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  Subjects -> HEALTH AND SAFETY (Total: 1291 journals)
    - CIVIL DEFENSE (18 journals)
    - DRUG ABUSE AND ALCOHOLISM (86 journals)
    - HEALTH AND SAFETY (521 journals)
    - HEALTH FACILITIES AND ADMINISTRATION (378 journals)
    - OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY (106 journals)
    - PHYSICAL FITNESS AND HYGIENE (101 journals)
    - WOMEN'S HEALTH (81 journals)

HEALTH AND SAFETY (521 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 203 Journals sorted alphabetically
16 de Abril     Open Access  
A Life in the Day     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Acta Informatica Medica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Health Sciences     Open Access  
Adultspan Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Advances in Child Development and Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
African Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal for Physical, Health Education, Recreation and Dance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Afrimedic Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
AJOB Primary Research     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Family Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
American Journal of Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
American Journal of Health Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Preventive Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 181)
American Journal of Public Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
American Medical Writers Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Analytic Methods in Accident Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanità     Open Access  
Annals of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Health Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Tropical Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Applied Biosafety     Hybrid Journal  
Applied Research In Health And Social Sciences : Interface And Interaction     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Medicine and Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Gambling Issues and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Atención Primaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Paramedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Australian Advanced Aesthetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Family Physician     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Indigenous HealthBulletin     Free   (Followers: 6)
Autism & Developmental Language Impairments     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Behavioral Healthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Best Practices in Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Bijzijn     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bijzijn XL     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biomedical Safety & Standards     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
BLDE University Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access  
BMC Oral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Brazilian Journal of Medicine and Human Health     Open Access  
Buletin Penelitian Kesehatan     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Buletin Penelitian Sistem Kesehatan     Open Access  
Bulletin of the World Health Organization     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Cadernos de Educação, Saúde e Fisioterapia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Family Physician     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Journal of Community Mental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Human Sexuality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Case Reports in Women's Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Case Studies in Fire Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Central Asian Journal of Global Health     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central European Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
CES Medicina     Open Access  
Child Abuse Research in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Child's Nervous System     Hybrid Journal  
Childhood Obesity and Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Children     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research     Open Access  
Christian Journal for Global Health     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia y Cuidado     Open Access  
Ciencia, Tecnología y Salud     Open Access  
ClinicoEconomics and Outcomes Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CoDAS     Open Access  
Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Conflict and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Curare     Open Access  
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Day Surgery Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Digital Health     Open Access  
Dramatherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Drogues, santé et société     Full-text available via subscription  
Duazary     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Early Childhood Research Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
East African Journal of Public Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Eating and Weight Disorders - Studies on Anorexia, Bulimia and Obesity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
EcoHealth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Education for Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
electronic Journal of Health Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
ElectronicHealthcare     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Elsevier Ergonomics Book Series     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Emergency Services SA     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Ensaios e Ciência: Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environmental Disease     Open Access  
Environmental Sciences Europe     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Epidemics     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Epidemiologic Perspectives & Innovations     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Ethics, Medicine and Public Health     Full-text available via subscription  
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Ethiopian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ethnicity & Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
European Journal of Investigation in Health, Psychology and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
European Medical, Health and Pharmaceutical Journal     Open Access  
Evaluation & the Health Professions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Evidence-based Medicine & Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Evidência - Ciência e Biotecnologia - Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Expressa Extensão     Open Access  
Face à face     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Families, Systems, & Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Family & Community Health     Partially Free   (Followers: 12)
Family Medicine and Community Health     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Family Relations     Partially Free   (Followers: 11)
Fatigue : Biomedicine, Health & Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Frontiers in Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Gaceta Sanitaria     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Galen Medical Journal     Open Access  
Geospatial Health     Open Access  
Gesundheitsökonomie & Qualitätsmanagement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Giornale Italiano di Health Technology Assessment     Full-text available via subscription  
Global Health : Science and Practice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Global Health Promotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Global Journal of Health Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Global Journal of Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Global Medical & Health Communication     Open Access  
Globalization and Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Hacia la Promoción de la Salud     Open Access  
Hastings Center Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
