposure.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.006
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • International Human Research and Ethics Standards: A Compilation of Legal
           Protections in Countries

    • Authors: S. Ly; W.P. Magee
      First page: 3
      Abstract: Human research investigations, including population-based studies and clinical trials, have the potential to alleviate the burden of diseases that disproportionately affects many low- and middle-income countries (1). The advent of globally recognized standards in ethical research conduct has placed human rights at the forefront of investigations (2-4). While standards are not legally enforceable, countries have adopted legislation to protect human subjects. The extent of legal protections varies by country and may be dependent on existing governmental and scientific infrastructure.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.005
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Development and Testing of a Low Cost Videolaryngoscope in a Resource
           Limited Setting

    • Authors: A.V. John; S.C. John, C. Lambert
      Pages: 4 - 5
      Abstract: The role of videolaryngoscopy has been increasingly recognized for training and management of difficult airways. Videolaryngoscopes improve visualization of the glottis for the anesthesia team and enhance supervision of intubation technique. Videolaryngoscopy requires less force than direct laryngoscopy, reducing cervical spine movement and permitting awake airway inspection and intubation. Current commercial videolaryngoscopes are too expensive for many resource-limited settings. We sought to address this problem by developing an inexpensive, reusable videolaryngoscope.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.009
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • TEAM Malawi: Low Cost Digital Microscopy for Automated Lab Testing

    • Authors: D. De La Torre Campos; J. Achempong, A. Atta, S. Claybon, D. DeVincentis, A. Edrees, D.L. Jones, S. Mackey, R. Schliemann, S. Tahir, J. Bird, A.A. Muelenaer, P. Muelenaer
      First page: 4
      Abstract: Today, Malawi is suffering from a major shortage of qualified lab technicians to scan, diagnose, and treat its population. Increased accessibility of accurate diagnostic mechanisms is the first step towards better specialized treatments which ultimately can lead to a healthier global population. Although not prevalent in developed countries, Tuberculosis affects 281 people per 100,000 in lesser developed nations, particularly in Africa. Current conventional light microscopy that examines Ziehl-Neelsen-stained direct smears requires trained staff and time.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.008
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Bottlenecks and Red Tape Reduce Access to Government Support Programs by
           Botswana’s Most Vulnerable Young Women

    • Authors: R. van der Wal; A. Cockcroft, B. Maswabi, N. Andersson
      Pages: 5 - 6
      Abstract: Botswana’s HIV prevalence is among the highest worldwide, with young women disproportionately affected. Structural barriers such as poverty, lack of education, and gender violence mean that young women are unable to implement HIV-prevention choices. Transactional and age disparate sex increase their HIV risk. A national structural intervention, implemented as a stepped-wedge cluster randomized controlled trial (ISRCTN54878784), aims to prepare young women to apply to available government support programs and to align the programs in favour of young women.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.011
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Getting High Quality Data to Drive Programs: How is the Quality of the
           Data Collection System Associated with the Quality of Routine Health Data
           in Malawi?

    • Authors: R. O'Hagan; M. Marx, K. Finnegan, P. Naphini, K. Ng'ambi, K. Laija, E. Wilson, L. Park, S. Wachepa, J. Smith, L. Gombwa, A. Misomali, T. Mleme, S. Yosefe
      First page: 5
      Abstract: Routine data can be a rich source of information for health systems. However, the perceived and actual quality of routine health data in low- and middle-income countries hinders its use for policy and programming. We conducted a data quality assessment (DQA) with the aim of characterizing the quality of routine data in Malawi’s health system and identifying associated systems-level factors.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.010
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • HIV Therapy without HBV Co-management in Ethiopia Fosters Emergence of
           Unintended HBV Drug Resistance and Vaccine Evasive Variants

    • Authors: Y.B. Akal; M. Maier, U.G. Liebert
      Pages: 6 - 7
      Abstract: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) drug resistance and vaccine escape gene mutants were determined in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) exposure of with unknown HBV status. Moreover, the reciprocal HIV drug resistance profiles were examined in HBV-HIV co-infected patients who developed HBV drug resistance.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.013
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Crowdsourcing to Promote HIV Testing among MSM in China: A Pragmatic
           Stepped Wedge Randomized Controlled Trial of a Crowdsourced Intervention

    • Authors: T. Zhang; W. Tang, T. SESH study group, J. Tucker
      First page: 6
      Abstract: Improving HIV testing for marginalized populations is critical to controlling the HIV epidemic. However, the HIV testing rate among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China remains consistently low. Crowdsourcing, the process of shifting individual tasks to a group, has been increasingly adopted to enhance public health programs and may be a useful tool for spurring innovation in HIV testing campaigns. We designed a multi-site study to develop a crowdsourced HIV test promotion campaign and evaluate its effectiveness against conventional campaigns among MSM in China.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.012
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of Self-medication with Antibiotics among Adults in Kosovo

    • Authors: Z. Shabani; K. Redican
      Pages: 7 - 8
      Abstract: The practice of using antibiotics without a prescription and antibiotic resistance are related public health problems in developing Eastern European countries. Self-medication with antibiotics is also an important factor driving antibiotic resistance. The aim of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of purchase of antibiotics without prescription and evaluate the knowledge regarding antibiotics among Kosovo adults.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.015
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Serum Folate Concentrations, Asthma, Atopy, and Asthma Control in Peruvian
           Children and Adolescents

    • Authors: A. Nicholson; S. Pollard, J. Lima, K. Romero, C. Tarazona-Meza, G. Malpartida-Guzmán, E. Mougey, N. Hansel, W. Checkley
      First page: 7
      Abstract: Asthma has become increasingly prevalent in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Folate may increase asthma risk through epigenetic mechanisms. Recent research has examined the relationship between folate status and asthma-related outcomes; however, this relationship has not been examined in LMIC settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.014
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Dietary Exposure of Pregnant Women in Suriname to Pesticides in Produce

    • Authors: F.Z. Abdoel Wahid; J. Wickliffe, M. Wilson, W.B. Hawkins, A.M. van Sauers, M.Y. Lichtveld
      First page: 8
      Abstract: National pesticide policies in Suriname are lacking and minimally enforced. In 2015, 1.8 million kg. of pesticides were imported. Data from the Netherlands on imported Surinamese produce (2010-2015) showed some samples exceeded maximum residue limits (MRLs) of the European Union (EU). Pesticide exposure has been associated with neurological- and neurobehavioral disorders. Pregnant women and children are especially vulnerable. The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health will assess exposure to select pesticides in 1000 mother/child dyads.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.017
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Impact of Integrating FOMENT within a Community-Based Gestational Diabetes
           Mellitus Health Program in Bangladesh

    • Authors: M. Parvin; S. Sharaf, M. Haider, M. Parvin
      First page: 8
      Abstract: Background: Evidence shows that community based GDM (Gestational diabetes mellitus) programs are effective in reducing morbidity in low resource settings. Diabetes mellitus, particularly type 2 diabetes, is now recognized as a major chronic public health problem in Bangladesh. Low socio-economic conditions, lack of knowledge related to nutrition and proper pregnancy planning and care are the possible barriers to effective pregnancy outcomes for women with diabetes. We describe an innovative intervention strategy for Bangladesh, and demonstrate how promotion of knowledge about GDM can be effectively integrated into a community based GDM program.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.016
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices of Exclusive Breastfeeding at
           Dhulikhel Hospital, Nepal

    • Authors: B.D. Ghaffari; A. Strauss, K. Blaisdell, C. Ruple, G. Fauchet, J.W. Bellows
      Pages: 9 - 10
      Abstract: Forty-one percent of children under five are stunted in Nepal, where infant mortality remains high. As one approach to addressing worldwide malnutrition, stunting and infant mortality, the WHO has promoted the practice of Exclusive Breastfeeding (EBF). The WHO defines EBF as giving infants only breastmilk for the first six months of life. Previous studies have shown that breastfeeding is prevalent in Nepal, however EBF rates are variable due to complimentary feeding practices. Investigations of breastfeeding practices have not been performed previously in Dhulikhel and the surrounding Kavre district.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.020
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Distributed Thermistor for Continuous Temperature Monitoring of
           Malnourished Infants at Risk for Hypothermia

    • Authors: M. David; A.A. Muelenaer, P. Muelenaer, J. Bird, S. Vespa, A. Yarrabothula, L. Cashman
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Severe acute malnutrition affects around 19 million children under 5 years worldwide, and kills 400,000 of them each year, according to the WHO. Hypothermia and hyperthermia, two clinical effects of malnutrition, often lead to death in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where understaffed hospitals are unable to continuously and simultaneously monitor the temperature of malnourished infants. A low-cost device that can collect temperature data of patients and wirelessly transmit this data to a single source for nurses would significantly alleviate the strain on human resources and decrease infant morbidity/mortality.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.019
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Fumonisin Exposure in Guatemalan Women of Child-Bearing Age: A Potential
           Link to the Observed High Incidence of Frontoethmoidal Encephalocele

    • Authors: A.-L. Marshall; D.J. Venuti, D.J. Eastman
      First page: 9
      Abstract: Frontoethmoidal encephalomeningocele (FEEM) is a neural tube defect (NTD) characterized by a persistent foramen cecum and herniation of cranial contents through an anterior skull defect. The mycotoxin fumonisin, a contaminant of maize, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of FEEM as it disrupts sphingolipid metabolism and decreases folate bioavailability. Studies have demonstrated that exposure to fumonisin in experimental animals induces FEEM.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.018
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Predictors of Long Acting Reversible Contraception Use among Women in the
           Extended Postpartum Period in Rural Uganda

    • Authors: R. Anguzu; H. Sempeera, J. Sekandi
      Pages: 10 - 11
      Abstract: Post-partum or post-abortion use of the most effective contraception is low in Uganda especially in rural settings. This study aimed at determining the predictors of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) use among women in extended postpartum periods in rural Uganda.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.022
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Healthcare-Seeking Behaviors of Females Presenting to St Paul’s Hospital
           Millennium Medical College & its Associated Community Clinics, Addis
           Ababa, Ethiopia

    • Authors: D.Y. Wang; M. Cadena, R. Mullings, B. Nigatu, J. Bell
      First page: 10
      Abstract: The infrastructure of a healthcare system is a significant determining factor of the healthcare-seeking behaviors of a community. Healthcare-seeking behaviors have a strong influence on the health outcomes of a population. There are few studies on such behaviors among females in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.021
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Post-Conflict Colombia Public Health Project: A Global Health
           Diplomacy Case Study

    • Authors: C. Arbelaez; P. Soskin, G. Greenough, M. vanrooyen, J. Snyder, T. Trombetta, J. Gomez, M. Garces, C.E. Vallejo, N.D. Bustamante, A. Patino, A. Barrett, R. Coelho
      First page: 12
      Abstract: After 50 years of conflict, Colombia has seven million IDPs, second only to Syria. Medellín, once the most violent, was transformed into one of the most innovative cities through “social urbanism” initiatives addressing poverty, violence, and equality. These progressive policies serve as a reintegration model for the world. Granizal, located in the outskirts of Medellin, is home to the second highest IDP community in Colombia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.025
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Foundation of a Maternity and Children’s Healthcare Center For
           Displaced Syrians

    • Authors: R. Aburas; T. Mackey, A. Najeeb, L. Ba Ageel
      First page: 12
      Abstract: The United Nations has declared the Syrian crisis the worst humanitarian crisis of the 21st century. More than 50% of Syria’s population is currently displaced. As a consequence of the violence, the infrastructure has collapsed, especially affecting healthcare facilitates. Many hospitals and the pharmaceutical industry has been severely damaged, leaving children without vital vaccines, and everyone without necessary medication. The healthcare for displaced Syrians and refugees is getting worse as the conflict continues.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.024
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Bidirectional Exchange of Health Professionals’ Students; Ensuring
           Equity between Partners

    • Authors: S.N. Byekwaso
      Pages: 13 - 14
      Abstract: Partnership in health professionals’ education have been put at the forefront of improving the quality and quantity of human resource for health. Medical schools are increasing, offering international elective opportunities for their students to enable them understand the concept of global health. This is by experiencing a medical system and culture different from their own. Currently, almost all medical schools have some avenues for medical students to pursue global health interests or activities.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.028
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Attacks on Hospitals and Healthcare Workers in Syria: A Cry for
           International Health Neutrality

    • Authors: F. Burkle; T.B. Erickson, M. vanrooyen, A. Redmond, S. Kayden, J. Von Schreeb
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Given the current humanitarian crisis in Syria where unprotected civilian patients, healthcare workers, and hospitals are under attack, we sought to quantify the number of healthcare worker fatalities and hospital attacks since the inception of the war in Syria, and examine existing humanitarian laws describing the right to international health neutrality. For many decades, the authors have provided global healthcare professionals with education and training in sudden onset disasters, complex humanitarian emergencies, and conflicts worldwide.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.027
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Health Service Delivery and State Legitimacy in Nepal’s Madhesh: A Study
           of Health Governance and Identity-Based Conflict in a Fragile State

    • Authors: S. Bhandari
      First page: 13
      Abstract: Improving the delivery of state services is fundamental to achieving state legitimacy in fragile and post-conflict states. This research investigated how Madhesis, an oppressed ethnic minority in Nepal experience state health care services, which is delivered largely by the ethnic majority, Pahadis. The study analyzed the relationship between the recipients’ perceptions about these services and their views on the state’s legitimacy within the health service domain.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.026
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Connecting Global Health & International Education: Best Practices,
           Enabling Systems, Health, Safety, & Pedagogy

    • Authors: J. Evert; H. MacCleoud, C. Colburn
      Pages: 14 - 15
      Abstract: International Education is a field of academic practice and expertise that has been maturing for many decades. Multiple health, safety, security best practices that are applicable for global health experiential learning domestically and internationally originate within the field of international education. In addition, well-developed pedagogies, such as service-learning, reflection, civic learning, and more have roots in the international education field. The aim of this session is to bring the pedagogies, policies, practices, and resources that have roots in international education to the visibility of the global health education community of practice.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.030
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Soil Transmitted Helminth Infection and Facors Affecting Preventive
           Chemotherapy for School-Age Children in Capiz and Iloilo Provinces
           Post-Typhoon Haiyan

    • Authors: E. Chernoff; G. Silverstein, P. Veldkamp, J. Chang, V. Belizario, J.P.C. Delos Trinos
      First page: 14
      Abstract: In the Philippines, Soil-transmitted helminths (STH) are controlled through mass drug administration (MDA) of preventive chemotherapy to school-age children (SAC). In 2013, the Philippines was devastated by the strongest cyclone ever recorded, Typhoon Haiyan. This study focused on three crucial issues regarding 1) the post-typhoon state of the MDA program in Capiz and Iloilo (Region VI), 2) change in post-typhoon STH infection and MDA program coverage of SAC in Region VI, and 3) MDA program factors that should be targeted to lead to program evaluation and improvement.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.029
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Arsenic in Drinking Water: Policy Implications in Mexico

    • Authors: A.T. Fisher; L. Lopez-Carrillo, B. Gamboa-Loira, M.E. Cebrián
      Pages: 15 - 16
      Abstract: Global concern around arsenic in drinking water and its linkage to disease make translation of evidence-based research into national policy a priority. The Mexican standard for arsenic concentration in drinking water is 25 μg/L, which remains “two-and-a-half” times higher than that of the World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation. Arsenic is a naturally occurring element widely distributed in the earth’s crust that contaminates drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water has come to be synonymous as carcinogenic to humans and a risk factor for other chronic and acute illness.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.032
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Economic Spillovers from Public Medical Countermeasure Investments: A Case
           Study of NexoBrid®

    • Authors: F. Farahati; S. Nystrom, D. Howell, R. Jaffe
      First page: 15
      Abstract: The US Department of Health and Human Services’ Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) awarded a $24 million contract to MediWound Ltd. for the development of NexoBrid® to enhance US preparedness for an improvised nuclear device incident. NexoBrid® is a burn debridement product reducing the need for surgical excision of dead tissue.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.031
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Barriers to Care and Support for Persons with Physical Disabilities in
           Moshi Rural and Moshi Urban, Tanzania

    • Authors: C. Joel; J. DiPietro, A. Fungo, V. Rodriguez
      First page: 16
      Abstract: Physical disability is a global health problem. Across the world, about 15% of people are currently living with disability, and the prevalence is on the rise due to ageing population and higher incidence of chronic disease and the majority of these individuals with disability reside in low-income countries, where access to proper infrastructure and quality services can be difficult. This study explore the policy issues concerning barriers to care and support for persons with physical disabilities in Moshi rural and Moshi municipal, Tanzania.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.034
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Understanding the Experiences of Street Working Children in Karachi Using
           Photovoice

    • Authors: M. Iqbal; R. Naqvi, S. Mohammed, M.A. Bilgrami
      First page: 16
      Abstract: Pakistan’s population of street children is estimated to be around 70,000, and 12,000 of these work on the streets of Karachi. Working as beggars, window cleaners, mechanics or trash pickers, these children are treated as adults by society, with little regard for their age. We are using Photovoice to document and understand the experiences of street children, in order to advocate for a supportive environment for them.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.033
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Community Participation in Health: Factors Associated with Active Health
           Facility Committees in Nagaland, India

    • Authors: A. Kaplan; K. Rao, A. Bhatnagar, N. Changkija, P. Mullen
      First page: 17
      Abstract: Community participation in health service delivery is a way to improve the accountability of providers, responsiveness of health services and quality of care. While community participation in health can take many forms, a common approach is to establish health committees where community members take an active role in health service provision. Existing reviews in low and middle-income country settings have concluded that factors associated with the health committee, the community they serve and the health facility they manage contribute to effective health committee performance.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.036
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Produce and Protect? Extractive Industry Tensions in a Sustainable
           Development Agenda

    • Authors: L.A. Johnston; J. Jones, C. Davison, O. Lkhagvasuren, C. Janes
      First page: 17
      Abstract: In order to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals the United Nations finds that three elements, economic growth, social inclusion and environmental protection, must be brought into coherence. Finding harmony in outcome among the UN’s 17 stated goals offers a great challenge – considering just three: reduced inequality, direct efforts to ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns, and to protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, offer a significant test in and of itself.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.035
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality in Neurosurgery Patients at Mbarara
           Regional Referral Hospital, Mbarara, Uganda

    • Authors: J. Abdelgadir; E. Smith, M. Punchak, J. Vissoci, C. Staton, L. Park, A. Muhindo, D. Kitya, M. Haglund
      Pages: 18 - 19
      Abstract: The unmet surgical need, specifically neurosurgical need, in Uganda is significant, yet only two public hospitals currently perform neurosurgery in the country. This study examines the epidemiology and outcomes of neurosurgical conditions presenting to one of 12 regional referral hospitals in Uganda, in an effort to understand the neurosurgical needs of this population.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.040
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Effects of Traditional Gender Roles and Perceptions on the
           Post-Graduation Choices of Female Medical Students in Khartoum University,
           Sudan

    • Authors: S.M.H. Abdalla; Z. Swar Aldahab
      First page: 18
      Abstract: Traditional Gender roles and the perceptions of what is expected of women in society, heavily influence women’s career choices in Sudan. Female medical students constitute more than two third of the student population at the University of Khartoum and other universities in Sudan. However, the number of working female doctors is less than half of the workforce. Moreover, more female doctors specialize in the fields of Paediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynaecology in comparison to Surgery. The disproportion between the student population and working doctors as well as the aggregation in one or two specialities constitute an additional burden to an already weak healthcare system.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.039
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Teach Back Method: Improving Healthcare Provider Counseling of Pediatric
           Patients with TB and their Caregivers in Chongqing, China

    • Authors: K. Abarcar; E.A. Talbot, L.V. Adams
      First page: 18
      Abstract: The world's medical community is launching a dramatically accelerated fight against tuberculosis (TB) and those most affected by it: the poorest, most vulnerable, socially marginalized, and inequitably served. From among these vulnerable groups are children. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to provide technical assistance to a large pediatric hospital in Chongqing, China to improve the way they counsel their patients with TB and their caregivers.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.038
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Social Media and disease surveillance in Nigeria – the Role of
           WhatsApp

    • Authors: T.I. Adesina; M. Niyang, D.B. Gobir, D.A. Nwandu
      Pages: 19 - 20
      Abstract: Disease surveillance requires multiple avenues for data collection, information dissemination and connecting people to experts (Forster, 2012). Nigeria currently maintains a paper based surveillance system with vertically transmitted facility-based reports (FMOH, 2005). There are limited ways for the public to learn about trending disease outbreaks and the information is not readily available. University of Maryland Baltimore, Nigerian program implemented a CDC funded Strengthening Emergency Response Systems (SERS) project aimed at strengthening existing reporting surveillance systems.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.042
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Emergently Accessing a Higher Level of Care: Referral System Strengthening
           Efforts to Improve Maternal and Child Health in Cambodia

    • Authors: P.C. Acker; T. Sovanna, M. Strehlow
      First page: 19
      Abstract: Despite advances in BEmONC and CEmONC services in Cambodia, referral of women and children suffering from emergencies is often significantly delayed due to systemic barriers. These shortfalls disproportionately impact poor and rural patients.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.041
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lean Development of Modern Medical Educators: A Cost-Effective and
           Practical Approach to Teacher and Curriculum Development for Global
           Partnerships

    • Authors: D.M. Elnicki; J. Mahoney, A.L. Arita, S. Khan, C. Lance-Jones, M. McDonald, A. Thompson
      Pages: 20 - 21
      Abstract: In developing countries, there is a need for implementation of top-quality medical education programs. Existing medical teachers in these locales have clinical expertise, but may not be prepared to deliver modern high-quality medical curricula. This project aimed to streamline mentoring development of medical teachers in a limited resource environment, to prepare them to develop and deliver an up-to-date curriculum using contemporary instructional methods that emphasize active learning and problem solving (deemphasizing lectures and memorization).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.044
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cultivating the Next Generation of Health Care Providers in Sub-Saharan
           Africa: The Global Health Service Partnership – Update 2016

    • Authors: J. Anathan; E. Cunningham, L. Foradori, E. Stuart-Shor, S. Sayeed, V. Kerry
      First page: 20
      Abstract: Resource-constrained countries face the double burden of high morbidity/mortality and limited human resources for health (HRH). The critical shortage of HRH in 83 countries negatively impacts the provision of care and continued education of health professionals. To mitigate this urgent problem the Global Health Service Partnership (GHSP; Seed/Peace Corps/PEPFAR) places US nurse and physician educators at partner institutions in Malawi, Tanzania and Uganda. GHSP educators work in collaboration with country faculty to support educational capacity building and long-term health systems’ strengthening.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.043
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Trainee-Focused Approach to Program Monitoring in a Novel
           Multidisciplinary Global Health Fellowship and Global Health Delivery
           Model

    • Authors: A. Aurrecoechea; R. Tittle, P.V. Le
      Pages: 21 - 22
      Abstract: The Health, Equity, Action & Leadership (HEAL) Initiative is a fellowship developed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) that offers a multidisciplinary global health curriculum as well as on the ground experience providing care for the underserved domestically and internationally. Global health providers-in-training that serve to augment existing clinical staff at sites already aiming to promote health equity. Monitoring and evaluation is increasingly an important component of programs designed for global health delivery.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.046
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Outcome Evaluation of the Edmundo Granda Ugalde Leaders in International
           Health Program (LIHP) of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) from
           2008 to 2012

    • Authors: A. Auer; Y. Ortiz, L. Alvarez, A.G. Mejicano, E. Moran
      First page: 21
      Abstract: Given complex challenges faced by health leaders in a globalized world, the Leaders in International Health Program Edmundo Granda Ugalde (LIHP) of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) strives to strengthen country capacity in the Americas to understand, act upon and positively influence the international determinants of health, promote national interests, and achieve international, intersectoral agreements, guided by the principle of global health equity. The Program targets mid-high level professionals from public health, international relations and related fields.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.045
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Collaborative Nursing Leadership Field Course in Malawi

    • Authors: K. Baltzell; S. Rankin, J. Jere, S. Davis, E. Schell, M. Perera
      Pages: 22 - 23
      Abstract: A two week field-based short course for nurse leaders from the US and Malawi to enhance skills in resource limited settings with a high disease burden. Participants are experienced nurses with management responsibilities who desire further training in leadership. Objectives are: 1) To create a community of nurses focused on equity in work and patient relationships; 2) To build leadership skills that improve nursing care quality in under-resourced settings in the US and Malawi; 3) To develop methods that promote inter-professionalism, especially with physicians; and, 4) To construct innovative teaching methods including case studies and simulation.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.048
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Initial Outcomes for Program Monitoring of a Novel Multidisciplinary
           Global Health Fellowship and Global Health Delivery Model

    • Authors: A. Aurrecoechea; R. Tittle, P.V. Le
      First page: 22
      Abstract: The HEAL Initiative is a two-year fellowship model that combines a multidisciplinary global health fellowship education with on-the-ground experience working with health organizations to promote health equity at sites across the globe. Rotating fellows work at one domestic site and one international site each year while site fellows remain at their site for the duration of the two-year fellowship. Fellows work as clinicians and public health practitioners. Monitoring the program activities for each cohort is an important programmatic component.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.047
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Creating a New OSCE Program at One Medical School in Turkey

    • Authors: N. Bertelsen; S. Zabar, H. Lee, M. Demirhan
      Pages: 23 - 24
      Abstract: Teaching medicine in English in non-English-speaking countries is increasingly common. IMGs receive less communication skills training and tend to perform less well on communication skills assessments. This project’s purpose was to create the first Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) program in English with standardized patients at one medical school in Turkey.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.050
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Stronger Training Programs for Better Transitions and Improved Retention:
           The Experience of a Bridging Program to Facilitate the Transition from
           Medical School to Internship Training in Botswana

    • Authors: M.J. Peluso; C. Haverkamp, N. Tapela, R. Maoto, A. Bedada, S. Mantzor, R. Luckett, P. Saleeb, M. Haverkamp, M. Mosepele, D. Prozesky, O. Nkomazana, T. Barak
      First page: 23
      Abstract: A focus on improving existing training programs in Botswana is seen as key to addressing the challenge of retaining medical doctors and preventing the attrition of medical graduates trained at considerable cost both in-country and abroad. Establishment of the national Medical Internship Training Programme (MIT) in 2014 represented a first step; here we review the addition of a dedicated bridging program for foreign and locally trained medical graduates in August 2016. The program aimed to facilitate medical graduates' return and transition into internship training in the context of considerable baseline variability in knowledge, experience, clinical skills, and familiarity with Botswana’s healthcare system.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.049
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effectiveness of Using Community Mental Health Workers in a Community
           Mental Health Programme of a Rural Health Center in a Lower Middle Income
           Country

    • Authors: R.G. Bhooma Goud; G. Jayaram, J. Pradeep
      Pages: 24 - 25
      Abstract: This paper highlights the experiences of a rural community based mental health programme (Maanasi Project) in providing essential mental health services to rural populations through community based health workers (CBHWs). The role of CBHWs in rendering psychiatric care is the bedrock for stymying a plethora of myths, misconceptions and stigma associated with metal illnesses. In this study we assessed their effectiveness in providing primary mental health services in a rural area.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.052
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effect of Ethiopia's Health Development Army on maternal and newborn
           health care practices: A multi-level cross-sectional analysis

    • Authors: W. Betemariam; Z. Damtew, C. Tesfaye, N. Fesseha, A.M. Karim
      First page: 24
      Abstract: Addressing the shortfall in human resources for health, Ethiopia launched the community health extension program (HEP) in 2004 by establishing a health post and deploying two female health extension workers (HEWs) in every kebele (i.e., community) of the country to ensure universal access to primary health care. In October 2010 the HEP incorporated the health development army (HDA) strategy. The strategy was adopted based on the experience that using a network of the community health volunteers increased the efficiency of the HEWs in reaching households with actionable health messages.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.051
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Training and Recruitment Strategies for Developing Sustainable, Global,
           Research Workforces in Low-Resource Settings: Perspectives From The
           International Family Study

    • Authors: F. Brindopke; S. Ly, A. Auslander, P. Sanchez-Lara, K. Magee, W. Magee
      Pages: 25 - 26
      Abstract: As our world has undergone globalization, individuals, institutions, and organizations now have the ability to launch campaigns, research projects, and interventions throughout the world. Thus while this has presented tremendous opportunities in global health, it also raises challenges of how workforces will be recruited to achieve these goals. With our global research collaboration, The International Family Study, we have been able to recruit and train global teams to carry out essential research functions and achieve continual project growth.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.054
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Challenges Faced by a Pre-vocational and Vocational Training Center for
           Adults with Autism-Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and Intellectual Disabilities
           (ID) in a Town in Northern India

    • Authors: N. Bhullar; N. Bhullar
      First page: 25
      Abstract: There is limited knowledge about adults with ASD in India and even less is known about their pre-vocational and vocational rehabilitation with a few exceptions (e.g. Daley, Weisner, & Singhal, 2014). This study examines the challenges faced in a center set up in one medium-sized town in North India with the aim of providing rehabilitation to this population during the course of three years.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.053
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Comprehension of Surgical Informed Consent in Haiti

    • Authors: J. Broecker; C. Sutton, L. Demma, G. Lynde
      Pages: 26 - 27
      Abstract: Informed consent has long been considered an essential requirement of surgical care in the United States; however, US studies have demonstrated that patient comprehension of informed consent is poor. Little is known about the use of informed consent on international surgical trips.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.056
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Long-term Patient Follow-up for Short-term Surgical Trips Is Possible

    • Authors: J. Broecker; J. Rappaport, C. Poorman, W. Liu, M. Lagina, L. Philipp, J. Srinivasan, J. Sharma
      First page: 26
      Abstract: Achieving adequate follow-up for surgical patients is challenging in resource-poor environments, especially for short-term surgical trips. The aim of this study was to evaluate the extent of follow-up using mobile phones to reach patients post-operatively and to evaluate post-surgical quality of life.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.055
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Health Practice Competencies: Building Health Professionals'
           Capacity to Work in Global Health Contexts

    • Authors: J. Carpenter; L. Chan, N. Thevathasan, M. De Sousa, D. Stys, L. McDiarmid
      Pages: 27 - 28
      Abstract: Building health professionals’ capacity to work in global health contexts is important to ensure future progress on global health challenges. Health professional students, particularly medical students, interested in global health often feel that course offerings are inadequate. Thus, exposure to global health through experiential learning, such as observerships and electives, provide students with immersive opportunities to develop skills required for global health practice. This study prospectively examines what health professionals need to know to work in globalized communities, and how global health electives and observerships impact medical students’ personal and professional development.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.059
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Teaching Advocacy to Health Professional Students: Advancing Global and
           

    • Authors: J. Carpenter; L. Chan, N. Thevathasan, M. De Sousa, T. Suart, L. McDiarmid
      First page: 27
      Abstract: Training local health professional students on advocacy, partnership building, international development, and the social determinants of health, will advance progress on population health locally and abroad. Physicians, in particular, can play a major role in promoting health and health equity; therefore, fostering medical students’ interest in population and global health is necessary for success. The Office of Global Health at Queen’s University has launched a Certificate in Global Health program to provide medical students with training on health advocacy and how to work ethically in global and public health contexts.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.058
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Perceived Reciprocal Value of Health Professionals’ Participation in
           Global Health-related Work

    • Authors: S.E. Carbone; J. Wigle, N. Akseer, R. Barac, M. Barwick, S. Zlotkin
      First page: 27
      Abstract: Leading children’s hospitals in high-income settings have become heavily engaged in international child health research and educational activities. Research to date on global health collaborations has typically focused on documenting improvements in the health outcomes of the developing countries. More recent discourse has characterized these collaborations with the notion of “reciprocal value”, namely, that the benefits go beyond strengthening the local health systems, and, instead, that both partners have something to learn and gain from the relationship.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.057
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Qualitative Evaluation of the Impact of a Rural Short-Term Service
           Learning Elective on Medical Students

    • Authors: B. Chang; E. Karin, J. Ripp, R. Soriano
      Pages: 28 - 29
      Abstract: The number of global health opportunities offered by US and Canadian medical schools has nearly tripled over the past 20 years, and nearly one-third of medical school graduates have participated in at least one global health service learning trip. There have been numerous studies elucidating the impact of global health service learning trips that are of longer duration (i.e. > 1-week) but not for shorter ones (i.e.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.061
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Feasibility of Standardizing Prehospital Communication in Cuenca, Ecuador

    • Authors: J. Carter; M. Hopkins, E. Trieu, E. Morocho, C. Mosquera, J.L. Prieto, F. Siguencia, N. Naik, M. Rains, D.A. Martinez, J.C. Salamea Molina, D.S. Jayaraman
      First page: 28
      Abstract: Prehospital to hospital communication in Cuenca, Ecuador has been shown to be limited and inefficient, with minimal communication of critical variables such as vital signs. We aimed to design and conduct a course based on a standard checklist used in high-income country settings to improve prehospital to hospital communication for injured patients in Cuenca.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.060
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Did an Innovative Approach to Technical Assistance by Nurse Mentors
           improve PMTCT Standard of Practice among Community Health Extension
           Workers at Primary Health Care Centres in Ebonyi Nigeria?

