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  Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 782 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (77 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (532 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (91 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (31 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (51 journals)

AGRICULTURE (532 journals)                  1 2 3 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 263 Journals sorted alphabetically
Aceh International Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta agriculturae Slovenica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Agrobotanica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Agronomica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acta Agronomica Sinica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Acta Scientiarum. Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Technology     Open Access  
Acta Technologica Agriculturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, Alimentaria     Open Access  
Advances in Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Agriculture & Botanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Agronomy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Life Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
AFBM Journal     Open Access  
Africa Development     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Africa Research Bulletin: Political, Social and Cultural Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
African Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
African Journal of Horticultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
African Journal of Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agra Europe     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agribusiness : an International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Agricultura Tecnica     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Agricultura Tropica et Subtropica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agricultura, Sociedad y Desarrollo     Open Access  
Agricultural Advances     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural and Food Science     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Agricultural Commodities     Full-text available via subscription  
Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Agricultural History Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agricultural Sciences in China     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agricultural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Agricultural Water Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Agriculture & Food Security     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agriculture (Poľnohospodárstvo)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agriculture and Agricultural Science Procedia     Full-text available via subscription  
Agriculture and Food Sciences Research     Open Access  
Agriculture and Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Agriprobe     Full-text available via subscription  
Agrivita : Journal of Agricultural Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Agro-Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Agroalimentaria     Open Access  
Agrociencia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agrociencia Uruguay     Open Access  
Agrokémia és Talajtan     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agronomía Colombiana     Open Access  
Agronomía Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Agronomía Mesoamericana     Open Access  
Agronomie Africaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Agrosearch     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AI & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Akademik Ziraat Dergisi     Open Access  
Alinteri Zirai Bilimler Dergisi : Alinteri Journal of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access  
Ambiência     Open Access  
Ambiente & Agua : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Botany     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Economics and Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Potato Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Rural Development     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annales des Sciences Agronomiques     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Agricultural and Environmental Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Agricultural Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annals of Silvicultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
APCBEE Procedia     Partially Free   (Followers: 1)
Applied Economics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Applied Financial Economics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Arboricultural Journal : The International Journal of Urban Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Archivos de Zootecnia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos do Instituto Biológico     Open Access  
Arthropod-Plant Interactions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Economic Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Plant Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Economic Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Forest Grower     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Forestry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Grain     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Holstein Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Agricultural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Sugarcane     Full-text available via subscription  
Avances en Investigacion Agropecuaria     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
B.E. Journal of Theoretical Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
Bangladesh Agronomy Journal     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access  
Bioagro     Open Access  
Biocatalysis and Agricultural Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biocontrol Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biodiversity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Biodiversity : Research and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Biological Agriculture & Horticulture : An International Journal for Sustainable Production Systems     Partially Free   (Followers: 10)
Biosystems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biotemas     Open Access  
Boletín Semillas Ambientales     Open Access  
Bragantia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Brazilian Archives of Biology and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Poultry Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Buletin Peternakan : Bulletin of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription  
Buletin Veteriner Udayana     Open Access  
Bulletin of University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca : Food Science and Technology     Open Access  
California Agriculture     Open Access  
Cambridge Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Canadian Water Resources Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Capitalism Nature Socialism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Ceiba     Open Access  
Cereal Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
CERNE     Open Access  
CESifo Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Change and Adaptation in Socio-Ecological Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Chemical and Biological Technologies for Agriculture     Open Access  
Chilean Journal of Agricultural Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia & Natura     Open Access  
Ciência e Agrotecnologia     Open Access  
Ciencia e investigación agraria     Open Access  
Ciência e Técnica Vitivinícola     Open Access  
Ciencia forestal en México     Open Access  
Ciência Rural     Open Access  
Ciencia y Agricultura     Open Access  
COCOS : The Journal of the Coconut Research Institute of Sri Lanka     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coffee Science     Open Access  
Cogent Food & Agriculture     Open Access  
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Computers and Electronics in Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contributions to Tobacco Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Corps et culture     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cuadernos de Desarrollo Rural     Open Access  
Cultivos Tropicales     Open Access  
Cultural Geographies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Cultural Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cultural Studies - Critical Methodologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cultural Studies of Science Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Cultural Trends     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Culture & Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Culture, Agriculture, Food and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Culture, Health & Sexuality: An International Journal for Research, Intervention and Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Current Agricultural Science and Technology     Open Access  
Current Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Research in Dairy Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Dairy Mail Africa : Publication for the Dairy Industry in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Derim     Open Access  
Developments in Agricultural Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Developments in Agricultural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription  
Diatom Research     Hybrid Journal  
Dossiers Agraris     Open Access  
Ecological Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 111)
Economic Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic and Industrial Democracy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Economic Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Economic Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Economic Record     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Emirates Journal of Food and Agriculture     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Empirical Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Encuentro     Open Access  
Engineering in Agriculture, Environment and Food     Hybrid Journal  
Ensaios e Ciência: Ciências Biológicas, Agrárias e da Saúde     Open Access  
Environment and Development Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Eppo Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Ethology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
EU agrarian Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Euphytica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Eurochoices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Agrophysical Journal     Open Access  
European Journal of Agronomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
European Journal of American Culture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Journal of Health Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
European Journal of Law and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
European Review of Agricultural Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
EvoDevo     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Extensão Rural     Open Access  
Farmer’s Weekly     Full-text available via subscription  
Farmlink Africa     Full-text available via subscription  
Fitosanidad     Open Access  
Folia Horticulturae     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Food and Agricultural Immunology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food and Energy Security     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Food Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Food Economics - Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section C     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Food New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Food Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Forestry Chronicle     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Forum for Health Economics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Frontiers in Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers of Agricultural Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Frontiers of Agriculture in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 3 | Last