HEADline     Hybrid Journal  
Health & Place     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health & Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Health : An Interdisciplinary Journal for the Social Study of Health, Illness and Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Health and Human Rights     Free   (Followers: 8)
Health and Social Care Chaplaincy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Health and Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Health Behavior and Policy Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Care Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Health Inform     Full-text available via subscription  
Health Information Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Health Issues     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Health Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Health Policy and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Health Professional Student Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Promotion International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Health Promotion Journal of Australia : Official Journal of Australian Association of Health Promotion Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Health Promotion Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Health Prospect     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Health Psychology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Health Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Health Renaissance     Open Access  
Health Research Policy and Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Health SA Gesondheid     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Science Reports     Open Access  
Health Sciences and Disease     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Services Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Health Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Health Voices     Full-text available via subscription  
Health, Culture and Society     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Health, Risk & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare in Low-resource Settings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Healthcare Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
HERD : Health Environments Research & Design Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Highland Medical Research Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Hispanic Health Care International     Full-text available via subscription  
HIV & AIDS Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Home Health Care Services Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Hong Kong Journal of Social Work, The     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Hospitals & Health Networks     Free   (Followers: 3)
IEEE Journal of Translational Engineering in Health and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
IMTU Medical Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Indian Journal of Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Indonesian Journal for Health Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Inmanencia. Revista del Hospital Interzonal General de Agudos (HIGA) Eva Perón     Open Access  
Innovative Journal of Medical and Health Sciences     Open Access  
Institute for Security Studies Papers     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
interactive Journal of Medical Research     Open Access  
International Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal for Equity in Health     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal for Quality in Health Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
International Journal of Applied Behavioral Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Behavioural and Healthcare Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Circumpolar Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Community Medicine and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of E-Health and Medical Communications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
International Journal of Evidence-Based Healthcare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Food Safety, Nutrition and Public Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Health & Allied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Health Geographics     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Health Policy and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Professions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Health Promotion and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Health Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)

        1 2 3 | Last

Journal Cover International Journal for Quality in Health Care
  [SJR: 1.593]   [H-I: 69]   [32 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1353-4505 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3677
   Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [370 journals]
  • Simplified Chinese Abstracts *
    • PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx063
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Traditional Chinese Abstracts *
    • PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx065
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Portuguese Abstracts *
    • PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx062
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Japanese Abstracts *
    • PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx077
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Spanish Abstracts *
    • PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx064
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Healthcare improvements from the unit to system levels: contributions to
           improving the safety and quality evidence base
    • Authors: Greenfield D; Iqbal U, Li Y.
      Pages: 313 - 313
      PubDate: 2017-05-09
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx054
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Measuring patient experience: a systematic review to evaluate psychometric
           properties of patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for emergency
           care service provision
    • Authors: Male L; Noble A, Atkinson J, et al.
      Pages: 314 - 326
      Abstract: PurposeKnowledge about patient experience within emergency departments (EDs) allows services to develop and improve in line with patient needs. There is no standardized instrument to measure patient experience. The aim of this study is to identify patient reported experience measures (PREMs) for EDs, examine the rigour by which they were developed and their psychometric properties when judged against standard criteria.Data sourcesMedline, Scopus, CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed and Web of Science were searched from inception to May 2015.Study selectionStudies were identified using specific search terms and inclusion criteria. A total of eight articles, reporting on four PREMs, were included.Data extractionData on the development and performance of the four PREMs were extracted from the articles. The measures were critiqued according to quality criteria previously described by Pesudovs K, Burr JM, Harley C, et al. (The development, assessment, and selection of questionnaires. Optom Vis Sci 2007;84:663–74.).ResultsThere was significant variation in the quality of development and reporting of psychometric properties. For all four PREMs, initial development work included the ascertainment of patient experiences using qualitative interviews. However, instrument performance was poorly assessed. Validity and reliability were measured in some studies; however responsiveness, an important aspect on survey development, was not measured in any of the included studies.ConclusionPREMS currently available for use in the ED have uncertain validity, reliability and responsiveness. Further validation work is required to assess their acceptability to patients and their usefulness in clinical practice.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx027
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Integrated care for older populations and its implementation facilitators
           and barriers: A rapid scoping review
    • Authors: Threapleton DE; Chung RY, Wong SS, et al.