    • Authors: A.F. Chizoba; C. Nwadike, E. Ezeobi, N. Kehinde, E.E. Ezeanolue, A.E. Nwandu
      Pages: 29 - 30
      Abstract: Globally, Nigeria accounts for 30% of childhood HIV infections. Mother-to-child transmission remains the major route of acquisition of new infections among children. Decentralization and task shifting to primary health centres (PHCs) and community health extension workers (CHEWs) has been used to scale effort aimed at prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT). To be effective, the capacity of CHEWs to provide standard of practice in PMTCT needs to be enhanced. We engaged and trained Nurses as Nurse Mentors to provide PMTCT technical assistance to CHEWs at PHCs and evaluated the effectiveness of this intervention on PMTCT standard of practice.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.063
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Right Diagnosis: The Role of Pathology in Health System Strengthening

    • Authors: K. Fleming; W. Cherniak, J. Flanigan, S. Horton, S. Sayed, R. Sullivan, M. Wilson
      First page: 29
      Abstract: The drive to Universal Health Care coverage, and the need for strengthening health systems, has led to the examination of the role of core elements of the system such as surgery and radiology. Until recently, pathology (which, along with radiology, is key to correct diagnosis and treatment), has been relatively neglected within the global health framework.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.062
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Should Large Urban Centres Decide How Best to Use Health Care Services:
           Exploring Alternative Approaches to Estimating Inpatient Hospital Use
           Based on Need in Canada

    • Authors: S.K. Clarke; Y. Asada, G. Kephart
      Pages: 30 - 31
      Abstract: Needs-based approaches for assessing key healthcare policy issues must define how need should be measured and a standard level of healthcare resource use given need should be estimated. Different population choices can be used to establish this standard, though the implications of this choice on estimates historically has been ignored.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.065
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Epidemiology of Poisoning Patients Presenting to the Emergency Center of
           Princess Marina Hospital in Gaborone, Botswana

    • Authors: P.-H. Yeh; E. Cioe-Pena, A. Rodriguez, M. Cox
      First page: 30
      Abstract: The burden of disease secondary to toxicologic insults in Africa is difficult to assess. No reliable epidemiological data exists due to poor documentation, scarce resources for reporting, and diagnostic challenges. Only 10 of 58 countries African countries have Poison Control Centers to direct care and compile epidemiologic data. Botswana currently does not have a poison control center. In fact, there is only one clinically trained toxicologist serving the entire country of over 2 million. Official estimates of toxicologic cases for Botswana are often extrapolated from other surrounding countries such as South Africa.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.064
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Pediatric Hospital Admissions and Surgical Procedures in Three Ugandan
           Hospitals

    • Authors: T. Concepcion; D. Ssekiwunga, J.N. Najjuma, C. Muhumuza, M. Haglund, E. Smith
      First page: 31
      Abstract: An estimated 85% of children in Africa having a surgically-treatable condition by the age of 15. Although children represent a vulnerable population in need of surgical services, the contribution of pediatric surgical conditions to the healthcare systems in resource-poor settings is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to describe the epidemiology of hospital admissions and surgical procedures at three hospitals in Uganda between January 2012 and December 2012.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.067
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Simulation Training in a Limited Resource Setting: Teaching Medical
           Residents in Brazil about Rapid Response Teams

    • Authors: K. Coffman; D. Rudym, I. Saraiva
      First page: 31
      Abstract: Our goal was to create a simulation-based curriculum on rapid response scenarios, teaching team dynamics, leadership, and communication to the internal medicine residents in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. In conjunction with a partner hospitalist in Belo Horizonte, two New York City internal medicine residents designed this educational study to evaluate the effectiveness of simulation curriculum in teaching team-building skills.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.066
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Master of Science in Global Health Students: Who Are They and What Jobs Do
           They Want?

    • Authors: A. Doobay-Persaud; S. Galvin, N. Sheneman, R. murphy
      Pages: 32 - 33
      Abstract: The Master of Science in Global Health (MSGH) at Northwestern University’s School of Professional Studies is a new interprofessional competency-based degree program focusing on preparing students for a career in global health. Building on data presented at the 2016 CUGH annual meeting, the purpose of our current research is to further understand the market characteristics for this degree, provide additional student backgrounds to inform continuous improvements to the MSGH coursework and program design, and to describe the desired student characteristics for admission into graduate degree programs in global health.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.070
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cost of Road Traffic Crashes in a Developing Country, Sri Lanka

    • Authors: P.G. Amarasinghe; S.D. Dharmaratne, S. Bandara, N. Amarasinghe
      First page: 32
      Abstract: Road Traffic Crashes (RTCs) kill an estimated 1.24 million and injure another 20-50 million people each year, globally. Sri Lanka is facing the growing burden of RTCs due to exponential growth in motorization. Published data on the cost of RTCs is scares for Sri Lanka. Therefore we conducted this study to estimate the cost of RTCs recorded at police stations in the Kurunegala Police Division (KPD) in Sri Lanka.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.069
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Delivering High-Impact, Evidence-based Interventions to Save the Lives of
           Women and Babies in Insingiro District

    • Authors: J. Nabukeera; E. Katarikawe, G.A. Conecker
      First page: 32
      Abstract: Jhpiego and GE Foundation worked in the Isingiro district of Uganda to save the lives of women, children and their families by strengthening the capacity of health providers to deliver high quality maternal and newborn health care. Uganda’s maternal mortality rate continues to remain higher than other developing countries at 438 deaths per 100,000 live births (UDHS 2011). The project sought to improve the maternal health services provided in public facilities and overcome challenges such as lack of basic supplies, equipment and skills needed to properly manage emergency obstetric cases.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.068
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Health Worker Text-messaging for Training, Peer Support, and Mentoring in
           Pediatric and Adolescent HIV/AIDS Care: Lessons Learned in Zimbabwe

    • Authors: V. Bertman; F. Petracca, B. Makunike, A. Jonga, B. Dupwa, S. Gwashure, N. Jenami, A. Nartker, L. Wall, D.A. Downer
      Pages: 33 - 34
      Abstract: Global 90-90-90 targets necessitate strengthening HIV related counseling services among children, adolescents and their families. Innovative, cost-effective approaches are needed, as Zimbabwe’s resources for training and mentoring are limited. Blended learning incorporates electronic media and discussion groups using the mobile phone text messaging application, WhatsApp. This study assessed the use of the text-messaging component of the program, to build skills, knowledge and confidence of primary counsellors to care for children and adolescents with HIV.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.072
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Development of a Global Health Milestones Tool for Emergency Medicine
           Trainees: A Pilot Project

    • Authors: K.A. Douglass; G. Jacquet, A. Hayward, B. Dreifuss, J. Tupesis
      First page: 33
      Abstract: In Graduate Medical Education, increasing numbers of both institutions and learners are participating in global health experiences. Within the context of outcomes-based, competency linked education and assessment methodologies, a standardized assessment tool may prove valuable to all stakeholders. Milestones are now used as the standard for trainee assessment across many specialties in Graduate Medical Education, thus, the development of a similar tool for Global Health was undertaken with learners in Emergency Medicine in mind.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.071
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Exploring the Implementation of Clubfoot Treatment Services in Malawi
           Using Extended Normalization Process Theory: An Ethnographic Study

    • Authors: S. Drew; P. Chidothie, C. Lavy, R. Gooberman-Hill
      First page: 34
      Abstract: Annually in Malawi around 800 children are born with clubfoot, where one or both feet are twisted inwards. If untreated, this limits participation in everyday life. Clubfoot may be treated using staged manipulation. This method has been adopted as the national standard and is delivered in 29 regional clinics. Implementing these services is challenging. Extended Normalization Process Theory (eNPT) specifies four constructs that may impact on service implementation: capacity, potential, capability and contribution.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.074
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Novel Paradigm for Short-Term Medical Teams

    • Authors: S. Draugelis
      First page: 34
      Abstract: Short-term medical aid trips have been criticized in be past for their inability to provided follow-up care, for their inability to address root causes of disease, and because they may detract from local economies. However, these types of trips are growing in popularity. Mobile electronic medical records systems have enabled these teams to collect patient-level data, even in areas with limited access to the Internet and electricity. By sharing this data with local healthcare providers, we can begin to improve the continuity of care provided to those who may rely on foreign aid as their primary mode of healthcare.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.073
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Addressing Mental Health Needs of Remote Staff: Developing Strategies to
           Provide Ongoing Support for Long-Term Employees Based in Resource-Limited
           Areas

    • Authors: P. English; T. Barton, M. Mizwa, D. Nguyen, A. Gibson, G. Schutze, M. Kline
      Pages: 35 - 36
      Abstract: A pediatric HIV-focused non-profit (Pedi-HIV) sent its first cohort of US-trained physicians to provide HIV/AIDS care and treatment in clinics throughout sub-Saharan Africa in 2005. A study conducted by BIPAI five years after program implementation found that 11% of physicians reported feelings of depression during and after their placements. Contributing factors to these feelings have been identified as dealing with large-scale death encountered in resource-limited areas (RLAs), long work hours in countries with a lack of trained, local medical professionals, and adapting to a new culture in both work and social settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.077
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • New Roads and Orthopedic Trauma in Rural Haiti

    • Authors: D.L. Eisenson; N. Thomas, M. Boyajian, A. Bowder, L. Ward, G. Dyer, S. Sullivan
      First page: 35
      Abstract: Road traffic injuries (RTIs) have been labeled the “hidden epidemic” in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) where road safety, injury prevention programs, and investments in trauma centers have failed to keep up with increasing vehicle ownership and transit infrastructure development. Haiti has recently constructed a major transport corridor, RN#3, linking two of the island’s largest cities, Port-au-Prince and Cap Haitien. The goal of this study was to evaluate the rise and response to RTIs by Haitian trauma centers.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.076
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Colorectal Cancer Screening in Greenland - An Economic Model

    • Authors: A.J. Dunkle; M. Blackwell, R. Jaros, S. kohn, A. Stucke, F. volkov, A. Wang, B. Niclasen
      First page: 35
      Abstract: Colorectal Cancer (CRC) is one of the top three causes of cancer death worldwide. Despite its wide effects, it is an entirely preventable cancer with effective screening measures. One population that is disproportionately affected is Alaska Natives (ANs). Since 2001, Alaska has implemented a successful screening program to increase CRC screening (CRCS) among its AN population. Greenland is a nation with similar environmental, cultural, and demographic characteristics to Alaska, and its population is also at high risk of CRC.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.075
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Barriers and Facilitators of Data Quality and Use in Malawi’s Health
           Information System

    • Authors: K. Finnegan; M. Marx, E. Kaludzu, B. Malunga, R. O'Hagan, S. Yosefe, I. Dambula
      Pages: 36 - 37
      Abstract: The Malawi Ministry of Health’s health information system (HIS) documents utilization of the health system, resource availability, and disease burden. Data are reported by MOH facilities to the central level monthly and stored in the HIS for reporting and program planning purposes. However, very few program planners use these data. We used qualitative methods to understand key barriers to use and perceptions of the quality of HIS data.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.079
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Quality Assessment of PMTCT Data Documentation among User and Non-User
           Data Clerks in a Nigerian PMTCT Program

    • Authors: C. Fan-Osuala; O. Adeyemi, C. Isah, N. Sam-Agudu
      First page: 36
      Abstract: High-quality routine data is needed to track progress and identify gaps in national PMTCT programs. In many resource-limited settings like Nigeria, the quality of data obtained from health facilities (HFs) has been poor. One of the major challenges is the documentation workload, in addition to non-utilization of data generated at the HF level. During the roll-out of a large PMTCT implementation research study, we piloted a comprehensive Mother-Infant pair (MIP) register at study sites. Data quality of MIP records was assessed by type of data clerk (DC) (User vs Non-User) documenting the data.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.078
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A WHO Surgical Safety Checklist-based Infection Prevention Program in
           Ethiopia: Using Process Mapping to Identify Barriers for Implementation

    • Authors: J.A. Forrester; L. Koritsanszky, N. Garland, L. Hirschhorn, S. Alemu, F. Jiru, T. Weiser
      Pages: 37 - 38
      Abstract: The WHO Surgical Safety Checklist (SSCL) is proven to reduce post-operative morbidity and mortality, though it can be difficult to implement, particularly in low resource settings. Since surgical site infections (SSIs) account for substantial postoperative morbidity and mortality, we developed CLEAN CUT - Checklist Expansion for Antisepsis and Infection Control: Customization, Use, and Training - with two goals: (1) increase adherence to evidence-based perioperative infection prevention measures and (2) decrease post-operative infectious complications.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.081
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating the Process and Impact of Global Health Education in a Social
           Accountability Perspective

    • Authors: V. Foley; C. Valois, P. Grand'Maison
      First page: 37
      Abstract: Global Health (GH) Education initiatives are numerous and diverse. They include initiatives for students in multiple health professions who may be at different levels of their educational pathway. They all aim to consider GH competencies in their professional disciplinary development. Competencies include a wide array of knowledge, skills and attitudes focussing on how to optimally work with vulnerable, marginalized and underserved populations, with an emphasis on equity, social justice and consideration of social determinants of health, more particularly cultural diversity.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.080
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Knowledge and Skill Retention of a Novel Lay-Provider Trauma Training
           Curriculum in Rural Peru: A Longitudinal Study

    • Authors: M.J. Fuller; M. Stewart, K. Baker
      Pages: 38 - 39
      Abstract: The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes that up to 50 million individuals suffer non-fatal injuries annually due to road traffic accidents and predicts that by 2030 road traffic injuries will be the eighth leading cause of death worldwide. While the burden of road traffic injuries is decreasing in high-income countries (HIC), low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) are disproportionately affected with 90% of road traffic deaths worldwide and only 20% of the world’s vehicles. The majority of these deaths occur pre-hospital, however many LMIC frequently lack formal pre-hospital systems or Emergency Medical Services (EMS).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.083
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Traditional Music as a Sustainable Social Technology for Community Health
           Promotion in Africa: “Singing and Dancing for Health” in Rural
           Northern Ghana

    • Authors: M. Frishkopf; D. Zakus, S. Abu, H. Hamze, M. Alhassan, I.A. Zukpeni
      First page: 38
      Abstract: This project and accompanying implementation research aim to promote rural health in northern Ghana--specifically, to reduce incidence of malaria and sanitation-related illnesses, using local expressive arts both in professional performances and subsequently sustainably embedded in rural communities.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.082
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Collaborative Methods to Prioritize Oral Health and Healthcare in Kenya

    • Authors: K.P. Ahluwalia; R. Mutave, C. Gitobu, B. Mua, A. Wetende, C. Gianfrancesco, A. Lerman, S. Nicholas
      Pages: 39 - 40
      Abstract: With only one dentist for every 42,000 people, Kenya falls below the World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation of one dentist for every 7,000 individuals. Despite a well-trained dental and public health workforce, oral health is not included in the country’s health policy framework and donors do not target oral health. A cross-national partnership (Columbia University, the University of Nairobi, the Kenya Ministry of Health, Kenya Dental Association), is using collaborative methods to bring visibility to oral health and develop a framework to prioritize and inform oral health policy and advocacy in Kenya.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.085
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Does the Measure Matter? Observed Quality of Care Score and Child
           Mortality in a Multi-Country Analysis

    • Authors: A. Gage; H. Leslie, M. Kruk
      First page: 39
      Abstract: As interest grows on what occurs within the “black box” of health care service delivery in lower and middle income countries, rigorous metrics are necessary to measure the quality of care that a health facility provides. Face validity of a quality metric for health administrators and policy makers requires that higher quality scores be associated with better health outcomes in the population the facility serves. This analysis aims to validate a metric of sick child care quality adapted from the Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses (IMCI) guidelines by assessing its association with under-5 mortality rates.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.084
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Healthcare in Nunavik, Canada: Basis for a Mixed Method Study

    • Authors: M.A. Girard; C. Regis
      First page: 40
      Abstract: For low populated remote areas, like Northern Quebec, it is highly problematic to recruit healthcare professionals. Consequently, workers in such settings practice in a stressful work environment. The source of the stress is both the lack of human resources and the lack of an acquired collaborative mechanism within the context of expanded scope of practice (Strasser 2010, Lessard 2005).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.087
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Expanding Pediatric and Maternal Clinical Care and Education Utilizing a
           Successful Pediatric HIV Infrastructure for Global Health Programs in
           Resource-Limited Settings

    • Authors: A. Gibson; T. Napier-Earle, M. Mizwa, D. Nguyen, C. Daskevich, M. Kline
      First page: 40
      Abstract: This College of Medicine (COM) and Academic Medical Center (AMC), through their joint non-profit focused on pediatric HIV care and education in resource limited settings (Pedi-HIV), have established 8 comprehensive, family-based clinical centers of excellence (COEs) in 7 countries. Through public-private partnerships with governments and donors, Pedi-HIV has created one of the largest pediatric HIV treatment network of affiliated non-governmental organizations (NGOs) training over 74,000 healthcare workers and treating over 300,000 patients.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.086
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Assessment of Acute Obstetrical Needs and Evaluation for the Role of
           Point-Of-Care Ultrasound in the North East Department of Haiti

    • Authors: D. Gomes; S. kendall, B. Kaufman, A. Aluisio, C.M. Bloem, V. Thomas
      Pages: 41 - 42
      Abstract: Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) implemented through task shifting to nontraditional users has potential as a diagnostic adjuvant to enhance acute obstetrical care in resource limited environments with limited access to physician providers. This study evaluated acute obstetrical needs and the potential role for POCUS programming in the North East Department of Haiti.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.090
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Strengthening Indigenous Training Capacity in Biomedical Engineering and
           Technology in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Replicable Model

    • Authors: K. Utan; S. Goldfrank
      First page: 41
      Abstract: In many low-income countries (LICs), over 95% of medical equipment in hospitals is imported. Much is out of service, yet could be easily repaired at minimal cost by trained professionals. A survey of 52 African hospitals conducted by Carleton University in Canada revealed that medical device maintenance services at 85% of these facilities had trouble finding qualified engineers and technicians locally. Biomedical engineers and technicians in LICs face similar challenges as other health cadres: inadequate qualified personnel to meet existing needs, limited educational opportunities and in-service training, absence of regulatory bodies, brain drain, and competition with the private sector for the limited pool of skilled professionals.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.089
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Measuring the Cross-cultural Adaptability of a Graduate Student Team from
           a Global Immersion Experience

    • Authors: L.B. Glickman; V. Rowthorn, J. Olsen
      First page: 41
      Abstract: This study measured the cultural competency skills for two groups of unmatched graduate students to determine if a global immersion experience improved student cross-cultural adaptability as a component of cultural competency skill development. Experiential learning through global immersion may promote these skills, needed to meet the healthcare, psychosocial, legal, and related needs of the 21st century client.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.088
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Ultrasound Use in Resource-limited Settings: A Systematic Review

    • Authors: R. Gopaul; G. bearman, M. Stevens
      Pages: 42 - 43
      Abstract: Over the past decade, Ultrasound machines have become smaller, less expensive, more reliable, durable and user-friendly making ultrasonography an ideal imaging modality in resource poor settings. We conducted a literature review to examine the use of ultrasound in resource-limited settings, with emphasis on common applications, barriers to implementation, and impact on clinical decision-making and patient disposition.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.092
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A New Cadre of Health Worker: Meeting Health Organization Capacity Needs
           in East and Southern Africa and the United States via a leadership
           Development Fellowship program

    • Authors: J. Gomez; B. Bush, H. Anderson
      First page: 42
      Abstract: Building strong health systems to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals requires a human resources for health (HRH) strategy that recognizes and addresses non-clinical capacity gaps at health organizations. Leadership development of non-clinical health workers is limited in implementation and discussion, resulting in a lack of data. We present initial findings from Global Health Corps’ (GHC) efforts in this area.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.091
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Trust as a Determinant of Intervention with Brucellosis in the Bedouin
           Community of the Negev

    • Authors: B. Hermesh
      Pages: 43 - 44
      Abstract: Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that is transferred from livestock to humans through exposure to milk and animal secretions. It is the most common bacterial zoonosis worldwide, and its incidence among the Bedouins of the Negev desert of Israel is among the highest in the world, raises up to 1:400. Current interventions, led by the Ministry of Agriculture (MoA), are focused mainly on vaccination and culling of infected herds.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.094
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Health Certification for Obstetric and Gynecology Residents

    • Authors: M.F. Haerr; M. Larkins-Pettigrew
      First page: 43
      Abstract: To improve competency of OB/GYN residents as quality global health providers.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.093
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Alliance for Nursing and Midwifery’s (GANM) Virtual Library:
           Knowledge Sharing and Capacity Building Rooted in the Sustainable
           Development Goals (SDGs)

    • Authors: A. Horn; A. Gresh, F. Mena-Carrasco, C. McCormick, T. Pfaff
      Pages: 44 - 45
      Abstract: The Global Alliance for Nursing and Midwifery (GANM) is a World Health Organization (WHO)/Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Collaborating Center (CC) at the Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing (JHUSON). The GANM’s main aim is to develop innovative approaches to knowledge dissemination that build the capacity of nurses and midwives around the world. Currently the GANM has nearly 4,000 members consisting of practitioners, policymakers, researchers, and academics.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.096
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Implications of Donor Engagement with Faith-Based Organisations for
           Health Systems: A Case Study Example from Cameroon

    • Authors: S. Herzig van Wees
      First page: 44
      Abstract: Faith-Based Organisations (FBOs) have a long history of providing indispensable social welfare to many Sub-Saharan African countries, including Cameroon. Over the past decade, donors have engaged FBOs in numerous sub-Saharan African countries in the context of health system reforms and health programmes. However, there is very little knowledge about the implications of this engagement for FBOs and health systems. The aim of this research is to understand these implications in the context of donor engagement of FBOs in Cameroon.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.095
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • 3D Printing to Repair, Modify and Create Medical Equipment in a Resource
           Limited Setting

    • Authors: S.C. John; A. John, L. Cuthbertson, K. VanKoevering, G. Green
      Pages: 45 - 46
      Abstract: Clinicians and technicians working in low resource settings have limited technology. They must be innovative to care for a diverse patient population with a wide breadth of disease. Significant limitations in hospital supply chain, budget and personnel make obtaining and repairing needed equipment challenging. We hypothesized that 3D printing technology could empower clinical care providers to design and manufacture simple, inexpensive products on-site to provide better patient care.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.099
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Child Health Curricula: A Systematic Review

    • Authors: C.A. Hui; L. pell, S. Zlotkin
      First page: 45
      Abstract: Global child health (GCH) education is becoming an increasingly important component of paediatric training. Over the past 10 years, the number of medical programs offering GCH tracks or elective courses has significantly increased. This rising demand highlights the need for thoughtful assessment of GCH curricula.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.098
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Teaching Global Health Nursing: The Process of Integrating Nursing
           Training into the Clinical Education Partnership Initiative

    • Authors: K.N. Hosey; J. Waldron, A. Shelton, J. Mburu, C. Farquhar
      First page: 45
      Abstract: Nurses make up the majority of the healthcare workforce. For this reason, the Clinical Education Partnership Initiative (CEPI) expanded its model of medical training to include University of Washington nurses, specifically graduate students in nurse practitioner, midwifery and community health nursing programs. With an eye towards education, multidisciplinary collaboration, and strong local partnership, the UW nursing/CEPI partnership has been able to better engage providers and staff of various clinical backgrounds and specialties in and around Naivasha, Kenya.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.097
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • State University of New York (SUNY) Global Health Institute (GHI) Virtual
           Grand Rounds Forum Fosters Collaboration and Innovation across the SUNY
           Network

    • Authors: J. Justino; C.D. Lupone, M. Sedler, S. Rinnert, C.M. Bloem, L. Mu, J. DeHovitz, G.D. Morse
      Pages: 46 - 47
      Abstract: The State University of New York (SUNY) is the largest public university system in the United States. The SUNY Global Health Institute (SUNY-GHI) was formed in 2014 to provide a mechanism for global health programs at the SUNY Academic Health Centers to foster collaboration and innovation in education, training, and research with international partners and regional corporate and economic leaders.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.101
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Training Trainers to Deliver Leadership Development Programs: Lessons
           Learned from Capacity Building in IPPFARO Learning Centers

    • Authors: S. Jonassen Bittman; L. de la Peza, I. Ogo
      First page: 46
      Abstract: The USAID-funded Leadership, Management & Governance Project (LMG) trained trainers within four Learning Centers (LCs) of the International Planned Parenthood Federation Africa Regional Office (IPPFARO) to deliver the Leadership Development Program Plus (LDP+) to improve service delivery. The goal is to institutionalize the LDP+ to scale up effective interventions, increasing utilization of family planning and reproductive health (FP/RH) services in Sub-Saharan Africa.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.100
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Using Data Visualization to Create New Tools for Interactive CHW
           Supervision in the Last Mile

    • Authors: J. Edwards; A. Kane
      Pages: 47 - 48
      Abstract: Since 2015, Medic Mobile has been working with Muso in Mali to design, build, and deploy dashboards that are used by supervisors to provide performance feedback to community health workers (CHWs). In 2015, Muso and Medic co-designed a 6-month randomized controlled trial (RCT) to measure the impact of this intervention on CHWs performance. This session will focus on the process used to design and test the dashboards, as well as the results of the study.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.103
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Rethinking R&D: Partnerships as Drivers of Global Health Innovation

    • Authors: K.T. Kadakia
      First page: 47
      Abstract: Emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) pose a significant health and socioeconomic threat. Five major global outbreaks in the last fifteen years have resulted in over 250,000 deaths and $100 billion in financial losses. Each pandemic shares a critical common thread – the lack of an effective, clinically approved vaccine prior to the outbreak’s escalation. Interestingly, the public health imperative of EIDs appears to galvanize stakeholders into fast-tracking the research and development (R&D) timeframe, with vaccine candidates advancing from pre-clinical to clinical trials 80% faster during an outbreak.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.102
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • PREventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths in Rural Northern Ghana (PREMAND):
           Access to Basic and Comprehensive Obstetric Care

    • Authors: E. Kaselitz; R. Aborigo, K. James, S. Chatio, J. Williams, C. Moyer
      Pages: 48 - 49
      Abstract: Maternal and neonatal health outcomes in low-resource settings are largely contingent on access to skilled providers for basic and comprehensive obstetric care. Services considered “comprehensive” include cesarean sections and blood transfusions; two procedures often needed urgently to save the lives of mothers and babies. This study explored the availability of basic and comprehensive obstetric services across four districts in the northern region of Ghana; an area known for its sparse population, high rates of poverty, and limited access to health facilities.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.105
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effectiveness of Supportive Supervision Visits on the Consistency of
           Community-Based Neonatal Sepsis Management Skills of the Health Extension
           Workers in 167 districts of Ethiopia

    • Authors: G. Tiruneh; A.M. Karim, W. Betemariam, B. Yihun, B. Birhanu, A. Ameha, B. Mathiwos, A. Wanboru
      First page: 48
      Abstract: The health extension program of Ethiopia initiated Community-Based Newborn Care (CBNC) strategy to reduce its persistently high neonatal mortality rate. The strategy trained 7,010 health extension workers (HEWs) in 3,952 health posts in 167 districts to provide community-based management of neonatal sepsis, conducted prompt post-training follow-up, continued coaching through supportive supervision, and conducted review meetings. This study examines the effects of the supportive supervision on the consistency of neonatal sepsis management skills of the HEWs.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.104
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Towards a Universal Medical Education Global Health Curriculum: Update on
           the Bellagio Global Health Education Initiative

    • Authors: M.J. Peluso; A. Kellett, D. Davies, J. Samaan, T. Brewer, S. Van Schalkwyk, B. Garg, H. Mayanja-Kizza, C.Z. Margolis, R. Rohrbaugh
      Pages: 49 - 50
      Abstract: Twenty global health (GH) educational leaders from low-, middle-, and high-income countries (LMICs, HICs) work collaboratively in the Bellagio Global Health Education Initiative (BGHEI) to identify GH curricular elements that could be universally applicable across diverse medical education systems.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.107
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Does a One Size Fit All Approach Work for Community Management of Acute
           Malnutrition in Rural Malawi?

    • Authors: R. Kawonga; E. Connolly, A. Fisher, E. Dunbar, L. McMeel, S. Kapira, E. Wroe
      First page: 49
      Abstract: The Community-Based Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM) program directs the surveillance for ∼58,000 children in Malawi’s rural Neno District and the care of those identified with malnutrition. In 2015, the Outpatient Therapeutic Programme (OTP) for treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) was subject to 83 stock-outs of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF), affecting each of the 13 health facilities. This resulted in premature termination of treatment for enrolled cases and no enrollment for newly identified cases.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.106
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Validation of Smart Monitoring System for Mobile Facility Deployed for
           Emergency Crisis and Post-Disaster Situations

    • Authors: E. Kim; S.M. Navarro, S. Michel
      Pages: 50 - 51
      Abstract: Recent epidemics in Africa and natural disasters across the world have shown the challenging aspects of handling additional burdens on health care facilities in a resource-constrained environment. There is a need for technology innovation to address global health infrastructure limitations. The implementation of a mobile facility engineered with a smart monitoring system allows for rapid augmentation of medical resources to meet increased medical needs in these settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.110
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Results of a Global Collaboration First Responder Course in Trauma Skills
           Training in New Delhi, India

    • Authors: N. Khandelwal; A. Fa, K. Muzaffar, M. Bhatia, D. Vyas
      First page: 50
      Abstract: In both developed and developing countries, most morbidity due to trauma occurs in the prehospital period. This increase in morbidity and mortality is partly due to a lack of appropriate critical care education of first responders in rural settings. Multiple studies have shown that prompt, well-executed pre-hospital care by first responders can lead to a reduction in mortality.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.109
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Medical Brain Drain in Uganda: Causes and Potential Remedies

    • Authors: D.P. Kendall
      First page: 50
      Abstract: Sub-saharan Africa currently bears 24% of the global disease burden, yet is home to just 3% of the global health workforce (Anyangwe 2007). Despite this crippling disease burden, nearly 30% of graduating physicians in Uganda choose to emigrate each year (Soucat 2013). Medical brain drain refers to this human resource crisis that plagues the healthcare systems of many developing countries, where newly graduated physicians choose to leave the country after receiving their formal medical education.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.108
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Factors Influencing Retention, Job Satisfaction, and Motivation among
           Jordanian Health Workers

    • Authors: M. Dieleman; E. Kleinau
      Pages: 51 - 52
      Abstract: In Jordan, about 3.78 million people, including refugees and marginalized populations, living in remote areas rely on Ministry of Health (MoH) services. The MoH’s 2013-2017 strategic plan lists retention of staff and attracting new talent into the public health system as two of its biggest challenges. USAID’s HRH2030 program performed a national level research study to identify factors influencing retention, job satisfaction, and motivation among doctors, nurses, and midwives within MoH health facilities and to provide evidenced-based recommendations to support the MoH in formulating policies to improve staff retention and recruitment.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.112
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Assessment Toolkit for Measuring Outcomes in Nursing Study Abroad
           Programs

    • Authors: S. Kirby
      First page: 51
      Abstract: International experiences and study abroad have become a common type of experiental learning in higher education, including nursing.However, a lack of outcomes measures in nursing study abroad programs, particularly from validated and reliable tools, has been identified in the literature. This poster is the result of a Doctor of Nursing Practice project to develop a toolkit that may be used to measure outcomes in nursing study abroad.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.111
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Success and Challenges of Implementing a Tablet-Based Trauma Registry in
           Tanzania

    • Authors: A. Lalande; R. Boniface, D. Bracco, D.L. Deckelbaum, T. Razek
      Pages: 52 - 53
      Abstract: Trauma is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, even more so in low- and middle-income countries. Access to epidemiological data through trauma registries has been one of the keys to the success of improvement in trauma care. A partnership between local leadership in Tanzania and the Centre for Global Surgery, founded by McGill-based surgeons, was formed about 10 years ago, and a minimal trauma registry was implemented. It has since then been expanded to a 6 sites across Tanzania and data collection is ongoing more steadily for the last 3 years using a tablet-based registry.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.114
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Filling the Gap for Healthcare Professionals Leadership Training in
           Africa: The Afya Bora Consortium Fellowship

    • Authors: D. Krakowiak; Y. Mashalla, G. O'Malley, E. Seloilwe, G. Ekane, S. Atanga, O. Gachuno, T.M. Odero, D. Urassa, E. Tarimo, D. Nakanjako, N. Sewankambo, Y. Manabe, K. ousman, S. Chapman, R. Dicker, R. Polomano, D. Wiebe, J. Voss, K.N. Hosey, J.N. Wasserheit, C. Farquhar
      First page: 52
      Abstract: The Afya Bora Consortium is a partnership of five African and four U.S. universities with the mission of providing future global health leaders with advanced skills that are beyond the traditional patient-centered training programs for healthcare professionals. Each year, an interdisciplinary group of twenty physicians, nurses and public health professionals participate in a 12-month African-based intensive fellowship to improve skills in leadership, resource management, program monitoring and evaluation, implementation, and applied research.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.113
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Training Health Workers to Provide Cervical Cancer Screening: Comparison
           of Educational Strategies in Liberia, South Africa and Grenada

    • Authors: A.M. Beddoe; O. Afzal, M. Lieber, W. jallah, C. McIntosh, P. Dottino
      Pages: 53 - 54
      Abstract: In preparation for regional cancer screening programs in Liberia, South Africa and Grenada a program to educate local nursing staff in performing gynecologic examinations, including speculum exams, collecting smears, performing visual inspection with acetic acid and cryotherapy procedures training was implemented in each country.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.117
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Redefining the role of Army Medicine in Global Health: Transformation in
           the Indo-Asia Pacific

    • Authors: D. Licina; B. Cogswell
      First page: 53
      Abstract: The recent US Army medical transformation aligns medical capabilities with Regional Combatant Commands to further enhance delivery of medical services to the warfighter and beneficiary population. Regional Health Command - Pacific (RHC-P) is one of four regional Army Medicine Commands and is aligned to directly support US Army Pacific and US Pacific Commands. This area of operation includes 36 countries, 17 percent of the earth's landmass, and 60 percent of the earth's population. Based out of Honolulu, HI with nine direct reporting units (e.g.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.116
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Ready or Not? Service Readiness of Health Facilities in High-Mortality
           Countries

    • Authors: H. Leslie; D. Spiegelman, X. Zhou, M. Kruk
      First page: 53
      Abstract: Health systems in lower income countries face substantial challenges in meeting population health needs, including a growing burden of non-communicable disease. Existing research suggests that health facilities may be poorly equipped to provide high-quality care, yet systematic assessment of health facility readiness has been limited to date. We define and compare service readiness in nine high-mortality countries.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.115
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Exchange the World: Clinical and Research Exchanges as a Means to Promote
           Understanding of Other Health Care Systems in Medical Students

    • Authors: X. Ma; T. D'Ignazio, M. Skulimowski, W. Jakubowska
      Pages: 54 - 55
      Abstract: The Quebec chapter of the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations (IFMSA-Quebec) organizes annually over 130 nonprofit, student-run clinical and research exchanges in 39 countries, which are recognized as credited courses in 3 of 4 medical faculties. Its objective is to complement students’ medical education by offering the opportunity to experience a different medical or research system where they will face challenges in communication, professionalism and scholarship (CanMEDS Framework).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.119
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Developing a Comprehensive Cancer Education Program to Increase Clinical
           And Research Capacity in Mozambique

    • Authors: M.S. Lopez; K. Schmeler, E. Baker
      First page: 54
      Abstract: In 2011, cancer surpassed coronary heart disease and stroke as the leading cause of death worldwide. 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million cancer-related deaths occur annually worldwide. 57% of new cases and 65% of cancer deaths occur in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs), and some cancers occur primarily in LMICs. For example, 90% of cervical cancer deaths occur in LMICs and cervical cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer mortality among women in Sub-Saharan Africa. Currently there are not enough medical specialists to provide prevention, screening and treatment services.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.118
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Health Needs of Refugees: Port of Arrival versus Permanent Camp Settings