Journal Cover Advances in Agronomy
  [SJR: 1.742]   [H-I: 67]   [12 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 0065-2113
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [2817 journals]
  • Utilization of Biowaste for Mine Spoil Rehabilitation
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 5 April 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): H. Wijesekara, N.S. Bolan, M. Vithanage, Y. Xu, S. Mandal, S.L. Brown, G.M. Hettiarachchi, G.M. Pierzynski, L. Huang, Y.S. Ok, M.B. Kirkham, C. Saint, A. Surapaneni
      Globally, around 0.4×106 km2 area of land is estimated to be disturbed by mining activities, thereby contributing to severe environmental consequences including the generation of large amounts of mine spoils. The shortfall in topsoil due to poor striping practices and low levels of organic matter have been identified as common problems in rehabilitation of mining spoil. High heavy metal concentrations in mine spoil can adversely impact microbial activity and subsequent revegetation succession. The release of acids associated with mine spoils (ie, acid mine drainage through oxidation of pyrite) can also create adverse effects on the surrounding vegetation. Large quantities of biowaste, such as manure compost, biosolids, and municipal solid waste (MSW) that are low in contaminants [including metal(loid)s] can be used to rehabilitate mine spoils. These biowastes provide a source of nutrients and improve the fertility of spoils. These biowastes also act as a sink for metal(loid)s in mine tailings reducing their bioavailability through adsorption, complexation, reduction, and volatilization of metal(loid)s. This review provides an overview of the sources of biowastes and the current regulations for utilization; describes their benefits in terms of improving the physical, chemical, and biological properties of mine spoils; and elaborates on the role of the utilization of biowastes on mine spoil rehabilitation through several case studies. Finally, future research needs and strategies are identified in terms of sustainable biowaste utilization in mine spoil rehabilitation.


      PubDate: 2016-04-09T04:56:46Z
       
  • Organic Farming, Soil Health, and Food Quality: Considering Possible Links
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): J.R. Reeve, L.A. Hoagland, J.J. Villalba, P.M. Carr, A. Atucha, C. Cambardella, D.R. Davis, K. Delate
      That the health of soils, plants, animals, and people are linked is an ancient idea that still resonates. Growing evidence links farm management, soil health, and plant health but relationships among soil health, food crop nutritional quality, and human health are less understood. Numerous studies compare organic with conventional farming in order to shed light on these links. Organic farming systems utilize carbon-based amendments, diverse crop rotations, and cover crops to build soil fertility. These practices increase biologically available soil organic matter and beneficial soil microbe and invertebrate activities, improve soil physical properties, reduce disease potential, and increase plant health. To date, comparisons of nutrient content between organic and conventional foods have been inconsistent. Recent evidence suggests that organically grown fruits and vegetables contain higher levels of health promoting phytochemicals, possibly linked to greater plant stress, rhizosphere microbial communities, and/or lower available nitrogen. But the overlap in management practices among farming systems make broad generalizations difficult. Moreover, environmental and crop species and/or cultivar interactions may exert stronger effects than management. Here we summarize the known factors influencing soil and plant health and link these with food-crop quality and human health. Though this paper draws primarily from research on organic farming, management practices that enhance soil, plant, and human health remain an important goal for all sustainable food production systems.


      PubDate: 2016-03-21T21:54:22Z
       
  • A Career Perspective on Soil Management in the Cerrado Region of Brazil
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 19 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): A.S. Lopes, L.R. Guimarães Guilherme
      The rise of agriculture production in the Brazilian savanna is seen as one of the greatest achievements of worldwide agricultural science in the 20th century. Yet, reaching this current situation was, and still is, not an easy task. Actually, until the 1960s, 23% of Brazil (2million km2) was occupied by a savanna-like vegetation generally called “Cerrado,” developed in highly weathered soils, with particularly low natural fertility, used for extensive beef cattle production on unimproved pastures. This review paper intends to summarize a pioneer survey study by Dr Alfredo Lopes on “Cerrado” soils in the mid-1970s aiming to: (1) revisit the main chemical and physical properties of 518 topsoil samples under “Cerrado” vegetation in Central Brazil; (2) compare these results with some of the critical levels suggested for soil fertility interpretation; and, (3) study some relations among soil physical, chemical, and mineralogical characteristics in selected 44 topsoil samples with data concerning available water, phosphorus fixation, charge attributes, as well as extractable and total zinc. Besides stressing on the importance of adequate management strategies to allow the incorporation of these low natural fertility soils into successful crop production, we also highlight the historical importance of international collaborations that contribute to the development of soil fertility evaluation and agronomic–economic research programs on tropical soils in the Brazilian Cerrados. Lastly, additional comments are provided concerning the need of strategic actions and appropriate political decisions for the continuous sustainable development of this region.