      Pages: 327 - 334
      Abstract: PurposeInform health system improvements by summarizing components of integrated care in older populations. Identify key implementation barriers and facilitators.Data sourcesA scoping review was undertaken for evidence from MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, organizational websites and internet searches. Eligible publications included reviews, reports, individual studies and policy documents published from 2005 to February 2017.Study selectionInitial eligible documents were reviews or reports concerning integrated care approaches in older/frail populations. Other documents were later sourced to identify and contextualize implementation issues.Data extractionStudy findings and implementation barriers and facilitators were charted and thematically synthesized.Results of data synthesisThematic synthesis using 30 publications identified 8 important components for integrated care in elderly and frail populations: (i) care continuity/transitions; (ii) enabling policies/governance; (iii) shared values/goals; (iv) person-centred care; (v) multi-/inter-disciplinary services; (vi) effective communication; (vii) case management; (viii) needs assessments for care and discharge planning. Intervention outcomes and implementation issues (barriers or facilitators) tend to depend heavily on the context and programme objectives. Implementation issues in four main areas were observed: (i) Macro-level contextual factors; (ii) Miso-level system organization (funding, leadership, service structure and culture); (iii) Miso-level intervention organization (characteristics, resources and credibility) and (iv) Micro-level factors (shared values, engagement and communication).ConclusionImproving integration in care requires many components. However, local barriers and facilitators need to be considered. Changes are expected to occur slowly and are more likely to be successful where elements of integrated care are well incorporated into local settings.
      PubDate: 2017-04-20
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx041
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Assessing the impact of diabetes on quality of life: validation of the
           Chinese version of the 19-item Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life
           for Taiwan
    • Authors: Wang H; Bradley C, Chang T, et al.
      Pages: 335 - 342
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo examine the reliability and validity of the Chinese version of the 19-item Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life for Taiwan (ADDQoL-CnTW).MethodsLinguistic validation procedures for patient-reported outcome measures were used to translate the Taiwan version from the original 19-item UK-English ADDQoL. The psychometric properties of the ADDQoL-CnTW were evaluated in a convenience sample, recruited from outpatient facilities, of 260 patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus.ResultsThe forced one-factor solution supported one general 19-item factor with all items loading above 0.43, accounting for 51.5% of the variance, although the results of confirmatory factory analysis did not strictly adhere to a one-factor structure. Using Kaiser's Criterion, exploratory factor analysis identified four sub-dimensions but the pattern of loading also confirmed the presence of a large general factor with 11 of 19 items loading ≥0.4 on the first component, accounting for 49.73% of the variance. Internal consistency for the entire scale was 0.94. Convergent and discriminant validity were suggested by a stronger correlation of average weighted impact (AWI) scores with the overview Diabetes-specific QoL item than with the Present QoL item. The Present QoL item correlated better with the World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF(TW) dimension scores than the Diabetes-specific QoL scores or the AWI scores. Insulin-treated patients reported significantly more negative AWI scores and Diabetes-specific QoL scores than those treated with tablets and/or diet, demonstrating known-groups validity.ConclusionsThe ADDQoL-CnTW revealed excellent internal consistency reliability, and showed evidence of validity for use in Taiwanese people with diabetes.
      PubDate: 2017-03-28
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx028
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Improved implementation of the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart to
           monitor surgical outcome quality
    • Authors: Keefe MJ; Loda JB, Elhabashy AE, et al.
      Pages: 343 - 348
      Abstract: Methodology issueThe traditional implementation of the risk-adjusted Bernoulli cumulative sum (CUSUM) chart for monitoring surgical outcome quality requires waiting a pre-specified period of time after surgery before incorporating patient outcome information.Proposed solutionWe propose a simple but powerful implementation of the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart that incorporates outcome information as soon as it is available, rather than waiting a pre-specified period of time after surgery.EvaluationA simulation study is presented that compares the performance of the traditional implementation of the risk-adjusted Bernoulli CUSUM chart to our improved implementation. We show that incorporating patient outcome information as soon as it is available leads to quicker detection of process deterioration.Advice to practitionersDeterioration of surgical performance could be detected much sooner using our proposed implementation, which could lead to the earlier identification of problems.
      PubDate: 2017-04-21
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx036
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • A cross-national comparison of incident reporting systems implemented in
           German and Swiss hospitals
    • Authors: Manser T; Imhof M, Lessing C, et al.