    • Authors: M.M. Matsumoto; G. Wimer, A. Sethi
      Pages: 55 - 56
      Abstract: The world’s refugee population currently stands at over 19 million, the large majority of whom reside in developing countries. The quality and accessibility of healthcare for refugee populations varies according to the geographic setting, availability of resources, and proper training of healthcare providers. This paper uniquely compares and contrasts two important settings for healthcare provision for refugees: the permanent “camp” settings of Za’atari, Jordan, versus the transitory location of Lampedusa, Italy—a major port of arrival for refugees.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.121
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Impact of an Evidence-Based Pediatric Electronic Knowledge System on
           Peruvian Physicians’ Perceptions of Care Quality, Learning, Teaching,
           and Self-Efficacy

    • Authors: B. Maron; G. Bendezu-Quispe, H. Dieckmann, C. Espinosa, P. Garcia, R. Dieckmann
      First page: 55
      Abstract: Lack of access to current medical information is a limiting factor in practicing evidence-based medicine (EBM). While many hospitals and most physicians have computers and smart phones, integration of these devices into everyday medical practice is poorly-developed in most resource-limited environments. The objective of this study was to evaluate how access to an EBM knowledge system, on the web and as a mobile application (app), impacts Peruvian physicians’ perception of care quality, learning, teaching and self-efficacy.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.120
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Developing Novel Competency-driven Professional Curricula in the US and
           Globally

    • Authors: G. Meredith; C. Madsen, N. Parandekar De Bernardis, M. Reichel, A. Travis, S.H. Cheng
      Pages: 56 - 57
      Abstract: International aid organizations have spent billions of dollars building public health workforce capacity without effective measures of impact. Following trends in other professional workforces, public health training programs have begun to use competency models to guide classroom learning, continued education, and performance improvement.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.123
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Promoting Health Professional Education: Improving the Health System’s
           Response to Epidemic Control

    • Authors: S. McQueen; N. VanDinter, P. Donkor, J. Hakim
      First page: 56
      Abstract: To address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in Sub-Saharan Africa, health systems need adequate numbers of quality health care workers (HCWs) who are able to provide the full continuum of HIV services. For five years, the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) funded Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) has been one of the flagship programs helping to assure there are adequate numbers of well-trained HCWs who can provide the HIV/AIDS services needed to address the epidemic.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.122
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lessons Learned in Creating a Neonatal Nursery at a District Hospital in
           Rural Malawi

    • Authors: J. Mhango; A. Fisher, E. Connolly, B. Uladi, D. Gunya, G. Nkula, N. Mwale, C. Maulidi, M. Mhango, E. Wroe, L. Nazimera
      Pages: 57 - 58
      Abstract: Malawi’s neonatal mortality rate is 42 per 1000 live births with about one third of childhood mortality represented in the neonatal period. Malawi’s challenges in neonatal care are caused by a high population growth rate, a high fertility rate and low health worker density. This is evident in Neno, a remote district in southwest Malawi with an estimated total fertility rate of 6-6.5 births per woman and only ∼65% of births attended by a skilled attendant. We set out to create a neonatal nursery in the District Hospital to better focus resources and care for this vulnerable population.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.125
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Assessing the Role of the Friends of Shanta Bhawan Nepal Clinic in the
           Communities of Northeast Kathmandu, Nepal with a Focus on Maternal and
           Child Health and Patient Satisfaction

    • Authors: R. Mersha; B. Girmay
      First page: 57
      Abstract: The Friends of Shanta Bhawan (FSBN) Clinic has been providing primary healthcare in the Jorpati community of Kathmandu, Nepal since 1983.The clinic serves a diverse population composed of various Tibetan and Nepali ethnic groups. Through a partnership with the FSBN clinic, students from the New York University School of Medicine (NYUSOM) performed a six week assessment in an effort to improve and expand care provided by the clinic with a focus on maternal and child health (MCH).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.124
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Zika Virus Knowledge and Attitudes among Ecuadorian Adults

    • Authors: G. Aidoo-Frimpong; T. Basta, G. Gomez, S. Casapulla, M. Grijalva
      Pages: 59 - 60
      Abstract: ZIKV is a public health issue because of the consequences that can result from infection, including microcephaly and Guillain-Barre Syndrome. To date, 47 countries and territories in the Americas have confirmed ZIKV cases. Ecuador has reported 2,150 suspected cases and 761 confirmed ZIKV cases, with the largest amount reported in Manabi Province, the coastal area affected by the recent earthquake. The purpose of this study was to assess 1) ZIKV knowledge and 2) ZIKV attitudes, based on the Health Belief Model (HBM), among Ecuadorian adults.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.129
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Factors influencing risky sexual behavior among young adults (15-24) years
           living with HIV attending Mulago HIV/AIDS Clinic

    • Authors: R. Abenakyo
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Estimates of 34 million people are living with HIV (PLWH) globally. Of these, 11.8 million are young adults (YAs) meaning for every three PLWH, one is a youth. In developing countries risky sexual behavior (RSB) among YAs is on the increase. In Uganda, the demographic health survey reported that 36% and 49% of young women and men respectively engage in high risk sexual activity. The report by UNAIDS quotes HIV rates of 4.8 %( males) and 2.3% (females), clearly indicating that these behaviors were placing YAs’ health and lives at risk.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.128
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Achieving Open Defecation Free Communities: Evaluating Knowledge,
           Attitudes, and Practices: Post- Community Led Total Sanitation Campaign

    • Authors: R. Abaka-Yankson; S. Shaw
      First page: 59
      Abstract: Diarrheal diseases cause approximately 11% of deaths worldwide and this burden is usually due to fecal contamination of water sources (CDC, 2015). Without proper sanitation facilities and sufficient hygiene, rural communities in Zambia often practice open defecation, which perpetuates a high incidence of diarrheal cases (UNICEF, 2011). The purpose of this research is to evaluate the health and social impacts of a Community Led Total Sanitation campaign that was triggered in the Madzimawe chiefdom in the Eastern Province of Zambia in 2012.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.127
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Redefining the Target Area for Leprosy Elimination Programs Through
           Serological Evaluation of a Broader Definition of Leprosy Contacts

    • Authors: M.D. Arulraja; A. Toepp, F. Amorim, T. Kummer, G. Monteiro, M. Nobre, M. Duthie, S. Reed, M. Wilson, S. Jeronimo
      Pages: 60 - 61
      Abstract: With 33,000 new cases in 2014, Brazil has the highest incidence of leprosy worldwide. Incidence fails to decrease while case-finding campaigns mostly evaluate household contacts (HHC’s). In Northeast Brazil several studies have explored risk of exposure to neighbors. Regarding multibacillary leprosy cases, (the primary source of infection) no significant difference was found between Mycobacterium leprae seropositivity rates of HHC’s compared to next door neighbors. Therefore, the foci of infection could be larger than the current definition of HHC’s identifies.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.131
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Strengthening Health Care Waste Management through Strategic Mentoring and
           Supportive Supervision in Rural HIV Clinics, South-Eastern Nigeria

    • Authors: P.O. Anyanwu; O. Okunoye, S.N. Okon, G. Odunze, O. Onyedinachi, A. Ebong Caleb, A. Eyo
      First page: 60
      Abstract: HIV pandemic placed additional burden on the weakened health care systems in Nigeria. With an estimated population of over 180 million and national HIV prevalence of 3.6%, the poorly organized health systems were put under serious stress; especially in the rural areas were large number of persons infected with HIV accessed services. The high volume of clients accessing care at these rural health facilities translated into more health care waste being produced without adequate waste management plan.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.130
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Epidemiology of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an Endemic Pacific Coastal
           Rainforest Area of Ecuador

    • Authors: A.O. Balogun; R. armijos, M. Weigel, W. Cevallos, X. sanchez, E. Puebla, R. Rodriguez
      Pages: 61 - 62
      Abstract: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is present in Ecuador’s northern Pacific coastal rainforest area, similar to the rest of the mainland. Our previous studies in the 1990s indicated that this area was hyperendemic for CL and had a complex epidemiologic profile. Since then, a number of significant ecological and population changes have occurred caused by intensive economic development (primary rainforest destruction, increased mono-cropping of palm oil and other crops, in-migration from non-endemic areas, tourist industry development).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.133
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • What is the TB Burden in Nigerian Prisons? – An Enhanced TB Case Finding
           Program experience from 13 Nigerian Prisons

    • Authors: E. Onu; V.A. Enejoh, J. Olarewaju, I. salihu, L. Igwegbe, M. Uwaezuoke, P. Igweike, C. Eze, E. Ugwu, A. Mpamugo, M. Mukiibi, I. Olajide, B. Awesu, K. Onu, T. Madubuko, B. Gobir, A. Olutola, E.E. Ezeanolue, A.E. Nwandu
      First page: 61
      Abstract: In resource-limited settings like Nigeria, prisons and correctional facilities are typically congested and lack adequate ventilation. Inmates are therefore particularly vulnerable to infections like TB and Nigeria ranks 4th among the 22 high burden countries with TB (WHO report 2015: Global Tuberculosis Control). WHO recommends active case detection to reduce the burden of TB. TB case detection in Nigerian prisons is passive. Our project was designed to actively increase TB case finding among inmates at 13 prisons in Nigeria.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.132
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • High Spatial Resolution Mapping of Changing Inequalities in Child
           Mortality Across Africa between 2000 and 2015

    • Authors: R. Burstein; N. Golding, A. Osgood-Zimmerman, J. Longbottom, L. Dwyer-Lindgren, A. Browne, L. Earl, C. Morozoff, S. Lim, H. Wang, A.D. Flaxman, D. Weiss, S. Bhatt, T. Farag, L.K. Krause, S. Dowell, P. Gething, C.J. Murray, C. Moyes, S. Hay
      Pages: 62 - 63
      Abstract: Cross-country studies of trends in child mortality have shown, in average, large declines in nearly every country. At the same time, these successes have been varied. It is unknown though to what extent inequalities in child mortality exists and persists within countries, as there have never been contemporaneous and comparable cross-country subnational estimates.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.135
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • HIV Self-Testing Values and Preferences in Rakai, Uganda: A Qualitative
           Study

    • Authors: V.M. Burke; N. Nakyanjo, W. Ddaaki, N. Hutchinson, C. Payne, F. Nalugoda, C. Kennedy
      First page: 62
      Abstract: HIV self-testing (HIVST) allows people who want to know their HIV status to collect a specimen, perform a test, and interpret the test results themselves; reactive results must be confirmed by health workers through national HIV testing algorithms. The privacy afforded by self-testing may encourage more people to learn their HIV status, but uptake and appropriate use of HIVST depends on communities’ perceptions and understandings of self-testing. Using qualitative methods, we examined values and preferences related to HIVST among community members and health care providers in mainland and fishing populations in rural Rakai District, Uganda.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.134
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Womens Constraint in Access to Prevention of Mother to Chidl Transnmission
           of HIV/AIDS (PMTCT) in Enugu State Nigeria

    • Authors: N.N. Ezumah
      First page: 63
      Abstract: The presentation is based on a study on prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV/AIDS (PMTCT) in Enugu state Nigeria. Prevalence of HIV/AIDS among children in Nigeria remains high. UNAIDS indicate that in 2009 children with HIV in Nigeria comprised about 1.8 million out of the 2.5 million that are HIV positive globally. Women’s constraint in access to PMTCT is linked to gender inequality constraining them from making vital decisions to prevent primary infection of HIV, community norms and health system factors.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.137
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Epidemiology of Soil-Transmitted Helminthiasis and Taeniasis in Rural
           Communities near Ranomafana National Park, Madagascar with a Comparison of
           Kato-Katz Technique Against Spontaneous Sedimentation Technique

    • Authors: K. Choi; L. Hakami, P. Castle, J. Kiernan, P. small, P. Wright, L. marcos
      First page: 63
      Abstract: Soil Transmitted Helminthiasis (STHs) and taeniasis are major health burdens in many developing settings. Rural communities near Madagascar's Ranomafana National Park (RNP) struggle to meet the basic standards of health from a lack of road infrastructure and endemic infections of parasites. This July 2016 study determined the epidemiology of parasitic infections and compared two parasitological stool diagnostic techniques.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.136
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Association between Risky Sexual Behavior and Cervical Cancer Screening
           among Women in Kenya: A Population-based Study

    • Authors: Z. Haile; C. Kingori, B. Chavan, J. Francescon
      Pages: 64 - 65
      Abstract: Cervical cancer is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. Throughout the sub-Saharan African region, the World Health Organization recommends screening and vaccination against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) to prevent cervical cancer. Sexual behavior has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cervical cancer. However, population-based studies examining the relationship between sexual behavior and cervical cancer screening are currently lacking. This study examined the association between risky sexual behavior and cervical cancer in screening among a representative sample of women in Kenya.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.140
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • HIV Awareness in the Former Soviet Union: An Assessment of HIV Knowledge
           among Varied University Disciplines in Armenia

    • Authors: H.Z. Wright; E. Gavin, M. Hovhannisyan
      First page: 64
      Abstract: Globally, 36.7 million people are HIV-positive, the majority of whom are living in low- and middle- income countries, with 2.1 million new cases in 2015 alone (WHO). In Armenia, 3,600 people live with HIV and it’s estimated that over 60% of that number are unaware of their status (UNAIDS). Since the emergence of the AIDS epidemic in 1981, progress combatting the spread of HIV has been hindered by lack of education, biased attitudes and unsafe practices. In Armenia, these factors are compounded by lack of public health resources and awareness.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.139
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Dengue Fever/Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever: Morbidity, Mortality Seasonal
           Variations and Spatial Distribution in Sri Lanka, 1996 - 2014

    • Authors: L.S. Galgamuwa; S.D. Dharmaratne, W.M. Iddawela
      First page: 64
      Abstract: Dengue Fever and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DF/DHF) are endemic in Sri Lanka. It has been included as a notifiable disease in 1996 and shows a dramatic increase in the incidence of dengue and its severe manifestations making this infectious disease a major public health problem. Climate change is associated with changes in seasonal weather patterns with subsequent impacts on the suitability and temporal and spatial distribution of these infections. The objective of this study was to describe trends of DF/DHF morbidity, mortality, seasonal variations and spatial distribution in Sri Lanka from 1996 to 2014.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.138
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • High Ambient Temperatures as A Cause of Neonatal Fever? Investigating the
           Association Between Environmental Temperature and Newborn Body Temperature
           

    • Authors: M.C. Indart; K. Vlasic, R. Patel, C. Stiglmeier, M. Patel, P. Brahmbatt, B. Fassl, C. Maloney
      Pages: 65 - 66
      Abstract: Fever in newborns is highly concerning for serious infections, prompting clinicians to perform a workup and initiate antibiotic treatment. High environmental temperatures during summertime may be associated with non-infectious temperature elevation in newborns, yet little is known about the prevalence of fever during that season.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.142
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Perception and Management of Acute and Chronic Pain in Rural Ghana

    • Authors: M. Harris; A. Birdsall, M. Birdsall, C. Sparks, S. Benson, T. Dickerson
      First page: 65
      Abstract: This article describes the perception of and management for acute and chronic pain experienced by residents of the Barekese sub district of Kumasi, Ghana. We were interested in understanding what types of pain were experienced by Ghanaians, how it affected their daily lives, and what they did to manage it.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.141
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Perceived Cost Advantages and Disadvantages of Purchasing HIV Self-Testing
           Kits among Urban Tanzanian Men: An Inductive Content Analysis

    • Authors: L. Jennings; D.F. Conserve, L. Kajula, J. Iwelunmor, S. Maman
      Pages: 66 - 67
      Abstract: Impoverished men have lower rates of facility-based HIV counseling and testing and higher unknown HIV-positive status than women. Economic theory suggests that rational individuals will test for HIV if the expected benefits are greater than the expected costs. Yet, few studies have investigated the range of financial incentives and disincentives of self-collecting and self-performing specimen-based HIV tests among poor men who decline or do not frequent HIV testing in health facilities.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.145
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Age of Menopause and Menopausal Symptoms in HIV Infected Women

    • Authors: D. Chawla; G. Bachmann, S. Jasani, I. Ndagire, C. Ayers
      First page: 66
      Abstract: Of the 37 million persons living with HIV globally, 52% are women. Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has resulted in reductions in HIV-associated morbidity and mortality dramatically improving life expectancy. Most HIV infections occur early in reproductive life with the potential to impact reproductive health and aging. For women with HIV this infection appears to accelerate menopause, leading to adverse hypoestrogenic consequences.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.144
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Knowledge and Perception of Self Medication by the People in Mbarara
           Municipality

    • Authors: J. Isiiko; K. Mawejje
      First page: 66
      Abstract: Self Medication (SM) is one of the key factors contributing to Antobiotic resistance. In 2012, the prevalence of antimicrobial SM in developing countries was 38.8%. A study done in 2014 showed that 75.7% of the people in Northern Uganda practice SM. WHO recommends both dispensing and using of antibiotics only when prescribed by a certified health professional.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.143
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Typhoid Epidemic in Rural Malawi: Real-world Challenges

    • Authors: C. Kachimanga; M. Jamu, T. Gates, B. Khongo, B. Kalombo, S. Epiphi, L. Nazimera, M. Mwesawina, A. Banda, J. Meiring, R. Kawonga
      Pages: 67 - 68
      Abstract: Typhoid fever is a major global health problem, with an estimated 22 million cases and 269,000 deaths annually. Caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi it is transmitted via the faecal-oral route and is associated with poverty and inadequate sanitation. Predominantly the burden of disease has been in South and South East Asia but is increasingly recognized in Sub-Saharan Africa, with increasing evidence showing it is both under-diagnosed and under-reported.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.147
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Uncontrolled Hypertension amongst People Living with HIV on Antiretroviral
           Therapy at an Urban HIV Clinic in Swaziland

    • Authors: O. Jimoh; A.B. Gachuhi, S. Simelane, M. Rabkin, H. Nuwagaba-Biribonwoha, P. Bongomin, A. Palma, M. McNairy, J. Franks, R. Bitchong, V. Okello, W.M. El-Sadr
      First page: 67
      Abstract: In sub-Saharan Africa, the burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD) amongst people living with HIV (PLWH) is rising, due to the increasing prevalence of CVD risk factors (CVDRF) such as hypertension (HTN). We explored CVDRF prevalence amongst PLWH on antiretroviral therapy (ART) at an urban hospital in Swaziland. This analysis focuses on the subset of patients found to have stage 3 HTN (hypertensive emergency) on their initial screening.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.146
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Extensive Antibiotic Prescription Rate among Hospitalized Patients in
           Uganda: But With Frequent Missed-dose Days

    • Authors: R. Kiguba; C. Karamagi, S. Bird
      Pages: 68 - 69
      Abstract: To describe the patterns of systemic antibiotic use and missed-dose days and detail the prescription, dispensing and administration of frequently used hospital-initiated antibiotics among Ugandan inpatients.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.149
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Unveiling Missed Opportunities for Providing Prevention of Mother to Child
           Transmission of HIV (PMTCT) Intervention at Immunization Clinics: A Case
           Study of a Large Primary Health Centre in Nigeria

    • Authors: A.F. Chizoba; F. Epoupa, E. Ezeobi, N. Kehinde
      First page: 68
      Abstract: HIV counselling and testing (HCT) is the critical initial step to provide Prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) intervention. Though HCT for PMTCT intervention has been focused at antenatal and intra-natal periods, postnatal intervention is still needed to prevent the 5-15% risk of transmission during breastfeeding. With Baccilus-Calmette-Guerin(BCG) vaccine at immunization clinic in Nigeria showing 76.41% uptake in 2010, there is need to utilize the large immunization clinic attendance to increase access to HCT/PMTCT services among women of child bearing age.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.148
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating Parental Knowledge of Bacterial Meningitis

    • Authors: Z.C. Levine; I. Agyeman, D. Ansong
      Pages: 69 - 70
      Abstract: Bacterial meningitis is a major cause of under-five mortality, especially in developing countries, with 9% of under-five deaths in 2016 caused by either meningitis or sepsis. Parental knowledge of disease affects ability to take health actions on behalf of their children. This study aimed to assess prior knowledge of bacterial meningitis in parents of children admitted to KATH with suspected meningitis or suspected sepsis.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.151
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Predictors of Tuberculosis Treatment Outcomes in Rural, Central India,
           2003 – 2015

    • Authors: T. Laux; S. Patil, B. Ghali, Y. Jain, R. Kataria
      First page: 69
      Abstract: Individual patient characteristics are known to influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment outcomes. We designed a retrospective study which measured how demographic, temporal and geographic characteristics affected TB treatment outcomes in our population.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.150
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Social Media Based Prevention Approach: A Content Analysis of YouTube
           Videos Related to HIV/AIDS Awareness and Prevention

    • Authors: M.A. Mamun; H. Omer, K. Pervin, T. Turin
      First page: 70
      Abstract: As a consequence of rapid digitalization and increased internet access, YouTube is now an adjunct to the traditional information dissemination tools for disease prevention. We performed a content analysis of YouTube videos related to HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention to identify the characteristics and usefulness of these videos.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.153
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Immunological Impact of HTLV-1 on Latent Tuberculosis

    • Authors: M. Lobaina; W. Hertzing, N. Vasquez, M. Montes
      First page: 70
      Abstract: Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-1) is associated with increased susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (TB) (1). Patients with active tuberculosis have a higher prevalence of HTLV-1 infection, compared with general population. HTLV-1 and TB coinfection increases the mortality rate of TB (1). The control of latent TB is highly dependent on the Th1 response (2). HTLV-1 infection causes proliferation of CD4+ T cells and an increased spontaneous production of IFN-γ (3). The underlying mechanism by which HTLV-1 increases severity and susceptibility of tuberculosis is poorly understood.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.152
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Trends of Incidence of Childhood and Adolescent Cancers in Kampala and
           Wakiso Districts, Uganda: 2009 to 2014

    • Authors: D.B. Abila; B. Fred
      Pages: 71 - 72
      Abstract: Cancer is relatively rare in childhood compared to later in life. Worldwide, the common malignant diseases of childhood are leukaemia, lymphomas, central nervous system tumors and embryonic solid tumors whereas among the adolescents, sarcomas of bone and soft tissue, and tumors of the male and female genital tracts. In Africa, the distribution of childhood cancers is quite similar, commonest being Kaposi sarcoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, retinoblastoma, leukaemia and Hodgkin lymphomas.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.157
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Analyzing the Emergency Triage Logbook Components of Road Traffic Accident
           Victims at AaBET Hospital in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    • Authors: Y. Abebe; T. Dida, D. Silvestri, E. Yisma
      First page: 71
      Abstract: Among African nations, Ethiopia has among the highest burden of road traffic accidents (RTA). Each year, the country loses around 3000 people from RTA. Nevertheless, there is a paucity of research on RTA victims presenting to urban emergency departments (EDs) in Ethiopia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.156
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Childhood Epilepsy Misconceptions In Sudan- A Descriptive Cross-Sectional
           Sudy

    • Authors: M. Abdalgadir; I. Noor, S. Nasur
      First page: 71
      Abstract: Epilepsy is one of the most prevalent non-communicable diseases worldwide. Stigma attached to epilepsy carries a greater burden than the disease itself. In Sudan, as in many low- and middle- income countries (LMICs) there is very limited research addressing neurological disorders in general, and epilepsy in particular. Misinformation and misconceptions should be identified and corrected for optimal care and management. This study was done to evaluate the knowledge, attitude and practices of mothers toward their epileptic children.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.155
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Awareness and Health-seeking Behavior of Urban Residents for NCD in
           Ethiopia

    • Authors: Y.T. Bayou; M. Bejiga, H. Tilahun
      Pages: 72 - 73
      Abstract: In Ethiopia, a double burden of disease is already emerging at the early stage of the epidemiological transition, with a mix of persistent, emerging, and re-emerging infectious diseases and increasing prevalence of chronic conditions and injuries. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward health care services and the current practices in healthcare related to NCD services in urban settings where JSI’s Strengthening Ethiopia’s Urban Health Program is being implemented.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.159
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Identifying Optimal Waist Circumference Cut-off Points for Central Obesity
           in Indigenous Guatemalans

    • Authors: M.A. Luna; R. Asturias-Luna, A. Rivera-Andrade, M. Chen, C. Mendoza-Montano, D. Burt, J. González
      First page: 72
      Abstract: Risk factors for Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) are now increasingly prevalent in developing countries. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) has recommended ethnic specific waist circumference (WC) thresholds, 90 cm for men and 80 cm for women from Central and South America based on limited data while the AHA and WHO recommends 102 and 88 cm. We aimed to identify the optimal WC cut off points to predict different CVD risk factors in an indigenous population in Guatemala as an alternative and more cost-effective method to assess risk in a resource limited setting.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.158
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Social Determinants of Depression in the Caribbean: A Systematic Review

    • Authors: C.R. Brown; I. Hambleton, N. Sobers-Grannum, S. Hercules, N. Unwin, E. Harris, R. Wilks, M. MacLeish, L. Sullivan, M. Murphy
      Pages: 73 - 74
      Abstract: Depressive disorders is the largest contributor to years lived with disability in the Caribbean, adding >900 in 2013. Depression is a risk factor for suicide and increased adverse outcomes of acute and chronic illnesses. Social inequalities influence the occurrence of depression. Yet little is known about the social inequalities of this condition. In support of the 2011 Rio Political Declaration on addressing health inequities, this article presents a systematic review of the role of social determinants on depression and its adverse outcomes in the Caribbean.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.161
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of Enhanced Kampala Advanced Trauma Course at Mulago Hospital,
           Uganda: A Mixed Methods Study

    • Authors: K. Bellardi; T. Rosa, R. Dicker
      First page: 73
      Abstract: Preventable death and disability due to traumatic injury is increasing in Uganda. The Kampala Advanced Trauma Course (KATC) was established to address the gaps in knowledge and skills of med/surg interns when managing trauma patients in low resource settings. This three-day course is mandatory for interns in the medical/surgical rotation at Mulago Hospital and a new scenario-based moulage component is being integrated into KATC. This is the first study that aims to determine students' immediate knowledge retention as well as describe perceptions of course strengths, weaknesses, and clinical feasibility.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.160
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Perceptions of Vaginal Illness Related to Water Quality in the Coastal
           Ouest Region of Haiti

    • Authors: K.S. Chapman; E. Wood, S. McKune, V.B.D.R. Madsen
      Pages: 74 - 75
      Abstract: There is a need for information on the perceptions of health concerns from a local perspective since resource availability and behavior expectations differ widely by social structure and region. Cultural competency, such as accurate definitions of health and illness are an integral part of developing effective medical interventions and educational initiatives because they allow research to respond directly to public needs, misconceptions, or behavioral practices.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.164
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Mortality in
           China, 1973-2005

    • Authors: X. Changfa; C. Wanqing
      First page: 74
      Abstract: To describe geographical variation in nasopharyngeal carcinoma mortality over time, we analysed nasopharyngeal carcinoma mortality data from three retrospective national surveys on causes of death in recent decades in China.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.163
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Best Practice Guidance for the Use of Strategies to Improve Retention in
           Randomised Trials: Results From Two Consensus Development Workshops

    • Authors: V.C. Brueton; S. Stenning, F. Stevenson, J. Tierney, G. Rait
      First page: 74
      Abstract: Loss to follow-up in randomised clinical trials (RCTs) can lead to biased results. Evidence from a Cochrane review identified that monetary incentives and some postal communication strategies improve retention in RCTs. A related qualitative study found retention strategies are routinely used without knowledge of their effect. As no guidance for the use of retention strategies in RCTs exists, we developed consensus based guidance for the use of retention strategies in RCTs based on the evidence available.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.162
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Pediatric Burn Injuries in Northern Laos

    • Authors: D. Cheung; M.-K. Jung, K. Douangdala, D. Bouapao, C. Sanderson
      Pages: 75 - 76
      Abstract: Burn injuries represent the third most common type of trauma experienced by the pediatric population and are a significant cause of pediatric mortality and lifelong disability worldwide. The current global burden of burn injuries is profoundly inequitable with low and middle-income countries (LMICs) carrying approximately 90% of total burn cases. The region of Southeast Asia carries the highest annual incidence of burn injuries at 243 per 100,000 population. Children in LMICS, like Laos, have been shown to be at higher risk of burn injuries- through flame burns or scalding.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.166
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Association between Childhood Abuse and Health Risk Behaviors among
           Chinese College Students

    • Authors: Y. Chen; Q.-Q. He
      First page: 75
      Abstract: Little is known about the link between child abuse and health risk behaviors among Chinese college students.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.165
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Preventative Healthcare in Post-Soviet Armenia: Providing Education and
           Screenings to Expand Awareness of Noncommunicable Diseases

    • Authors: H.Z. Wright; E. Gavin, N. Channell, B. Craner, K. Amirkhanashvili, M. Hovhannisyan
      Pages: 76 - 77
      Abstract: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) account for more than 75% of deaths globally on an annual basis. Cardiovascular disease (CVD), cancer, diabetes, and respiratory disease (CDC) are the most prominent NCDs which, while typically unique to the developed world, are growing in prominence in post-soviet nations. In Armenia, mortality from chronic preventable NCDs is over 90%, with a 30% yearly risk for individuals between 30-70 years of age (WHO). Education, prevention, health screenings and cost-effective treatment options would be a boon to Armenia and all developing nations’ efforts to combat barriers to NCD reduction.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.168
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Barriers to Cardiovascular Disease Secondary Prevention Care in the West
           Bank, Palestine - A Health Professional Perspective

    • Authors: V.J. Collier
      First page: 76
      Abstract: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are fast-becoming a global burden on health due to the rise in the rates of conditions such as cardiovascular disease (CVD), increasingly noticeable in developing countries. There is a dearth of earlier studies relating specifically to patients and their capacity for risk factor behaviour change within secondary care settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.167
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Chance to Thrive, Not Just Survive Ebola: A Model for International
           Psychosocial Support Programming in Emergency and Disaster Settings

    • Authors: A. Decosimo; C.R. Boland
      Pages: 77 - 78
      Abstract: Exposure to community-wide trauma during childhood, such as the Ebola epidemic, is linked to long-term physical and mental health consequences. Psychosocial and mental health services are known to reduce the impact of trauma, yet access is inadequate in resource limited communities. Child-centered, expressive art therapy techniques are proven to improve health outcomes after a traumatic event. In June 2015, Playing to Live (PTL) launched an innovative psychosocial support program utilizing expressive arts techniques to meet this service gap in Liberia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.171
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Prevalence of Proximal DVT in Orthopaedic Trauma Patients in Northern
           Tanzania Without the Routine Use of Thromboprophylaxis

    • Authors: E. Bulat; S. Davey, H. Massawe, A. Pallangyo, A. Premkumar, N. Sheth
      First page: 77
      Abstract: The standard-of-care for lower limb orthopaedic trauma in Tanzania is associated with prolonged, bed-based immobilization. This, along with a nearly complete lack of thromboprophylaxis, significantly raises the risk for deep vein thrombosis (DVT). However, there have been few studies on DVT prevalence in East African patients. We aimed to estimate the cross-sectional prevalence of proximal DVT in lower limb orthopaedic trauma patients in northern Tanzania.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.170
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Malnutrition and Associated Factors among Community-dwelling Elderly in
           Sri Lanka

    • Authors: H.D.W.T. Damayanthi; F.M. Moy, L.A. Khatijah, S.D. Dharmaratne
      First page: 77
      Abstract: Malnutrition among elderly is a multi-dimensional problem which predisposes them to increased risks of disability, hospitalisation and mortality. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of and associated factors for malnutrition in community-dwelling elderly.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.169
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • I think we can be controlled:' A Mixed-Method Comparative Study of
           Multidimensional Health Locus of Control and (un)Healthy Days in India and
           the United States

    • Authors: T.D.V. Dye; D. Li, M. Demment, S. Groth, D. Fernandez, J.G. Pérez-Ramos, A. Dozier
      Pages: 78 - 79
      Abstract: Global health education and health intervention strategies rely upon health behavior change models that assume individuals perceive they control their own health. Particularly in the context of economic and social inequality, this assumption may be false. Thus, achieving individual health improvement through behavior change can be challenging. This analysis aimed to evaluate if and how health locus of control - perception that one’s health was controlled by internal or external factors - related to healthy/unhealthy days.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.173
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Money or Knowledge? Behavioral Aspects of Malnutrition

    • Authors: K. Donato
      First page: 78
      Abstract: Malnutrition accounts for nearly half of child deaths worldwide. Children who are well-nourished are better able to learn in school, grow into more physically capable adults, and require less health care during childhood and adulthood. Moreover, it is difficult to make up for poor childhood nutrition later in life. Prior surveys from the study region, Oromia, Ethiopia, suggest that many mothers know how to correctly respond to a hypothetical situation where a young child exhibits poor growth. However, mothers frequently appear unaware about their own children’s growth deficiencies.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.172
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Relationship Between Patients Sense of Wellbeing and Adherence to ARTs

    • Authors: V.A. Enejoh; B. Awesu, A. Olutola, A.E. Nwandu, E.E. Ezeanolue
      Pages: 79 - 80
      Abstract: Poor adherence to antiretroviral drugs can result in serious health consequences including emergence of opportunistic infections. There is limited data particularly in resource-limited settings like Nigeria that examines the relationship between sense of well-being and adherence to ARV’s. Identification of negative correlates of adherence can contribute to developing a “risk profile” that care providers can use to identify patients “at risk “of being non-adherent and thus provide interventions to enhance adherence.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.175
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Avoiding “A Massive Spin-off Effect in West Africa and Beyond”: The
           Tobacco Industry’s Role in Stymieing Tobacco Control in Nigeria

    • Authors: C.O. Egbe; S.A. Bialous, S. Glantz
      First page: 79
      Abstract: Nigeria plays important economic and political roles in Africa and is a significant market for the tobacco industry. This study describes the tobacco industry’s efforts to block Nigeria’s early tobacco control attempts, especially the Tobacco Smoking (Control) Decree 20 of 1990, and efforts to strengthen it in 1995.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.174
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence of Presbyopia, Presbyopia Correction Coverage and Barriers to
           Uptake Eye-Care Services for Near-Vision Impairments among Indigenous
           Population in Northern part of Bangladesh

    • Authors: N. Ferdausi
      Pages: 80 - 81
      Abstract: Presbyopia is an age-related loss of lens accommodation that results in an inability to focus at near distances. Uncorrected presbyopia is the most common cause of visual impairment and has a substantial impact on quality of life. The purposes of this study were to determine the prevalence of presbyopia, presbyopia correction coverage (PCC) and self-perceived barriers to accessing services for near vision impairment in financially challenged, mostly illiterate indigenous population in northern rural part of Bangladesh.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.177
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Association between Fasting Blood Glucose and Liver Cancer Risk in
           Chinese Males: A Prospective Cohort Study

