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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1277 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (18 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (86 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (506 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (381 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (106 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (100 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (80 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (506 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access  
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
AJOB Primary Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 170)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
American Medical Writers Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Research In Health And Social Sciences : Interface And Interaction     Open Access  
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 6)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access  
Behavioral Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Best Practices in Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Bijzijn     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Bulletin of the World Health Organization     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Studies in Fire Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Children     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access  
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access  
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CoDAS     Open Access  
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Curare     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Digital Health     Open Access  
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Full-text available via subscription  
Duazary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência: Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription  
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Evidence-based Medicine & Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Family & Community Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Human Rights     Free   (Followers: 8)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal  
Health Professional Student Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Health Prospect     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 46)
Health Psychology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Health Renaissance     Open Access  
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Health SA Gesondheid     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Sciences and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Services Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Health, Culture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare in Low-resource Settings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Heart Insight     Full-text available via subscription  
HERD : Health Environments Research & Design Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Highland Medical Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Hispanic Health Care International     Full-text available via subscription  
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Home Health Care Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Hospitals & Health Networks     Free   (Followers: 2)
IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
IMTU Medical Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Indian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inmanencia. Revista del Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos (HIGA) Eva Perón     Open Access  
Innovative Journal of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
interactive Journal of Medical Research     Open Access  
International Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Behavioural and Healthcare Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Circumpolar Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of E-Health and Medical Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Health Geographics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Health Policy and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Professions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Promotion and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Health Sciences Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Services     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Health Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Health System and Disaster Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Healthcare Delivery Reform Initiatives     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Healthcare Information Systems and Informatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Healthcare Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)

        1 2 3 | Last

Journal Cover Canadian Family Physician
  [SJR: 0.406]   [H-I: 46]   [11 followers]  Follow
    
   Partially Free Journal Partially Free Journal
   ISSN (Print) 0008-350X - ISSN (Online) 1715-5258
   Published by College of Family Physicians of Canada Homepage  [1 journal]
  • Critical international normalized ratio results after hours: To call or
           not to call?
    • Authors: Korn, D; Sean McMurtry, M, George-Phillips, K, Bungard, T. J.
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo determine whether the timing of notification of critical international normalized ratio (INR) results (during or after clinic hours) altered the clinician’s ability to affect same-day patient care.DesignRetrospective chart review.SettingThe Anticoagulation Management Service at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton.ParticipantsA total of 276 patients with critical INR results (> 5.0) separated by at least 30 days were identified to have 200 critical INR results reported during clinic hours and 200 reported after hours.Main outcome measuresDifferences in the proportion of patients with critical INR results having same-day care altered (by changing warfarin dose, administering vitamin K, or referring for assessment) between those with results reported during clinic hours compared with those with results reported after clinic hours. Differences by highly critical INR results (> 9.0 vs ≤ 9.0) and whether patients experienced thromboembolism or bleeding within 30 days were also assessed.ResultsSame-day patient care was affected for 174 out of 200 (87.0%) critical INR results reported during clinic hours compared with 101 out of 200 (50.5%) reported after clinic hours (P < .001). The most common reason for not being able to intervene was that warfarin had already been taken. Warfarin dose alteration was the most frequent change (97.1% during clinic hours and 96.0% after hours). When patients with INRs greater than 9.0 were assessed separately, the ability to affect care increased for INRs reported both during and after clinic hours (92.9% and 63.6%, respectively), largely attributable to oral vitamin K use. Overall, thromboembolic and major bleeding event rates were low and were similar in both groups.ConclusionSame-day care was less likely to be affected by critical INR results communicated after hours, most commonly because the patient had already taken their daily warfarin dose. However, after-hours care was still affected for 1 out of 2 patients, which is meaningful and supports current practice.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:55-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty:
           Findings from a faculty work-life and leadership survey
    • Authors: Krueger, P; White, D, Meaney, C, Kwong, J, Antao, V, Kim, F.