      Pages: 349 - 359
      Abstract: ObjectiveThis study aimed to empirically compare incident reporting systems (IRS) in two European countries and to explore the relationship of IRS characteristics with context factors such as hospital characteristics and characteristics of clinical risk management (CRM).DesignWe performed exploratory, secondary analyses of data on characteristics of IRS from nationwide surveys of CRM practices.SettingThe survey was originally sent to 2136 hospitals in Germany and Switzerland.ParticipantsPersons responsible for CRM in 622 hospitals completed the survey (response rate 29%).Intervention(s)None.Main outcome measure(s)Differences between IRS in German and Swiss hospitals were assessed using Chi2, Fisher's Exact and Freeman–Halton-Tests, as appropriate. To explore interrelations between IRS characteristics and context factors (i.e. hospital and CRM characteristics) we computed Cramer's V.ResultsComparing participating hospitals across countries, Swiss hospitals had implemented IRS earlier, more frequently and more often provided introductory IRS training systematically. German hospitals had more frequently systematically implemented standardized procedures for event analyses. IRS characteristics were significantly associated with hospital characteristics such as hospital type as well as with CRM characteristics such as existence of strategic CRM objectives and of a dedicated position for central CRM coordination.ConclusionsThis study contributes to an improved understanding of differences in the way IRS are set up in two European countries and explores related context factors. This opens up new possibilities for empirically informed, strategic interventions to further improve dissemination of IRS and thus support hospitals in their efforts to move patient safety forward.
      PubDate: 2017-03-07
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx030
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Patient reporting of undesirable events: a pilot study in China
    • Authors: Yan J; Liu K, Zhang L, et al.
      Pages: 360 - 365
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo identify the frequency of undesirable events reported by patients during hospitalization and explore the relationship between undesirable events and perception of safety and satisfaction with care in China.DesignCross-sectional survey.SettingChinese university hospital.ParticipantsAdult patients (N = 341) discharged from medical and surgical departments.InterventionsPatients were interviewed post-discharge using a survey instrument to ask whether they had experienced specific undesirable events during hospitalization. Patient perception of safety and satisfaction with care received were also probed during this interview.Main outcome measuresFrequency of interpersonal problems, medical complications and healthcare process problems, and perception of safety and satisfaction with care.ResultsIn total, 601 undesirable events were reported (rate of 1.76 per person), including 229 interpersonal problems, 132 medical complications and 240 healthcare process problems. The most frequent event was insufficient explanation of medication side effects (22.9%). Both the perception of safety and satisfaction with care were related to the experience of undesirable events negatively.ConclusionsMany respondents experienced undesirable events during hospitalization and these experiences impacted negative on patients’ feelings toward the hospital. Engaging patients as partners in reporting undesirable events is a valuable tool for identifying and monitoring problematic areas of care. In order to encourage the contribution patients could make to improving patient safety, it is necessary to develop patient incident reporting systems.
      PubDate: 2017-03-10
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx029
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The proportion of errors in medical prescriptions and their executions
           among hospitalized children before and during accreditation
    • Authors: Mekory T; Bahat H, Bar-Oz B, et al.
      Pages: 366 - 370
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo evaluate the rate of medication related errors in the pediatric ward and pediatric emergency department (PED), before and after implementing intervention strategies according to the Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation program.DesignA retrospective cross-sectional study that included chart review.SettingA university affiliated pediatric ward and PED.ParticipantsChildren 0–18 years old admitted on February 2013 (before the JCI program) and February 2014 (during implementation of the JCI program).Intervention(s)A training program designed to meet the JCI official standards on medication prescribing.Main outcome measure(s)The number of prescribing and medication administration errors in the 2 years.ResultsWe collected 937 valid prescription orders and 924 administration orders (1861 medical orders) from February 2013, and 961 valid prescription orders and 958 administration orders (1919 medical orders) from February 2014. There was a significant reduction in prescribing errors from 6.5 to 4.2% between years 2013 and 2014 (P = 0.03). There was no significant difference in administration error rates between the two periods (104 (11.3%) in the first period and 114 (11.9%) in the second; P = 0.61).ConclusionsThe errors rate we found was within the range described in the literature. Quality assurance interventions can significantly reduce medication prescribing errors.