    • Authors: X. Feng; G. Wang, Z. Lv, S. Chen, L. Wei, Y. Chen, W. Yang, S. Wu, M. Dai, N. Li, J. He
      First page: 80
      Abstract: Fasting blood glucose (FBG) has been suggested to be associated with the risk of cancer, however, the relationship hasn’t been studied in detail among Chinese people. A large prospective cohort was performed to investigate the association between FBG levels and incident liver cancer risk in Chinese males.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.176
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Identifying Daily Stress, Family Conflict and Health Care Resource Gaps at
           the Sri Lankan Tamil Refugee Camps in India: Implications for Developing
           an Evidence-based Family Intervention for Refugees

    • Authors: M. George
      Pages: 81 - 82
      Abstract: Numerous epidemiological studies have shown that daily stressors are associated with refugees’ physical/psychological health difficulties. Research has also identified strong associations between refugee health difficulties and complex refugee family dynamics. The dearth of scientific knowledge on complex refugee family dynamics has resulted in a lack of family-based interventions in many host countries. This gap could be due to the failure to address multidimensional changes, complexities experienced by refugee families over time, and uncertainty in the field over which of these elements to address first.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.180
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Using Saliva as a Biomaterial for Screening of Non-Communicable Diseases
           in African Countries

    • Authors: A. Gatarayiha; C. Mumena, D. Uwayezu, M. Razzaque
      First page: 81
      Abstract: There is an increased research effort for identifying, understanding and intervening the rising of physical, emotional and financial burdens of non-communicable diseases in African countries including Rwanda. At present, identifying the blood-based markers is the gold standard for monitoring most of the non-communicable diseases, including diabetes, hypertension and obesity. However, blood-based biomarker studies are not always convenient and risk free; particularly in African countries where such blood-based analysis poses risk of infection & disease transmission.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.179
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Perceptions of Breast Cancer among Muslim Women in Ghana: An Opportunity
           for Targeted Breast Health Education in Sub Saharan Africa

    • Authors: A. Gyedu; C.E. Gaskill, G. Boakye, B. Anderson, B. Stewart
      First page: 81
      Abstract: The burden of breast cancer continues to increase in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). Within this, Muslim women are observed to present with more advance disease and worse outcomes. With mammography absent and widespread clinical breast examination (CBE) lacking, screening often relies on breast self-examination (BSE). However, little is known regarding the role of religion in a woman’s perceptions and practice of breast health.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.178
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • War-Related Injuries and Surgical Procedures in Syria

    • Authors: M. Hariri; M. Hani, H. Al-Nahhas, A. Al-Kassem, T.B. Erickson
      Pages: 82 - 83
      Abstract: Despite its highly publicized nature, little is known about the burden of injuries and illnesses in the Syrian war. Syrian healthcare providers care for patients with limited resources in health facilities that are under attack. We report health statistics from Syrian hospitals over a 6-month period in 2016.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.182
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Prevalence of Depression and its Correlation with Healthcare Barriers
           in Urban Islamabad

    • Authors: M. Haque; A. Choudhury, A. Haque, R. Blackwood
      First page: 82
      Abstract: The prevalence of mental illness in Pakistan is thought to be very high albeit few studies assessing depression have ever been conducted there, particularly post 2001. Even fewer studies have been carried out in well-to do urban areas. This study was hence done in an upscale residential sector of Islamabad, Pakistan in order to assess the prevalence of depression and understand if an association exists between barriers to healthcare access and depression.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.181
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Osteoporosis-related knowledge and health beliefs among female community
           leaders in Peru

    • Authors: M. Sava; E. Hsieh, P. Garcia, D. Mabey
      Pages: 83 - 84
      Abstract: Postmenopausal women are at high risk for osteoporosis, and early adoption of osteoporosis-preventative behaviours, such as physical activity and dietary calcium intake, can help mitigate this risk. Behavioural studies have shown that knowledge and health beliefs are key factors associated with adoption of healthy behaviours. There are few such studies regarding osteoporosis in South America. Our aim was to conduct an exploratory study evaluating osteoporosis-related knowledge and health beliefs among a group of female community leaders in Peru, who may potentially serve as promoters of bone health in future community-based osteoporosis interventions.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.184
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Anemia in Ecuador: The Journey to a Sustainable Intervention in
           a Global Health Nursing Course

    • Authors: S. Heaston; A.S. Romero
      First page: 83
      Abstract: Collaborative efforts of a College of Nursing from a University in the western United States and a non-profit organization based in Guayaquil, Ecuador have helped to build healthier communities. Global Health experiences have been a part of the nursing program at this University for the past twelve years. Due to economic difficulties of the families in this area, many children were coming to school hungry. This prompted a local non-profit organization to seek assessments and interventions in order to better be able to understand the nutritional needs of these children.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.183
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Funding Flows for the Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery
           (GICS): Lessons Learned

    • Authors: L.F. Goodman; A. Linden, G. Jensen, N. Kaseje, N. Wright, E. St-Louis, Y. Yousef, H. Wissanji, M. Cheung, D. Ozgediz, D. Poenaru, K. Lakhoo, S. Greenberg, E. Ameh, K. Oldham, S. Bickler, D. Farmer
      Pages: 84 - 85
      Abstract: Despite surgical conditions accounting for an estimated 30% of the global burden of disease, and children comprising up to 50% of the population in the lowest-resource settings, the funds available for global children’s surgery delivery are limited and poorly defined. Further, the focus of prior global health efforts has traditionally been determined by funding, often discounting the experience and priorities of local providers. Thus, our goal was to describe the funding associated with a unique initiative dedicated to improve children’s surgical care, the Global Initiative for Children’s Surgery (GICS), which prioritizes the perspectives of providers from low-resource settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.186
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Systematic Review of the Diseases Interaction between Helminthic
           Infections and Diabetic Mellitus

    • Authors: N.S.N. Htun; N. Probst-Hensch, C. Daubenberger, P. Odermatt
      First page: 84
      Abstract: The hygiene hypothesis indicated that a lack of exposure to microorganisms or parasites during childhood increases the chances of having autoimmune diseases due to alteration of natural immune system development. The purpose of the review is to summarize the current knowledge and updates of any epidemiological association between helminthic infections and their interactions on diabetic metabolism.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.185
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Demographics and Mortality Outcomes of Neurotrauma in Guatemala City

    • Authors: M. Kheng; S. Asturias, J.C. Puyana
      Pages: 85 - 86
      Abstract: In Guatemala, trauma is the leading cause of productive years of life lost and the fourth leading cause of death, but no published data is available on the incidence of neurotrauma. This study was conducted to obtain basic demographic information on traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients at the second highest-volume hospital in the country; determine whether TBI severity and other demographic variables correlated to poor outcomes; and place this information in the context of neurotrauma worldwide.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.188
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Use of Ultrasound in an Outpatient Primary Care Clinic in Mozambique

    • Authors: A.B. Lyons; T. Belsches, T. Robertson, P. Veldkamp, E. Demetria, C. Kensler
      First page: 85
      Abstract: Ultrasound is a valuable inpatient diagnostic tool in developing countries, where other types of imaging may not be available. It is not known how ultrasound technology contributes to patient care in a limited-resource, outpatient primary care setting. This information is vital to developing appropriate training programs for practitioners in this setting. This study aimed to quantify the number, type, indication and usefulness of ultrasound at an urban health center in Beira, Mozambique.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.187
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Impact of Helmet Usage on Clinical Presentation and Outcome of Traumatic
           Brain Injury in Motorcycle Operators in Cambodia

    • Authors: S. Gupta; V. Iv, K. Klaric, K. Park
      First page: 86
      Abstract: Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) contribute heavily to burden of disease in Cambodia, where motorcycles are an increasingly common mode of transportation despite low rates of helmet usage. We sought to quantify the protective effect of helmets for TBIs and looked for an association between severity of injury and functional outcome with helmet usage at the time of accident.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.190
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Determinants of Occupational Injuries among Building Construction Workers
           in Kampala City, Uganda

    • Authors: A. Kiconco; N. Ruhinda, V. Kyobutungi, S. Watya, W. Bazeyo
      First page: 86
      Abstract: About 1,000 people die and close 860,000 people sustain injury at work daily globally. Health and safety improvement requires strong evidence, but most studies focus on general causes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.189
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Depression and Anxiety Disorders in Child and Adolescent Populations in
           Low and Middle Income Countries: A Review

    • Authors: S. Yatham; S. Sivathasan, R. Yoon, T. da Silva, A.V. Ravindran, S.E. Levitt
      First page: 87
      Abstract: The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that mental illness accounts for 14% of the global burden of disease. Depression and anxiety disorders are among the most common mental illnesses –constituting the 4th and 26th most disabling disorders, respectively – and often have their onset in childhood or adolescence. Although the majority of the world’s population lives in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs), very little research addresses mental health in these nations, particularly in childhood and adolescence.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.192
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Partnerships for Late Stage T4 Translation Research in Low and
           Middle Income Countries

    • Authors: D.G. Leventhal; L.A. Salicrup
      First page: 87
      Abstract: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute’s (NHLBI) Center for Translation Research and Implementation Science (CTRIS)’ mission is developing a robust, integrated and coordinated portfolio of late stage (T4) translation research and training activities domestically and in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Partnerships with public health and clinical practitioners, government agencies, and the private sector are essential to late stage (T4) translation research, for testing optimal and sustainable implementation strategies for proven effective intervention.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.191
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Community Perception of Solid Waste Management (SWM) in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    • Authors: S.N. Ahmed; A.M. Sinha, M. Haider, H. Craddock
      First page: 88
      Abstract: Managing Solid Waste in the rapidly growing city of Dhaka, the capital city of Bangladesh is a great concern. The municipal organization responsible for solid waste management (SWM) has tried different approaches to address the SWM challenges, however more research is needed to find more affordable, acceptable ways to manage waste. Presently the waste from households, markets, and restaurants is collected together, and waste collectors separate organic waste and inorganic waste without any safety measures.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.197
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Exploring Community-Supported-Agriculture Farmshare Programs; Need for
           reinforcing better Lifestyle Choices especially in Disadvantaged
           Population Settings

    • Authors: F. Agboola; P. Herring, M. Ghamsary, N. Modeste, D. Handysides, K. Oda
      First page: 88
      Abstract: The rising obesity and associated co-morbidity problems the United States has indication for a multi-sectoral approach of which expanding healthy food alternatives and improving their accessibility are pivotal. The perceived or reported non-affordability of healthier food options in Community-Supported-Agriculture programs compared to global-scale retail fast-food options especially in people living below poverty line may also compound the obesity epidemic. The carbon/ecological footprints associated with global-chain-retail-mechanized agriculture also impacts the ecosystem which is not spared from their aftereffect.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.196
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Water Use of Diets in India

    • Authors: F.B. Harris; R. Green, E. Joy, A. Haines, A. Dangour
      Pages: 89 - 90
      Abstract: India’s fresh water use is dominated by agriculture, but diminishing groundwater supply and potential changes to rainfall threaten future food production. Quantifying the water use of food can inform policy makers and help plan for future water scenarios. This includes investigating water use of food types, diets and differences between socio-demographic groups. This research aims to provide an initial insight into the water use of diets in India using the water footprint (WF) assessment method.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.200
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Sustainable Departure: Examining Exit Strategies of a Multi-sector NGO
           in Zambia

    • Authors: S. Gandhi; S. Marquez, C. Kasanga, J. Banda
      First page: 89
      Abstract: Living and working alongside the people of Zambia in the summer of 2016, the author was exposed to the efforts, struggles, and rewards of a sub-Saharan NGO endeavoring to make an impact in the region. In particular, he noticed the exit strategies as critical components of the international development agenda.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.199
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Persistent Environmental Toxicants in Breast Milk and Infant Growth

    • Authors: R. Criswell; V. Lenters, S. Mandal, N. Iszatt, M. Eggesbø
      First page: 89
      Abstract: Many environmental toxicants are passed to infants through breast milk, and exposure to toxicants during the perinatal period can alter growth patterns, impairing growth or increasing obesity risk. Most previous studies have evaluated toxicant levels in maternal serum or cord blood, whereas breast milk is a better measure of postnatal exposure. Further, previous studies have focused on only a few toxicants at a time. We explored levels of 27 toxicants in breast milk and their association with rapid infant growth, a marker for later obesity.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.198
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • GEOHealth - The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and
           Occupational Health: Environmental Health Science Research Training in
           Suriname

    • Authors: M.Y. Lichtveld; C. Zijlmans, D.R.A. Mans, W.B. Hawkins
      Pages: 90 - 91
      Abstract: Suriname and other Caribbean Region countries suffer a triple public health burden: high perinatal mortality, environmental contamination, and a lack of environmental policies. The Caribbean Consortium for Research in Environmental and Occupational Health (CCREOH) is designed to examine the impact of exposures to neurotoxicants on maternal and child health and increase research capability. Tulane University (TU), the Academic Hospital Paramaribo Scientific Research Center Suriname and Anton de Kom University of Suriname (AdeKUS) are collaborating to strengthen global environmental and occupational health (EOH) research capacity specifically in Suriname and the Caribbean Region.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.202
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Novel Approach to One Health Education and Collaboration across Academic
           Institutions and the Public/Private Sector

    • Authors: M.S. Harris; S. Kennedy-Stoskoph, J. Casani, C. Woods, P. Cowen, W. Pan
      First page: 90
      Abstract: The interinstitutional One Health course introduces the concept of One Health as an important approach to a holistic understanding of the prevention of disease and the maintenance of human, animal and environmental health.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.201
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Implementing Planetary Health Competencies into Medical Education

    • Authors: T. Iroku-Malize; B. Keber, N. Philippe
      Pages: 91 - 92
      Abstract: Planetary health is an emerging field in medicine dealing with the health of human civilization and the state of the natural systems on which it depends. It is the health of human civilisation and the state of the natural systems on which it depends. It has found its way into the curricula of school children and has now moved up into UME and GME. Richard Horton, editor of The Lancet, gave the keynote speech, “Making the Case for Planetary Health: Why and How” at the 2016 Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) conference.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.204
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Piloting a Model for Holistic Environmental Contamination Assessment that
           Could Be Implemented by Community Scientists

    • Authors: M.C. Hay; J. Levy, S. Mutiti, G. Filippelli, N. Munyinda, I. Nyambe, C. Nalweya Mundia, K. Jordan, C. Michelo
      First page: 91
      Abstract: Zambia has vast mineral resources that contribute to the country’s gross domestic product, but often have negative impacts on the communities that surround the mines. Kabwe is the location of a former lead and zinc mine open between 1906 and 1994; its environmental impacts are still affecting the surrounding communities. Despite numerous remediation efforts in the past 20 years, individual studies repeatedly have shown high lead blood levels of children and widespread soil contamination.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.203
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Disasters as a Global Health Topic: Understanding the Case of Haiyan in
           the Philippines

    • Authors: D.E.I. Lucero-Prisno
      Pages: 92 - 93
      Abstract: On 8 November 2013, typhoon Haiyan struck the central islands of the Philippines resulting in more than 6,000 deaths. This study seeks to characterize the global dimension of disasters through Haiyan and understand how it informs global health.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.206
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Drinking Water Provision and Quality in Low-Income Peri-Urban Communities
           of Lusaka, Zambia

    • Authors: J. Levy; C. Hay, R. Chandipo, K. Jordan, I. Nyambe, S. Mutiti
      First page: 92
      Abstract: Lusaka, Zambia, is a rapidly growing city with over 2 million people. About 65% of Lusaka’s population lives in unplanned, low-income, periurban communities with historically poor access to safe drinking water. Almost all of the supply for these communities comes from a vulnerable, karst aquifer system, severely impacted by human activities, especially waste disposal and sanitation. Water-borne disease is frequent, including diarrhea, dysentery and cholera. To address this problem, in the early 2000s, CARE International partnered with Zambian government agencies to establish Water Trusts in several communities, completely run by community residents.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.205
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Early Postnatal Care Service Utilization and its Correlates in Urban Areas
           of Ethiopia

    • Authors: Y.T. Bayou; M. Bejiga, D. Tesfamichael, H. Tilahun
      Pages: 94 - 95
      Abstract: According to the world health organization, access to immediate postnatal care service within the first three days after delivery reduces maternal and neonatal mortality significantly. Three fourths of the total deaths during the neonatal period occur in the first week of life (74.3%). During the first week, the first three days of life account for the highest number of deaths (37.6%, 8.4% and 10.7% of total neonatal deaths occur on days 0, 1 and 2 respectively).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.210
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Identifying Barriers to Accessing Maternal Health Care in Rural Morocco: A
           Qualitative Study

    • Authors: J. Baayd; S. Simonsen
      First page: 94
      Abstract: Over the past 30 years the Moroccan government has made enormous strides towards improving maternal health care for Moroccan women. However, improvements in maternal mortality outcomes for rural women have lagged far behind improvements for their urban counterparts. There is little data currently available to address the reasons for the disparity in outcomes. This study seeks to understand the experience of women giving birth in rural Morocco, and to identify some of the barriers those women face when accessing maternity care at a health facility.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.209
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Maternal Health Literacy and Maternal and Child Health Outcomes: A Review
           of the Literature

    • Authors: E. Azugbene
      First page: 94
      Abstract: The significance of maternal health literacy as a concern cannot be overstated because pregnancy for some women, may be the initial encounter with the health system especially in low-income populations. The ability of a woman to process, understand and apply health information is critical to the health of the fetus she carries and the child’s formative years after birth.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.208
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Association between Intimate Partner Violence and Depression Symptoms
           in a Cohort of Adolescent Girls and Young Women in Lilongwe, Malawi

    • Authors: S. Brar; N. Rosenberg, T. Phanga, B. Maseko, N. bhushan, D. Vansia, M. Chikhungu, T. Nthani, C. Bamuya, C. Libale, E. Madomola, L.-G. Bekker, A. Pettifor
      Pages: 95 - 96
      Abstract: Gender power differentials contribute to the high prevalence of intimate partner violence in sub-Saharan African countries such as Malawi. Adolescent girls and young women who are victims of such intimate partner violence may experience great psychological and emotional distress. The objective of this study is to examine the relationship between intimate partner violence (IPV) and symptoms of depression in a cohort of sexually active adolescent girls and women, aged 15-24 years.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.212
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Mentor Mothers’ Willingness to Engage Male Partners and Screen for
           Domestic Violence among HIV-Positive Women in Rural Nigeria

    • Authors: M. Belich; M. Bathnna, G. Nwanne, L. Cornelius, N. Sam-Agudu
      First page: 95
      Abstract: DV data among HIV-positive Nigerian women is scarce. Due to HIV and DV stigma, these women likely do not seek or receive help for DV. Mentor Mothers (MMs) are HIV-positive women trained to provide psychosocial support to other HIV+ women. We evaluated the willingness of MMs to engage male partners (MPs) and screen clients for DV.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.211
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Patterns in Personal and Home Care Products along Pregnancy in Puerto
           Rican woman from the Northern Karst Region: The Role of Socio-Demographic
           Characteristics

    • Authors: N.R. Cardona; Z. Rosario, C. Velez-Vega, J.F. Cordero, A. Alshawabkeh
      Pages: 96 - 97
      Abstract: A diversity of Personal and Home Care Products have been developed along the years, with the purpose of making our lives convenient and pleasant. Nonetheless, a concern has emerged in the scientific community for the study of chemicals substances used in personal and home care products regarding their potential for developmental health risks; specially in vulnerable populations such as pregnant woman. The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of personal and home care products used by Puerto Rican woman along pregnancy and the role played by socio-demographic characteristics in their usage.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.215
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • ‘Victims’ and ‘Perpetrators’ of Intimate Partner Violence among
           Young Persons in a high HIVßburden Rural Community in Western Kenya, 2014
           

    • Authors: B. Burmen
      First page: 96
      Abstract: Intimate partner violence (IPV) can lead to sexually transmitted infections, including HIV. We set out to assess the prevalence of IPV among young persons in Siaya County, a high HIV burden county.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.214
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Availability of Essential Drugs and Services for Children and Pregnant
           Women in the Barakese Sub-District of Ghana

    • Authors: J.B. Brooke; S. Woolsey, D. Ansong, E. Xorse Amuzu
      First page: 96
      Abstract: Forty seven percent of the population in Ghana lives in rural areas; centralization of the health system in urban and cities has resulted in the provision of limited health services in most rural communities.Vast disparities exist between the infant, under-five and maternal mortality rates between urban and rural communities. The World Health Organization (WHO) has defined a set of essential medications to prevent the most common complications of the puerperium and infancy and that are critical to best outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.213
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Ultra-Low Cost Uterine Balloon Tamponade Package Saves Lives among
           Women with Advanced Shock from Uncontrolled Postpartum Hemorrhage in Low
           Resource Settings

    • Authors: T. Burke; S. Danso-Bamfo, A. Cappetta, C. Masaki, M. Guha, M. Oguttu, S. Kargbo, M. Niang, V. Tarimo, M. Eckardt, B. Nelson
      Pages: 97 - 98
      Abstract: Advanced shock from uncontrolled postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal mortality in low-and middle-income countries, with 54,000 deaths in sub-Saharan Africa alone in 2015. First-line treatment for PPH includes administration of uterotonic agents, however, when hemorrhage persists, alternative methods are often employed, including aortic compression, uterine balloon tamponade (UBT), and surgical interventions such as B-Lynch compression sutures and ultimately hysterectomy.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.217
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Uptake of Post-abortion Care (PAC) Services and Acceptance of
           Post-Abortion Contraception in Remote Areas of Puntland, Somalia

    • Authors: M. Gallagher; K. Chukmuwalu, S. Baunach
      First page: 97
      Abstract: Abortion-related morbidities account for 7.9% of the burden of maternal death globally. In humanitarian settings, access to post-abortion care (PAC) services are extremely limited. Improving access to PAC and post-abortion contraception for crisis-affected women is crucial for preventing maternal mortality and morbidity.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.216
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Trends in the Use of Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptive Methods in
           Conflict Settings: A Retrospective Review of Health Facility Data in North
           Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo

    • Authors: C.G. Eldred; K. Morris, R. Amsalu, J. Ngoma, A. Cannon, S. Casey
      Pages: 98 - 99
      Abstract: Protracted conflict, as found in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), has far reaching implications for health. Unintended pregnancies, unsafe abortions, and violations of women’s reproductive rights are heightened during armed conflict. Recent Demographic Health Survey (DHS) data reveal continued low contraceptive prevalence and high unmet contraceptive need in DRC. Availability and access to long-acting reversible contraceptives (LARCs) is limited in humanitarian settings. Save the Children, in partnership with the Ministry of Health, has been providing a mix of contraceptive methods, clinical training of service providers, commodity provision, and community mobilization in North Kivu province since 2011.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.219
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Challenges and Successes of a Perinatal Community Health Worker Program
           for Pregnant Somali and Sudanese Refugee Women

    • Authors: J. Dyer; A.S. Tecle, A. Awan
      First page: 98
      Abstract: This presentation describes the challenges and successes of a Perinatal Community Health Worker (PCHWs) program for a unique group, pregnant Somali and Sudanese Refugee Women (SSRW) in the U.S. Many African refugees are resettled in metropolitan areas throughout the U.S. and a large portion of these people are from Somalia and Sudan. Pregnant African refugee women are often isolated in their new communities and must interface with a healthcare system that is outside their experience. While pregnancy may be safer in the new country, perinatal outcomes for these women are still poorer than other women of the resettled country.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.218
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Understanding the Relationship between Violence against Women-related Laws
           and Perceptions of Intimate Partner Violence among Women in Brazil

    • Authors: D.P. Evans; M. Vertamatti, S. Conchao
      Pages: 99 - 100
      Abstract: In March 2015, Brazil passed anti-femicide legislation to criminalize gender-motivated killings of women and stiffen existing penalties for perpetrators of violence against women (VAW). It is important to understand the impact of such laws on individual and community attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV), a common form of VAW. The aim of this study was to examine community perceptions and individual experiences of intimate partner violence (IPV) - one form of violence against women (VAW) - from the perspectives of women.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.221
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Nutritional Status of Schoolchildren in the Amazon Rainforest Interior of
           Multi-ethnic Suriname: the Influence of Age, Sex and Ethnicity

    • Authors: C.S.C. Essed; S. Mac Donald- Ottevanger, B. Jubitana, C. Zijlmans
      First page: 99
      Abstract: Adequate nutrition is critical for normal development during childhood. The nutritional status of schoolchildren living in the interior Suriname, South America, is of growing concern to the Medical Mission Primary Health Care Suriname (MM), that provides health care in this region. This study aims to evaluate the nutritional status of these schoolchildren.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.220
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effect of Job-Aids on Improving Family Planning Counseling: A Natural
           Experiment in Selected Rural Districts of Ethiopia

    • Authors: N. Fesseha; A.M. Karim, B. Yeshanew, W. Betemariam
      First page: 100
      Abstract: The increase in contraceptive prevalence rate (CPR) in Ethiopia from 15% in 2005 to 41% in 2014 is mostly (68%) contributed by injectable contraceptives. Providing injectable contraceptives is logistically burdensome and costly; moreover, the 34% discontinuation rate for the method also makes the national family planning (FP) program less effective. To address the matter, Ethiopia initiated community-based long acting reversible contraceptive (LARC) services—i.e., Implanon—in 2009. The strategy shifted the task of providing the LARC from higher level health facilities to community based health extension workers (HEWs).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.223
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Effect of Sanitary Pads and Menstrual Symptom Management on School
           Performance of Adolescent Girls in Rural Kenya: A Cluster Randomized Trial
           

    • Authors: J.C. Fazio; M. Irving, F. Marquez, M. Deissinger, A. Tomedi, C. Schmitt
      First page: 100
      Abstract: Access to education is an important social determinant for adolescent and maternal health. Despite the recognized importance of menstruation-related problems as a barrier to adolescent girls’ education, studies addressing this have failed to show improved school attendance. Additionally, school performance has not been studied in this context. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether the availability of menstrual products and ibuprofen would improve examination scores of seventh and eight grade girls.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.222
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Randomized-controlled Trial of a Livestock Asset Transfer Intervention
           to Improve Economic and Health Outcomes and Reduce Intimate Partner
           Violence in a Post-Conflict Setting

    • Authors: N. Glass; N. Perrin, M. Mpanano
      Pages: 101 - 102
      Abstract: In addition to the economic benefits of asset transfer programs evidence suggests that it is an effective vehicle for improving health; however, evidence is mixed on the impact of economc programs on gender equity outcomes, as measured here by male violence against their intimate female partner.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.226
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Transformed Women, Transformed Communities: Impact of Mental Health
           Support Groups for North Indian Women

    • Authors: N. Gailits; K. Mathias, E. Nouvet, P. Pillai, L. Schwartz
      First page: 101
      Abstract: Although major depression is one of the leading causes of premature death and disability in India, there is little infrastructure to provide mental health services in the highly populated North Indian state of Uttarakhand. The worldwide burden of depression is 50% higher in women than men, however Indian women experience the double burden of gender disadvantage and poverty which restricts their autonomy and access to social support, and increases their risk for common mental disorders (CMDs). In this low resource setting, community mental health (CMH) models of care may offer the best approach to supporting women with CMDs.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.225
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Exploration of the Prevalence of Depression amongst Obese Pregnant
           Women and the Relationship between Depression and Potential Demographic
           Risk Factors

    • Authors: H. Friedman; M. Li, R. Cronin, R. Taylor, L. McCowan
      First page: 101
      Abstract: Antenatal depression is a condition from which 8-29% of women suffers worldwide, and may be more prevalent in obese women and women of low socioeconomic status. Counties Manukau is a region of New Zealand that has a high prevalence of obesity and socioeconomic deprivation amongst its population. There are limited data concerning the issue of depression in pregnant women in this population. Additionally, the relationship between demographic characteristics and rates of depression in this population is unexplored.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.224
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Characterization of Emergency Care-seeking Patterns for Nontraumatic
           Conditions in Pregnant Women in the East African Setting, a Pilot Study

    • Authors: B.C.H. Griffith; I. Namagembe, A. Nakimuli, N. Basta
      Pages: 102 - 103
      Abstract: Many of the conditions contributing to maternal morbidity and mortality present as emergency conditions during and directly after pregnancy. The emergency care seeking patterns of pregnant women in low-resource settings, such as Uganda, are not well-characterized but could provide insight into opportunities to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality. We aimed to identify the most common emergency conditions among pregnant and postpartum women who present at the Obstetrics and Gynaecology Ward at Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH) in Kampala, Uganda.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.228
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Communities Care: Evaluation of a community led intervention to change
           social norms that sustain violence against women and girls in Somalia

    • Authors: N. Glass; M. Marsh, N. Perrin
      First page: 102
      Abstract: The goal of Communities Care is to create safer communities for women and girls by transforming harmful social norms that contribute to gender based violence (GBV) into social norms that uphold equality, safety and dignity. The prevention intervention provides information, resources and materials to achieve the local community engagement and action for prevention and response for social norms change in humanitarian settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.227
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Perceived Social Support and Depression amongst Pregnant and Postnatal
           Women with HIV in Nyanza, Kenya

    • Authors: Z.C. Heinemann; W. Reidy, M. Karanja, M. Syengo, D. Chege, R. Fayorsey
      Pages: 103 - 104
      Abstract: In order for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission (PMTCT) programs to be effective, they must identify pregnant women living with HIV, provide them with antiretroviral treatment (ART), support medication adherence, and retain patients to ensure that infants receive the appropriate care including final determination of HIV status. Previous research has demonstrated that depression is a barrier to retention in PMTCT programs and that perceived social support is a key facilitator.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.230
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Malaria Control Methods and Healthcare Access among Pregnant Women in
           Democratic Republic of the Congo

    • Authors: A. Hardee; A. Merianos, R. Vidourek, K. King
      First page: 103
      Abstract: Malaria is a major public health problem and life-threatening disease. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), 400 children die every day and almost half of these deaths are attributable to malaria. Malaria is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children under-5 in the DRC, accounting for an estimated 40% of outpatient visits and 40% of childhood mortality.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.229
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Multi-Center Study of Automated Breast Ultrasound System for the
           Diagnosis of Breast Cancer in China

    • Authors: M.-M. Jia; X. Lin, P. Liu, Y. Chen, L. Bao, S. Wang, X. Zhou, W. Feng, A. Li, Y. Qiao
      Pages: 104 - 105
      Abstract: Access to breast cancer screening in China is primarily limited by the shortage of qualified radiologists in primary hospitals. Automated Breast Ultrasound System(ABUS) is a potential method to alleviate current shortages in accessible breast cancer screening. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of ABUS by comparing it with Hand Held Ultrasound(HHUS) and Mammography(MAM).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.233
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Video Analysis System as a Tool to Improve the Quality of Basic Emergency
           Obstetric and Neonatal Care through Simulation Training in Bihar, India

    • Authors: A.T. Janjua; J. Dyer, H. Spindler, J. Sterne, S. Cohen, M. Morgan, A. Christmas, M. Bharat Shah, A. Das, D.D. Walker
      First page: 104
      Abstract: Limited-resources and expertise precluded satisfactory quality of care during childbirth in Bihar, India. UCSF and PRONTO International collaborated with CARE India to integrate on-site basic emergency obstetric and neonatal care (BEmONC) simulation and team-training into an ongoing mobile mentorship model in 320 primary health centers (PHCs). The feasibility and effectiveness of video analysis was evaluated for monitoring the uptake of evidence-based practices (EBP) and teamwork and communication (T&C) used in simulation.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.232
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Health, Information, Perception and Demographic Variables as Correlate of
           Gender Equality in Science Technology Engineering and Math (Stem)
           Education in South-West Nigeria

    • Authors: M.A. Iroaganachi; C. Nkiko, A. Eni
      First page: 104
      Abstract: With the level of efforts and interventions by researchers and organizations around the world towards gender equality in Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM), the number of women participation is still very low. UNESCO Institute for Statistics (2015) revealed that female representation is only about 30% of the total population in STEM while in Africa it is about 17% ( Ekine, 2013). This statistics, raises the question of what could be responsible for the resistant disparity? Could it be that girls at the foundational level do not have adequate career information about STEM and all it entails? What are their perceptions of Mathematics and sciences, are there some demographic issues? There is need to discover what the real causes of gender disparity in mathematics and sciences are from the junior secondary school, a period that precedes the choice subjects that form student’s career paths.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.231
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Rates of Viral Suppression among HIV-positive Women in Rural North-central
           Nigeria

    • Authors: D. Lee; G. Rinomhota, U.C. Anaba, N. Sam-Agudu
      Pages: 105 - 106
      Abstract: The effectiveness of antiretroviral drugs in prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) and suppression of viral load (VL) is well-documented. In addition, viral suppression is in line with the 90-90-90 global strategy of HIV elimination. To determine adherence and effectiveness of PMTCT treatment, we assessed VL in postpartum HIV-positive women enrolled in a large PMTCT implementation research study in rural North-Central Nigeria
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.235
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence of Teenage Pregnancy at Saint-Nicolas Hospital in Saint-Marc, a
           Community Hospital in Haïti

    • Authors: E.F. Julceus; O. Sainterant, R. St-Jean, N. Sohler, K. Israel
      First page: 105
      Abstract: Teenage pregnancy is a significant public health problem. It affects 10% of births worldwide and has harmful health effects on mothers and newborns. Additionally, it is stigmatized in many countries, resulting negative socioeconomic consequences. Several risk factors have been identified, however none of the previous studies conducted in the Caribbean explored the role of Carnival. Carnival is often thought to be conduit for unplanned sexual encounters. This study aimed to determine the proportion of teen pregnancy at Saint-Nicolas Hospital (HSN) broadly, and at the different points were the pregnant woman (PW) sought care as well as testing whether the proportion increased during the carnival period.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.234
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Advocacy for Women: Impact of Simulation-based Training

    • Authors: N. Lowy; M. Rota
      Pages: 106 - 107
      Abstract: Latin America is plagued by high maternal and infant mortality rates, often attributed to limited maternal healthcare provided by traditional birth attendants, or comadronas. This led to our development of a simulation-based culturally sensitive educational program specifically for these providers.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.237
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • New Narratives in Global Health: Using Stories and Storytelling to Promote
           Family Planning