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo identify predictors of job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members.DesignA comprehensive Web-based survey of all faculty members in an academic department of family medicine. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with job satisfaction.SettingThe Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario and its 15 affiliated community teaching hospitals and community-based teaching practices.ParticipantsAll 1029 faculty members in the Department of Family and Community Medicine were invited to complete the survey.Main outcome measuresFaculty members’ demographic and practice information; teaching, clinical, administration, and research activities; leadership roles; training needs and preferences; mentorship experiences; health status; stress levels; burnout levels; and job satisfaction. Faculty members’ perceptions about supports provided, recognition, communication, retention, workload, teamwork, respect, resource distribution, remuneration, and infrastructure support. Faculty members’ job satisfaction, which was the main outcome variable, was obtained from the question, "Overall, how satisfied are you with your job?"ResultsOf the 1029 faculty members, 687 (66.8%) responded to the survey. Bivariate analyses revealed 26 predictors as being statistically significantly associated with job satisfaction, including faculty members’ ratings of their local department and main practice setting, their ratings of leadership and mentorship experiences, health status variables, and demographic variables. The multivariable analyses identified the following 5 predictors of job satisfaction: the Maslach Burnout Inventory subscales of emotional exhaustion and personal accomplishment; being born in Canada; the overall quality of mentorship that was received being rated as very good or excellent; and teamwork being rated as very good or excellent.ConclusionThe findings from this study show that job satisfaction among academic family medicine faculty members is a multi-dimensional construct. Future improvement in overall level of job satisfaction will therefore require multiple strategies.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:55-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Leadership training in a family medicine residency program:
           Cross-sectional quantitative survey to inform curriculum development
    • Authors: Gallagher, E; Moore, A, Schabort, I.
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo assess the current status of leadership training as perceived by family medicine residents to inform the development of a formal leadership curriculum.DesignCross-sectional quantitative survey.SettingDepartment of Family Medicine at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ont, in December 2013.ParticipantsA total of 152 first- and second-year family medicine residents.Main outcome measuresFamily medicine residents’ attitudes toward leadership, perceived level of training in various leadership domains, and identified opportunities for leadership training.ResultsOverall, 80% (152 of 190) of residents completed the survey. On a Likert scale (1 = strongly disagree, 4 = neutral, 7 = strongly agree), residents rated the importance of physician leadership in the clinical setting as high (6.23 of 7), whereas agreement with the statement "I am a leader" received the lowest rating (5.28 of 7). At least 50% of residents desired more training in the leadership domains of personal mastery, mentorship and coaching, conflict resolution, teaching, effective teamwork, administration, ideals of a healthy workplace, coalitions, and system transformation. At least 50% of residents identified behavioural sciences seminars, a lecture and workshop series, and a retreat as opportunities to expand leadership training.ConclusionThe concept of family physicians as leaders resonated highly with residents. Residents desired more personal and system-level leadership training. They also identified ways that leadership training could be expanded in the current curriculum and developed in other areas. The information gained from this survey might facilitate leadership development among residents through application of its results in a formal leadership curriculum.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:55-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • How do family physicians measure blood pressure in routine clinical
           practice?: National survey of Canadian family physicians
    • Authors: Kaczorowski, J; Myers, M. G, Gelfer, M, Dawes, M, Mang, E. J, Berg, A, Grande, C. D, Kljujic, D.
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo describe the techniques currently used by family physicians in Canada to measure blood pressure (BP) for screening for, diagnosing, and treating hypertension.DesignA Web-based cross-sectional survey distributed by e-mail.SettingStratified random sample of family physicians in Canada.ParticipantsFamily physician members of the College of Family Physicians of Canada with valid e-mail addresses.Main outcome measuresPhysicians’ self-reported routine methods for recording BP in their practices to screen for, diagnose, and manage hypertension.ResultsA total of 774 valid responses were received, for a response rate of 16.2%. Respondents were similar to nonrespondents except for underrepresentation of male physicians. Of 769 respondents, 417 (54.2%) indicated that they used manual office BP measurement with a mercury or aneroid device and stethoscope as the routine method to screen patients for high BP, while 42.9% (330 of 769) reported using automated office BP (AOBP) measurement. The method most frequently used to make a diagnosis of hypertension was AOBP measurement (31.1%, 240 of 771), followed by home BP measurement (22.4%, 173 of 771) and manual office BP measurement (21.4%, 165 of 771). Ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) was used for diagnosis by 14.4% (111 of 771) of respondents. The most frequently reported method for ongoing management was home BP monitoring (68.7%, 528 of 769), followed by manual office BP measurement (63.6%, 489 of 769) and AOBP measurement (59.2%, 455 of 769). More than three-quarters (77.8%, 598 of 769) of respondents indicated that ABPM was readily available for their patients.ConclusionCanadian family physicians exhibit overall high use of electronic devices for BP measurement, However, more efforts are needed to encourage practitioners to follow current Canadian guidelines, which advocate the use of AOBP measurement for hypertension screening, ABPM and home BP measurement for making a diagnosis, and both AOBP and home BP monitoring for ongoing management.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:55-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • La medecine poetique: Les rimes et la raison dans labecedaire de la sante
    • Authors: de Leeuw S.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:55-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Le diable dans le jugement: Paternalisme medical et problemes
           terminologiques dans le milieu des soins palliatifs
    • Authors: Devlin, M; Maida, V.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Prise en charge des troubles de consommation dopioides en premiere ligne:
           Abstinence, methadone ou buprenorphine-naloxone?