      PubDate: 2017-03-10
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx031
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Improving safety culture in hospitals: Facilitators and barriers to
           implementation of Systemic Falls Investigative Method (SFIM)
    • Authors: Zecevic AA; Li A, Ngo C, et al.
      Pages: 371 - 377
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe purpose of this study was to assess the facilitators and barriers to implementation of the Systemic Falls Investigative Method (SFIM) on selected hospital units.DesignA cross-sectional explanatory mixed methods design was used to converge results from a standardized safety culture survey with themes that emerged from interviews and focus groups. Findings were organized by six elements of the Ottawa Model of Research Use framework.SettingA geriatric rehabilitation unit of an acute care hospital and a neurological unit of a rehabilitation hospital were selected purposefully due to the high frequency of falls.ParticipantsHospital staff who took part in: surveys (n = 39), interviews (n = 10) and focus groups (n = 12), and 38 people who were interviewed during falls investigations: fallers, family, unit staff and hospital management.InterventionImplementation of the SFIM to investigate fall occurrences.Main Outcome Measure(s)Percent of positive responses on the Modified Stanford Patient Safety Culture Survey Instrument converged with qualitative themes on facilitators and barriers for intervention implementation.ResultsBoth hospital units had an overall poor safety culture which hindered intervention implementation. Facilitators were hospital accreditation, strong emphasis on patient safety, infrastructure and dedicated champions. Barriers included heavy workloads, lack of time, lack of resources and poor communication.ConclusionsSuccessful implementation of SFIM requires regulatory and organizational support, committed frontline staff and allocation of resources to identify active causes and latent contributing factors to falls. System-wide adjustments show promise for promotion of safety culture in hospitals where falls happen regularly.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx034
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Attributes of primary care in relation to polypharmacy: a multicenter
           cross-sectional study in Japan
    • Authors: Aoki T; Ikenoue T, Yamamoto Y, et al.
      Pages: 378 - 383
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo investigate the association between attributes of primary care and polypharmacy.DesignCross-sectional study.SettingA primary care practice-based research network in Japan (28 primary care clinics).ParticipantsAdult outpatients filled out a standardized questionnaire.Main outcome measurePolypharmacy defined as the use of five or more concurrent prescription or over-the-counter medications.MethodsAttributes of primary care were assessed via patient experience using the Japanese version of Primary Care Assessment Tool (JPCAT). Poisson mixed effects model was used to adjust for clustering within clinics and covariates.ResultsData were analyzed for 544 primary care outpatients. After adjusting for patients’ sociodemographic and health characteristics, the JPCAT community orientation score was found to be inversely associated with polypharmacy at the clinic level [risk ratio per 1 standard deviation increase = 0.83; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.73–0.96; P = 0.008]. Sensitivity analyses using a different definition of polypharmacy showed results similar to those of the primary analyses.ConclusionsWe found that a higher level of community-oriented primary care is associated with a lower prevalence of polypharmacy in outpatients at the clinic level. These findings may be useful in developing community-based interventions to minimize polypharmacy.
      PubDate: 2017-03-22
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx035
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Assessing archetypes of organizational culture based on the Competing
           Values Framework: the experimental use of the framework in Japanese
           neonatal intensive care units
    • Authors: Sasaki H; Yonemoto N, Mori R, et al.