    • Authors: R. Limaye; A. Ballard, E. Futrell, N. Ahmed, S. Ohkubo
      First page: 106
      Abstract: The use of stories and storytelling may provide a powerful approach to sharing knowledge, and empirical evidence illustrates that both approaches can impact global health outcomes. Stories and storytelling have the potential to spread knowledge by leveraging a traditional means of communication: the Humans of New York (HONY) initiative suggests that the power of a simple image and a few carefully-chosen words can influence individual knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. The Family Planning Voices initiative aims to document, through photography and interviews, the stories of individuals working to improve access to family planning around the world and share their experiences widely.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.236
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Clinical Skills for the Treatment of Postpartum Hemorrhage in a
           Low-Resource Setting Using Two Simple, Low-Cost Training Models

    • Authors: H. Lytle; P. Tembo, R.J. Pope, J. Sclafani
      First page: 107
      Abstract: Obstetric hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal mortality worldwide. There are simple techniques available to treat postpartum hemorrhage, however hands-on skills training can be difficult in low-resource settings where high fidelity models are not available.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.239
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Knowledge and Attitude of Women Aged 30-49 Years towards Menopause in
           Gulele Sub-City of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    • Authors: N. Eshetu; S. Ly, E. Yisma
      First page: 107
      Abstract: Menopause is a natural phenomenon marked by a reduction in estrogen and progesterone levels and eventual cessation of menstruation occurring in women approaching middle age. Appropriate understanding of the physical, social, and psychological transitions during menopause differs across countries and cultures. There is a paucity of research on the menopausal experience of women living in urban Ethiopia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.238
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A National Cervical Cancer Screening Program in Haiti

    • Authors: R. McCurdy; K. Taylor, V. DeGennaro
      Pages: 108 - 109
      Abstract: In Haiti, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer and cancer-related death due to the lack of widespread screening. Haiti has the highest prevalence of cervical cancer in the Western Hemisphere. With the Ministry of Health, we strived to create an effective, national cervical cancer screening program in efforts to increase the rate of early detection of cervical cancer and prevent invasive cervical cancer amongst women in Haiti.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.242
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Failures in the emergency obstetric and neonatal care referral chain lead
           to high rates of intrapartum stillbirth in southwestern Uganda

    • Authors: A. McCue; H. Beidinger, L.N. Ahern, A. Radomsky, B. McCarthy, A. Geoffrey, F. Kaharuza
      First page: 108
      Abstract: Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (CEmONC) services are an essential component of maternal and child health care. When failures or inadequacies exist in CEmONC systems, poor outcomes such as high maternal mortality and intrapartum stillbirth rates persist. An estimated 40,000 stillbirths occur in Uganda per year. The Saving Mothers Giving Life initiative (SMGL) has implemented a surveillance system known as Birth Weight and Age-at-death Boxes for Intervention and Evaluation System (BABIES) in several Ugandan districts.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.241
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Disrespect and abuse during childbirth in district Gujrat, Pakistan: A
           quest for respectful maternity care

    • Authors: Z. Azhar; O. Oyebode, H. Masud
      First page: 108
      Abstract: Disrespectful and abusive practices at health facilities during childbirth discourage many women from seeking care at facilities. This may result in increased maternal morbidities and mortalities. Despite severe impacts, such practices remain hidden and are rarely reported in developing countries. Pakistan is one of the countries with the highest burden of maternal, newborn and infant mortalities in South Asia. Nationally 61% of women use facilities for the delivery of their first child but not for subsequent children.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.240
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Translating Political Commitment to Action: WHO, AMR, and the One Health
           Approach

    • Authors: P. Manandhar-Sasaki
      Pages: 110 - 111
      Abstract: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is an urgent global concern, extending beyond the human and animal health sector. Rendering previously treatable conditions fatal, AMR has the potential to severely hinder attainment of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) adopted by the 70th UN General Assembly. If action is not taken, an estimated 10 million people will die annually due to AMR in 2050. The World Health Organization (WHO) was established in 1948 to ensure the highest possible level of physical, mental, and social health by all peoples.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.246
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • International Research Funded by the US National Institutes of Health
           (NIH): A Bibliometric Analysis of Publications with NIH Funding and Non-US
           Authors – 2014

    • Authors: P. Kilmarx; A. Livinski
      First page: 110
      Abstract: Background: NIH is the largest funder of biomedical research worldwide. We characterized NIH’s international collaboration by analyzing publications in 2014 that were funded by NIH and included at least one non-U.S. author.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.245
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Involvement of Men in Childcare: National Policy Efforts of Croatia,
           India, and Mexico

    • Authors: S. Kasymova; K. Walsemann, J. Thrasher, D. Billings
      First page: 110
      Abstract: Since ratification of the International Conference of Population and Development (ICPD) Programme of Action, the importance of promoting men's participation in childcare has been recognized globally as an important approach for achieving gender equality in all spheres of life. This research documents the national policy efforts that have been implemented in Croatia, India, and Mexico to increase men’s participation in childcare during the ICPD Programme of Action timeframe: 1995-2014.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.244
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Approach to Partnership Assessment for Global Health in
           Resource-limited Settings

    • Authors: T. Napier-Earle; A. Gibson, M. Mizwa, D. Nguyen, C. Daskevich
      Pages: 111 - 112
      Abstract: Designing global health programs and determining the appropriate partners to engage can be difficult. Program/project implementers often have limited time, funding and human resources to implement their project, making it necessary and convenient to partner with local, in-country or external partners to leverage resources.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.248
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Collective Action among Non-Governmental Organizations Working in Maternal
           and Child Health in Haiti

    • Authors: S. McCool
      First page: 111
      Abstract: Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) provide much needed social services to the people of Haiti, where abject poverty and inadequate infrastructure means the government relies heavily on NGOs to provide such services. Haiti has the second highest number of NGOs per capita in the world, second only to India. Despite the high number of NGOs, Haiti still experiences dismal health outcomes. Global public goods (such as health) are best provided when people and entities work together. It is therefore important to study collective action/cooperation among NGOs in order to gain a deeper understanding of the barriers to collective action/cooperation and how these barriers might be addressed.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.247
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Barriers that Nurse Practitioners Face as Primary Care Providers in the
           United States

    • Authors: C. Pando
      Pages: 112 - 113
      Abstract: There have long been concerns in the United States about shortages of primary care physicians. Expansion of coverage under the Affordable Care Act, along with increased specialization, and the growing and aging patient populations has increased the demand for care. Concerns about shortage have led to a variety of policy proposals, one of which would enhance the role of nurse practitioners in primary care. Past studies have found no difference in health status or satisfaction between patients treated by physicians and those treated by nurse practitioners.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.250
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Policy and Economic Considerations for the Provision of Global Public
           Goods: Biomedical Research and Development

    • Authors: C.L. Anderson; T. Reynolds, P. Biscaye, J. Knauer, C. O'Brien-Carelli
      First page: 112
      Abstract: The concept of global public goods represents a framework for organizing and financing international cooperation in global health research and development (R&D). Advances in scientific and clinical knowledge produced by biomedical R&D can be considered public goods insofar as they can be used repeatedly (non-rival consumption) and it is difficult or costly to exclude non-payers from gaining access (non-excludable). This paper considers the public good characteristics of biomedical R&D in global health and describes the theoretical and observed factors in the allocation R&D funding by public, private, and philanthropic sources.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.249
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Secondhand Smoke (SHS) Exposure and Perceived Health Risks of Tobacco Use
           among Urban Residents in Five Cities in China

    • Authors: P. Redmon; J. Huang, Z. Duan, Y. Duan, J. Li
      Pages: 113 - 114
      Abstract: Exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) causes many health problems. In China, 740 million non-smokers are exposed to SHS, which leads to approximately 100,000 deaths every year. To systematically assess SHS exposure and perceived health risks of tobacco use, China CDC collaborated with five cities, including Chengdu, Chongqing, Wuhan, Xiamen and Xi’an, to launch the Tobacco Questions for Surveys (TQS) in 2015.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.253
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Pre-Health Advisor Perspectives on Undergraduate Short-Term Global Health
           Experiences

    • Authors: J. Evert; T. Todd, S. Prasad
      First page: 113
      Abstract: The ethics and safety of short-term experiences in global health (STEGH) are of primary concern. With a proliferation of global health degrees and programs encouraging student global mobility, it is increasingly important to characterize STEGHs. Best practices and patient safety considerations suggest that pre-health students should not be conducting hands-on patient care while abroad. It is observed that pre-health students are often motivated to engage in STEGH, in part, because it provides experiences perceived to be beneficial when applying to professional schools.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.252
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Participatory Capacity Building Strategies for Improving Quality of Child
           Care Centers in Thailand

    • Authors: H. Petcharoen; N. Suwanpong, R. Ramaswamy
      First page: 113
      Abstract: Most of a child’s brain development takes place in the child's first 5 years. Children in child care centers (CCC) not meeting quality standards are at risk of transmitting communicable diseases that might impede development.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.251
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Constructing and Governing Partnerships for Capacity Building in
           Implementation Science

    • Authors: J. Sherry; S. Ski, K.-A. Jones
      Pages: 114 - 115
      Abstract: Partnership approaches are critical to strengthen institutional and leadership capacity in low- and middle-income countries – capacities to both conduct Implementation Research and Delivery Science (IRDS) and to utilize IRDS evidence to improve health outcomes. Institutional leadership and capacity development for IRDS is needed at multiple levels and demands novel approaches to generate high-quality evidence; to make findings accessible and relevant to real world problems; and to influence programs and policies.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.255
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Attacks on Health Facilities as an Indicator of the Human Cost of Conflict
           in Syria

    • Authors: S.E. Ri; T. Ogata, R. Snyder, R. Haar
      First page: 114
      Abstract: The primary indicator of the human cost of conflict has consistently been the number of armed forces and civilian deaths. Although it has been the best proxy available to measure the frequency and intensity of violence, the mortality rate is difficult to enumerate during or even after a conflict. In the case of the conflict in Syria, estimated mortality rates range from 250,000 to 470,000, highlighting the difficulty in obtaining accurate death tolls in a violent context.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.254
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Nurses Attitudes Towards Minor's Capacity to Consent: A Cross Sectional
           Study Done in Sri Lanka

    • Authors: S.R. Tissera; N. Silva
      Pages: 115 - 116
      Abstract: Gilic competence is a concept used to decide the capacity of a child (less than 16 years) to consent to medical treatment. This concept is not yet widely practiced in the world and is likely to depend on cultural and social norms of a society. Therefore it is important to assess the attitudes towards these aspects among nurses trained and practicing in a developing country like Sri Lanka to evaluate how a traditional cultural values system would affect such a modern concept of Autonomy.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.257
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Project Embrace: A Non-Profit Providing Sustainable Medical Materials to
           Low and Middle Income Countries

    • Authors: M.K. Sudabattula
      First page: 115
      Abstract: As an organization, Project Embrace is dedicated to the reutilization of sustainable medical materials – in particular, materials that provide skeletal support and mobility assistance for patients in need. The FDA classifies these types of devices as nonintrusive Class I and Class II medical devices; nonintrusive meaning these devices remain on the exterior of the patient yet provide medical benefits for the active participant. Currently, in medicine, it is practiced to discard these forms of devices after limited use either to a landfill or by incineration.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.256
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Visions and Voices: Using Photovoice to Document International Migrants’
           Health Needs in Santiago, Chile

    • Authors: J. Trop; M. Withers
      First page: 116
      Abstract: In recent years, Chile has witnessed a significant influx of migrants, largely from other Latin American countries. While these migrants may be offered access to education and health care, they may face discrimination and other migration-associated challenges that can impact health. We employ participant-generated photovoice photography among fifteen migrants to explore the unique determinants of health in their community. The study objectives include the following: 1) to explore migration as a social determinant of health; 2) to identify this community’s needs from their perspectives; and 3) to determine the utility of the photovoice in this application.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.258
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • University of Arizona, University of Cuenca and The Cinterandes
           Foundation: A New Global Health Collaboration in Ecuador

    • Authors: F.E. Mora; R. Pust, G. Pritchard, P. Gordon, B. Vega, E. Rodas, F. Moreno
      Pages: 117 - 118
      Abstract: Global Health is an important component of the University of Arizona’s curriculum. International collaboration and exposure to global health is vital to develop resident’s and student’s skills, to improve multicultural and linguistic experiences and to integrate opportunities for new academic collaboration and research development. We describe the initial results of an international collaborative program which aims to enhance academic development and capacity building efforts across organizations.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.262
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Abroad Experiences and its Impact on Career Trajectories of
           Osteopathic Medical Students: A Retroactive Longitudinal Study

    • Authors: M.I. Modayil; G.H. Ice
      First page: 117
      Abstract: Ohio University is located in the poorest counties and education and retention of primary care physicians to work in underserved regions of Ohio is an essential mission of the osteopathic college. Although a concern that providing global health experiences(GHE) may take students away from this mission exists, exposure to GHE provides an opportunity to develop cultural humility and work in diverse communities. Literature indicate that medical students who are exposed to GHE during their education develop a keener insight into differential diagnosis, conduct comprehensive physical exams that rely less on technological and invasive testing, work collaboratively in interdisciplinary health teams, and develop a greater understanding of the interaction between health, diseases, and its determinants (Drain et al., 2007; Edmonds, 2012; Kelleher, 2013; Mkandawire-Valhmu & Doering, 2012; Nilsson et al., 2014).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.261
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Initiating Kangaroo Mother Care in Facilities in Limited Resource Settings

    • Authors: A. Misra
      First page: 117
      Abstract: Taking a cue from the Global Every Newborn Action Plan, India launched the India Newborn Action Plan (INAP) in September 2014. INAP is being implemented within the National Health Mission of the Government of India (GOI). Majority (80%) of mortality among newborns occurs among low birth weight and preterm newborns together constituting ‘small newborns’. Recognizing this fact, care of small and sick newborn is one of the core pillars of INAP.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.260
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Anatomic Pathology in Sub-Saharan Africa to Support Cancer Care

    • Authors: S. Ayers; D. Berney, A. Eslan, J. Guarner, S. Lester, R. Masia, Z. Moloo, S. Sayed, J. Stall, M. Wilson
      Pages: 118 - 119
      Abstract: This project focused on determining the best training approach to improve the ability of anatomic pathologists in East, Central and Southern Africa (ECSA) to perform staging of four common cancers. It was approached as a partnership among organizations in ECSA and the US. It involves three 2.5-day workshops that included 46 pathologists from thirteen institutions across eleven ECSA countries. Three different approaches to training were compared; traditional lectures, case-based studies, and a blended approach.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.264
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Residency Building From Your Home Office: Effectiveness of Videoconference
           Based Tele-education for Emergency Medicine Residents and Providers in
           Vietnam

    • Authors: M.H. Morgan
      First page: 118
      Abstract: Emergency Medicine (EM) was recognized as a specialty in the United States in 1979, and has spread globally. There remain many areas of the world where EM remains non-existent or underdeveloped. The country of Vietnam recognized EM as a specialty in 2012, but progress has been slow and physicians are working to establish and promote the specialty. One particular continued area of need is the creation and support of resident training programs.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.263
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Role Development of Community Health Workers for Cardiovascular Disease
           Control in India

    • Authors: A.K. Khetan; D.K. Barbhaya, T. Patel, R. Josephson, S.K. Madan Mohan, A. Webel
      Pages: 119 - 120
      Abstract: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of mortality in India. Since Community health workers (CHWs) have historically played a pivotal role in improving maternal and child health, it has been hypothesized that they have the potential to mitigate the impact of CVD in low and middle income countries such as India. Project SEHAT (clinicaltrials.gov number- NCT02115711) is a cluster RCT to test the hypothesis that CHWs can improve the control of cardiovascular risk factors in a community in West Bengal, India.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.266
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Mentorship in Malawi: A Model for Empowering Medical Students with Skills
           for Coping, Resilience, and Career Success

    • Authors: A. Kennedy; Z. Jacobs, H. Mwakalinga, T. Bui
      First page: 119
      Abstract: Mentoring programs are widely accepted as a critical component of medical education. Mentorship not only supports professional growth, it has also been shown to improve student well-being and reduce career burnout. High levels of stress are common amongst medical students across the globe, especially for those practicing in resource-limited settings. At the University of Malawi College of Medicine, students have limited access to faculty mentors and have expressed a desire for more structured mentorship opportunities.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.265
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cost Analysis of Intramedullary (IM) Nailing and Skeletal Traction for
           Treatment of Femoral Shaft Fractures in Malawi

    • Authors: M. Mustafa; D. Shearer, J. Kahn, B. Lau, H.-H. Wu, L. Chokotho
      Pages: 120 - 121
      Abstract: Femoral shaft fractures are among the most common musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. In high-income countries, intramedullary (IM) nailing is the standard treatment. In many low- and middle- income countries (LMICs) skeletal traction is still common because surgical treatment is deemed cost-prohibitive. However, the notion that surgery is not cost-effective lacks supporting evidence. The purpose of this study was to estimate the cost of both IM nailing and traction for treatment of femoral fractures.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.268
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Creation and Implementation of Standards for Ethical Global Health
           Volunteering

    • Authors: J. Lasker; M. Aldrink, R.B. Balasubramaniam, P.H. Caldron, B. Compton, S. Siegel
      First page: 120
      Abstract: Growing concern about the quality and ethics of short-term volunteer trips in global health has led to the development of guidelines by a number of organizations and individuals (Caldron, 2016). Some of the best known are the Working Group on Ethics Guidelines for Global Health Training (WEIGHT) (Crump & Sugarman, 2010), the Catholic Health Association (2015), and the University of Minnesota’s Global Ambassadors for Patient Safety (GASP). Different guidelines include recommendations targeted at organizations planning trips, criteria for potential volunteers to consider in choosing an experience, and procedures for running medical, surgical, or dental clinics.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.267
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Learning Across Borders: Developing a Pharmacist-Driven Continuing
           Professional Development Program Through the Baylor College of Medicine
           International Pediatric AIDS Initiative Pharmacy Network (BIPAI-PN)

    • Authors: D. Nguyen; A. Vyain, R. Crutchley, A. Cheng, M. Mizwa
      Pages: 121 - 122
      Abstract: As the leading provider for pediatric HIV care and treatment in the world, BIPAI has been building capacity of clinical and non-clinical staff in its Centers of Excellence (COEs) in Romania, Botswana, Lesotho, Swaziland, Malawi, Uganda, and Tanzania. Each COE has pharmacy professionals who play a critical role in patient care. The BIPAI-PN is a community of pharmacy professionals from the COEs that enables opportunities to build capacity, improve operational and clinical pharmacy practice, and share best pharmacy practices.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.271
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Strengthening Health System - Evidence from the use of Bi-directional
           SMS-based Screening and Feedback System to Improve Efficiency and Quality
           of Disease Surveillance in Vietnam

    • Authors: J. Wong; L. Dang, T. Le, N. Phan, S. James, P. Katona, N. Vu, T. Vu, L. Katona, J. Rosen, C.K. Nguyen
      First page: 121
      Abstract: Mobile health (mHealth) has recently become the emerging and feasible practice to strengthen health systems, especially in low-resource settings. However, most mHealth initiatives are pilot efforts and only conceptually illustrate how to address determinants of health interventions using mobile technologies. Therefore, there is still an urgent need of vigorous evidence about mHealth and its use in public health. This study examined the use of bi-directional Short Message Service (SMS) in disease surveillance in Vietnam, and its evidence in improving efficiency and quality of reporting task.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.270
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Developing and Refining the MSGH Degree Program: A Theory and
           Competency-Driven, Multi-Phase Curriculum Development and Alignment
           Process

    • Authors: L.C. Neubauer; A. Doobay-Persaud, S. Galvin, N. Sheneman, R. Murphy
      First page: 121
      Abstract: This paper will discuss a theory-driven, five-phase process for curriculum development and alignment in a Master of Science in Global Health (MSGH) degree program. Northwestern University's MSGH degree is an interprofessional, competency-driven program that prepares students for careers in the field through generalist, leadership-focused, real-world, practical professional education.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.269
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Status of Primary Health Workforce in a Nigerian State: Findings from
           Enrollment into a Digital Health Workforce Registry

    • Authors: I.E. Nta; N. Sani, G. Gomez, J. Aghatise, E. Chiazor, N. Okere, A. Onah
      Pages: 122 - 123
      Abstract: Classified alongside 57 countries by the WHO as experiencing a health workforce(HW) crisis, Nigeria’s health system dysfunction is aggravated by mal-distributed and lopsided skill mix of available personnel. For effective health system planning, comprehensive and accurate data on the distribution, mix and migration dynamics of HW is required. An integrated human resources information system (iHRIS) is a valuable digital repository that eases the collection, maintenance and analysis of HW data. To improve HW management, the Institute of Human Virology Nigeria, an NGO that supports states to provide quality HIV services, assisted Nasarawa state to enroll primary health care (PHC) employees into the iHRIS-based state HW registry.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.273
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Health System Predictors of Access to Maternal Health Medicines in Low and
           Middle Income Countries

    • Authors: C.E. Nnorom
      First page: 122
      Abstract: An approximate 800 women die every day from pregnancy related complications like postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) and pre-eclampsia and eclampsia. These complications can be prevented by appropriate use of essential maternal health medicines – which are not readily available in low and middle income countries. Researchers attribute these to gaps in structure and functions of multiple health system building blocks. But little is known about the relative impact of each building block on access to essential maternal health medicines.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.272
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Identifying the Needs and Barriers to Patient-Family Education to Design
           Educational Interventions that will Improve Neurosurgery Patient Outcomes
           in Mulago Hospital, Uganda

    • Authors: C. Nwosu; S. Batakana, J. Vissoci, S. Vaca, S. Lim, E. Smith, A. Fuller, M. Haglund
      Pages: 123 - 124
      Abstract: Family members are the primary caregivers for patients at Mulago National Referral Hospital (MNRH), Uganda. They take on responsibilities with little or no knowledge of the patient’s illness, key and critical observations to report to hospital staff, and proper overall health management. This ultimately results in poor medication management, high infection rates, and longer hospital stays which negatively impact patients’ health outcomes. The objective of this study was to evaluate the needs and barriers to patient-family education in the neurosurgical ward at MNRH.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.275
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Sustainable PEPFAR Funded In Service HIV Training Delivery Models: A
           Training Impact Evaluation from Nigeria

    • Authors: A.E. Nwandu; T. Madubuko, E. Onu, D. Olutola, K. Nike, U. Okonkwo, J. Ilozumba, J. Egharevba, A. Ehoche, J. Apata
      First page: 123
      Abstract: PEPFAR has invested significant resources in strengthening the healthcare workforce in Nigeria. In-service training for health care workers is a key strategic approach to scaling up and sustaining health-related services in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Center for Clinical CareClinical Research (CCCRN) in partnership with University of Maryland Baltimore implemented a CDC funded training award to build sustainable models for In service training delivery. Training hubs at tertiary health care academic facilities in 9 states were established.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.274
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Training Healthcare Workers on the Use of Electronic Medical Records in
           HIV clinics in Kenya: An Evaluation of Three Training Models

    • Authors: C. O'Brien-Carelli
      Pages: 124 - 125
      Abstract: There is substantial evidence that use of electronic medical records (EMR) can improve the quality of health services and mitigate the overburdening of healthcare workers, yet a number of recent studies have identified inadequate training in health informatics as a persistent barrier to the implementation of EMR in low-resource settings. From September 2012 to September 2014, The International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH) trained 1,423 Kenyan healthcare workers in Western Kenya on the use of EMR for point-of-care data entry and clinical decision-making using three distinct training models.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.277
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Global Analysis of the Proportion of Surgical Specialists in Relation to
           Overall Human Resources for Health

    • Authors: K. Nyberger; H. Holmer, L. Hagander, S. Mukhopadhyay
      First page: 124
      Abstract: Today, five billion people lack access to safe, affordable surgical and anesthesia care. A major reason for this is the pandemic shortage of surgical workforce. In 2015, the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery estimated that at least 20-40 surgeons, anesthesiologists, and obstetricians (SAO) are needed per 100,000 people. This is far from the case in many countries. However, in those countries, there is often also a general lack of physicians and overall health workforce, but thus far, there are no studies on the relationship between the number of specialist SAO and the total physicians and health workforce, and its impact on health outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.276
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Health - The Lessons of Ebola: Two Universities Join to Teach an
           International Audience Via an Inter-professional Massive Open Online
           Course (MOOC)

    • Authors: J. Olsen; K. Marconi, D. Donahue
      Pages: 125 - 126
      Abstract: Global health is a collaborative field; one that requires diverse professionals to address the clinical, biological, social, environmental, and political factors that contribute to the health of communities and nations. The interprofessional nature of global health education presents a distinct challenge, namely ensuring that students learn to collaborate with other professionals to address complex global health needs. While much work has been done to define the field of global health and discipline-specific competencies, less has been done in the area of interdisciplinary or interprofessional global health education.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.280
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Blended Learning on Family Planning Policy Requirements: Key Findings and
           Implications from a Mixed Methods Study

    • Authors: S. Ohkubo; R. Limaye, N. Ahmed, A. Ballard
      First page: 125
      Abstract: To address unmet needs for family planning and advance women’s rights, U.S. federal foreign aid recipients must ensure compliance with the family planning legislative and policy requirements. Because many health providers work in rural and remote settings, blended learning, which combines in-person and online experiences, is a promising approach for strengthening their compliance knowledge. However, there has been no systematic study of the relationship between various learning approaches and their impact on learning outcomes within this context.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.279
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Fifth Child – A Data Informed Community Engagement Strategy to
           Improve Defaulter Tracing on Immunizations

    • Authors: J. O'Keeffe; N. Kozuki, J. Landegger
      First page: 125
      Abstract: Access to health care is low in rural Northern Uganda, and low rates of vaccination reflect this issue of access. Only 49% of children are fully vaccinated in this area by 23 months of age. The International Rescue Committee, in coordination with the Ugandan Ministry of Health, evaluated an mHealth application and community engagement strategy entitled CommCare+ to identify immunization defaulters and re-enter them into the vaccine schedule.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.278
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Impact of a Triage System Designed to Reduce Waiting Time and
           Prioritize Care for High-Risk Obstetric Patients in a Ghanaian Regional
           Hospital

    • Authors: M. Owen; D. Goodman, E. Pfeiffer, R. Ramaswamy, A. Olufolabi, C. Tetteh, E. Srofenyoh
      Pages: 126 - 127
      Abstract: Delay in receiving care in hospitals contributes to maternal and newborn mortality in low resource settings. Ridge Regional Hospital (RRH) is a high volume obstetric referral center in Accra with 8,000-9,000 annual births. Approximately 70% of the women referred are high-risk and many are in labor. Conducting midwife-led obstetric triage in referral facilities is new as most have utilized a first-come, first-serve approach irrespective of patient risk. An obstetric triage training program that modified patient flow was developed, and a job aid involving red, yellow, and green color-coded wristbands to identify high, medium and low risk patients, respectively, was introduced in 2013-2014 for 62 midwives at RRH.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.282
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving and Sustaining ICT Skills of Health Researchers in Kenya Through
           a Three-Tiered Approach of Online Learning, Hands-On Workshops, and
           Personalized Mentoring

    • Authors: A. Osoti; J. Kinuthia, M. Chung, E. Opiyo, R. Oboko, C. Chepken, S. Fueller, D. Masuda, M. Dunbar, D. Masys
      First page: 126
      Abstract: Despite the recent growth in health informatics, the use of information, communication and technology (ICT) by health researchers in resource-limited settings has been slow and inequitable. Further, many local institutions that have excellent ICT capacity do not routinely provide such services to the health researchers. innovative delivery of ICT skills to health researchers may improve the quality and impact of research outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.281
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effects of Public Health Insurance on Labor Supply in Rural China

    • Authors: Z. Shen; M. Parker, D. Brown, X. Fang
      Pages: 127 - 128
      Abstract: Since the implementation of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) in 2003, there has been a proliferation of research about the effects of public health insurance, healthcare resource utilization, and its associated clinical outcomes. However, there is little evidence regarding the association between the NCMS and labor force supply behaviors in rural China. The aim of this paper is to contribute substantively to the literature by examining the effect of the NCMS on these behaviors, specifically hours of farm work, the likelihood of not working, and the likelihood of off-farm labor force participation.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.284
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Continuing Education in a Hospital System in Ecuador

    • Authors: S. Palmer; E. Montgomery
      First page: 127
      Abstract: Many times in developing countries hospitals struggle to maintain properly trained medical personnel. A successful project for continuing education in a hospital system in Ecuador was initiated with cooperation from a nursing college in the United States. The education program was to help improve outcomes in patient care. In addition, health care workers morale and satisfaction was low due to staffing shortages and high patient load.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.283
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • State of Emergency Medicine Residencies in Colombia

    • Authors: A. Patino; V. Alcalde, C. Arbelaez
      Pages: 128 - 129
      Abstract: Emergency medicine is in different stages of development around the world. Colombia has made significant strides in the development of emergency medicine in the last two decades and recognized it as a medical specialty in 2005. The country now has seven emergency medicine residency programs, three in the capital city of Bogota, two in Medellin, one in Manizalez, and one in Cali. The seven residency programs are in different stages of maturity, with the oldest founded 20 years ago and two founded in the last two years.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.286
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Qualitative Approach to Evaluating the Global Barriers of International
           Emergency Medicine Development

    • Authors: N.D. Bustamante; A. Patino, A. Von Eckartsberg, R. Coelho, S. Suarez, C. Arbelaez
      First page: 128
      Abstract: The ACEP International Ambassador Program was developed as a venue for international experts to provide current status and progress of Emergency Medicine (EM) in their assigned countries. An annual one-day conference was created to convene ambassadors and allow for collaboration to reach the common interest of advancing emergency care. Our objective was to analyze the major perceived barriers for the evolution our specialty.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.285
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Assessing the Impact of Standardized Educational Curriculum Modules on
           Medical Interns’ Preparedness for Independent Practice in Botswana

    • Authors: M.J. Peluso; J. Langeveldt, K. Mochankana, M. Haverkamp, M. Williams, A. Rodman, B. Ricci, R. Maoto, D. Prozesky, O. Nkomazana, R. Luckett, N. Tapela, T. Barak
      Pages: 129 - 130
      Abstract: Currently, there is no standardized internship educational curriculum in Botswana. Medical school graduates participate in one year of internship training, after which they are assigned to practice independently as medical doctors. Challenges to training in this setting include variability in medical school backgrounds of interns and in clinical resources and supervision across eight internship sites. This project seeks to address these issues through the implementation of standardized educational curriculum modules at internship sites across Botswana.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.288
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The PIERS on the Move mobile health application

    • Authors: B. Payne; S. Sharma, D. dunsmuir, G. Dumont, L. Magee, M. Vidler, P. von Dadelszen, U.O. Ansermino
      First page: 129
      Abstract: To develop a simple decision aid for triage and treatment of women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) in low-resourced settings that can be sustainably implemented through public/private partnership.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.287
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • International Cancer Expert Corps: Sustainable Mentorship and
           Transformational Technology for Cancer Disparities Worldwide

    • Authors: D.A. Pistenmaa
      First page: 130
      Abstract: Cancer is a rising global problem, especially in developing countries where over 70% of newly diagnosed cancers occur, and in geographically-isolated indigenous populations in developed countries. While addressing all aspects of cancer care, radiotherapy is a critical ICEC focus. Unfortunately, radiation technology in challenging settings, if any, is often mediocre or too complicated for the existing infrastructure. It often utilizes Cobalt-60 which lacks the sophistication for advanced radiation therapy and is of concern for its potential use by terrorist organizations.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.290
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Building Interprofessional Global Health Infrastructure at a University
           and Health System: Navigating Challenges and Scaling Successes

    • Authors: L.B. Pilling; J. Bogen, L. Hunter, N. Leon
      First page: 130
      Abstract: To describe the challenges faced and progress made over the past seven years to formalize an interprofessional global health initiative at Thomas Jefferson University. For over seven years, faculty and students have built the initial infrastructure of the Global Health Initiatives Committee (GHIC) across six colleges. Our goals are to: 1) develop a global health identity 2) educate and engage students, residents, fellows, faculty, and staff in medical and public health issues that transcend national boundaries 3) promote health equity and embrace diversity 4) create a focused initiative that incorporates global health concepts into education, research and the delivery of health care and community health initiatives.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.289
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lessons Learned Live: 35 Years' Preparing North American Clinicians for
           Global & Resource-Limited Settings

    • Authors: R. Pust; T. Carroll, A. Heimann
      Pages: 131 - 132
      Abstract: Before the burgeoning of global health [GH] interest among USA clinicians and students, we identified in 1980 only one US medical school course with a clinical preparation [parasitology] course. Recognizing this need, multidisciplinary Arizona Health Sciences Center faculty in Tucson with “on the ground” clinical experience designed the full-time, three-week, case-oriented “Arizona Course,” Global Health : Clinical & Community Care, revised and conducted annually since 1982. The evolution of GH education preparing North American clinical professions students for short or career experiences abroad evolved, leading to the 1991 founding meeting in Tucson of the International Health Medical Education Consortium, which became Global Health Education Consortium a decade later, prior to its 2012 merger into CUGH.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.293
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Strengthened Local Voluntary Membership Networks: Stronger Health Sectors

    • Authors: S.E.P. Post
      First page: 131
      Abstract: Recognizing the critical role local voluntary membership networks play in the health sectors in low resourced countries, the newly developed and piloted Network Strengthening Program (NSP) is designed specifically for the managers (Board members, Secretariat staff, and actively engaged members) of country-level networks to strengthen their management in five key areas: Membership, Distributed Leadership, Governance, Financial Sustainability, and Communications for Resource Mobilization.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.292
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of an International Trainee Exchange Program Developed by the
           Global Health Initiative at Henry Ford Health System

    • Authors: D. Parke; A. Plum, T. Prentiss, J. Zervos, D.N. Dankerlui, L. Kaljee
      First page: 131
      Abstract: The Global Health Initiative (GHI) at Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) in Detroit, Michigan is committed to improving health outcomes and infrastructure in resource-limited countries through collaborative capacity-building models. In collaboration with our international partners, GHI developed a medical education and research exchange program whereby international trainees (medical and public health students, residents, and faculty) conduct a one- to two-month observation at HFHS including clinical rotations and lectures, laboratory experience, and engagement in structured global health research training.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.291
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Novel Telephone Triage Program for Hiv-Positive Children in Resource
           Poor Settings: Training Triage Coordinators in Chennai, India

    • Authors: J. Radoc; G. Odudu
      Pages: 132 - 133
      Abstract: India is home to the world’s third largest HIV-positive population. One particular sub-population- children living with HIV (CLHIV) -requires unique ‘HIV triaging’ to ensure patients at high risk receive priority interventions and treatment without delay. The International Alliance for the Prevention of AIDS (IAPA), an NGO in Chennai, India, supports 43 CLHIV by offering free once monthly medical visits and packages of nutritional supplements. Between once-a-month visits, all calls from patients are triaged by a single staff member.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.295
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cost Recovery and Service Usage in a Community Health Insurance Plan in
           Rural Uganda