      PubDate: 2016-03-21T21:54:22Z
       
  • Iron Redox Cycling Coupled to Transformation and Immobilization of Heavy
           
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 March 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): H.-Y Yu, F.-B. Li, C.-S. Liu, W. Huang, T.-X. Liu, W.-M. Yu
      Red soil is an important soil resource, which bears substantial implication for sustainable development of agriculture and healthy growth of economy. However, the red soil in China has been deteriorating in recent years and facing many threats, such as soil erosion, acidification, and pollution. Among these, contamination of heavy metals, particularly arsenic and cadmium pollution in paddy soils of the red soil regions, has become a major environmental concern. In this paper, we reviewed recent publications on iron redox cycling and its coupling to the fate of heavy metals and metalloids. The most exciting findings on the iron biogeochemistry processes include dissimilatory iron reduction, Fe(II) oxidation, and Fe2+-catalyzed recrystallization of iron (hydro)oxides, all of which contribute to the immobilization of heavy metals. Although these findings are mainly based on laboratory experiments, they provide guidance for exploring innovative remediation strategies for controlling pollution of heavy metals in paddy soils of the red soil regions. We also summarized how the iron redox cycling may be affected by other biogeochemical processes or active constituents, such as the nitrogen cycling, the sulfur cycling and humic substances. It appears that the mechanisms underlying the interactions among these multiple components and processes are not sufficiently understood and may require further studies. Finally, future research needs pertaining to iron redox cycling coupled to the fate of heavy metals are suggested. The results summarized in this review may provide insights for solving the heavy metal pollution of paddy soils in the red soil regions.


      PubDate: 2016-03-11T15:08:46Z
       
  • The definition of soil since the early 1800s
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 February 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Alfred E. Hartemink
      The soil is defined differently by soil scientists, and its definition has changed over time. This paper reviews how the definition of the soil has changed since the early 1800s by selecting and listing 81 definitions given in a wide range of soil science books, handbooks, glossaries, and dictionaries. Initial definitions of the soil were based on developments in agricultural chemistry or geology. The soil was seen as a production factor (medium) for agriculture that needed to be understood before it could be improved, or the soil was defined as disintegrated rocks mixed with organic matter. Definitions were rudimentary reflecting the overall level of understanding. Soil variation was not well understood. Overarching soil definitions appeared in the late 1800s following some major shifts in the understanding and knowledge about soils. The definition of the soil was particularly relevant for soil survey and in soil classification because it affected how soils were viewed in the field and represented in a two dimensional way (soil maps). Both the World Reference Base (WRB) and Soil Taxonomy have defined the soil, but standard field books describing soils often lack a definition. Most of the definitions in dictionaries and glossaries are detailed stressing the organic and inorganic part of the soil as well the origin, complexity, and some of its functions. Current soil definitions have a more environmental outlook reflecting the broadening of the soil science discipline but definitions will change following scientific advances and discovery. Soils are defined differently by subdisciplines. Considerable research is conducted nowadays outside soil science departments and research centres, and for some researchers the soil may solely be a medium—just as it was in the mid-1800s. The effect of increased specialisation and expansion in soil science causes the detail of the investigation to prevail over the idea of soil as a complex dynamic system that is part of a much wider Earth system. This review ends with a proposal for a scientific definition of soil, and a definition for lay persons and the general public.


      PubDate: 2016-02-13T21:54:09Z
       
  • Plant Bioregulators for Sustainable Agriculture: Integrating Redox
           Signaling as a Possible Unifying Mechanism
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 2 February 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Ashish Kumar Srivastava, Ratnakumar Pasala, Paramjit Singh Minhas, Penna Suprasanna
      Increasing agricultural productivity and sustainability will have to be prioritized to enhance food production. The major challenge toward this emanates from multiple stress factors and unpredictable climatic conditions. Thus, it is critical to understand and characterize the plant responses to changing environmental conditions. Needless to say, plant breeding has contributed a great deal to crop improvement over the past decades and is still supplementing the biotechnological advancement to bring technologies for enhancing crop yield. In recent years, although several stress tolerant transgenic lines have been developed; however, their performance in farmer's field is still to be tested. In this regard, present review describes Low External Input and Sustainable Agriculture (LEISA) based agriculture wherein low concentration of plant bioregulators (PBRs) are applied externally at a suitable developmental stage to boost the plant signaling which finally leads to enhanced growth and crop yield. There is a wide range of chemical- and hormone-based PBRs used for different crops and here in, we have proposed a unified mechanism for their mode of action. This is based upon PBRs ability to fine tune plant redox homeostasis which regulate root growth for improving plant water/nutrient status, photosynthetic efficiency and source–sink homeostasis for enhanced crop yield and metabolism for overall improvement in plant growth. The knowledge gaps and quality control aspect have also been discussed to ensure the adoptability and applicability of PBRs on a wider scale.