      Pages: 384 - 391
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo assess organizational culture in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in Japan.DesignCross-sectional survey of organizational culture.SettingForty NICUs across Japan.ParticipantsPhysicians and nurses who worked in NICUs (n = 2006).Main Outcome MeasuresThe Competing Values Framework (CVF) was used to assess the organizational culture of the study population. The 20-item CVF was divided into four culture archetypes: Group, Developmental, Hierarchical and Rational. We calculated geometric means (gmean) and 95% bootstrap confidence intervals of the individual dimensions by unit and occupation. The median number of staff, beds, physicians’ work hours and work engagement were also calculated to examine the differences by culture archetypes.ResultsGroup (gmean = 34.6) and Hierarchical (gmean = 31.7) culture archetypes were higher than Developmental (gmean = 16.3) and Rational (gmean = 17.4) among physicians as a whole. Hierarchical (gmean = 36.3) was the highest followed by Group (gmean = 25.8), Developmental (gmean = 16.3) and Rational (gmean = 21.7) among nurses as a whole. Units with dominant Hierarchical culture had a slightly higher number of physicians (median = 7) than dominant Group culture (median = 6). Units with dominant Group culture had a higher number of beds (median = 12) than dominant Hierarchical culture (median = 9) among physicians. Nurses from units with a dominant Group culture (median = 2.8) had slightly higher work engagement compared with those in units with a dominant Hierarchical culture (median = 2.6).ConclusionsOur findings revealed that organizational culture in NICUs varies depending on occupation and group size. Group and Hierarchical cultures predominated in Japanese NICUs. Assessing organizational culture will provide insights into the perceptions of unit values to improve quality of care.
      PubDate: 2017-03-28
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx038
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • The effects of patient education on patient safety: can we change patient
           perceptions and attitudes': Lessons from the Armed Forces Capital
           Hospital in Korea
    • Authors: An J; Kim S, Park S, et al.
      Pages: 392 - 398
      Abstract: ObjectiveStrategies to promote patient involvement in medical error prevention have been implemented, but little is known about the effects of education on changes in perceptions and attitudes about patients’ own safety.DesignWe administered a survey to military personnel admitted to the Armed Forces Capital Hospital. Responses were classified according to perception and attitude.SettingSingle military hospital in Korea.ParticipantsA total of 483 completed surveys were included in our study; 252 of the respondents received safety education at admission.MethodsWe provided educational program material to one-half of the patients at admission (intervention group). The other one-half of patients received no safety education (non-intervention group). We then performed two rounds of a self-administered survey, based on whether the patient received patient safety education. Cronbach's alpha was calculated to determine scale score reliability. Regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between education and change in scores.ResultsScores for perception and attitude were greater in the intervention group. The results of the regression analysis revealed that compared with the non-intervention respondents, the respondents who received education had higher perception (estimate: 7.809, P < 0.0001) and attitude scores (estimate: 5.539, P < 0.0001).ConclusionOur study results suggested that patient education was associated with higher scores in both perception and attitudes about safety. To improve patient engagement in this area, efficient methods that encourage patient empowerment should be developed. Specialized health care providers who provide patient level education are needed to achieve a satisfactory patient safety climate.
      PubDate: 2017-03-28
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx037
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • How did market competition affect outpatient utilization under the
           diagnosis-related group-based payment system'
    • Authors: Kim S; Park E, Kim S, et al.
      Pages: 399 - 405
      Abstract: ObjectiveAlthough competition is known to affect quality of care, less is known about the effects of competition on outpatient health service utilization under the diagnosis-related group payment system. This study aimed to evaluate these effects and assess differences before and after hospitalization in South Korea.DesignPopulation-based retrospective observational study.SettingWe used two data set including outpatient data and hospitalization data from National Health Claim data from 2011 to 2014.ParticipantsParticipants who were admitted to the hospital for hemorrhoidectomy were included. A total of 804 884 hospitalizations were included in our analysis.Main outcome measure(s)The outcome variables included the costs associated with outpatient examinations and the number of outpatient visits within 30 days before and after hospitalization.ResultsHigh-competition areas were associated with lower pre-surgery examination costs (rate ratio [RR]: 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.88–0.89) and fewer outpatient visits before hospitalization (RR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.98–0.99) as well as after hospitalization compared with moderate-competition areas.ConclusionOur study reveals that outpatient health service utilization is affected by the degree of market competition. Future evaluations of hospital performance should consider external factors such as market structure and hospital location.
      PubDate: 2017-04-07
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx042
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Unannounced versus announced hospital surveys: a nationwide
           cluster-randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Ehlers L; Simonsen K, Jensen M, et al.