    • Authors: F. Pyarali
      First page: 132
      Abstract: Without a national health insurance system in Uganda, many areas have developed community health insurance initiatives (CHI). Although several studies examine the increased access to healthcare with CHI’s, few studies investigate its sustainability at a hospital level. This study aims to find the differences in cost recovery and service usage between patients paying out of pocket (OOP) and those paying through the Kabale Diocese Community Health Insurance Scheme.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.294
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global is Local: Assessing Family Medicine Residency Programs’ Training
           on the Care of Immigrants, Migrants, Torture Survivors, Asylees and
           Refugees (IMTARs)

    • Authors: S. Rajamoorthi; R. Mishori, L. Buchanan, E. Morris
      Pages: 133 - 134
      Abstract: We have three objectives for this project:
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.297
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Anemia and its Socio-demographic Correlates among Adolescent Girls in
           Bangladesh

    • Authors: M. Rahman; S. Mistry
      First page: 133
      Abstract: Anemia is a significant wide spread public health threat especially among the adolescent girls who are more vulnerable towards low level of hemoglobin particularly of low and middle income countries (LMICs). We investigated the prevalence of anemia among the adolescent girls (10-19 years) in Bangladesh and its socio-demographics distribution.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.296
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Transforming Medical Student International Engagement to a Focus on
           Educational Programs

    • Authors: M. Rivera-Ramos; E. Plasencia, E. DeVos, J. Grigg
      Pages: 134 - 135
      Abstract: Short-term medical mission (STMM) trips have become more popular in recent years. These trips offer medical students exposure to practice in a low-resource setting, the complexities of patient-provider communication, and the importance of cultural competency. However the long-term impact of these mission trips is difficult to assess and the ethical considerations of these trips have recently come under scrutiny. A few ethical dilemmas include: cultural differences and power imbalances that may make it challenging to ensure equitable partnerships, poor healthcare infrastructure that may compel trainees to practice beyond their level of training, healthcare services delivered that may compete with local services and deplete limited resources.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.300
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Designing a Global Health Curriculum in a Military Family Medicine
           Residency

    • Authors: M.E. Ray
      First page: 134
      Abstract: Global Health is a quickly expanding area of study throughout medicine, education and public health. As family physicians, we are well suited for the diverse spectrum of disease and full scope of practice that global health care requires, and military physicians specifically are primed to participate in Global Health engagements based on their world wide presence. Many civilian residencies internationally have created educational experiences and training opportunities for young family medicine physicians in this realm, but military family medicine residencies have yet to offer a structured curriculum.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.299
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The F-T-E Approach for Global Care Delivery in Remote Settings

    • Authors: A.S. Rajan; S. Michel, R. Christner, C. Popper, S. Anandasabapathy
      First page: 134
      Abstract: The delivery of healthcare services in remote settings in low and middle income nations remains a significant challenge on a global scale. Telemedicine offers a means to provide point of care services via global E-visits in capacity-constrained situations. We posit that key elements of a telemedicine comprise an F-T-E approach that include: 1) Facility for care delivery in remote settings; 2) Technology for connectivity and managing the clinical encounter, and 3) Expertise in clinical medicine.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.298
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Motivating Factors Contributing to Retention of Community Health Workers
           in Rural Liberia: A Qualitative Study

    • Authors: E. Rosenberg
      Pages: 135 - 136
      Abstract: A shortage of doctors, distance to health facility and poor infrastructure make accessing healthcare difficult for communities in rural Liberia. In order to provide basic healthcare to Liberians living more than 5 kilometers from the nearest health facility and strengthen its health system weakened by civil war and Ebola, the Liberian Ministry of Health plans to scale up a community health worker (CHW) program piloted by Last Mile Health, and recruit 4000 CHWs over the next five years. We aimed to understand the factors which contribute to CHW retention, as worker retention is key in building a sustainable CHW program.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.302
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Continuing Education and Job Satisfaction in a Rural Haitian Hospital

    • Authors: S. Rose; E. Hall, V. Etienne, F. Dieudonne, B. Romela, M. Tondereau, M. Armony, K. Baltzell
      First page: 135
      Abstract: UCSF School of Nursing, Partners In Health (PIH) and its affiliated Haitian organization, Zanmi Lasante (ZL), collaborated to develop training and mentorship programs in a low resource setting. To date, the partnership has completed two years of nurse education, leadership development and quality improvement training.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.301
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Utility of WhatsApp Messenger to Promote Communication in a Medical
           Department in Malawi

    • Authors: A. Sakona; Y. Mtende, T. Bui, A. Kennedy, L. Chunda, J. Ngoma
      First page: 136
      Abstract: The use of mobile phone technology in healthcare has the potential to improve patient care and medical education. We evaluated the use of a WhatsApp messaging group among clinical staff of the Internal Medicine department at Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi. WhatsApp is a low-bandwidth instant messaging platform that allows users to send and receive text messages and media as a low-cost alternative to SMS.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.304
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Creating a Bidirectional Culture of Safety in Global Health Electives Via
           Comprehensive Safety Protocols

    • Authors: M. Sadigh; S. Parve, L. Moody, M. Sadigh
      First page: 136
      Abstract: Despite refinement of selection tools and pre departure orientations in response to rising participation in global health electives, the development of safety protocols trails behind as attention has been on ethical and emotional issues, illness, and infection, while studies that do address safety lack comprehensive solutions vital to sustaining these electives and protecting involved parties. The Liaison Committee on Medical Education deems it the responsibility of global health programs to uphold the highest possible safety standards for participants and faculty members.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.303
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Novel Device for Rapid Acquisition of Heart Rates in Neonatal Patients for
           future use in Malawi

    • Authors: L. Sarment; C. De Angelus, R. Accolla, M. Cole, J. Brabender, J. Bird, A.A. Muelenaer, P. Muelenaer
      Pages: 137 - 138
      Abstract: In 2014, a working model of a medical device intended to rapidly determine temperature, respiratory rate, and heart rate in infants and children at risk for bacterial pneumonia was introduced to over 100 health care providers at 8 hospitals in Malawi. As part of this community based participatory design (CBPD) process, it was determined that this device could also be utilized for the assessment of newborns in need of resuscitation, and for longer term monitoring of vital signs in hospitals. Over the next year, the electronic component of this device was perfected and the exterior harness was envisioned to be capable of quickly capturing heart rate in neonatal patients.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.307
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Key Drivers of Success and Sustainability for Academic Global Health
           Centers: Lessons Learned from CUGH Members

    • Authors: A. Santella; A. Nerlich, K. Scott, E. Coffield, H. Seirup, O. Uwemedimo
      First page: 137
      Abstract: Global health has taken on an increasingly more visible role within academic institutions engaged in health professions training. Many institutions have worked to collocate and strengthen global health teaching, research, and clinical education by creating centers thereby housing multiple resources of the academic institution under a single hub and that focuses on global health issues. There is, however, a dearth of literature on the issues involved in developing global health centers within academia that would serve to guide and direct institutions during this process.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.306
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Implementing Newborn Care Services in Humanitarian Settings: Barriers and
           Facilitators to Implementation at the Community and Facility Level in
           Displaced Person Camps in South Sudan

    • Authors: S. Sami; S. Kenyi, R. Amsalu, B. Tomczyk, D. Jackson, J. Meyers, M. Greeley, A. Dimiti, E. Scudder, K. Kerber
      First page: 137
      Abstract: The majority of countries with the highest neonatal mortality rates have recently experienced a humanitarian emergency. Health service delivery challenges are aggravated by deterioration in facility infrastructure and lack of skilled health care workers and medical supplies. Additionally, neonatal health services are typically not prioritized in the initial emergency response. Achieving an understanding of the complex interactions between these barriers and the delivery of lifesaving newborn care is critical for humanitarian health responses.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.305
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Disparities in Availability of Essential Medicines to Treat
           Non-communicable Diseases in Uganda: A Cross-sectional Poisson Analysis
           Using the 2013 Service Availability and Readiness Assessment

    • Authors: M. Armstrong-Hough; J. Schwartz, S. Kishore
      Pages: 138 - 139
      Abstract: The most widely endorsed methodology used to collect data on health system readiness is the Service Availability and Readiness Assessment (SARA), a comprehensive survey of health facility preparedness, developed by the World Health Organization. SARA data have not previously been used to model and analyze the predictors of readiness indicators measured in the survey. We sought to demonstrate that SARA data can be used in this way by modeling the availability of essential medicines for treating non-communicable diseases (EM-NCD).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.309
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Client Evaluation of Peer Counselor Performance in a Rural PMTCT Program
           in Nigeria

    • Authors: G. Manji-Obadiah; E. Saunders, C. Fan-Osuala, I.E. Nta, N. Sam-Agudu
      First page: 138
      Abstract: PMTCT service scale-up in Nigeria has been challenging, particularly in rural areas where professional health workforce is limited and uptake is low. Engaging experienced HIV+ women to serve as lay peer counselors (PCs) is important in optimizing outcomes among PMTCT clients. MoMent Nigeria is a two-arm implementation research study investigating the impact of a structured, supervised peer counselling program on PMTCT outcomes in rural areas. Client-focused audits of PC activities were conducted to evaluate PC performance and for Quality Control (QC).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.308
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Human-centered Strategic Planning at a Rural Rwandan Medical School: A
           Case Study for Navigating Institutional Challenges and Strengthening
           Community and National Population Health in Low and Middle Income
           Countries

    • Authors: T. Singer; J. Rugengande, B. Barikumana, P. Zhu, I. Holmen, P. Hakizimana, Z. Rukemba, O. Urayeneza
      Pages: 139 - 140
      Abstract: Human-centered design (HCD) for strategic planning of educational, infrastructural, and financial objectives can provide a framework for medical schools throughout LMICs to efficiently increase in-country healthcare providers while concurrently contributing to community and national healthcare priorities. We undertook an HCD strategic planning process for the University of Gitwe Faculty of Medicine and Allied Health Sciences in Gitwe, Rwanda, the first rural medical school in Rwanda, opened in 2013.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.311
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improvement in User Confidence and Competency in Novice Endoscopists with
           the Use of a Smartphone-based Endoscopy Training Application

    • Authors: R. Shukla; C. Arredondo, J. Lee, S. Anandasabapathy
      First page: 139
      Abstract: Global endoscopic capacity is limited by a lack of providers skilled in these relatively complex procedures. Endoscopy is useful in early detection and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. With rising rates of gastrointestinal cancers, there is an urgent need for providers trained in the performance of endoscopy. Current methods of endoscopic training, based on an apprenticeship model, are inadequate to prepare trainees to meet advancing competency expectations.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.310
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Naiku Dee (Good Teacher) Training Project for Medical Educators in the
           Lao People’s Democratic Republic

    • Authors: K. Southisombath
      Pages: 140 - 141
      Abstract: Lao PDR has set a goal to, “Ensure that all the Lao people have access to healthcare,” as part of their Health Strategy 2020. However, non-qualified health providers and shortages of medical educators continue to be an obstacle. The Naiku Dee Training Project for Medical Educators is a four year educational and mentorship program directed by Health Leadership International (HLI) to create a cohort of Lao medical educators to address this need.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.313
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Assessing Clinician Compliance with National Guidelines for Pediatric HIV
           Care and Treatment in Rwanda

    • Authors: L. Sirbu; S. Ghosh, D. Riedel
      First page: 140
      Abstract: Children infected with HIV in resource-limited settings such as Rwanda do not fare well; it is estimated that, without treatment, more than half of HIV-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa will die before age two. Over the past decade, Rwanda has made great strides in increasing access to antiretroviral therapy (ART), however, obstacles remain, particularly for children, including difficulties with early HIV diagnosis, commencement of a treatment plan, and retaining children in long term care.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.312
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating Residents’ Perceptions of Post-Graduate Training Programs at
           St Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College (Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)

    • Authors: K.E. Steenbergh; S. Weinberg, L. Gebremedhin, G. Sandhu
      Pages: 141 - 142
      Abstract: Physician migration remains a limiting factor in healthcare delivery throughout Ethiopia despite efforts to increase the number of physicians. University of Michigan Health System (UMHS) efforts in Ghana have provided a highly effective model for physician retention through postgraduate training programs. In 2012, a similar partnership was launched with St. Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College (SPHMMC) in Ethiopia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.315
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Factors Affecting the Implementation of a Mental Health Training Program
           in Tunisia: Perspectives of Trainers and Tutors

    • Authors: J.M.V. Spagnolo; F. Champagne, N. Leduc, M. Piat, A.-L. Guisset, W. Melki, F. Charfi, I. Guesmi, N. Bram, M. Laporta
      First page: 141
      Abstract: Due to a shortage and an uneven distribution of mental health specialists in Tunisia, general practitioners (GPs) receive between 30-40% of mental health consultations. However, it is not uncommon for them to lack knowledge and skills to adequately address mental illness. To address this gap, a mental health training based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Mental Health Gap Action Programme (mhGAP) Intervention Guide (IG) was implemented in the Greater Tunis Area of Tunisia. This initiative follows international efforts which seek to build the mental health capacity of non-specialists.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.314
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Open Osmosis: Promoting the Global Diffusion of Open Education Resources

    • Authors: S. Tackett; S. Gaglani, K. Slinn, T. Marshall, R. Desai, M.R. Haynes
      Pages: 142 - 143
      Abstract: Free educational resources available online can make high quality content available to learners anywhere and may be one way to overcome faculty shortages and curricular disrepair in low resource settings. Here we describe preliminary evaluation data for videos created as part of Open Osmosis (https://open.osmosis.org/), an initiative targeting health professions learners.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.318
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Developing an Academic Global Health Program for Medical Students: Lessons
           Learned from our First Year

    • Authors: R. Sundararajan; W.-S. Johansson, J. Mandel
      First page: 142
      Abstract: The University of California, San Diego (UCSD) Global Health Academic Concentration (GHAC) was launched in 2015 in response to growing interest in Global Health careers among medical students, and recognition of an increasingly well-connected global medical community. Having completed one year of administering this program, we reflect on the strategies implemented to translate educational concepts into an effective medical student curriculum, as well as barriers we faced along the way.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.317
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Strengthening Human Resources for Nursing in Haiti– A Qualitative Study
           of a Cross-Cultural Nursing Faculty Project

    • Authors: N.W. Street; L. Mandel, L. Bermudez, L. Man
      First page: 142
      Abstract: In 2007, a US university renowned for nursing endeavored to create a sustainable graduate nursing program. Ultimately, a cadre of up to 40 masters-prepared nurse educators in Haiti will lead baccalaureate education delivery into perpituity. Utilizing an educate-the-educator model, this international partnership includes three consecutive cohorts, spaced two years apart. Now in its sixth year of program delivery, we sought to assess perceived changes in professional role, leadership competency and classroom teaching skills.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.316
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Rural Community Assessment and Surveillance in the Dominican Republic and
           Haiti

    • Authors: J.S. Thiele; F.W.J. Anderson
      Pages: 143 - 144
      Abstract: Rural border communities experience unique challenges to health care delivery. Anecdotal reports from four rural Haitian communities comprising 216 households located near the border with the Dominican Republic indicate these areas are experiencing poor maternal, neonatal and infant outcomes. A novel community based assessment model method for reliably and quickly identifying maternal mortalities in conjunction with routine community based child survival and sanitation surveillance was tested.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.320
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Implementation of a Health Systems-Framed Health Emergency Preparedness
           Planning in Haiyan-Affected Localities: Lessons for Health Planners in
           Disaster-Prone Countries

    • Authors: F.D. Tandinco
      First page: 143
      Abstract: In 2014, UNICEF and several partners developed the Evidence-Based Planning for Resilient Health Systems Project (rEBaP) to assist local planners from Haiyan-affected localities in crafting their health emergency preparedness, response, and recovery plans (HEPRRPs). The goal of the project was to build community resilience in areas that were devastated when supertyphoon Haiyan struck on November 8, 2013.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.319
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Dementia and Memory Care: Strengthening Health Systems Capacity through
           Long-term Service Learning Projects and Study Abroad Programs

    • Authors: C.A. Tisone; I.S. Harvey
      Pages: 144 - 145
      Abstract: Repeated exposure to memory care activities is recommended for optimal benefit to dementia patients, yet many senior centers, assisted-living facilities, and rehabilitation centers lack sufficient human resources to carry out comprehensive long-term memory care programs. For the past four years, health majors taking a Human Disease course at Texas A&M University have participated in a Service Learning project dedicated to dementia and memory care.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.322
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Addressing Gaps in Infectious Disease Training and Care in the Caribbean
           Region: The University of the West Indies - Jamaica / University of South
           Carolina Partnership to Develop a Postgraduate Infectious Diseases
           Fellowship

    • Authors: S. Weissman; T. Thompson, T. Quinby, C. Henn
      First page: 144
      Abstract: There is need to create and support existing programs to increase the number of qualified Infectious Disease (ID) physicians and overall system of care for infectious diseases, including HIV, throughout the Caribbean.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.321
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Effect and Tangible Measures of Value in Global Health Nursing Education:
           Findings from a Comprehensive Review

    • Authors: M.P. Truskey; T. Pfaff
      Pages: 145 - 146
      Abstract: With increasing globalization, emerging diseases, shifting health concerns and growing health inequities among and within countries, all nurses need the skills to address complex global health challenges. Schools of nursing in the United States are continuously embracing global health programs and educational opportunities for their students, however there is little evidence which describes the impact of these educational endeavors.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.324
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving the Quality of Prehospital to Hospital Communication in Cuenca,
           Ecuador Using a Standardized Course

    • Authors: E. Trieu; M. Hopkins, J. Carter, E. Morocho, J.L. Prieto, C. Mosquera, F. Siguencia, D.A. Martinez, N. Naik, M. Rains, J.C. Salamea Molina, D.S. Jayaraman, E. Rodas
      First page: 145
      Abstract: Poor communication can lead to adverse patient outcomes. Previous observations have highlighted the need for standardizing communication from the prehospital to hospital settings in Cuenca. The objective of the study was to determine the effectiveness of a standardized training course on the quality of communication between prehospital and hospital settings in Cuenca, Ecuador.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.323
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Supporting Institutional Access to Evidence-based Clinical Resources by
           Establishing Onsite Knowledge Management Centers

    • Authors: K. Utan; C. Henn
      Pages: 146 - 147
      Abstract: Evidence-based medicine refers to the systematic application of best practices based on scientific research. It helps improve quality of care and patient outcomes, while at the same time making the most rational use of scarce resources. In many healthcare facilities in low-resource countries, however, medical and allied practitioners, students, and other interested individuals do not have access to the evidence-based clinical resources that could make significant improvements in patient care.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.326
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • International Community Access to Child Health Program – 10 Years of
           Supporting Global Child Health

    • Authors: R. Umoren; Y. Vaucher, M. Kurbasic, M. Moore, A. Behrmann, G. Mustafa, D. Staton
      First page: 146
      Abstract: The International Community Access to Child Health (ICATCH) program was initiated in 2005 by the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on International Child Health. It provides modest funding and technical support for starting or expanding training or services to improve child health in resource-limited settings.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.325
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Helping teachers to teach Global Health in health professional educational
           programs: the Sherbrooke experience

    • Authors: C. Valois; V. Foley, P. Grand'Maison
      Pages: 147 - 148
      Abstract: Globalization calls educational programs to increase their graduates’ competence in Global Health (GH). Various initiatives here or abroad have been implemented on different scales. If programs and students are called upon, teachers are also at the forefront of GH education.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.328
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Neurology Initiative: Piloting an Innovative Global Health
           Curriculum for Neurology Residents at the University of Massachusetts in
           collaboration with Charutar Arogya Mandal in Gujarat, India

    • Authors: E.K.E. Kim; Y. Mayasi, N. Valizadeh, M. Sharma, A. Hohler, M. Fischer, S. Desai, A. Deb
      First page: 147
      Abstract: As globalization transforms the medical landscape, global health education is becoming an integral part of medical training. Our aim was to develop an innovative global health curriculum, through use of technology, for neurology trainees at the University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMMS) and trainees at Charutar Arogya Mandal (CAM) in Gujarat, India.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.327
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Newborn Care in Resource Poor Settings: Evaluation of a Combined
           Training and Quality Improvement Approach

    • Authors: K. Vlasic; M.C. Indart, C. Stiglmeier, R. Patel, M. Patel, P. Brahmbhatt, C. Maloney, B. Fassl
      First page: 148
      Abstract: Every year 2.8 million newborns die worldwide due to complications in the newborn period. Newborns with low birth weight
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.330
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Interactive Training in Emergency Preparedness and Response [EPR]:
           Innovative Class Simulation Module that Helped Save Lives in Recent India
           Floods

    • Authors: I. Schenker; D. vecksler, S. Janani, R. Gur-Arie, T. Kushnir, N. Davidovitch
      First page: 148
      Abstract: Increasing numbers of environmental emergencies (disasters, pandemics) and manmade disasters around the world, require diverse training of healthcare professionals and students at all levels. Global Health (GH) teaching programs struggle with developing an optimal model which could move the needle from theoretical understanding of the issues to real-life implementation and capacity building.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.329
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Impact of Implementing an Electronic Medical Record on an International
           Medical Mission

    • Authors: J.B. Weeks; J. Hickman, M. Ryan
      Pages: 149 - 150
      Abstract: Short Term Medical Trips (STMT) are vital in bringing healthcare to underserved communities. When they become established providers an accessible medical record keeping system is paramount to increasing the quality of follow-up. Implementing an EHR in such venues enhances continuum of care. It allows providers to easily establish a history of care and improve decision making in their medical management. Furthermore, it allows providers to evaluate the long term effects on morbidity and mortality in the communities they serve.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.333
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Palliative Care Practices of Community Health Workers and Professional
           Nurses in Limpopo Province, South Africa

    • Authors: C. Campbell; L. Ware, J. Stueve, M.K. O'Brien
      First page: 149
      Abstract: Palliative care is an interprofessional model of care used to guide end-of-life care for people in the advanced stages of a life-limiting illness of any type and their care persons. Little is known about palliative care interventions used by community health workers (CHWs) and professional nurses (PNs) in rural areas of sub-Saharan Africa. The specific aims of our research were to 1) to identify palliative care interventions used by professional nurses and CHWs in Limpopo Province, South Africa to promote dignified dying and 2) to identify the interventions that are most important to promote dignified dying by professional nurses and CHWs in Limpopo Province, South Africa.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.332
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Implementation of an Undergraduate Medical Education Course in Global
           Health Based on the Consortium of Universities for Global Health Core
           Competencies: A Pilot Program

    • Authors: C. Donelan; M. Wagar, C. Howard, S. Benson, C. Dahl, F. Ianovich, B. Leitch
      First page: 149
      Abstract: In 2013 the Consortium of Universities for Global Health(CUGH) appointed a subcommittee to determine global health core competencies integral and applicable to interdisciplinary health care. The Global Health Impact Group(GHIG) at the University of Minnesota(UMN) Medical School identified a need for global health curriculum in our undergraduate medical education. GHIG developed and implemented a year long monthly course addressing the core competencies as defined by the CUGH Global Health Competencies subcommittee.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.331
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Ten Keys to Developing a 'Culture of Better Information Use': Challenges
           and Successes of a Global Nutrition Project

    • Authors: T. Williams
      Pages: 150 - 151
      Abstract: Why do health projects working in development settings collect data, and how is information used? Often in the past, health programs and donor-funded projects have allowed reporting needs to drive monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems, placing emphasis on indicators for reporting, but not contributing to decision making and program improvements. There was often little meaningful data collected beyond reporting, to help managers know how well activities were working and whether changes were needed.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.335
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Central Role of Relationships in Promoting Careers in Global Health

    • Authors: B. Williams; J. Bell, K.E. Hughey, P. Mullan
      First page: 150
      Abstract: Medical school curricula in global health most often center around providing coursework and field experiences. Few studies have examined the role of non-curricular aspects of students’ experience in facilitating careers in global health. To guide and refine the Global Health and Disparities (GHD) Path of Excellence at the University of Michigan Medical School, we examined the relative value to students of curricular and non-curricular aspects of the GHD Path.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.334
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Community-Based Health Needs Assessment in Léogâne and Gressier, Haiti:
           Six Years Post-Earthquake

    • Authors: E. Wood; K.S. Chapman, V.M. Beau de Rochars, S. McKune
      Pages: 151 - 152
      Abstract: This study is a community-based health needs assessment designed to identify resources and gaps within the community and to prioritize community-identified needs in targeted communities around Gressier and Léogâne, Haiti.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.337
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Innovative Approach to Teaching Global Health Research Ethics

    • Authors: M. Withers; S. Kumar
      First page: 151
      Abstract: As a growing volume of public health and biomedical research is conducted around the world, the multitude of complex ethical issues involved in research with human beings necessitates in-depth, interdisciplinary training on research ethics as part of the global health education and training curriculum.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.336
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Strengthening the Free Healthcare Initiative and Hospital-Based Service
           Delivery in Sierra Leone through a hospital-based Social Worker program

    • Authors: S. Yamba; K. Barron, S. Hernandez, R. Azcueta, J. Gassimu, R. Carshon-Marsh, K. Dierberg, R.H. Marsh
      Pages: 152 - 153
      Abstract: In 2010, the Sierra Leonean Ministry of Health and Sanitation implemented the Free Healthcare Initiative to improve health service delivery, providing free care for pregnant and lactating women, children under 5, and people with HIV and TB. The goal was to increase service utilization and decrease mortality; however, the 2013-2015 Ebola epidemic undermined service delivery at all levels of the health system, particularly in hospital-based care.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.339
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • We Call Them Miracle Babies': How Health Care Providers Understand
           Neonatal Near-Misses at Three Teaching Hospitals in Ghana

    • Authors: L.V. Wynn; M.A. Bell, D.A. Bakari, D.P.S. Oppong, M.J. Youngblood, M.Z. Arku, R. Adanu, D.C. Moyer
      First page: 152
      Abstract: Despite global efforts to reduce neonatal mortality, sub-Saharan Africa continues to bear a disproportionate burden. In addition, newborn morbidity is a significant challenge and may provide an increasingly important metric by which to measure improvements in the health care system. One potential metric is the concept of a “near-miss,” or when a baby experiences a life threatening condition but survives. This term is relatively new, and it is not clear how providers conceptualize or value this categorization.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.338
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • RE-AIMing Program Design and Implementation: A Preliminary Process
           Evaluation of a Workforce Development Program

    • Authors: A. Yoos; T. Kenigsberg, E. Willacy
      Pages: 153 - 154
      Abstract: Recent outbreaks and emerging public health concerns have underscored the critical need for global workforce development. The Improving Public Health Management for Action (IMPACT) Program, developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), aims to improve public health management capacity in low-to-middle income countries. Partnering with Ministries of Health (MOHs), the two-year fellowship trains entry-level professionals through didactic instruction, field-based assignments, and structured mentorship and supervision.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.341
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Barriers and Facilitators of the Referral System of the Communityßbased
           Newborn Care Initiative in Ethiopia: An Audit of 546 Cases

    • Authors: Y.B. Yeshanew; A.M. Karim, W. Betemariam, N. Fesseha
      First page: 153
      Abstract: About 82,000 newborns still die every year in Ethiopia mainly due to sepsis, asphyxia and prematurity. To curb this situation, the Government of Ethiopia (GoE) implemented community based newborn care (CBNC). The strategy trained health extension workers (HEWs) at the health posts level to manage local infections, birth asphyxia, and prematurity and identify and refer cases of neonatal sepsis (i.e., very sever disease [VSD]) to health centers (or higher level facilities) after providing a pre-referral dose of antibiotics.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.340
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Methodological Comparisons in Assessing Neurosurgical Capacity in Uganda

    • Authors: B. Zick; J. Abdelgadir, A. Muhindo, C. Muhumuza, E. Smith, J. Vissoci, M. Haglund
      Pages: 154 - 155
      Abstract: An estimated 19.2% of the world’s disability adjusted life years are attributed to conditions that require surgical intervention. Despite this great burden of surgical conditions, nine out of ten people cannot access basic surgical care in low-middle-income countries (LMIC). While there has been a recent surge in support for increasing capacity and access to surgery, there is a still gap in knowledge on the capacity for surgical sub-specialties. This study examined the neurosurgical capacity of public hospitals in Uganda.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.344
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Crossing Boundaries: Health, Illness, and Palliative Care for a Rapidly
           Aging Population in China

    • Authors: X. Zhang
      First page: 154
      Abstract: As a result of rapid economic development, better basic health care and the “One-Child Policy”, China will face a rapidly growing aging population. It is estimated that the percentage of people aged 65 and older will grow exponentially from 9% in 2010 to 25% by 2030. However, the traditional care model, where the sons take care of their parents, will no longer be sustainable given the country’s “inverted pyramid” population profile. Currently, China lacks the foundation, structure, laws, finance, and number of professional caregivers, in both government and private sectors, to meet the increasing demand for elderly care.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.343
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Leadership and Communication for EMTs in India: Bringing Calm to the Chaos

    • Authors: S. Zachariah; B. Lindquist, K. Koval, J. Newberry, R. Rao, M. Strehlow
      First page: 154
      Abstract: Emergency medical technicians (EMTs) in low and middle income countries with relatively nascent emergency medical services and pre-hospital care systems face unique challenges. In India, the highly dense population draws large crowds to field calls, and the unfamiliarity with EMTs and prehospital medical care often leads to chaotic scenes that interfere with patient care. These calls require skilled crowd control and clear communication with the patient, family, and bystanders. Further, most EMT care in India is directed by physicians at a centralized call center, yet EMT-to-physician communication varies in quality due to disorganized structure and incomplete content during consultations and handoff, compromising patient care and safety.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.342
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Sustaining Global Health Research Collaboration in Ukraine through Support
           of an In-county Data Management Center

    • Authors: O. Zvinchuk; A. Matsola, O. Lapikura, D. Hryhorczuk
      First page: 155
      Abstract: The University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) has been continuously engaged in NIH-funded research on health issues in Ukraine since 1992. Our in-country research and training programs were carried out in large part by the UIC Louise Hamilton Data Management Center (LHDMC). The creation and operation of this Center faced many challenges but resulted in the capacity to obtain and conduct over 13 externally funded research and 3 training capacity building programs.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.345
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Investigating the Role of Stigma on Fertility Desire among HIV-positive
           Women in Bangkok, Thailand: A Qualitative Study

    • Authors: N. Mehta; J. Ho, P. Boonsuk, A. Sohn
      Pages: 156 - 157
      Abstract: The Thai Ministry of Public Health is committed to reaching the United Nations’ goal of zero new HIV infections, zero AIDS-related deaths, and zero discrimination towards people living with HIV by 2030. While significant progress has been made towards the first two targets, internalized stigma and discrimination by healthcare providers and the general community remain concerns for women living with HIV (WLHIV), particularly in the context of their desire to have and raise children.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.351
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Current Nutritional Status does not Modify the Malaria-Anemia Relationship
           in Young Children: A Cross-Sectional Study in Five Sub-Saharan African
           Countries

    • Authors: S. McCuskee; E.B. Brickley, A. Wood
      First page: 156
      Abstract: Anemia is a multifactorial and prevalent condition, particularly in children under age 5 in sub-Saharan Africa. Public health policy aimed at addressing anemia requires evidence on its modifiable risk factors. Malaria infection and nutritional status and their potential interaction have been suggested as risk factors by previous literature, but these studies have largely lacked the power to detect effect modification and compare different country contexts.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.350
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Community Members’ Perceptions of Tuberculosis (TB) Stigmatization
           in Rural Maharashtra, India

    • Authors: S. Tilekar; D. Rajaput, B. Varghese, L.L. McCreary
      First page: 156
      Abstract: India has the world’s highest burden of TB, reflecting the resurgence of TB due to HIV/TB comorbidity. Stigmatizing attitudes among the general public are a barrier to public health measures to control the spread of TB. This study describes rural Maharashtra adults’ perceived TB-related stigmatization in their communities.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.349
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence and Factors Associated with Hypocholesterolemia among Adults
           with Bacteriologically Confirmed Pulmonary TB in Kampala

    • Authors: J. Mukisa; E. Mupere, W. Worodria
      Pages: 157 - 158
      Abstract: Hypocholesterolemia has been associated with altered immune function, possible delayed conversion at two months and increased risk of mortality. However, lipid profiles are not done routinely for Tuberculosis patients and there is paucity of data regarding the prevalence of hypocholesterolemia and its associated factors among adult bacteriologically confirmed Pulmonary Tuberculosis patients.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.353
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lights, Camera, Action!: Utilizing Standardized Patient Actors To Improve
           Quality Of Care For HIV-Infected Adolescents In Kenya

    • Authors: C. Mugo; K. Wilson, J. Slyker, G. John-Stewart, D. Bukusi, A.D. Wagner, I. Inwani, B. Richardson, D. Wamalwa, P. Kohler
      First page: 157
      Abstract: HIV-infected adolescents have worse retention in HIV care compared to children or adults. One likely reason is poor quality of care by health care workers, who lack adequate training. We report on a pilot study of a clinician training intervention using standardized patient (SP) encounters to improve communication and empathy skills, with the goal to improve retention in care of HIV-infected adolescents in Kenya.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.352
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Surviving Ebola in Sierra Leone: A community’s Experience During and
           After the Epidemic - A Qualitative Study

    • Authors: R. Murray; L.B. Drew, C. Memmott, Y. Bangura, E. Maring
      Pages: 158 - 159
      Abstract: The 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic - a complex public health crisis with various sociological, ecological, and environmental drivers - devastated populations throughout West Africa. Due to its high mortality rate and infectious nature, most Ebola research to date has focused on healthcare response and interventions; however, little is known about the experiences of Ebola survivors and communities. This qualitative study aimed to better understand the lived experience of community members, including children, during and after the Ebola epidemic in Sierra Leone.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.355
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Eso viene de por ahí' Community Perception of Zika and Mosquito-borne
           Virus in Puerto Rico

    • Authors: C.M.M. Velez Vega; C. Murphy, J. Pérez Ramos, T.D.V. Dye
      First page: 158
      Abstract: A massive public health response from the US and in Puerto Rico has resulted from a recent outbreak of the Zika virus, with investment in education and surveillance programs combined with tactical assistance in preventing the disease. Little is known, however, about how community residents feel about, prevent, and think and plan around Zika. The purpose of this study was to elucidate salient themes in communities of Puerto Rico that experienced outbreaks in 2016, and to better understand and evolve conceptual models around Zika.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.354
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Tale of Two Diseases: A Descriptive Study Comparing Two Hashtags