      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Half title page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 136




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Series page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 136




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Title page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 136




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Copyright page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 136




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 136




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Preface
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 136
      Author(s): Donald L. Sparks



      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Half title page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 135




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Series page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 135




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Title page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 135




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Copyright page
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 135




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 135




      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • Preface
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 135
      Author(s): Donald L. Sparks



      PubDate: 2016-02-08T20:28:32Z
       
  • A Comprehensive Review of the CERES-Wheat, -Maize and -Rice Models’
           Performances
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 8 January 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Bruno Basso, Lin Liu, Joe T. Ritchie
      The Crop Environment Resource Synthesis (CERES) models have been developed and utilized for the last 30years to simulate crop growth in response to climate, soil, genotypes and management across locations throughout the world. We reviewed 215 papers found in the literature that contained field observed data where the CERES models were tested. Over 30 simulated variables of the CERES models have been tested in 43 different countries under various experimental treatments. Across all testing conditions, the CERES models simulated grain yield with a root mean square error (RMSE) of less than 1400kg/ha (∼10% relative error, RE), 1200kg/ha (∼20% RE) and 800kg/ha (∼10% RE) for maize, wheat, and rice, respectively. Phenological development was simulated with less than 7days difference from the observations in most studies. The CERES models simulated aboveground biomass, harvest index, evapotranspiration, and soil water reasonably well too. The simulations of grain number (up to 4340 root mean square error, RMSE), grain weight (up to 22% error), intercepted photosynthetically active radiation (IPAR, up to 0.41MJ/plant), leaf area index (LAI, 31.9% error), soil temperature (over 10°C difference), and nitrogen (N) dynamics (up to 80% error) were less accurate. In fact the average error of CERES model simulations tends to be higher under marginal crop growing conditions such as extreme heat or cold, water and nutrient deficit conditions.


      PubDate: 2016-01-13T06:41:50Z
       
  • Performance of Coffee Seedlings as Affected by Soil Moisture and Nitrogen
           Application
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Alveiro Salamanca-Jimenez, Timothy A. Doane, William R. Horwath
      Nitrogen (N) and soil moisture are the most important factors controlling yield in Colombian coffee crops. Since long-term productivity is contingent on robust early growth, it is imperative to study these factors in seedlings in order to ensure maximum yield potential of mature trees. A greenhouse experiment with four soil water and four N levels was used to determine how these two important variables affect quantifiable parameters representing seedling performance. Shoot biomass, the most obvious indicator of performance, was increased by both higher soil moisture and higher N application, although root biomass increased with N application only in wetter soils and in general the root to shoot ratio diminished with increasing N application. Like shoot biomass, leaf N content and N derived from fertilizer (Ndff) also increased with increasing N application, with relatively more leaf N recovered from fertilizer as soil moisture increased. Evapotranspiration (EVPT) responded to soil moisture, whereas water use efficiency, in terms of shoot mass produced per unit of evapotranspired water, responded dramatically to N level but was not affected by soil moisture. The strong effect of N application on water use efficiency was affirmed by the higher 13C/12C ratios and stem water potentials of plants grown under higher N levels, indicating greater water stress in these plants. All of these responses were associated with changes in photosynthesis as a result of acclimation to the imposed conditions. Consideration of these results will facilitate new recommendations for maximizing growth of coffee seedlings by increasing water and N use efficiency while reducing the economic and environmental impacts attributed to N fertilizers.


      PubDate: 2016-01-09T04:16:49Z
       
  • Perspectives About the National Cooperative Soil Survey
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Richard W. Arnold
      A discussion of nine tenets of pedology provides perspectives of the US soil survey program. The tenets are: paradigm of soils, scientific methodology, functional landscapes, soils as individuals, behavioral functions of soils, improving documentation, sharing pedological knowledge, reliability of information, and enhancing decision making. Highlights of each reveal progress, concerns, and opportunities. Accepting soil as a continuum rather than as individual entities may be the most important shift in our thought processes and understanding of the pedosphere. New technologies and changing social and political strategies suggest there is hope for a viable and sustainable Earth. Pedology can provide meaningful information and knowledge about soil resources.