      Pages: 406 - 411
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo evaluate the effectiveness of unannounced versus announced surveys in detecting non-compliance with accreditation standards in public hospitals.DesignA nationwide cluster-randomized controlled trial.Setting and participantsAll public hospitals in Denmark were invited. Twenty-three hospitals (77%) (3 university hospitals, 5 psychiatric hospitals and 15 general hospitals) agreed to participate.InterventionTwelve hospitals were randomized to receive unannounced surveys (intervention group) and eleven hospitals to receive announced surveys (control group). We hypothesized that the hospitals receiving the unannounced surveys would reveal a higher degree of non-compliance with accreditation standards than the hospitals receiving announced surveys. Nine surveyors trained and employed by the Danish Institute for Quality and Accreditation in Healthcare (IKAS) were randomized into teams and conducted all surveys.Main outcome measureThe outcome was the surveyors’ assessment of the hospitals’ level of compliance with 113 performance indicators—an abbreviated set of the Danish Healthcare Quality Programme (DDKM) version 2, covering organizational standards, patient pathway standards and patient safety standards. Compliance with performance indicators was analyzed using binomial regression analysis with bootstrapped robust standard errors.ResultsIn all, 16 202 measurements were acceptable for data analysis. The risk of observing non-compliance with performance indicators for the intervention group compared with the control group was statistically insignificant (risk difference (RD) = −0.6 percentage points [−2.51–1.31], P = 0.54). A converged analysis of the six patient safety critical standards, requiring 100% compliance to gain accreditation status revealed no statistically significant difference (RD = −0.78 percentage points [−4.01–2.44], P = 0.99).ConclusionsUnannounced hospital surveys were not more effective than announced surveys in detecting quality problems in Danish hospitals.Trial Registration numberClinicalTrials.gov NCT02348567, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02348567'term=NCT02348567.
      PubDate: 2017-04-13
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx039
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Development and implementation of a risk identification tool to facilitate
           critical care transitions for high-risk surgical patients
    • Authors: Hoffman RL; Saucier J, Dasani S, et al.
      Pages: 412 - 419
      Abstract: Quality problemPatients recently discharged from the intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk for clinical deterioration.Initial assessmentUnreliable and incomplete handoffs of complex patients contributed to preventable ICU readmissions. Respiratory decompensation was responsible for four times as many readmissions as other causes.Choice of solutionForm a multidisciplinary team to address care coordination surrounding the transfer of patients from the ICU to the surgical ward.ImplementationA quality improvement intervention incorporating verbal handoffs, time-sensitive patient evaluations and visual cues was piloted over a 1-year period in consecutive high-risk surgical patients discharged from the ICU. Process metrics and clinical outcomes were compared to historical controls.EvaluationThe intervention brought the primary team and respiratory therapists to the bedside for a baseline examination within 60 min of ward arrival. Stakeholders viewed the intervention as such a valuable adjunct to patient care that the intervention has become a standard of care. While not significant, in a comparatively older and sicker intervention population, the rate of readmissions due to respiratory decompensation was 12.5%, while 35.0% in the control group (P = 0.28).Lessons learnedThe implementation of this ICU transition protocol is feasible and internationally applicable, and results in improved care coordination and communication for a high-risk group of patients.
      PubDate: 2017-03-22
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx032
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Improving the quality of radiological examinations: effectiveness of an
           internal participatory approach
    • Authors: Mamede F; Gama Z, Saturno-Hernández P.
      Pages: 420 - 426
      Abstract: Quality problem or issueTo assess the quality of radiological examinations (REs) and to evaluate the effectiveness of a participatory continuous improvement approach to ensure best practices in a Portuguese hospital imaging department.Initial assessmentAt baseline, we found 232 (10.2%) non-compliances, mostly related to the criteria image centering and framing in chest radiography (CXR), proper use of radiological protection equipment in other conventional RE (CR) and X-ray beam collimation (CXR/CR).Choice of solutionA baseline and three consecutive evaluations of the RE quality were conducted. Each assessment was followed by participatory focused interventions for improvement.ImplementationFor each evaluation, we selected a random sample (n = 60) of cases for four types of examination (total n = 240 for each assessment, and 960 for the whole project). Both the building of quality criteria and the design of interventions for improvement were participatory, involving the radiology technicians. Estimates of criteria compliance were calculated with 95% confidence intervals. The statistical significance of absolute and relative improvements was tested using one-tail z-tests.EvaluationAfter the intervention, non-compliances decreased to 48 (2.1%). Compliance estimates improved in 25 of 38 criteria assessed, with statistical significance for 5 criteria in CXR and 3 in CR and digestive examination.Lessons learnedThe internal participatory approach enabled the identification of existing quality problems and, by focusing on the more frequent quality defects, was effective in improving the quality of RE.