    • Authors: Srivastava, A; Kahan, M, Nader, M.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Maladie des vibrations: Ce que tout medecin de famille devrait savoir
    • Authors: Shen, S; House, R. A.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Lacetaminophene et lasthme chez lenfant
    • Authors: Sakulchit, T; Goldman, R. D.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The changing landscape of family medicine
    • Authors: Pimlott N.
      Pages: 184 - 184
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Le portrait changeant de la medecine familiale
    • Authors: Pimlott N.
      Pages: 185 - 185
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Can medical assistance in dying harm rural and remote palliative care in
           Canada?
    • Authors: Collins, A; Leier, B.
      Pages: 186 - 190
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The demon in deeming: Medical paternalism and linguistic issues in the
           palliative care setting
    • Authors: Devlin, M; Maida, V.
      Pages: 191 - 194
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Laide medicale a mourir peut-elle nuire aux soins palliatifs en milieux
           ruraux et eloignes au Canada?
    • Authors: Collins, A; Leier, B.
      Pages: 195 - 198
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • When science translates badly
    • Authors: Zitner D.
      Pages: 199 - 199
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Call to action: frailty assessment in primary care
    • Authors: Hofmeister, M; Mouissi, F.
      Pages: 199 - 199
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Primary care management of opioid use disorders: Abstinence, methadone, or
           buprenorphine-naloxone?
    • Authors: Srivastava, A; Kahan, M, Nader, M.
      Pages: 200 - 205
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo advise physicians on which treatment options to recommend for specific patient populations: abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance, or methadone maintenance.Sources of informationPubMed was searched and literature was reviewed on the effectiveness, safety, and side effect profiles of abstinence-based treatment, buprenorphine-naloxone treatment, and methadone treatment. Both observational and interventional studies were included.Main messageBoth methadone and buprenorphine-naloxone are substantially more effective than abstinence-based treatment. Methadone has higher treatment retention rates than buprenorphine-naloxone does, while buprenorphine-naloxone has a lower risk of overdose. For all patient groups, physicians should recommend methadone or buprenorphine-naloxone treatment over abstinence-based treatment (level I evidence). Methadone is preferred over buprenorphine-naloxone for patients at higher risk of treatment dropout, such as injection opioid users (level I evidence). Youth and pregnant women who inject opioids should also receive methadone first (level III evidence). If buprenorphine-naloxone is prescribed first, the patient should be promptly switched to methadone if withdrawal symptoms, cravings, or opioid use persist despite an optimal buprenorphine-naloxone dose (level II evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is recommended for socially stable prescription oral opioid users, particularly if their work or family commitments make it difficult for them to attend the pharmacy daily, if they have a medical or psychiatric condition requiring regular primary care (level IV evidence), or if their jobs require higher levels of cognitive functioning or psychomotor performance (level III evidence). Buprenorphine-naloxone is also recommended for patients at high risk of methadone toxicity, such as the elderly, those taking high doses of benzodiazepines or other sedating drugs, heavy drinkers, those with a lower level of opioid tolerance, and those at high risk of prolonged QT interval (level III evidence).ConclusionIndividual patient characteristics and preferences should be taken into consideration when choosing a first-line opioid agonist treatment. For patients at high risk of dropout (such as adolescents and socially unstable patients), treatment retention should take precedence over other clinical considerations. For patients with high risk of toxicity (such as patients with heavy alcohol or benzodiazepine use), safety would likely be the first consideration. However, the most important factor to consider is that opioid agonist treatment is far more effective than abstinence-based treatment.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Hand-arm vibration syndrome: What family physicians should know
    • Authors: Shen, S; House, R. A.
      Pages: 206 - 210
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo provide family physicians with an understanding of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, symptoms, diagnosis, and management of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS), an important and common occupational disease in Canada.Sources of informationA MEDLINE search was conducted for research and review articles on HAVS. A Google search was conducted to obtain gray literature relevant to the Canadian context. Additional references were obtained from the articles identified.Main messageHand-arm vibration syndrome is a prevalent occupational disease affecting workers in multiple industries in which vibrating tools are used. However, it is underdiagnosed in Canada. It has 3 components—vascular, in the form of secondary Raynaud phenomenon; sensorineural; and musculoskeletal. Hand-arm vibration syndrome in its more advanced stages contributes to substantial disability and poor quality of life. Its diagnosis requires careful history taking, in particular occupational history, physical examination, laboratory tests to rule out alternative diagnoses, and referral to an occupational medicine specialist for additional investigations. Management involves reduction of vibration exposure, avoidance of cold conditions, smoking cessation, and medication.ConclusionTo ensure timely diagnosis of HAVS and improve prognosis and quality of life, family physicians should be aware of this common occupational disease and be able to elicit the relevant occupational history, refer patients to occupational medicine clinics, and appropriately initiate compensation claims.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Acetaminophen use and asthma in children
    • Authors: Sakulchit, T; Goldman, R. D.