      PubDate: 2016-01-09T04:16:49Z
       
  • Impact of Herbicides on Soil Biology and Function
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 January 2016
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Michael T. Rose, Timothy R. Cavagnaro, Craig A. Scanlan, Terry J. Rose, Tony Vancov, Stephen Kimber, Ivan R. Kennedy, Rai S. Kookana, Lukas Van Zwieten
      There is a growing awareness among farmers about the importance of soil for sustaining crop production and providing beneficial ecosystem services. Over the last 2 decades, global herbicide use has increased as farmers have shifted to more sustainable conservation tillage practices and have adopted herbicide-tolerant crop cultivars. The implications of increased herbicide use for soil biology are being questioned, but a comprehensive review on this topic is lacking. In this chapter we outline the chemistry and use of the major herbicide classes, and review the soil functions relevant to crop production. We then collate and critically evaluate the evidence for herbicide effects on soil biota and activity. In general, most studies suggest that the impacts of herbicide application on soil function are only minor and/or temporary. However, there are some instances where findings consistently suggest effects that could significantly alter soil function. These include disruptions to earthworm ecology in soils exposed to glyphosate and atrazine; inhibition of soil N-cycling (including biological N2-fixation, mineralization and nitrification) by sulfonylurea herbicides in alkaline or low organic matter soils; and site-specific increases in disease resulting from the application of a variety of herbicides. Issues with extrapolating these findings to broadacre farming include the lack of a consistent framework for assessing herbicide risk to soil biology, the relevance of the magnitude of herbicide impacts compared with the impacts of other soil management practices such as tillage or crop rotation, the complexity of herbicide formulations and mixtures, and the limited number of long-term field studies.


      PubDate: 2016-01-09T04:16:49Z
       
  • Groundwater Depletion by Agricultural Intensification in China's HHH
           Plains, Since 1980s
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 10 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Xiangbin Kong, Xueliang Zhang, Rattan Lal, Fengrong Zhang, Xunhong Chen, Zhenguo Niu, Lei Han, Wei Song
      Sustainable use of groundwater is critical to China's present and future food security. Natural groundwater resources of Huang–Huai–Hai plains (HHH), the region that produces 60–80% of China's wheat (Triticum aestivum) and 35–40% of its maize (Zea mays), are being jeopardized by excessive water withdrawal. While previous studies have assessed the groundwater depletion rate in parts of this region, there is a lack of data on the rate of groundwater depletion and the corresponding change process analysis at the entire scale in the HHH. In this article, we document that the groundwater is being depleted at a mean rate of 0.46±0.37 m year−1 for the shallow aquifer and 1.14±0.58 m year−1 for deep aquifer. Based on the general specific yield of aquifer in the HHH, the rate of loss of total groundwater in the entire region is 8.32–10.75 km3 year−1. The severity of groundwater depletion is attributed to the long-term intensive irrigation for increasing crop yields and total biomass production in the HHH. Increasing 1 million Mg of wheat production lower the deep groundwater by 1.8 m (e.g., in Dezhou in the flood and coastal plains) and the shallow groundwater by 0.37 m (e.g., in Shijiazhuang in the piedmont plains). Thus, effective measures must be adopted to mitigate groundwater depletion for sustaining the present level of food production in the HHH.


      PubDate: 2015-12-13T12:30:56Z
       
  • Scientific Underpinnings of the System of Rice Intensification (SRI): What
           Is Known So Far?
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Amod K. Thakur, Norman T. Uphoff, Willem A. Stoop
      During the last 10 plus years, the system of rice intensification (SRI), a methodology for rice cultivation with many reported benefits, has been promoted in a number of countries, particularly in the major rice-growing nations of China, India, Indonesia, Vietnam, and Cambodia, which produce two-thirds of the world's rice. However, reports of substantial yield increases and phenotypic changes resulting from SRI management have been challenged on various grounds in the scientific literature. The debate has been among the most contentious in recent agronomic forums, although it has been receding in recent years as evidence continues to accumulate. This paper reviews information now available in the scientific literature that supports the multiple agronomic, plant physiologic, and soil microbiologic foundations for the reported SRI performance, and discusses how these effects are becoming even more relevant in the context of changing climates.


      PubDate: 2015-12-08T10:06:19Z
       
  • Molecular and Genomic Tools Provide Insights on Crop Domestication and
           Evolution
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 4 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Mulatu Geleta, Rodomiro Ortiz
      Rapid progress in genomic research and the development of genome-wide molecular markers for various crops significantly improved our knowledge on plant domestication and evolution. Molecular markers and other genomic tools have been used to understand the evolutionary changes that converted wild plants into domesticated crops, and the identification of loci behind domestication syndrome traits will have significant importance in the fast-track domestication of new plants. The application of genomics-assisted selection in plant breeding programs has significantly contributed to efficient plant breeding for desirable traits. Genomic tools also facilitated the efficient identification of progenitors of crops as well as centers of domestication. Multiple genomic regions with signature of selection during plant domestication have been found in various crops. Extensive analyses of plant genomes revealed that genes underlying domestication syndrome traits show a significant loss of diversity, for example, up to 95% of genetic diversity in wild relatives has been lost during domestication process in extreme cases. Genomic research revealed repeated occurrence of polyploidization during plant evolution and various interesting events that occurred following polyploidization such as gene loss and silencing. The loss of most replicated genes through time and nonrandom retention of some duplicated genes that serve as signatures of polyploidy are among interesting changes in polyploid plant genomes. Further insights into the advances in our knowledge on plant domestication and evolution made through the use of DNA markers and genomic tools is provided in this paper.


