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a/b : Auto/Biography Studies : Journal of The Autobiography Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Anales Galdosianos     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Biography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Goethe Yearbook     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Hemingway Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Henry James Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
History of Neuroscience in Autobiography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Ibsen Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Žižek Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
James Joyce Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Medical Biography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Niels Bohr Collected Works     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
SHAW The Annual of Bernard Shaw Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
The Hopkins Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
The Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Tolkien Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Wallace Stevens Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
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History of Neuroscience in Autobiography
Number of Followers: 5  
 
  Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
ISSN (Print) 1874-6055
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3203 journals]
  • Preface to volume 1
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire
      This section presents 17 personal narratives by some of the true pioneers of neuroscience. The group includes four nobel laureates and 11 members or foreign associates of the National Academy of Sciences, United States. The contributors have done their scientific work in the United States, Canada, England, Australia, France, and Sweden. The diverse section within the book deals with the personal perspectives and viewpoints of the authors and does not reflect material or opinion from the Society for Neuroscience.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(06)80023-x
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 5
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire
      This section discusses The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography that includes 16 autobiographies of senior neuroscientists. The authors tell about the experiences that shaped their lives, the teachers, colleagues, and students with whom they worked, and the scientific work that has absorbed them during their careers. Their essays serve as enduring records of a lifetime of discovery and achievements.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(06)80023-x
      Issue No: Vol. 5 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 1
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(04)80010-0
      Issue No: Vol. 4 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 2
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(04)80010-0
      Issue No: Vol. 4 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 3
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(04)80010-0
      Issue No: Vol. 4 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 4
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(04)80010-0
      Issue No: Vol. 4 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 1
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(01)80003-7
      Issue No: Vol. 3 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 2
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(01)80003-7
      Issue No: Vol. 3 (2016)
       
  • Preface to volume 3
    • Authors: Larry R. Squire
      Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3
      Author(s): Larry R. Squire


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
      DOI: 10.1016/s1874-6055(01)80003-7
      Issue No: Vol. 3 (2016)
       
  • Previous contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Samuel H. Barondes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter gives detailed information on Samuel Barondes who played a major role in bringing a molecular and genetic approach to neuroscience and psychiatry. In his early work, he helped establish the requirement for brain protein synthesis in long-term memory and demonstrated the rapid transport of proteins in brain axons. He discovered discoidin–smslime mold relatives of the discoidin-domain proteins involved in synaptogenesis as well as galectins, a family of glycoconjugate-binding proteins, some of which are found in neurons. A gifted writer, he published three books about psychiatric genetics and molecular psychiatry for a general audience. Besides his study on brain protein synthesis, the chapter focuses on Samuel's early life, qualifications, and achievements.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Joseph E. Bogen
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter focuses on the life and achievements of Joseph E. Bogen. Joseph Bogen was a neurosurgeon who pioneered “split-brain” surgery for epilepsy and studied the first “split-brain” patients of the modern era. He is also credited for popularizing the concepts of hemisphere specialization and wrote widely about consciousness as a neurobiological phenomenon. This chapter highlights his appointments and honors. He was appointed as an assistant in surgery, Cornell Medical School, and later as a research fellow in neurophysiology with California Institute of Technology. He has received many accolades, including fellow, American College of Surgeons, award of merit by California Association of Neurological Surgeons, best of show by Descanso Bonsai Society, and others.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Alan Cowey
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter focuses on the life of Alan Cowey. Alan Cowey began his research by making parametric measurements of visual field defects in monkeys with cortical or retinal lesions and showed that only the latter produced absolute blindness in the field defect. Later, he discovered and plotted cortical visual area, “V2,” in monkeys. He carried out behavioral experiments of visual acuity in monkeys and explained the effects on the acuity of cortical lesions by studying the magnification factor of the retina in the thalamus and area V1 by anatomical and electrophysiological methods. He also studied the selective effects of a variety of brain lesions in monkeys and patients on form, motion, and color and interpreted their disorders by testing normal subjects with a combination of psychophysical, neuroimaging, and magnetic brain stimulation methods. He also combined studies on patients and monkeys to elucidate the neural basis of blind sight.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • David R. Curtis
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter describes the facts based on David R. Curtis experiences. David Curtis pioneered the use of microelectrophoretic techniques to examine the effects of potential synaptic transmitters on single identified neurons in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) in vivo. He similarly examined the effects of compounds that blocked or enhanced synaptic transmission at the synapses of particular excitatory or inhibitory pathways. Thus, he contributed to the identification of a number of central transmitters, particularly glycine, gamma- aminobutyric acid (GABA), and aspartic and glutamic acids. The chapter also highlights Curtis' family background and his award-winning discoveries.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Ennio De Renzi
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      Ennio De Renzi pioneered the development of neuropsychology as a scientific discipline in Italy. This chapter discusses the success stories of Ennio De Renzi. Born in Cremona, Italy, he graduated in medicine at Pavia University with a thesis in neurology. He carried out his early work on hemispheric specialization, in patients with unilateral brain lesions, and made fundamental contributions to understanding the nature of virtually every neurological condition that affects higher functions—namely, aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, amnesia, disorders of spatial cognition, and frontal lobe syndromes. He founded the international journal Cortex and served as an editor for more than 25 years. He received the Carlo Riquier award for neurological studies and was an honorary member of the Academy of Neurology and British Neuropsychological Society.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • John S. Edwards
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      John Edwards worked throughout his career on the aspects of insect physiology and ecology, especially on neural development. He pioneered the use of an insect system, the cercus-to-giant interneuron connectivity, in the analysis of sensory regeneration. He also discovered the pioneer role of insects in ecosystem regeneration after the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. John Edwards was born in Auckland during the great depression that hit New Zealand. He was accepted by Gonville and Caius College for PhD with V.B. Wigglesworth. He was appointed as quick professor in the Department of Zoology and the author of the books on Insect Physiology, and became known as the “founder of the field.”