    • Authors: K. Ngo; P. Swamy, A. Mandalakas
      Pages: 159 - 160
      Abstract: The advent of the internet and social media heralds a new era for communication. With increased communication occurring through social media (SM), advocacy has also been adapted for the social media era. HIV advocacy and communication within the HIV epidemic has quickly proven instrumental in increasing funding and raising awareness of the disease. The Global Fund was established in 2002 with the goal of eliminating HIV, TB, and Malaria and to this date has provided billions of dollars in aid to developing countries.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.357
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Interim Treatment Outcomes among Clinic-based Ambulatory Care Multißdrug
           Resistant Tuberculosis Patients Initiated From Mulago National Referral
           Hospital

    • Authors: S. Namatovu; J. Sekandi, E. Buregyeya, I. Mugisa, R. Ssenyonga, A. Etwon, A. Mukose, A. Katamba
      First page: 159
      Abstract: Multidrug resistant TB (MDR-TB) is a strain of TB which is resistant to isoniazid and rifampicin, is a growing concern in Uganda. To address the issue of costs of hospitalization and limited space, clinic-based ambulatory care has been adopted. This study assessed the interim treatment outcomes of clinic-based ambulatory care of MDR-TB patients initiated from Mulago Hospital MDR-TB clinic Kampala within the first 6 months.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.356
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Quality of Tuberculosis Diagnosis at DOTS Centers in Niger & Kwara states,
           Nigeria - Lessons from TB REACH

    • Authors: I. Olajide; A. Mpamugo, J. Bamidele, N. Emperor, E. Onu, B. Gobir, A.E. Nwandu
      Pages: 160 - 161
      Abstract: Quality assured bacteriology at DOTS centers is a recommended tuberculosis (TB) control strategy by the STOP TB program 1..Maryland Global Initiative Cooperation (MGIC) in collaboration with the Center for Clinical Care and Clinical Research Nigeria (CCCRN) implemented a WHO funded project called TB-REACH in Niger and Kwara States, from June 2014 to October 2015. Goal of the project was Rapid Identification and Treatment of TB (RITT) and improved quality assurance methods at TB DOTS microscopy centers in Kwara and Niger states to ensure accurate TB diagnosis.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.359
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Traditional and Conventional Treatment for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in an
           Endemic Rainforest Area of Northern Ecuador

    • Authors: E. Obeng-Gyasi; M. Weigel, R. Armijos, W. Cevallos, X. Sanchez, E. Puebla
      First page: 160
      Abstract: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) causes unsightly lesions and can cause permanent disfigurement. The gold standard CL treatment is a toxic antimonial drug. Our study examined the traditional and conventional treatment knowledge, beliefs, and practices (KAP) of an endemic rainforest population in Ecuador and compared the findings with those we published two decades ago in the same area.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.358
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Pap Smear Testing among HIV+ Women in La
           Romana, Dominican Republic, 2015-2016

    • Authors: F. Pacheco; A. Thornton, S. Cunto-Amesty, M. Halpern, A. Candelario, D. Berroa
      First page: 161
      Abstract: Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are major health issues in the Dominican Republic. Little is known about the prevalence of common STIs, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), as comprehensive screenings are not available to the general population. HPV infection can cause abnormal Pap smear results, and can eventually lead to cervical cancer if gone undiagnosed; HIV+ women are at elevated risk of HPV disease progression to cervical cancer. One of the aims of Estudio de Prevalencia de Infecciones de Transmisión Sexual en Poblaciones Claves (EPIC) is to assess HPV and abnormal cytologies among HIV+ women.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.361
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Analysis of Viewer Engagement in YouTube Videos Related to HIV/AIDS
           Awareness and Prevention

    • Authors: H. Omer; M.A. Mamun, K. Pervin, T. Turin
      First page: 161
      Abstract: Everyday approximately a billion viewers watch hundreds of millions of hours on YouTube. Currently YouTube videos are used as internet based media for dissemination of public health information. To characterize viewer engagement pattern, we measured viewership, viewer-preferences and viewer-responses to the HIV/AIDS awareness and prevention related videos on YouTube.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.360
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Increasing Access to HIV Treatment and Care Services for Key Populations
           in Zambia: A Partnership Approach to Strengthening Local Capacity to
           Provide Sensitivity Training to Health Workers

    • Authors: T. Phaup; M. Lunda, J. Haloka, C. Kayumba, A. Stark, S. Weissman
      Pages: 162 - 163
      Abstract: HIV and AIDS continue to be a major developmental challenge for Zambia, which has one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world. There is limited information and services available for key populations (KP) such as female sex workers (FSW), people who inject drugs (PWID) and men who have sex with men (MSM) due to the illegal status of these high-risk populations. It is recognized that stigma and discrimination increase the risk of HIV exposure or limit access to treatment services. Estimates suggest that KP may be HIV epidemic drivers in Zambia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.364
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • HIV Partner Notification Values and Preferences in Rakai, Uganda: A
           Qualitative Study

    • Authors: C. Payne; N. Nakyanjo, W. Ddaaki, N. Hutchinson, V. Burke, F. Nalugoda, C. Kennedy
      First page: 162
      Abstract: HIV partner notification, also known as assisted partner services or contact tracing, involves contacting the sexual partners of people who test HIV-positive to link people at heightened HIV risk to testing services, treatment, and prevention. As partner notification programs expand across sub-Saharan Africa, organizations must consider community perceptions and preferences to design acceptable, effective programs. We conducted a qualitative study to understand values and preferences around HIV partner notification in Rakai, Uganda.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.363
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence of Extra Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Patients with Tuberculosis
           Attending Institutions Managed by Zanmi Lasante in Saint-Marc, Haiti

    • Authors: E.F. Julceus; S. Payant, N. Sohler, K. Israel
      First page: 162
      Abstract: Tuberculosis is as a global health problem responsible for millions of deaths each year. Lung disease remains the most common clinical form, however extra pulmonary localizations are increasingly seen with HIV infection. Extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is most prevalent in low income countries. Few studies on EPTB have been carried out in Haiti, at risk because of poor economy and high HIV prevalence. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of EPTB and its association with HIV in two public institutions managed by Zanmi Lasante in Saint-Marc.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.362
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Stigma among Women Living with HIV in Nepal: A Double Burden of Disease
           and Disparity

    • Authors: S.S. Rai; S. Dhakal, J. Yasuoka, K. Kikuchi, D.R. Singh, B. Pandey, M. Jimba
      Pages: 163 - 164
      Abstract: Globally, women living with HIV feel the most burden of HIV stigma. They not only face stigma of having HIV, but also other multiple stigmas associated with gender disparities they face in the society. HIV stigma among women is even more pronounced in developing nations because of preexisting socioeconomic inequalities and subjugating gender norms. However, the experience of stigma among women particularly living in South Asian countries like Nepal remains underexplored. This study aimed to focus on Nepalese women and determine the extent of HIV stigma experienced by them, and identify the associated factors.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.366
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • One Health Student Club Model: Preparing the Future Workforce to Address
           Infectious Disease Threats in Rwanda

    • Authors: S. Muhizi; R. Kibuuka, I. Rwego, C. Porta
      First page: 163
      Abstract: Rapid and effective response to infectious disease threats requires multidisciplinary collaboration. Despite recognition of the human, animal, and environmental interface that underlies most infectious diseases and subsequent emerging pandemic threats, pre-service educational programs (e.g., veterinary sciences, public health, nursing, medicine) continue to be siloed with rare opportunities to understand and experience the benefits of multidisciplinary collaboration. The purpose of the One Health Student Club Model is to provide students from varied disciplines with didactic and clinical experiential learning activities that benefit students and communities and address relevant zoonotic infectious disease threats.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.365
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Missed Opportunities for Early Infant Diagnosis in Rural Nigeria: An
           Analysis from the MoMent Study

    • Authors: U.C. Anaba; C. Isah, H. Omari, M. Charurat, N. Sam-Agudu
      Pages: 164 - 165
      Abstract: Less than 10% of HIV-exposed infants (HEI) in Nigeria receive EID by the recommended age of 2 months. Low EID uptake means delays in time to infant ART initiation, leading to missed opportunities for lifesaving treatment. The MoMent Nigeria study, an interventional PMTCT implementation research study, evaluated EID uptake and cascade losses amongst HEI at Primary Healthcare Centres (PHCs) in rural North-Central Nigeria.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.368
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • In Vivo Antibacterial Activity of Dadih and Dadih Ice Cream Toward
           Salmonella typhimurium Development

    • Authors: S. Rezvi; A. Eka Putra, T. Faadhila
      First page: 164
      Abstract: Dadih is one of Indonesia's heritage foods from Minangkabau, West Sumatra. This traditional food contains probiotics. The health benefits of dadih probiotic have been proven. However, in the original form, dadih has sour taste, rendering it less favorable by many people. To overcome the taste problem and increase its acceptance, dadih can be modified into ice cream. Moreover, a study showed that ice cream supports the availability of probiotics. We aimed to prove that dadih processed into ice cream retains its benefit for health by observing the in vivo antibacterial activity toward Salmonella typhimurium.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.367
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Tick, Tock, Clock: When is the best time to post on Twitter?

    • Authors: P. Swamy; K. Ngo, A. Mandalakas
      Pages: 165 - 166
      Abstract: Social media can be utilized for health-related advocacy. Twitter users post “tweets” which are limited to 140 characters. Within a Tweet, users can use hashtags which can later be searchable and utilized to advocate for issues like Tuberculosis. World TB Day which happens annually on March 24 was started in 1882. This day was started to build awareness and advocate for those living with Tuberculosis. This year the #worldTBday was added to the Symplur database. When conducting a social media campaign, businesses often identify when to post to maximize reach.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.370
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) Survey of
           an Endemic Rainforest Population in Northern Ecuador

    • Authors: T. Sorocco; M. Weigel, R. Armijos, W. Cevallos, X. Sanchez, E. Puebla
      First page: 165
      Abstract: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is endemic throughout the Pacific coastal rainforest region of Ecuador. We conducted a survey in the same endemic region to examine CL-related KAP. We also compared these findings with those from prior studies we conducted two decades ago. We did so because extensive primary rainforest destruction and intensive economic development activities have changed the region’s ecology and disease distribution patterns. In addition, many subsistence farmers who originally settled have been replaced by migrants from non-endemic areas of Ecuador.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.369
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Crowdsourcing Designathon: A New Model for Multisectoral Collaboration

    • Authors: J. Tucker; W. Tang, H. Li, C. Liu, R. Fu, S. Tang, B. Cao, C. Wei, T. Tangthanasu
      Pages: 166 - 167
      Abstract: Many HIV testing services campaigns for young people are designed by experts with limited input from young people. Hackathons are events in which a diverse community of individuals collaborates over several days, typically developing a new technology. We adapted the concept of a hackathon to focus on developing a community-based HIV testing campaign for young men who have sex with men (MSM).
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.373
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • HepTestContest: A Global Innovation Contest Soliciting Descriptions of
           Hepatitis B and C Testing Programs

    • Authors: J. Tucker; H. Team
      First page: 166
      Abstract: Innovation contests provide a structured mechanism to solicit community feedback on important public health issues. Innovation contests have been used to develop public health campaigns, clinical algorithms, and inform policy. The purpose of this innovation contest was to solicit descriptions of hepatitis B and C testing from around the world.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.372
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Reimagining Health Communication: A Non-Inferiority Randomized Controlled
           Trial of Crowdsourcing in China

    • Authors: W. Tang; J. Mao, C. Liu, K. Mollan, T. Wong, Y. Zhang, S. Tang, M. Hudgens, Y. Qin, B. Ma, M. Liao, B. Yang, W. Ma, D. Kang, C. Wei, J. Tucker
      First page: 166
      Abstract: Crowdsourcing, the process of shifting individual tasks to a large group, may reimagine health communication, making it more people-centered. We aimed to compare the effectiveness of a crowdsourced versus a social marketing video in promoting condom use.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.371
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Patterns and Perceptions of Self-Prescribed Antibiotic Use in Guayaquil,
           Ecuador

    • Authors: O. Hall; L. Malter, E. van der Linden, J. Weinstein
      Pages: 167 - 168
      Abstract: The rising incidence of antibiotic-resistant disease is partially attributable to the extensive use and misuse of antibiotics. Ecuador has the second highest rate of per-capita antibiotic consumption in Latin America. The purpose of this study is to identify factors that contribute to self-prescribed antibiotic use in a low-income neighborhood of Guayaquil, Ecuador’s largest city, where antibiotics are frequently available over-the-counter.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.375
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Diagnosis of Cutaneous Leishmaniasis using Microscopic Detection and
           Molecular-based PCR Assay Techniques

    • Authors: Y. Wang; R. Armijos, M. Weigel, A.O. Balogun, T. Sorocco, W. Cevallos, X. Sanchez, E. Puebla, R. Rodriguez
      First page: 167
      Abstract: Molecular identification of Leishmania species using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) has been studied as a more sensitive approach compared to parasitological and microscopic methods. However, in many Cutaneous Leishmaniasis (CL) -endemic areas in low and middle income countries, there is little to no infrastructure to conduct PCR assays on the site. PCR-based molecular diagnosis aids in CL treatment and follow-up due to its higher sensitivity and specificity.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.374
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Delayed HIV Testing among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Australia Has
           Improved but Remains an Issue

    • Authors: H. Zou; X. Meng, Z. Xu, D. Callander, B. Donovan, A. Grulich, M. Chen, C. Fairley, C. O’Connor, M. Hellard, R. Guy
      First page: 168
      Abstract: Guidelines in Australia and other countries recommend regular HIV testing for men who have sex with men (MSM) and up to 3-monthly for MSM at higher risk of HIV transmission. We determined trends and factors associated with delayed HIV testing in among MSM attending Australian sexual health clinics.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.377
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Epidemiological Burden and Health Outcomes of Tuberculosis in the
           Philippines from 2000-2015

    • Authors: T. Yuen; D. Geocaniga-Gaviola, C. Garfin, R.P.H. Yadav
      First page: 168
      Abstract: Despite meeting all three Millennium Development Goals on tuberculosis (TB) prior to the 2015 end date, the Philippines remains to be one of the 22 high-burden TB countries. In 2013, TB was the seventh leading cause of death and attributed to 4.4% of total death. The objective of the current study is to summarize the epidemiological burden and health outcomes of TB from 2000-2015.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.376
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Use of an Anti-Helminth Tracking Card to Promote Adherence to Deworming
           Treatment in Rural Honduras

    • Authors: M. Kumar; A. Dosaj, J. Cook, S.S. Modi, K. Sanogo, N. Masroor, G. Bearman, M. Stevens
      First page: 169
      Abstract: Soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections are prevalent in the developing world and are second only to malaria in terms of global morbidity. To reduce the burden in endemic regions, the WHO has recommended twice yearly anti-helminthic medication administration. Although Virginia Commonwealth University’s Global Health & Health Disparities Program (GH2DP) has been supporting de-worming efforts in the region in and around La Hicaca in rural, remote Honduras since 2008, a relatively high prevalence of chronic STH infections persists in the region.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.378
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Knowledge of and Attitudes Toward Alcoholism among Church Leaders in Saint
           Vincent/Grenadines

    • Authors: S. Liu; M. Zafer, Y. Smart, K. Providence, C.L. Katz
      Pages: 170 - 171
      Abstract: Saint Vincent and the Grenadines (SVG) is an Eastern Caribbean country with a high rate of Alcohol Use Disorders (AUDs) but inadequate community mental health resources to address them. This study sought to gauge attitudes toward and knowledge of alcoholism among church leaders in SVG in order to investigate their potential role in community alcohol interventions.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.385
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Fresh Fruit Intake May Decrease Long-term Risk of Esophageal Cancer Death
           among Smokers Based on Results from the Linxian Nutrition Intervention
           Trail

    • Authors: H. Liang; Z. Yang, P. Yu, J.-H. Fan, Y.-L. Qiao
      First page: 170
      Abstract: Previous studies have shown inadequate intake of fruit to be one of the main risk factors of esophageal cancer death. This association is particularly true among the smokers. We investigated the association between long-term risk of esophageal cancer death and fresh fruit consumption among smokers in the Linxian Nutrition Intervention Trail.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.384
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Mental Health in Leon, Nicaragua: Reflections from a Seven-Week Global
           Mental Health Elective

    • Authors: S.E. Levitt; T. da Silva, A.V. Ravindran
      First page: 170
      Abstract: Nicaragua is a low and middle income country (LMIC) with a long history of socio-political, economic and environmental challenges that have profoundly affected the local population. Mental disorders and addictions are highly prevalent and suicide rates are the highest in the region. Mental health infrastructure and funding are sparse and care differs significantly from standards in Western countries. A final year medical student completed a seven-week psychiatry global mental health elective in Leon, Nicaragua.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.383
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Characteristics and Motivations of Women of Reproductive Age in Uganda
           with Rheumatic Heart Disease: A Mixed Methods Study

    • Authors: A.Y. Chang; J. Nabaale, H. Nalubwama, I. Ssinabulya, E. Okello, C. Longenecker, A. Webel
      Pages: 171 - 172
      Abstract: Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is a leading cause of premature morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Women of reproductive age are a vulnerable group of patients with RHD, due to greater risk of cardiovascular complications and mortality during pregnancy. Warfarin can prevent some of these complications (e.g. stroke) but can also cause fetal abnormalities. Yet, in an international study,
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.387
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Depression: A Comparison Study of
           Garment Factory Workers in Bangladesh

    • Authors: T.J. Fitch; G. Villanueva, J. Moran, H. Alamgir, R. Sagiraju, M. Quadir
      First page: 171
      Abstract: Poverty-level wage labor is rising overseas as western corporations outsource for cheaper and abundant labor. The workplace health, safety and wellbeing of these workers is neglected. In developing countries evidence on the prevalence and risk factors of mental health conditions is limited. Our study aim was to determine the prevalence of depression and report its associated risk factors in such a population- Bangladesh’s female garment factory workers.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.386
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Addressing Long-term Primary Care and Mental Health Concerns in
           Marginalized, Underdeveloped Communities

    • Authors: C. Madden; R.C. McKersie, M. Fried
      Pages: 172 - 173
      Abstract: When Himalayan HealthCare (HHC) was founded in 1992, the remote mountain communities of Northern Dhading District were suffering from extreme poverty and neglect. Though located only 60 km northwest of Kathmandu, the villages have no road access and some require a three-day walk with passes of 14,000 feet. There was no funding from the Nepal government, which was preoccupied with civil war and political instability, or from international organizations which focused aid on Western Nepal. HHC found mortality and morbidity rates above the national average, prevalent alcoholism and domestic violence and only 15 children enrolled in school in the village of Tipling.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.389
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Emotional Distress Screening Tool as a Predictor for Medical Utilization
           and Disability: A Retrospective Analysis of Refugees Resettling in
           Syracuse, NY

    • Authors: C.D. Lupone; P. Cronkright
      First page: 172
      Abstract: Major depression, PTSD, and anxiety disorders rank among the most common disorders in refugees, challenging clinicians and public health professionals. The Refugee Health Screener – 15 (RHS-15) is a validated screening instrument for emotional distress and is used as a diagnostic proxy for PTSD, anxiety, and depression, however the clinical and social utility of the tool is lacking.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.388
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Barriers in Seeking De-Addiction Treatment in Patients with Hazardous Use
           of Alcohol in a Tertiary Care Centre in lower middle income country

    • Authors: V. Mathew; N. Chacko Kunjumon, J.P. Ruben
      Pages: 173 - 174
      Abstract: Alcohol is one of the leading causes of death and disability globally. Almost 4 per cent of all deaths worldwide are attributed to alcohol. It is suggested that only one in fourteen of the in-need alcohol dependent population are accessing treatment each year. This suggests that problem drinkers experience varied barriers in seeking deaddiction services. This study attempts to evaluate various barriers in seeking deaddiction services in a lower middle income country.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.391
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • It's kind of a shameful thing': Stigmatization and Diabetes in Majuro,
           Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI)

    • Authors: J.P. Marriott; A. Sy, T. Tomeing, S. Mcintosh, M. Demment, T.D.V. Dye
      First page: 173
      Abstract: Diabetes in the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) is ranked among nations with the highest diabetes rates in the world. Poor adherence to preventive advice and medical and social complications are common. While various factors and mechanisms are responsible for diabetes prevalence on Majuro, the capital of RMI, diabetes stigma may serve as a barrier to prevention of diabetes and complications in Majuro. This analysis examines the role of diabetes stigma with diabetic experiences in Majuro.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.390
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Indoor Air Quality in Rural Honduras, One Stove at a Time

    • Authors: S.S. Modi; D. Kosturakis, A. Dosaj, G. bearman, J. Cook, K. Sanogo, N. Masroor, P. Bearman, M. Stevens
      Pages: 174 - 175
      Abstract: Indoor air pollution (IAP) increases the risk for acute and chronic respiratory disease and is a major issue in developing countries where biomass fuels are commonly used. A 2012 survey by Le et al. in a region of rural Honduras served by VCU’s Global Health & Health Disparities Program (GH2DP) revealed a high prevalence of respiratory illness linked to improperly installed cook stoves. Subsequently, improved cook stoves were installed throughout the region.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.394
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Understanding How Home Health Services Can Be a Resource for Somali Older
           Adults and Their Families

    • Authors: S.M. Miner
      First page: 174
      Abstract: Home health care (HHC) refers to the delivery of health and personal care services in the home by paid health professionals and/or paraprofessionals. Somali older adults face a number of challenges that impede their access to HHC services, but there is promising evidence indicating that HHC services can improve their health outcomes. Further exploration of Somali families’ perceptions of these services can demonstrate what is needed to improve their access and experience with HHC.The purpose of the study was to explore and describe Somali older adults’ and their families’ perceptions of and experiences with the services offered by adult HHC.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.393
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Factors Associated with Child Passenger Motorcycle Helmet Use in Cambodia

    • Authors: H. Merali; A. Bachani
      First page: 174
      Abstract: Cambodia has the highest motorcycle death rate in South East Asia. Helmets are effective at decreasing injuries and mortality, but their use in children has been found to be very low in Cambodia. To gain insight into how we might increase child-passenger helmet use and protect children from head injury and death, we sought to analyze several risk factors associated with child-passenger helmet use in five provinces in Cambodia.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.392
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Disparities in Smoking Prevalence: A Missed Opportunity for Tobacco
           Control in Pakistan

    • Authors: O. Oyebode; H. Masud
      Pages: 175 - 176
      Abstract: Pakistan is one of the highest tobacco consuming countries in South Asia and consumption is increasing. For Pakistan to implement equity orientated tobacco control policies, the most vulnerable groups must be identified. We aimed to identify these groups using data from the Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS) 2012-13.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.396
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Diabetes Awareness and Education Program

    • Authors: O. Nimbabzazi; B. Hirwa
      First page: 175
      Abstract: DAEP, Diabetes Awareness and Education Program is a countrywide program initiated by Rwanda Pharmaceutical Students in 2015 with the aim of raising an awareness on diabetes; its causes, symptoms, treatments and prevention, highlighting the importance of starting the day with a healthy breakfast to help prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes and effectively manage all types of diabetes to avoid complications as suggested by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) and also assess nutrition status and blood pressure measurement for participants to appraise risks factors and complications.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.395
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Independent Field Audit of Individual Household Latrine (IHHL) in Charutar
           Region of Gujarat, India

    • Authors: K.N. Talati; A. Phatak, M. Shinde, K. Prajapati, B. Joshi, S. Mishra, B. Thomas, H. Murphy, S. Nimbalkar
      First page: 176
      Abstract: In India, the promotion of total sanitation is increased by the “Swachh Bharat Mission” initiative of the current Government. Construction of Individual Household Latrines (IHHL) is one of the key components under the mission to achieve ‘Open Defecation Free’(ODF) status for urban areas and villages. Urban areas and 4,800 villages in the state of Gujarat have been declared ODF. However, there are various reports questioning construction and utility of IHHL. We conducted an independent audit of IHHL in Charutar region of Gujarat.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.398
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Healthy Eating and Active Living (HEAL): Feasibility and Acceptability of
           Implementing School-based Intervention to Control Childhood Overweight and
           Obesity in Urban Area of Bangladesh

    • Authors: S. Pervin; M. Wang, A. Mamun, A. Naheed
      First page: 176
      Abstract: The prevalence of overweight and obesity is now on the rise in Bangladesh along with the rapid urbanization and nutrition transition. There is no evidence of intervention to control such growing burden among children and adolescent in Bangladesh. The study aimed to test feasibility and acceptability of culturally appropriate healthy eating and active living (HEAL) guidelines for children and adolescents to control overweight and obesity through a school based initiative.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.397
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prehypertension and Hypertension in Bangladesh – Modifiable
           Lifestyle Factors

    • Authors: M. Rahman; Y. Fakir
      Pages: 177 - 178
      Abstract: It is documented that pre-hypertensive patients are at greater risk of developing hypertension and thereby more likely to experience cardiovascular diseases in their lifetime. However, little attention has been given to the lifestyle modifiable factors that enhance developing prehypertension in order to prevent the transfer from pre-hypertension to the hypertension.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.401
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Self-reported Oral Hygiene Care and Natural Teeth Retention among Older
           Singaporeans

    • Authors: Y. Qian; B. Wu, C. Sim
      First page: 177
      Abstract: In recent years, the elderly population in Singapore has significantly increased. However, few studies have conducted on oral health among older Singaporeans. Oral health is an important part of general health. Studies have shown that poor oral health is related to pain, functional impairment, and quality of life. The aim of this study is to examine the association between self-reported oral hygiene care and tooth retention from clinical examinations among older adults by linking the survey to patients’ dental records.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.400
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Summarizing Factors Contributing to Partial or Non-utilization of
           Individual Household Latrine (IHHL) in Charutar Region of Gujarat, India

    • Authors: K.N. Talati; B. Joshi, K. Prajapati, S. Mishra, A. Phatak, S. Nimbalkar, H. Murphy, A. Dongre
      First page: 177
      Abstract: Sanitation campaign in India found renewed interest after Prime Minister Narendra Modi mentioned about it in his 2014 Independence Day speech followed by launch of “Swachh Bharat Abhiyan”(SBA). Construction of Individual Household Latrines(IHHL) is one of the key components under the mission to achieve ‘Open Defecation Free’(ODF) status. While IHHLs have been constructed in majority of villages in Gujarat, government is now campaigning for its increased utilization. The study assessed factors contributing non-utilization of IHHLs so that promotional campaign can be contextualized to address underlying issues.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.399
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Health Related Quality of Life in Morbidly Obese Women Attending a
           Tertiary Care Hospital in India

    • Authors: S.L. Ramasamy; N. Kapoor, M. Joseph, S. Jiwanmall, D. Kattula, V. Abraham, I. Subramaniam, T. Paul, N. Thomas
      First page: 178
      Abstract: The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide, attributable to shifts in diet and lifestyle. Obesity is correlated with increased health risks including cardiovascular disease, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. South Asians have higher body fat percentage at lower BMI’s compared to European counterparts, and therefore have the same health risks at lower stages of obesity.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.403
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Thinking Out of the Box - Snoring as Global Non-communicable Health
           Concern

    • Authors: M. Rahman; F. Yunus
      First page: 178
      Abstract: Although snoring is commonly known but ignored breathing problem that affects among all ages and both genders,contribute to poor health and diminishes quality wellbeing. We, therefore, aimed to study the relationship of snoring with chronic disease among the Bangladeshi population.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.402
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Impact of Community-Academic Partnerships on Nursing Students and the
           Community: An Integrative Review

    • Authors: A.R. Schneider; L. Stephens, S. Semenic
      Pages: 179 - 180
      Abstract: Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) are increasingly being developed in nursing education to enhance the number of clinical placement sites, to develop community nursing knowledge and skills, and to “give back” to the community; however, literature to date is largely descriptive with limited empirical data on key outcomes of CAPs. This review synthesized the current literature on nursing CAPs in order to identify their impacts at the individual, community, and organizational level.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.406
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Use of Seatbelt and Child Restraints in the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC)
           Region as a Factor in Road Traffic Safety

    • Authors: W.M. Rohrer; C. Lobo, B. Folb, A. Dulin
      First page: 179
      Abstract: Introduction: Road traffic accidents (RTAs) are a major public health challenge across the World Health Organization’s Eastern Mediterranean (EM) region, including the Gulf Co-Operation Council (GCC) nations of Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. Evidence-based studies guiding health policy changes in addressing public health impact of RTAs within this region are limited.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.405
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Translating Research into Practice: A Program to Scale up Mental Health
           Services in Madhya Pradesh, India

    • Authors: R. Shidhaye; R. Ramaswamy
      First page: 179
      Abstract: The SOHAM (Scaling up Opportunities for Healthy and Active Minds) initiative was instituted in June 2015 to scale up integration of mental health services in primary care in all 51 districts in the state of Madhya Pradesh in India covering a population of 72 million. The intervention for SOHAM is based on a research programme called PRIME established in 2011 to generate evidence on the best methods for implementation of mental health services through primary care in several countries. PRIME was implemented in three hospitals in Madhya Pradesh.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.404
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Selection of Hospice Electronic Medical Record (EMR) for Low Income
           Country: A Case Study

    • Authors: B.K. Shah; T. Shah
      Pages: 180 - 181
      Abstract: Selection of an ideal EMR is an important but a complicated process, especially because there are few established guidelines available. EMR may be cost-prohibitive, and challenging to implement in low income countries because of limited access to internet at many places. We describe a case study on the process of selection of hospice EMR from our experience at the Binaytara home hospice program, Patan Nepal.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.409
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Exploring Knowledge and Attitudes toward Non-Communicable Diseases among
           Village Health Teams in Eastern Uganda: A Cross-sectional Mixed Methods
           Study

    • Authors: T. Ojo; N. Hawley, M. Desai, D. Guwatudde, J. Schwartz
      First page: 180
      Abstract: Community health workers are essential personnel in resource-limited settings. In Uganda, they are organized into Village Health Teams (VHTs) and are focused on infectious diseases and maternal-child health; however, their skills could potentially be utilized in national efforts to reduce the growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We sought to assess the knowledge of, and attitudes toward NCDs and NCD care among VHTs in Uganda as a step toward identifying their potential role in community NCD prevention and management.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.408
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Analysis of the Perceptions and Behaviors Related to Water, Sanitation,
           and Hygiene as a Result of Community-Led Total Sanitation in Southern
           Senegal

    • Authors: S.M. Schneider; R. Lambisso Wamisho, A. Catford, L. Badiane, C. Sambou
      First page: 180
      Abstract: Lack of proper sanitation, hygiene, and access to safe drinking water affects the health of a community and subsequently impacts its potential for development. In Senegal, diarrheal diseases caused 11% of deaths in children under five years of age in 2013. Basic interventions to better drinking water, sanitation, and hygiene could significantly reduce this mortality and lead to overall improvements in children’s health, school attendance, and community development. Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) is a behavior change approach that aims to end open defection by improving knowledge of contamination and its consequences.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.407
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Socioeconomic, Psychosocial, and Healthcare-Access Contributors to
           Poisoning and Suicide in Sri Lanka: An Ecological Survey

    • Authors: A.E. Sumner; J. Whittall, A. Rodrigo, T. da Silva, A.V. Ravindran
      Pages: 181 - 182
      Abstract: Sri Lanka has recently undergone a series of turbulent changes, including a prolonged civil war, tsunami, and considerable government instability, which have contributed to a substantial degree of poverty and resultant health disparities across the country. Despite recent political stability and economic growth, Sri Lanka reports the fourth highest suicide rate in the world, with rates of deliberate self-harm estimated to be many times higher. Most suicides in Sri Lanka occur among young adults, and suicide is the leading cause of death in the 16-24 age group.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.411
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Perceptions of Risk and Safety in a Day Laborer Community in Los Angeles,
           California

    • Authors: B. Silverberg
      First page: 181
      Abstract: By definition, day laborers receive a piece-meal income from temporary work. Sometimes they find themselves in potentially dangerous situations, but due to fear of reprisal, may not protest. One study in Los Angeles found that 38% of male day laborers had been solicited for sex by another man while looking for work. Similarly, 26% had had sexual contact with a female prostitute over the preceding year. Alcohol and/or drugs were frequently involved in both types of encounters and safer sex practices were not always followed.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.410
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Epidmilogical Study of Health Outcome among Internal Migrants in
           Beijing, China

    • Authors: G. Tian; T. Guan
      First page: 182
      Abstract: The relationship between internal migration and health outcome in China is important to investigate due to the large scale of mobilized population. Previous studies on internal migration and health in China were almost all conducted by using self-reported health status, rarely by using other health indicators. In this study, we aimed to examined the relationship by using Bejing’s vital statistics 2007-2012 to provide better evidence.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.413
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Experiences of Task Shifting to Reduce Mental Health Disparities in
           Underserved, Rural Communities

    • Authors: R. Bischoff; P. Springer, N. Taylor, K. Cruickshank
      First page: 182
      Abstract: There are huge disparities worldwide in access to mental health care, with disparities not only existing in low income countries but also in developing countries like the United States. To begin to address the large disparities of mental health both locally and globally, unconventional models of mental health care need to be considered. Task shifting is an unconventional strategy to address the worldwide workforce crisis by expanding the workforce to include mid-level providers and non-professionals.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.412
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • New Molecular Evidence of Exposure to Aristolochic Acid in South Korea:
           Implications for Global Public Health Hazard Linked to Nephrotoxic and
           Carcinogenic Herbal Medicines

    • Authors: S. Wang; J.S. Lim, D.E. Choi, K.G. Dickman, M. Olivier, S. Villar, V.S. Sidorenko, B.H. Yun, R.J. Turesky, J. Zavadil, A.P. Grollman
      Pages: 183 - 184
      Abstract: Aristolochic acid (AA) is a potent nephrotoxin and carcinogen (IARC Group 1) associated with urothelial, hepatobiliary, and renal carcinomas. Exposure to AA from dietary intake of traditional herbal medicines containing Aristolochia species poses a global health hazard, yet also an opportunity for disease prevention. Molecular epidemiology studies employing sensitive and specific biomarkers for screening of populations at risk are thus warranted.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.416
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Influence of Smokeless Tobacco Use on Diet and Nutrient Intake among
           Households in Bangladesh

    • Authors: M.K. Virk-Baker; M. Husain, M. Parascandola
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Tobacco users on average have less adequate diet as compared to non-users. While the majority of the studies are from developed countries, less is known about the influence of tobacco on dietary composition in developing countries where malnutrition is a major public health challenge. Additionally, the effect of smokeless-tobacco use on dietary composition are unknown.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.415
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Early Repolarization is Associated with Short QT Syndrome in Italian
           Cohort