      Pages: 211 - 213
      Abstract: Question A child with a history of asthma came to my clinic with acute fever. I have heard that acetaminophen might be associated with exacerbation of asthma. Is it safe if I recommend acetaminophen for this child?Answer Most studies suggest an association between acetaminophen use in children and development of asthma later in childhood. However, several confounding factors in study design might contribute to this positive correlation, and without a prospective controlled trial, confirming this finding is challenging. If children have a known history of asthma, it is likely safe to administer a single dose of acetaminophen without concern of precipitating adverse respiratory symptoms. Regular use of acetaminophen to relieve fever or pain does not seem to exacerbate asthma in children more than ibuprofen does.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Emerging risk of untreatable gonorrhea and what to do about it
    • Pages: 214 - 214
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Risque emergent de gonorrhee intraitable et ce quil faut faire
    • Pages: 215 - 215
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Non-sterile gloves in minor lacerations and excisions?
    • Authors: Steve, E; Lindblad, A. J, Allan, G. M.
      Pages: 217 - 217
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Catheterization without foreskin retraction
    • Authors: Carmack, A; Milos, M. F.
      Pages: 218 - 220
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Role of family physicians in an urban hospital: Tracking changes between
           1977, 1997, and 2014
    • Authors: Neimanis, I; Woods, A, Zizzo, A, Dickson, R, Levy, R, Goebel, C, Corsini, J, Burns, S, Gaebel, K.
      Pages: 221 - 227
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo investigate changes in family doctors’ attitudes about and participation in hospital activities and inpatient care in an urban hospital family medicine department from 1977 to 1997 and 2014.DesignCross-sectional survey design.SettingThe Department of Family Medicine at St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton in Ontario.ParticipantsFamily physicians affiliated with the Department of Family Medicine at St Joseph’s Healthcare Hamilton were surveyed in 2014. Data were compared with findings from similar surveys administered at this institution in 1977 and 1997.Main outcome measuresFamily physicians’ roles in hospital activities, attitudes toward the role of the family physician in the hospital setting, and the barriers to and facilitators of maintaining this role.ResultsA total of 93 physicians returned completed surveys (37.3% response rate). In 2014, half of the respondents provided some inpatient care. This patient care was largely supportive and newborn care (71.7% and 67.4%, respectively). In 2014, 47.3% believed the quality of care would suffer (compared with 92.1% in 1977 and 87.5% in 1997) if they were not involved in patient care in the hospital. There was also a considerable shift away from the 1977 and 1997 perception that the family physician had a role as patient advocate: 92.0% and 95.3%, respectively, compared with only 49.5% in the 2014 survey.ConclusionFamily physicians’ hospital activities and attitudes continued to change from 1977 to 1997 and 2014 in this urban hospital setting. Most of the respondents had stopped providing direct inpatient care, with a few continuing to provide supportive care. Despite this, most respondents still see a role for the Department of Family Medicine within the hospital as a focus for identifying with their family physician community, a place to interact with other specialist colleagues, and a source of some continuing medical education.
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Poetic medicine: Adding rhyme and reason to the literacy of health
    • Authors: de Leeuw S.
      Pages: 228 - 231
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • No one should walk alone: Practising medicine amid and bearing witness to
           the global refugee crisis
    • Authors: Lodge A.
      Pages: 232 - 233
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Use of Facebook as part of a social media strategy for patient engagement
    • Authors: Liddy, C; Hunter, Z, Mihan, A, Keely, E.
      Pages: 251 - 252
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • What does it take to be a good GP?
    • Authors: White D.
      Pages: 253 - 253
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Que faut-il pour etre un bon medecin generaliste?
    • Authors: White D.
      Pages: 254 - 254
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Premier contact : son importance pour la pratique de medecine familiale en
           2017 ?
    • Authors: Lemire F.
      Pages: 255 - 255
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • First contact: what does it mean for family practice in 2017?
    • Authors: Lemire F.
      Pages: 256 - 256
      PubDate: 2017-03-14T11:01:54-07:00
      Issue No: Vol. 63, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
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