      PubDate: 2015-12-08T10:06:19Z
       
  • Adsorption Properties of Subtropical and Tropical Variable Charge Soils:
           Implications from Climate Change and Biochar Amendment
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Ren-kou Xu, Nikolla P. Qafoku, Eric Van Ranst, Jiu-yu Li, Jun Jiang
      This review paper attempts to summarize the progress made in research efforts conducted over the past years to study the surface chemical properties of the tropical and subtropical soils, usually called variable charge soils, and the way they response to different management. The paper is composed of an introductory section that provides a brief discussion on the surface chemical properties of these soils, and five other review sections. The focus of the following sections is on the evolution of surface chemical properties during the development of the variable charge properties (second section), interactions between oppositely charged particles and the resulting effects on the soil properties and especially on soil acidity (third section), the surface effects of low molecular weight organic acids sorbed to mineral surfaces and the chemical behavior of aluminum (fourth section), and the crop-straw-derived biochar-induced changes of the surface chemical properties of these soils (fifth section). A discussion on the effect of climate change variables on the properties of the variable charge soils is included at the end of this review paper (sixth section).


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T09:15:48Z
       
  • Impact of Climate Change Factors on Weeds and Herbicide Efficacy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 3 December 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Aruna Varanasi, P.V. Vara Prasad, Mithila Jugulam
      Rising carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and associated changes in global temperature and precipitation are major concerns for future weed management and crop production. This review focuses on the impacts of climate change factors on the growth of weeds and the potential variations in the efficacy of herbicides under changing climate conditions. Weeds are likely to show greater resilience and better adaptation to changes in CO2 concentrations and rising temperature in competition with crops due to their diverse gene pool and greater physiological plasticity. Weeds with C3 and C4 photosynthetic pathways may exhibit differential responses to higher CO2 levels and temperatures, which can affect the dynamics of crop–weed competition. In addition to its positive impact on weed growth, climate change factors could influence the efficacy of many herbicides, making weed management a major challenge for sustainable crop production. To enhance our understanding of the impact of climate change factors on herbicide efficacy, it is important to evaluate the effects of environmental conditions on various herbicide modes of action. Environmental factors such as CO2, light, temperature, relative humidity, and soil moisture differentially affect the uptake, translocation, and activity of different herbicide chemistries. Furthermore, interactions among these environmental factors may have unpredictable effects on herbicide activity. Existing literature suggests that climate change factors impacts vary not only within herbicide modes of action but also among herbicides belonging to same mode of action, so making generalized assumptions for each mode of action is difficult. Extensive research on the impact of climate change factors and their interactions on all commonly used herbicides is necessary to understand the implications for weed management in future climate scenarios.


      PubDate: 2015-12-04T09:15:48Z
       
  • Preface
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 134




      PubDate: 2015-10-20T04:39:38Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 134




      PubDate: 2015-10-20T04:39:38Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 134