    • Authors: E. Rawick; D. Nevelev, S. Nevelev, A. Mazzanti, S. Priori
      First page: 183
      Abstract: Early repolarization (ER), defined as an elevated slurring or notching of the QRS-ST junction, or J wave, on electrocardiogram, has recently been linked to malignant ventricular fibrillation. Because ER is common in the general population, however, there is a need to identify when the pattern has prognostic significance. The early repolarization pattern may be associated with arrhythmogenic syndromes, specifically Short QT Syndrome (SQTS), a lethal disorder whose natural history is incompletely characterized.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.414
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Global Development-Related Assistance for Mental Health: A Review of the
           Last Decade

    • Authors: M. Wickremsinhe; B. Liese, E. Huang
      Pages: 184 - 185
      Abstract: Mental and behavioral disorders constitute 7.3% of the global burden of disease and are projected to be the leading cause of disability in the year 2030. This burden is disproportionately borne by low- and middle-income countries. Recently, global mental health has gained international attention, as evidenced by the inclusion of mental health and wellbeing in the Sustainable Development Goals, the international meeting on mental health as a priority for global development--co-hosted by the World Health Organization and the World Bank in April of 2016--and other key milestones.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.418
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Substance Abuse, A Challenge to the Mental Health Status in Uganda

    • Authors: S.A. Weil M; T. Trevor Kwagala
      First page: 184
      Abstract: Globally, it is estimated that in 2012, between 162 million and 324 million people has used substances. In Uganda, there is 79% increase in use and abuse of substances, and substances commonly abused are alcohol, cannabis, tobacco, khat and kuber. The global burden of disease report for Uganda of 2010 indicates alcohol, cigarette smoking and drug use as one of the fifteen leading causes of disease. Hence this study assesses the risk factors associated with, the prevalence rates and the effects of substance abuse on the mental health status of Ugandans.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.417
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Taipei Hospital’s Chronic Kidney Disease Education Program and eGFR
           Outcomes

    • Authors: E. Young; B. Liu, V. Wan, T.-L. Lin, A. Lin, Y.-Z. Chen
      Pages: 185 - 186
      Abstract: Taiwan has the highest prevalence and incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in the world. Taipei Hospital established the Chronic Kidney Disease Education Program (CKDEP) to decrease the progression of chronic kidney disease (CKD) to ESRD. Specific diets are assigned according to the patient’s CKD stage and patients are given individualized consultations with a dietician. Analyzing the effectiveness of this program can lead to further funding and patient recruitment.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.421
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Expert Perspectives on Mesoamerican Nephropathy (MeN): Examining the
           Production of Biomedical Knowledge about a Contested Epidemic

    • Authors: E. Wright; S. Hamdy
      First page: 185
      Abstract: A form of chronic kidney disease sometimes called Mesoamerican nephropathy (MeN) is killing thousands of impoverished young men, mostly sugarcane harvesters, throughout Central America. Despite growing research interest in this disease since it was first described in 2002, its characteristics, causes, and even existence as a distinct clinical entity remain uncertain and, at times, contested. Using extensive interviews with leading MeN researchers, this study explored how biomedical knowledge about MeN is produced in a research climate fraught with barriers and controversy.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.420
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Telepathology: Reducing Time from Biopsy to Treatment in Limited Resource
           Settings

    • Authors: C. Wilson
      First page: 185
      Abstract: Innovating Health International (IHI) operates one of the few cancer treatment centers in Haiti and is setting up the first pathology lab at a public facility outside Port-au-Prince. Up until recently, histopathologic diagnosis of tumors required the use of private pathologists in Haiti or transporting samples to United States for evaluation. This resulted in a lag between initial consultation and diagnosis and ultimately delayed treatment onset. To address this, IHI established a telepathology program at Justinien University Hospital (HUJ) in Cap Haitien, Haiti.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.419
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Mortality from Thermal Burns in Patients Using Emergency Medical Services
           in India: A Prospective Study

    • Authors: J. Newberry; C. Bills, E. Pirrotta, G. RamanaRao, S. Mahadevan, M. Strehlow, S. Zachariah
      First page: 186
      Abstract: Globally, there were over 33.5 million thermal burn injuries in 2013, resulting in over one million years lost to disability, and approximately 237,500 deaths. The majority of burn deaths, an estimated 90%, occur in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) with India alone accounting for 163,000 fire-related deaths annually. The goal of our study was to characterize the demographics, management, and outcomes of patients using emergency medical services (EMS) for thermal burns in India.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.422
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Community Development: A Holistic Approach in Malawi

    • Authors: J. Rogers; M. Mizwa, J. Wilkinson, D. McGuire, A. Gibson
      First page: 187
      Abstract: The U.S. non-governmental organization (US-NGO) is an entrepreneurial, faith-based organization working in Malawi since 2007. Malawi is among the world’s least developed countries with a GDP rank of 146:196 and high maternal mortality rates according to the CIA. The US-NGO is driven by the opportunity it sees to help millions of rural Africans move from “dependence” to “independence.”
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.471
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Animal Injury, Zoonotic Disease, and Other Occupational Hazards of Rural
           Livestock Keepers in Uganda

    • Authors: J. Meisner; K. Curtis, P. Rabinowitz
      First page: 187
      Abstract: Worldwide, 70% of rural poor rely on livestock for income, nutrition, and draught power. Livestock farming in Africa is in a state of transition from traditional management systems towards intensification, calling into question the future of traditional systems. To inform this debate, we conducted a survey in Moyo District, Uganda, to describe occupational practices and hazards of agropastoralist livestock keepers.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.470
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • What has Changed as a Result of Having Access to Water in Rural
           Communities in Gaza, Mozambique?

    • Authors: K. Ogebule; P. Ramirez, S. Marquez, E. Opong, N. Varjavand, I. Roia, B. Macamo
      Pages: 188 - 189
      Abstract: About half of the populations without access to improved drinking water are in Sub-Saharan Africa (319 million).[1] Mozambique, as part of this statistic, is also ranked as one of the most poverty-stricken countries in the world (180 out of 188 in the UN Human Development Index).[2] In an effort to provide every person with the human right to water and sanitation, World Vision Mozambique has implemented the WASH (Water Sanitation and Hygiene) Project. However, has this project been successful and ultimately benefited the country? In an effort to understand the impact that introducing a reliable source of water has in a Mozambican community, we conducted a field study to assess the aftermath of WASH.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.474
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Palm Oil in Myanmar: A Spatiotemporal Study of How Industrial Farming
           Affects Biodiversity Loss and the Sustainable Diet

    • Authors: K.M. Nicholas; J. Fanzo, K. MacManus
      First page: 188
      Abstract: Palm oil consumption is not only potentially deleterious to human health, but its production has resulted in 11 million hectares of deforestation globally. Palm oil development and consumption in Myanmar is a burgeoning and under-researched phenomenon. Importing roughly 394,000 metric tons of palm oil in 2012 alone, the Burmese government has recently pushed for intensive palm oil development to sate domestic demand for consumption and become international market players. Given well-studied linkages between biodiversity loss and ecosystem instability, this study aims to characterize the nature of deforestation for palm oil production in Myanmar, its effects on the ‘sustainable diet’, and what factors influence it.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.473
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • TEAM Malawi (Technology-Education-Advocacy-Medicine Malawi): A
           Multidisciplinary Global Health Experience

    • Authors: P. Muelenaer; R. Hall, P. Kelly, K. kochersberger, A.A. Muelenaer, J. Powell, P. Talbot, A. Taylor
      First page: 188
      Abstract: Among faculty and students, there is increasing demand for global engagement experiences. In 2013, one physician from the Virginia Tech Carilion School of Medicine (VTCSoM) and two students from Virginia Tech (VT) engineering conducted a community based participatory research (CBPR) project in water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and a needs assessment for medical devices in Malawi. In 2014, two physicians and three students returned to Malawi to share prototypes of seven devices with 100 healthcare providers at eight hospitals.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.472
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • The Effects of Early Childhood Development Centers on Child Development
           and Nutritional Outcomes in Estancia, El Salvador

    • Authors: A.E. Symonds; S. Garcia, J. Kasper
      Pages: 189 - 190
      Abstract: In El Salvador, it is estimated that 35% of households live in multidimensional poverty with limited access to education, adequate nutrition, and economic opportunities. Poverty is known to affect child development and educational outcomes. An estimated 25% of three and four-year children in El Salvador have a low Early Childhood Development Index (ECDI) score. Doctors for Global Health partnered with a local non-governmental organization, La Asociación de Campesinos para el Desarrollo Humano (Peasant Association for Human Development, CDH), and facilitated the creation of Centers for Integrated Child Development (CICD) for children two – six years of age; children receive a curriculum that includes motor, language, and socio-emotional activities and nutritional supplementation.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.476
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Seasonal Variations in Fetal Growth Patterns in Ulaanbaatar City, Mongolia

    • Authors: H. Ong; S. Hunter, C. Azen, B. Munkhuu, D. Warburton
      First page: 189
      Abstract: Ulaanbaatar, the capital city of Mongolia sees some of the world's most extreme seasonal variability in climate and air pollution levels. In the winter months, temperatures can drop to −40 °C and particulate matter and gaseous pollutant concentrations at this time can exceed over 20 times WHO standards. In the summer months, air pollution levels are low and temperature extremes can reach up to +33 °C. This cross-sectional study examines whether there are seasonal variations in fetal growth patterns on prenatal ultrasound evaluations given these extreme environmental fluctuations.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.475
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Transforming Global Health Education with the Utilization of Simulations
           and Workshops

    • Authors: M. Mankbadi; A. Sterling, S. Du, A. Diaz, P. Patel, M. McGee, V. Vudatha, E. Wellings, N. Spitzer, B. thiel, J. Simms-Cendan
      Pages: 190 - 191
      Abstract: Previous studies have investigated the utilization of the IFMSA (International Federation of Medical Students' Associations) model, the Latin American SOCEM (Sociedades Científicas de Estudiantes de Medicina) model, and curriculum changes as a method to addressing education on global health topics, particularly neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). However, little has been done on the integration of simulations and workshops in graduate education as a means of addressing the knowledge gap in global health education.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.478
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluation of the Health Impact of a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene
           Intervention in Mugombwa Refugee Camp

    • Authors: M. TatahMentan; S. Marquez, G. Hamra, A. Asmare, N. Ugabinema, B. Nsanzumuhire, G. Gitau
      First page: 190
      Abstract: Globally, refugees constitute approximately 32% of “forcibly displaced” persons. Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) interventions are of high importance in emergency situations because of the health impact of poor water, sanitation, and hygiene practices. In 1994, 42,500 deaths of Rwandese refugees in the Democratic Republic of Congo were caused by water-related parasites. Health outcomes in these situations can be improved by increasing access to clean water, adequate water supply, access to sanitation facilities and improved hygiene practices.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.477
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Traffic-related Air Pollution and Parent-reported Behavioral Problems in
           Low Income School Children in Quito, Ecuador

    • Authors: S.D. Yonts; K. Khan, M. Weigel, N. Castro, G. Arias, E. Landuzuri, R. Armijos
      Pages: 191 - 192
      Abstract: Long-term exposures to traffic-related air pollutants are associated with chronic health conditions including cancer, cardiovascular, and respiratory outcomes as evident in epidemiological literature. Limited information from mechanistic and epidemiological studies indicate that air pollution may also affect the nervous system leading to mental and behavioral problems in vulnerable populations. We used an established cohort in the Quito Metropolitan District (QMD) consisting of children living in low, medium, and high PM2.5 exposure zones to explore the relationship of traffic-related air pollution with behavioral problems reported by mothers in late childhood.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.480
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Applying Interprofessional Global Health Principles to a Local Student-Run
           Free Clinic to Address the Health Care Needs in Apopka, Florida

    • Authors: S. Du; P. Patel, A. Diaz, V. Vudatha, M. Mankbadi, M. McGee, A. Sterling, F. Villanueva, E. Wellings, J. Simms-Cendan
      First page: 191
      Abstract: In July 2016, the University of Central Florida College of Medicine’s global health organization, MedPACt, in collaboration with the Farmworker Association of Florida initiated a local clinic for an underserved community in Apopka, Florida. Our community need assessment identified healthcare obstacles that patients faced including transportation difficulty, scheduling conflicts, and language barriers. 30.5% of patients had not seen a doctor in more than 1 year, with some reporting up to 20 years gap between doctor visits.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.479
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Uptake of Antenatal Care, and its Relationship with Participation in
           Health Services and Behaviors: An Analysis of the Poorest Regions of Four
           Mesoamerican Countries

    • Authors: C.R. McNellan; E. Dansereau, D. Colombara, E. Palmisano, M. Wallace, C. Johanns, A. Schaefer, D. Ríos-Zertuche, P. Zúñiga-Brenes, B. Hernandez, E. Iriarte, A. Mokdad
      Pages: 193 - 194
      Abstract: Antenatal care (ANC) is intended to identify high risk pregnancies, bring women into the health system, and educate them about when to return. Though poor women have a heightened need for ANC and are least likely to receive it, there is a concerning dearth of evidence detailing whether those who receive care are more likely to return for other maternal and child interventions. This analysis is the first to examine the relationship between ANC uptake and later uptake of health interventions.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.482
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Lessons from Central America: Technology Training for Maternal Health
           Project Development in Low- and Middle Income Countries

    • Authors: S. Mcintosh; E. Avendaño, D. Ossip, J.G. Pérez-Ramos, T. David, T.D.V. Dye
      First page: 193
      Abstract: The MundoComm project, funded in 2015 by the United States National Institutes of Health Fogarty International Center, builds upon a 17-year partnership among researchers in the US, Costa Rica, and the Dominican Republic. Its goal is to develop an innovative training program to enhance the ability of community-based teams in Latin America to use Information Communication Technology (ICT) to improve maternal health. Progress in reducing maternal mortality has stalled or worsened in Latin America, despite overall health improvements in child health.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.481
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating the Feasibility, Acceptability and Clinical Impact of
           Implementing New Pregnancy Dating and Fetal and Newborn Growth Standards
           in Peri-Urban Nairobi, Kenya

    • Authors: K.R. Millar; A. Langer, F. Muigai, M. Munson, S. Patel, S. Subbiah, M.N. Wegner
      Pages: 194 - 195
      Abstract: The INTERGROWTH-21st Project, which involved 60,000 mothers and infants across the world, produced the only comprehensive, scientifically-based platform to assess gestational age, fetal growth, and newborn size at birth.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.484
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Exploring Variations in Perceptions of Neonatal Airway Management with
           Traditional Birth Attendants and Midwives Practicing in Rural Uganda: A
           Qualitative Study

    • Authors: M. Mendhi; D.C. Pope
      First page: 194
      Abstract: Each year worldwide, 2.8 million neonatal deaths occur, and 25% are caused by hypoxic events, also referred as birth asphyxia. The World Health Organization (WHO) recognizes the need to educate the developing nation’s physicians, nurses and midwives to reduce the neonatal mortality rate, to address the Millennium Development Goal (MDG). Although trained health care workers decrease the neonatal mortality rate, the limited numbers are unable to cover rural areas. Therefore, Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) remain the primary healthcare providers in the rural areas.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.483
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Association of Maternal Prenatal Stress, Methylation Changes in IGF-1 and
           IGF-2, and Birth Weight in Mother-Newborn Dyads

    • Authors: D.C. Montoya-Williams; J. Quinlan, C. Clukay, C. Mulligan
      First page: 195
      Abstract: Maternal stress has been previously linked to low birth weight in newborns through various mechanistic theories. One theory, which draws from the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm, posits that epigenetic changes at certain candidate genes may occur as a result of prenatal maternal stress, leading to lower birth weight in infants. In this study, we sought to explore the potential association between prenatal stress, birth weight and methylation at two candidate genes related to newborn birth weight: IGF-1 and IGF-2.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.486
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Exploring Access to Cervical Cancer Screening Through At-home
           Self-collection and HPV Testing: Lessons Learned in the Two Rural
           Resource-Limited Settings of Southwest Virginia, USA and Bluefields,
           Nicaragua

    • Authors: E.M. Mitchell; H. Lothamer, C. Garcia, M. Forera, H. Al Kallas, Y. Pokam Tchuisseu, J. Keim-Malpass
      First page: 195
      Abstract: Significant preventable morbidity and mortality are associated with cervical cancer, of which 70-90% of cases are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Early screening and detection of cervical lesions through Pap tests can significantly increase better health outcomes. However, barriers to screening in rural resource-limited settings are pervasive at the individual, family, community, and systems levels. This presentation aims to describe exploring the cultural acceptability and feasibility of increasing cervical cancer screening through at-home self-collection of HPV DNA samples, in two rural resource-limited settings: Southwest Virginia, USA and Bluefields, Nicaragua.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.485
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • A Comparative Study of Sickle Cell Disease Related Maternal Mortality at
           Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital, Accra, Ghana

    • Authors: A.I. Nwokelo; S. Oppong
      Pages: 196 - 197
      Abstract: Sickle cell disease (SCD) is one of the most common inherited genetic diseases, affecting an estimated 30 million individuals worldwide. The greatest burden of SCD falls on Sub-Saharan Africa, where over 200,000 babies are born with the disease annually. Due to advances and improvements in medical care, survival of children with SCD has greatly increased, resulting in a significant proportion of patients surviving into childbearing age. However, SCD in pregnancy is associated with increased adverse maternal and fetal outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.489
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Breastfeeding Practices at the Community Level: Result from
           Sinazongwe District, Zambia

    • Authors: J.J. Nutor; S.P. Marquez, J.C. Slaughter-Acey
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Breastfeeding has been accepted as one of the most important intervention to enhance growth and development of a child. It satisfies an infant's nutritional and emotional needs better than any other methods of infant feeding. In order to achieve maximum benefit of breastfeeding for both mother and infant, there is a need for proper attachment and positioning. The purpose of this project was to teach mothers proper attachment and position during breastfeeding.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.488
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • PREventing Maternal And Neonatal Deaths in Rural Northern Ghana (PREMAND):
           Using Social Autopsy and GIS to Understand Neonatal Deaths and Near-Misses
           

    • Authors: C. Moyer; R. Aborigo, E. Kaselitz, K. James, S. Chatio, J. Williams
      First page: 196
      Abstract: Every year nearly 3 million babies die within 1 month of birth. While the clinical causes of such deaths are well known, few understand the complex social and cultural antecedents that increase the likelihood of deaths from largely preventable causes. In addition, little is known about the geographic variability of these factors – preventing interventions from addressing the local context and thus being maximally effective.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.487
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Gender Differences in Households’ Resource Alllocation and Decision to
           Seek Healthcare in South-Eastern Nigeria: Results from a Mixed Methods
           Study

    • Authors: M.N. Onah
      Pages: 197 - 198
      Abstract: In many low and middle income countries (LMICs), economic costs of seeking healthcare is still the predominant barrier to healthcare utilisation. This barrier is exacerbated when gender dynamics are considered with the most vulnerable being females within these poor household. Studies have found existing gaps in literature regarding women’s autonomy and health care utilization. This include gaps in the areas of healthcare that have been measured, the influence of sex roles and social support, and the use of qualitative studies to provide context and nuance.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.491
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Partner Notification and Treatment for Sexually Transmitted Infections
           among Pregnant Women in Gaborone, Botswana

    • Authors: O.A. Offorjebe; A. Wynn, D. Joseph Davey, K. Arena, N. Moshashane, D. Ramogola-Masire, C. Morroni, P. Gaolebale, J. Klausner
      First page: 197
      Abstract: Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae(NG), and Trichomonas vaginalis (TV) are sexually transmitted infections (STIs) associated with adverse birth outcomes. Untreated partners contribute to high rates of STI re-infection, thus partner notification and treatment remain important components of STI care and control.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.490
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Improving Emergency Obstetric and Neonatal Care (EmONC) Practices through
           Retrospective Analysis of Intrapartum Stillbirth Data at the Fort Portal
           Regional Referral Hospital, Southwesten Uganda

    • Authors: A. Radomsky; F. Kaharuza, B. McCarthy, E.A. McCue, L. Ssenyonjo, L.N. Ahern
      Pages: 198 - 199
      Abstract: Through support from the Saving Mothers Giving Life Initiative, Fort Portal Regional Referral Hospital (FPRRH) has used the BABIES (Birthweight Age-at-death Boxes for Intervention and Evaluating System) matrix to track progress in perinatal care since 2013. The BABIES matrix is an epidemiological tool which uses birthweight and time of death to define newborn health problems, assess the performance of a health system, select interventions, and then monitor and evaluate these interventions. From 2013 to 2015, the birthweight-specific mortality rates of normal birthweight babies (2,500g+) increased from 12.1 to 19.2 intrapartum stillbirths per 1000 total births, indicating a gap in care during labor.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.493
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Determinants of Contraception among Women with a Previous Ceasarean
           Section in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana

    • Authors: E. Otupiri
      First page: 198
      Abstract: A previous Caesarean section (CS) confers high risk on the index pregnancy. Ensuring optimal inter-pregnancy intervals and the reduction of unintended pregnancies among this sub-population of high risk pregnancies is important for maternal health and survival. Contraception is encouraged especially after CS in order to reduce the risk of a short inter-pregnancy interval. The determinants of contraception among women has been widely studied but there are few studies that have looked at the predictors of contraception among this high risk subpopulation - women with a previous CS.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.492
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Evaluating the Cost-Effectiveness of an Integrated Program to Reduce
           Maternal and Neonatal Mortality in Ghana

    • Authors: D. Goodman; R. Ramaswamy, M. Jeuland, E. Srofenyoh, C. Engmann, A. Olufolabi, M. Owen
      Pages: 199 - 200
      Abstract: Few studies have examined the cost effectiveness of facility based interventions in low-resource settings aimed at improving obstetric care. From 2007-2011, Kybele, an international NGO, partnered with the Ghana Health Service (GHS) to improve obstetric care through an integrated program addressing systems, skills, and leadership at a large tertiary hospital in Ghana. Despite doubling of patient volume and quadrupling of high-risk patients during this period, maternal mortality and still births were reduced.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.495
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Low-cost, Speculum-free, Automated Cervical Cancer Screening: Bringing
           Expert Colposcopy Assessment to Community Health

    • Authors: M.N. Asiedu; S. Guillermo, N. Ramanujam
      First page: 199
      Abstract: Although cervical cancer is on the decline in high income countries, the WHO estimates that 88% of worldwide invasive cervical cancer mortalities occur in LMICs and is expected to increase to 98% by 2030. Our work seeks to ameliorate key barriers to cervical cancer screening by developing: 1) a speculum-free alternative, using an inserter and the POCkeT Colposcope, a Point of Care Tampon-sized digital colposcope, for a more comfortable exam, that also allows for self-colposcopy; and 2) an image processing algorithm to aid health workers in the automated classification of cervical pre-cancer lesions real-time, using extracted features.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.494
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Trends in Breastfeeding and Cesarian sections over a 20 year period in 40
           low and middle income countries

    • Authors: A. Roess; D.R. Robert
      Pages: 200 - 201
      Abstract: WHO recommends that mothers initiate breastfeeding within the first hour after childbirth, exclusively breastfeed their child for six consecutive months, and then continue to breastfeed and supplement for up to two years; to optimize growth and development. While it has long been recognized that breastfeeding improves child survival by decreasing diarrheal disease and acute respiratory infections, recently it has also been linked to a decreased risk of childhood obesity and diabetes. Moreover benefits to the mother have been underestimated; breastfeeding is associated with a lower risk of cancer and metabolic disorders.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.498
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • An Innovative, Mobile-health Enhanced, Peer-counseling Program to Improve
           Breastfeeding among Low-income, Minority Populations in Washington, DC

    • Authors: R. Robert; A. Roess, E. Cleaves, D. Kuehn, P. Thompson
      First page: 200
      Abstract: Breastmilk is associated with reduced childhood obesity, asthma, infectious diseases, and sudden infant death syndrome, all of which disproportionately affect minority and low-income children in the US. Yet, breastfeeding rates are lower among low-income populations compared to the general population. Research has shown that peer-counselors, who come from the same culture and community and have experience breastfeeding, are effective in providing education and social support to improve breastfeeding behavioral outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.497
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Differences and Determinants of maternal mortality ratio in Sub-Saharan
           African countries.

    • Authors: M. Gonzalez; R. Ren
      First page: 200
      Abstract: Reducing maternal mortality ratio (MMR) was a primary target of the Millennium Development Goals (MDG5a). In Sub-Saharan Africa only three countries achieved the MDG5a and MMR is still high in the region. This study aims analyzing the data among Sub-Saharan countries that did not achieved the MDG5a and defining the determinants affecting MMR.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.496
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Coordination and Partnership for Improved Maternal-Child Health in Rural
           Chiapas, Mexico

    • Authors: T. Schimek; R. Molina, J. Villar de Onis, L. Palazuelos, D. Palazuelos, P. Elliott, H. Flores, A. Reyes Gutierrez
      Pages: 201 - 202
      Abstract: Improving maternal-child health remains a major goal worldwide for the most marginalized and vulnerable populations. New methods that implement what is known to work medically, but that also comprehensively address the myriad factors contributing to poor outcomes, are needed. Chiapas has one of the highest rates of maternal mortality in Mexico at 61 maternal deaths per 100,000 births. Partners In Health (PIH) has partnered with the Mexican Ministry of Health to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality by increasing the number and quality of institutional births, as well as reducing obstetric violence.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.500
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Disparity in Delivery: Why Is What Is Good for the Goose, Not Good for the
           Gander? Cervical Cancer Screening Program Strategies in LMICs Are Inferior
           

    • Authors: A. Sawaya; R. Anand, S. Venkatapuram, N. Rodriguez, R. Dewar
      First page: 201
      Abstract: The incidence of cervical cancer is significantly higher in Low and Middle Income Countries (LMICs) than in High Income Countries. There are three methods to screen for cervical cancer: Visual Inspection with Acetic Acid (VIA), HPV testing, and cytology. Cytology based screening resulted in drastic reduction in cervical cancer in High Income Countries, but has not been implemented in many LMICs because it is thought to be expensive and for fear of “loss to follow-up.” In this study, we surveyed countries in various income groups and correlated income with the published screening strategy in each country.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.499
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Human-Centered Design of Women's Reproductive Health Education in
           Guatemala: Promoting Education and Understanding about Cervical Cancer

    • Authors: E.M. Schutzenhofer; B. Williams, F. Archila, J. González, D. Burt
      Pages: 202 - 203
      Abstract: Although cervical cancer is the most common cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related premature deaths and disabilities (DALYs) among women in Guatemala, only an estimated 40% of Guatemalan women have ever been screened for this preventable cancer. With the long-term goal of increasing women’s utilization of cervical cancer screening, this project of the UVA-Guatemala Initiative (UVA-GI) utilized human-centered design (HCD) methodology to co-design an educational curriculum concerning cervical cancer (CC), screening, and preventive health with indigenous Guatemalan women.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.502
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Critical Assessment of Maternal-Newborn Care Delivery in Solukhumbu, Nepal

    • Authors: S. Schoenhals; S. Folsom, D. Levy, A.J. Sherpa, B. Fassl
      First page: 202
      Abstract: The majority of Nepal’s births take place in remote, rural and difficult to reach areas. Adverse outcomes for mothers and newborns are common. Little information exists about available health resources and care practices for maternal-child health (MCH) in these areas. The intent of this study was to evaluate care practices and identify areas of intervention for ante-, intra-, and postpartum care in one Nepali district.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.501
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Closing the Gender Gap in Global Health Leadership and Why it Matters

    • Authors: G. Seo; J. Mathad, J. Downs, L. Reif
      Pages: 203 - 204
      Abstract: Improving women’s health and reducing inequalities is fundamental to global health, and multiple studies demonstrate that female leaders enact policies that improve the health of women and children. Despite this, global health leadership is highly skewed towards men. Female trainees make up three-quarters of those interested in global health, yet women hold only a quarter of senior leadership positions in the field. Addressing the gender gap in global health leadership is essential for equity and the promotion of women’s health globally.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.504
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Preliminary Results: Youth Friendly Reproductive Health Provision
           Preferences among Youth, Parents, and Health Providers in Malawi

    • Authors: A.R. Self; M. Marx, T. Aung, C. Chalimba, J. Chilembwe, M. Chimchere, S. Chipokosa, M. Ishmail, P. Kamoto, A. Misomali, E. Monjeza, L. Park, J. Ndawala
      First page: 203
      Abstract: Malawi’s population growth is exacerbating growing food insecurity and environmental degradation while stretching already scarce government health and education funding. With two-thirds of the population under the age of 25, reducing unmet need for family planning among youth (15-24 years) as a means to reduce unwanted pregnancies is a priority for the reproductive health agenda. Uptake of family planning among youth and changes in youth-specific fertility rates have been slow despite recent investments.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.503
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • E-Cigarette Use In Pregnancy: A Human Rights-Based Approach To Policy and
           Practice

    • Authors: Y. van der Eijk; A.B. Petersen, S. Bialous
      Pages: 204 - 205
      Abstract: The use of e-cigarettes is increasing, and in pregnancy is a potential health concern for both mother and baby. A 2016 World Health Organization report states that: “evidence is sufficient to warn… pregnant women… against ENDS [e-cigarette] use.” Guidelines for healthcare professionals on e-cigarette use in pregnancy, published by the UK Smoking in Pregnancy Challenge Group, similarly state that: “We… don’t know about any risks to unborn babies from exposure to [e-cigarette] vapour.” Yet these guidelines also recommend that: “if a pregnant women chooses to use an electronic cigarette and if that helps her to stay smokefree, she should not be discouraged from doing so.” Equally concerning is the UK Medicines & Healthcare Products Regulatory Authority’s recent approval of the ‘e-Voke’ e-cigarette to aid smoking cessation during pregnancy.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.506
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Intimate Partner Violence and Unintended Pregnancy among Young Pregnant
           Women in Low-and Middle Income Countries: Integrative Review of the
           Literature

    • Authors: T. Udmuangpia; D.T. Bloom
      First page: 204
      Abstract: According to the World Health Organization, about 16 million adolescent girls give birth every year, 95% of them from Low-and Middle Income Countries (LMICs). Intimate partner violence (IPV) is prevalent in LMICs and a known risk factor for unintended pregnancy. The purpose of this review was to understand the state of the scientific literature regarding the intersections between unintended pregnancy among young women and IPV in LMICs.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.505
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Saving Mothers Project-Distribution of Birth Kits with Misoprostol in Two
           Rural Districts of Mara Region Tanzania: The challenges with survey data

    • Authors: G. Webber; B. Chirangi, N. Magatti
      Pages: 205 - 206
      Abstract: The “Saving Mothers Project” in Bunda and Tarime Districts of Mara Region, was conducted from October 2015 to early 2017. Pregnant women were provided with clean delivery kits with misoprostol to prevent infection and postpartum hemorrhage. The kits were distributed through community health workers (CHWs) and nurses. The women were instructed to seek a health facility for birth, but the kits could be used for home births, delivery on route, and at the facility as supplies were often lacking. Also, CHWs were given mobile phones equipped with an m-health application to register the pregnant women, send them reminders to attend antenatal clinic, warn them about danger signs, and track their delivery outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.508
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Social Factors Influencing Family Planning Knowledge, Attitudes, and
           Practices in the Ngäbe Population in Bocas del Toro, Panama

    • Authors: C.M. Vicens-Cardona; J. Lewis, A. Novak, B. La Brot
      First page: 205
      Abstract: According to Panama’s 2009 National Sexual and Reproductive Health Survey, only 19% of indigenous women in Panama use modern family planning (FP) methods. Despite the Ngäbe representing 62% of the indigenous population, there is limited research on their use of FP.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.507
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Obtaining Cost Efficiencies in a Cervical Cancer Screening Program in
           Kenya: Leveraging High-volume, Low-margin Clinics with Novel Technological
           Platforms

    • Authors: Q.W. Wong; R. Korom, M. Adam
      First page: 206
      Abstract: Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women in Kenya. Several barriers, including the high cost of quality screening methods, have led to less than 5% of women in developing countries being screened for cervical cancer. Penda Health is a social enterprise that provides high-quality, comprehensive primary health care to low-income Kenyans in a financially sustainable way through its three high-volume, low-margin medical centers in Nairobi.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.510
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Experiences of Women, Nurses and Community Health Workers in “Saving
           Mothers Project Tanzania”: Lessons for Scaling Up

    • Authors: G. Webber; B. Chirangi, N. Magatti
      First page: 206
      Abstract: The “Saving Mothers Project” in Bunda and Tarime Districts of Mara Region, was conducted from October 2015 to early 2017. Pregnant women were provided with clean delivery kits with misoprostol to prevent infection and postpartum hemorrhage. The kits were distributed through community health workers (CHWs) and nurses. The women were instructed to seek a health facility for birth, but the kits could be used for home births, delivery on route, and at the facility as supplies were often lacking. Also, CHWs were given mobile phones equipped with an m-health application to register the pregnant women, send them reminders to attend antenatal clinic, warn them about danger signs, and track their delivery outcomes.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.509
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Prevalence of Anemia in Schoolchildren Living in the Interior of
           Multi-ethnic Suriname: the Influence of Age, Sex and Ethnicity

    • Authors: L. Yau; M. Mac Donald-Ottevanger, B. Jubitana, C. Zijlmans
      First page: 207
      Abstract: Anemia in early life may lead to poor motor development and impaired cognitive function. The current prevalence of anemia in schoolchildren living in the interior of multi-ethnic Suriname, South America, is unknown. The Medical Mission Primary Health Care Suriname (MM) provides healthcare in this region, and has implemented school screening in their annual program. Objective of this study is to investigate the prevalence of anemia among these schoolchildren and to determine the influence of age, sex and ethnicity.
      Citation: Annals of Global Health 83, 1 (2017)
      PubDate: 2017-01
      DOI: 10.1016/j.aogh.2017.03.512
      Issue No: Vol. 83, No. 1 (2017)
       
  • Transforming a Medical Student Exchange Program into a Sustainable
           Community Partnership for Women’s Health in the Dominican Republic

    • Authors: C. Gray; S. Bridge, J. Wu
      First page: 207
      Abstract: Disparity exists in access and quality of gynecologic care for impoverished Dominican and Haitian women in the rural Dominican Republic. Although international efforts are present, a need for long-term, community-based intervention to sustainably address women’s preventive health and surgical needs exists. In spite of reformation of the Dominican healthcare system in 2001, only 5.5% of the Dominican GDP contributes to health care; a mere 33.9% of this funding addresses the public sector. Most practitio