      PubDate: 2017-03-02
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx026
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Monitoring the quality of cardiac surgery based on three or more surgical
           outcomes using a new variable life-adjusted display
    • Authors: Gan F; Tang X, Zhu Y, et al.
      Pages: 427 - 432
      Abstract: Quality problem or issueThe traditional variable life-adjusted display (VLAD) is a graphical display of the difference between expected and actual cumulative deaths. The VLAD assumes binary outcomes: death within 30 days of an operation or survival beyond 30 days. Full recovery and bedridden for life, for example, are considered the same outcome. This binary classification results in a great loss of information.Initial assessmentAlthough there are many grades of survival, the binary outcomes are commonly used to classify surgical outcomes. Consequently, quality monitoring procedures are developed based on binary outcomes. With a more refined set of outcomes, the sensitivities of these procedures can be expected to improve.Choice of solutionA likelihood ratio method is used to define a penalty-reward scoring system based on three or more surgical outcomes for the new VLAD. The likelihood ratio statistic W is based on testing the odds ratio of cumulative probabilities of recovery R. Two methods of implementing the new VLAD are proposed.ImplementationWe accumulate the statistic W−W¯R to estimate the performance of a surgeon where W¯R is the average of the W’s of a historical data set. The accumulated sum will be zero based on the historical data set. This ensures that if a new VLAD is plotted for a future surgeon of performance similar to this average performance, the plot will exhibit a horizontal trend.EvaluationFor illustration of the new VLAD, we consider 3-outcome surgical results: death within 30 days, partial and full recoveries. In our first illustration, we show the effect of partial recoveries on surgical results of a surgeon. In our second and third illustrations, the surgical results of two surgeons are compared using both the traditional VLAD based on binary-outcome data and the new VLAD based on 3-outcome data. A reversal in relative performance of surgeons is observed when the new VLAD is used. In our final illustration, we display the surgical results of four surgeons using the new VLAD based completely on 3-outcome data.Lessons learnedFull recovery and bedridden for life are two completely different outcomes. There is a great loss of information when different grades of ‘successful’ operations are naively classified as survival. When surgical outcomes are classified more accurately into more than two categories, the resulting new VLAD will reveal more accurately and fairly the surgical results.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx033
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Reducing the incidence of pressure ulcers in critical care units: a 4-year
           quality improvement
    • Authors: Richardson A; Peart J, Wright SE, et al.
      Pages: 433 - 439
      Abstract: Quality problemCritical care patients often have several risk factors for pressure ulceration and implementing prevention interventions have been shown to decrease risk.Initial assessmentWe identified a high incidence of pressure ulcers in the four adult critical care units in our organization. Therefore, avoiding pressure ulceration was an important quality priority.Choice of solutionWe undertook a quality improvement programme aimed at reducing the incidence of pressure ulceration using an evidence-based bundle approach.ImplementationA bundle of technical and non-technical interventions were implemented supported by clinical leadership on each unit. Important components were evidence appraisals; changes to mattresses; focussed risk assessment alongside mandating patients at very high risk to be repositioned two hourly; and staff training to increase awareness of how to prevent pressure ulcers.EvaluationPressure ulcer numbers, incidence and categories were collected continuously and monitored monthly by unit staff. Pressure ulcer rates reduced significantly from 8.08/100 patient admissions to 2.97/100 patient admissions, an overall relative rate reduction of 63% over 4 years. The greatest reduction was seen in the most severe category of pressure ulceration. The average estimated cost saving was £2.6 million (range £2.1–£3.1).Lessons learnedA quality improvement programme including technical and non-technical interventions, data feedback to staff and clinical leadership was associated with a sustained reduction in the incidence of pressure ulceration in the critically ill. Strategies used in this programme may be transferable to other critical care units to bring more widespread patient benefit.
      PubDate: 2017-04-07
      DOI: 10.1093/intqhc/mzx040
      Issue No: Vol. 29, No. 3 (2017)
       
 
 
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