      PubDate: 2015-10-20T04:39:38Z
       
  • Front Matter
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 134




      PubDate: 2015-10-20T04:39:38Z
       
  • Advances in Agronomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 134




      PubDate: 2015-10-20T04:39:38Z
       
  • Advances in Agronomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 134




      PubDate: 2015-10-20T04:39:38Z
       
  • Management-Induced Changes to Soil Organic Carbon in China: A
           Meta-analysis
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Xin Zhao, Ran Zhang, Jian-Fu Xue, Chao Pu, Xiang-Qian Zhang, Sheng-Li Liu, Fu Chen, Rattan Lal, Hai-Lin Zhang
      Soil carbon (C) sequestration is an environmentally friendly and efficient strategy to offset emissions of greenhouse gases and mitigate climate change. However, inappropriate farming practices can deplete soil organic carbon (SOC) stock and degrade soil quality. Thus, we conducted a meta-analysis to assess and identify the effects of improved farming practices on SOC sequestration in China by compiling a data set of 83 studies. The results indicated that SOC concentration and stocks at 0–30cm depth significantly increased by 1.00±0.26gkg−1 and 0.97±0.24Mgha−1 when plow tillage with residue removal was converted to no-till with residue retention (NT); 1.11±0.21gkg−1 and 2.09±0.46Mgha−1 when no fertilization was changed to chemical fertilization (CF); and 1.99±0.62gkg−1 and 3.09±0.99Mgha−1 when CF was changed to manure application (MF) (P <0.05), respectively. However, increases in SOC were primarily observed in the surface layer and decreased with soil depth. Therefore, the adoption of NT and MF in conjunction with CF is an effective strategy to enhance SOC stock in the surface layer. Further, in single-crop farming regions, the effects are more significant at 0–10cm depth; and the new equilibrium can occur within 11–20years after the adoption of NT. In double-crop farming regions, conversion to MF enhanced the SOC at 0–20cm depth over 16years. Additional research is warranted to credibly assess the rates of residue and manure input, soil “C saturation,” and soil type on the potential SOC sink capacity in China's croplands.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Using Functional Traits to Assess the Services Provided by Cover Plants: A
           Review of Potentialities in Banana Cropping Systems
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 20 July 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Gaëlle Damour, Eric Garnier, Marie Laure Navas, Marc Dorel, Jean-Michel Risède
      Cover plant-based cropping systems have gained considerable attention over the last few years because of the recognized benefits of increasing the diversity of agrosystems to sustain services other than those pertaining to production. While agronomical tools and methods to assess these services in multispecies plant communities barely exist, trait-based approaches, originally developed in the field of comparative functional ecology, provide an appropriated framework to study the effects of plant diversity on agrosystems. The aim of this article is to discuss how a trait-based approach can be used to assess the services delivered in cover plant-based cropping system. We focus on semiperennial cropping systems based on cover plants, exemplified by the banana cropping systems. These systems are described in a first section to identify the services targeted. A second section, based on a literature survey, analyzes the processes associated with each service and identifies related effect traits of cover plants. A shortlist of markers to be used to assess agrosystem processes is proposed and hypothesis on trade-offs and synergies among services are formulated. In a third section, issues related to the scaling-up from plant traits to the services delivered by plant agricultural communities are discussed. Such an approach, originated in the field of ecology, appears highly promising to tackle agronomic issues and its application to agrosystems constitutes a challenging test of their genericity. It raises specific questions and stresses the need for new methodological developments, which could be part of a research agenda at the interface between the two disciplines.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Chapter Three Advances in Structured Light Sensors Applications in
           Precision Agriculture and Livestock Farming
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133
      Author(s): Joan R. Rosell-Polo, Fernando Auat Cheein, Eduard Gregorio, Dionisio Andújar, Lluís Puigdomènech, Joan Masip, Alexandre Escolà
      The sustained growth of the world's population in the coming years will require an even greater role for agriculture to meet the food needs of humankind. To improve the productivity and competitiveness of the agricultural industry, it is necessary to develop new and affordable sensing technologies for agricultural operations. This kind of innovations should be implemented in a framework considering the farm, the crops, and their surroundings, with the aim of providing the farmer with information to take better decisions to enhance the production. This is the case of precision agriculture and precision livestock farming. This chapter reviews and discusses the use of structured light sensors in the characterization and phenotyping of crops in orchards and groves, weeds, and animals. As a result of a collaboration between researchers from Spain and Chile, opportunities for this type of sensors have been identified in these countries as examples of South American and European agriculture. In this context, several empirical case studies are presented regarding the use of structured light sensors for flower, fruit, branch, and trunk characterization considering depth and RGB (red-green-blue colors) information in avocados, lemons, apple, and pear orchards. Applications to weed detection and classification as well as to livestock phenotyping are also illustrated. Regarding the presented case studies, experimental and statistical results are provided showing the pros and cons of structured light sensors applied to agricultural environments. Additionally, several considerations are included for the use of this type of sensors to improve the agricultural process.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Chapter Two Climate Change Effects on the Suitability of an Agricultural
           Area to Maize Cultivation
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133
      Author(s): Antonello Bonfante, Eugenia Monaco, Silvia M. Alfieri, Francesca De Lorenzi, Piero Manna, Angelo Basile, Johan Bouma
      Climate change is likely to have a major impact on agricultural production in Mediterranean regions, due to higher temperatures and lower water availability for irrigation. A Hybrid Land Evaluation System (HLES) is proposed allowing a comparison between plant demands on the one hand and estimated future temperatures and soil water regimes on the other. A storyline is followed for each plant species hybrid and each soil mapping unit in the area to be studied, starting with step 1: evaluation of thermal conditions, followed by step 2: a traditional empirical land evaluation procedure identifying limiting features that are not covered by crop simulation models (such as flooding, surface stones, salt). Step 3 applies the quantitative Soil–Water–Atmosphere–Plant (SWAP) model and calculates soil water regimes and associated productions, at 100%, 80%, and 60% hypothetical irrigation water availability. HLES was applied in the Destra Sele area in Italy, comparing two climates: “reference” (1961–1990) and “future” (2021–2050), studying 11 maize hybrids and showing that in future, 6 hybrids suffered severely at 80% water availability and 7 could not meet requirements at 60%. HLES allows a proactive approach to future water allocation issues and provides data for genetic modification studies in terms of defining hydrological conditions for sites of native plants and for areas where new hybrids are to be introduced. HLES presents options, to be explored in close interaction with users, rather than one-way judgments.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Front Matter
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133




      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Copyright
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133




      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Contributors
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133




      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Preface
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133
      Author(s): Donald L. Sparks