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Mitchell Glickstein
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter describes a range of Glickstein experiences. Mitch Glickstein is an American born Emeritus professor at the University College of London. Glickstein began his studies with Garth Thomas and Roger Sperry. Using mainly the neuroanatomical methods, as well as physiology and behavior, he studied the organization of the cortical visual pathways in mammals and found that the lateral geniculate nucleus projects were widely beyond its sole cortical target. Subsequently, he identified projections from visual cortical areas to the pontine nuclei and from visually driven pontine cells to the cerebellum. His work has illuminated the role of the cerebellum in the sensory guidance of movement.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Carlton C. Hunt
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter describes Carlton's many successes in the field of neuroscience. Carlton Hunt began his scientific career in close collaboration with Stephen Kuffler at the Wilmer Eye Institute. He became a leading expert on the muscle spindle, a sense organ that detects changes in muscle length and movement. Working with Kuffler, he showed how the central nervous system regulates the intricate behavior of these sense organs. In his later work, he elucidated the spindle's role in sensing the position of limbs in space. A gifted administrator, he also built three departments of physiology at three different universities, prior to the emergence of neuroscience as an interdisciplinary activity.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Lynn T. Landmesser
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      Lynn Landmesser utilized the embryonic chick spinal cord to provide the first evidence for early specification of motoneuron subtypes and their selective path finding. Her laboratory also demonstrated motoneuron pool-specific spontaneous bursting patterns and characterized the circuits that drive the earliest rhythmic activity and defined its role in motor circuit formation. She has also elucidated the roles of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and polysialic acid in neuromuscular development, synaptic maturation, and transmission. This chapter also highlights Lynn's early life beside her achievements in the world of neuroscience. Her father's interest in nature and the environment had a huge impact on her to become a biological scientist.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Rodolfo R. Llinás
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter provides an introduction to the neuroscientist Rodolfo R. Llinás, a founding father of modern brain science. Rodolfo R. Llinás has carried out detailed and elegant studies of the electrophysiology of the vertebrate cerebellum. In mammalian neurons, he discovered dendrite calcium spikes, dendritic inhibition, electronic coupling, and subthreshold oscillations. At the squid giant synapse, he demonstrated presynaptic calcium current. He studied the electrophysiology of thalamocortical networks in brain slices and related his findings to his pioneering work with humans using magnetoencephalography (MEG). He has also drawn on his physiological findings to propose the possible commonalities among certain neurological and psychiatric disorders. His passion for the study of the nervous system made him publish over 500 scientific articles.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Alan Peters
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter describes the most phenomenal achievements of Alan Peters. One of the foremost anatomists of the mammalian nervous system, Alan was one of the first to determine the structure of myelin sheaths in the central nervous system (CNS). He used light and electron microscopy to characterize the ultra structure of neuroglia and neurons, as well as the micro circuitry and organization of neurons in cerebral cortex and the organization of thalamocortical projections. With S.L. Palay and H. deF. Webster, he co-authored three editions of the definitive text on the fine structure of the nervous system, and with E.G. Jones he created the authoritative series that appeared in 14 volumes. He has also studied the anatomy of normal aging in the primate brain.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Martin Raff
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter gives an insight into the life and achievements of Martin Raft. Raft began his scientific career as an immunologist and then brought his interest in the problem of cell identity to developmental neurobiology. He charted the origins of glia and used Schwann cells, precursors of oligodendrocytes, and retinal cells to make major contributions to understanding the regulation of cell size and number, the control of cellular differentiation and maturation, and the role of extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms in the generation of cell diversity. Martin Raft was the member of the Medical Research Council (MRC) Laboratory for Molecular Cell Biology (LMCB) and an emeritus professor in the biology department at University College, London (UCL). He is also the co-author of a textbook on cell biology.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Wilfrid Rall
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter presents an extensive profile of Wilfrid Rail. Wilfrid pioneered biophysical modeling and computation for dendritic neurons, with a focus on functional insights, testable predictions, and reinterpretation of experiments. With research collaborators, he demonstrated the functional importance of synapses on dendrites, predicted the discovery of dendrodendritic synapses, and identified the dendritic spine as a possible locus for plasticity. He is the scientist emeritus of the National Institutes of Health and one of the founders of the Society for Neuroscience. For his incredible work on biophysics and neurophysiology, he has been honored with many honors and adulation, including the highest honors in physics with Yale B.S., NIH Senior Scientific Service Performance Award, Scientist Emeritus of the NIH, and others.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Mark R. Rosenzweig
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      The chapter discusses the early life and discovery of brain plasticity by Rosenzweig. Mark Rosenzweig discovered brain mechanisms of auditory localization and the precedence effect in localization. He is best known for his research to demonstrate neurochemical and neuroanatomical plasticity of the brain. Rosenzweig also investigated the neurochemical processes underlying the successive stages of memory formation. The latter study of Rosenzweig also showed plastic responses of the brain during hibernation. This chapter focuses on the discovery of unexpected aspects of the nervous system as well as the satisfaction of systematical testing alternative hypotheses. The chapter also highlights some occasions where Rosenzweig failed to follow up leads or insights that later proved important in his discoveries.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Arnold Bernard Scheibel
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter discusses the impressive achievements of the psychiatrist, educator, and research director Arnold Scheibel. Scheibel is known for his studies of detailed architecture of the spinal cord, brain stem, and cerebral cortex and introduction of the module concept into the central nervous system research. His description of the recurrent axonal projection of the nucleus reticularis thalami led to the gatelet theory of selective attention. His Golgi studies of human brain tissue extended the knowledge about the nature of neuronal changes in senile brain disease and in schizophrenia. He demonstrated the correlations between human cognitive activity and structural change, and also emphasized the role of plasticity in the living reactive brain.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Gerald Westheimer
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      After clinical practice, as an optometrist in Sydney, Gerald Westheimer worked to attain a deeper understanding of human vision. This chapter focuses on the biography and achievements that span years of Dr. Westheimer's professional and personal life. Westheimer elucidated the neural control of eye movements and ocular accommodation by using the systems approach to map motor responses in the human, and subsequently employed the neurophysiological techniques to outline midbrain and brainstem circuits in the nonhuman primate. Measurement of the optical image of the eye led to the investigation of the retinal and cortical circuitry involved in the processing of spatial visual information, including the analysis of acuity, stereopsis, and contextual effects. He became the first head of the Division of Neurobiology at Berkeley.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Index of names
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2006
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 5
      This chapter presents the list of names that have contributed to the book “The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography” (volume 5). It includes Abbel J. J, Abbott K, Abney, Abulencia, Akeson, R. L, Albe-Fessard, Aserinsky E., and Badcock D. other names are also listed in the chapter.

      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Previous contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Per Andersen
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Mary Bartlett Bunge
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Jan Bures
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Jean-Pierre G. Changeux
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • William Maxwell (Max) Cowan
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • John E. Dowling
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Oleh Hornykiewicz
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Andrew F. Huxley
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • JacSue Kehoe
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Edward A. Kravitz
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • James L. McGaugh
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Randolf Menzel
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Mircea Steriade
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Richard F. Thompson
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Index of names
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2004
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 4


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Previous contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Morris H. Aprison
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Brian B. Boycott
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Vernon B. Brooks
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Pierre Buser
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
  • Hsiang-Tung Chang
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2001
      Source:The History of Neuroscience in Autobiography, Volume 3


      PubDate: 2016-07-04T14:17:19Z
       
 
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