      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Chapter One Advances in Using Soft X-Ray Spectroscopy for Measurement of
           Soil Biogeochemical Processes
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133
      Author(s): Adam W. Gillespie, Courtney L. Phillips, James J. Dynes, David Chevrier, Thomas Z. Regier, Derek Peak
      Light elements are particularly important in biogeochemical processes. These include organic matter components and macronutrients (C, N, O, S, P), micronutrients (Na, Mg, K, Mg), mineral elements (Si, Al), and transition metals. Determining the chemical speciation of these light elements in environmental samples is important for understanding bioavailability, decomposition, contamination mobility, and nutrient cycling. Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy is a useful tool available to probe the chemistry of atoms important in biogeochemical processes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) probes the local bonding and coordination environment of these elements in whole samples. Bulk XAS techniques permit for high throughput, the study of whole soils, and high sampling density. These analyses are complementary to X-ray transmission microscopy techniques which are limited by low throughput, thin particles (<100nm), and low sampling density. In many projects, these bulk XAS measurements may be essential to understanding large-scale processes in soils such as the global C cycle. Despite these important applications, bulk soft XAS has not been extensively applied to environmental samples until recently. The primary reasons for this gap is the lack of beamline endstations that are suitable for “dirty” samples and the technical challenges related to acquiring and normalizing spectra from dilute samples. Many of these technical challenges have now been overcome through the development of energy-resolving detectors, proper detector positioning, and development of liquid cell applications. Technical developments and recent applications will be presented, showing how bulk soft X-ray XAS is now positioned to contribute significantly to advancing the characterization of soils and environmental samples.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Advances in Agronomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133




      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Advances in Agronomy
    • Abstract: Publication date: 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy, Volume 133




      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Bacterial Diseases of Crops: Elucidation of the Factors that Lead to
           Differences Between Field and Experimental Infections
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 13 July 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Jay Ram Lamichhane
      Diseases caused by plant pathogenic bacteria have attained great concern worldwide as they are responsible for severe economic losses throughout the cultivated areas. Although studies performed in experimental conditions have provided many new insights into chemical and molecular signaling between plants and bacterial pathogens during pathogenesis, little is known about the factors that interact in natural field conditions. In particular, a wide gap exists between these two systems in terms of disease occurrence and severity. This review attempts to highlight the possible reasons that make natural field conditions different from the experimental ones, which might be useful to bridge the current gap and to facilitate the development of adequate control measures.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Advances and Perspectives to Improve the Phosphorus Availability in
           Cropping Systems for Agroecological Phosphorus Management
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 15 July 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Michel-Pierre Faucon, David Houben, Jean-Paul Reynoird, Anne-Maïmiti Mercadal-Dulaurent, Romain Armand, Hans Lambers
      Phosphorus (P) is a limiting nutrient for the productivity of many agroecosystems, and the depletion of global mineral P reserves is of concern for global food security. On the other hand, overfertilization with P and its subsequent export through runoff can cause eutrophication of water bodies and natural terrestrial habitats. An important challenge is therefore to develop productive farming systems in which P availability in soils is increased, while reducing mineral P inputs, outputs, and negative off-site impacts. Increasing the P availability in cropping systems requires several approaches including management of soil properties and P amendments, agroecology of cropping systems, and plant breeding. The objective of the present review is to identify new research perspectives in agronomy and emerging strategies to improve the P availability in cropping systems. For this purpose, we explore the following: (1) the use of renewable waste-derived P resources (including crop residues, excreta, struvite, and biochar) to improve P availability, particularly the impacts of applications of such renewable P sources on the chemical properties of the soil, soil organic matter dynamics, soil microbial and rhizospheric activity, and, ultimately, P availability; (2) the effects of multispecies cropping system on P availability, notably the incorporation of the concepts of positive plant–soil feedback on P availability, previously demonstrated in grassland and forest ecosystems, to multispecies cropping systems; and (3) the identification of genetic traits of plant–microorganism relations involved in the tolerance of low-P soils to improve plant breeding outcomes. The challenge for sustainable management of P resources for agriculture is now to reengineer agricultural systems at several scales and to define P management strategies in cropping systems by combining the use of renewable P resources and the management of soil properties, multispecies cropping system, and crop cultivars that increase soil P availability.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
  • Soil Biogeochemistry, Plant Physiology, and Phytoremediation of
           Cadmium-Contaminated Soils
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 17 July 2015
      Source:Advances in Agronomy
      Author(s): Shanying He, Zhenli He, Xiaoe Yang, Peter J. Stoffella, Virupax C. Baligar
      Cadmium (Cd) loading in soil and the environment has been accelerated worldwide due to enhanced industrialization and intensified agricultural production, particularly in the developing countries. Soil Cd pollution, resulting from both anthropogenic and geogenic sources, has posed an increasing challenge to soil quality and food security as well as to human health. Compared with other heavy metals such as copper (Cu) and lead (Pb), Cd demonstrates greater mobility along food chain and in the environment. Cd is harmful to human health and potentially toxic to biota at lower concentrations. Therefore, it is imperative to develop management strategies for control of pollution sources and remediation of contaminated soils. Extensive studies have been conducted in recent years to understand biogeochemical processes of Cd in soils, its cycle in agroecosystems, impacts on soil quality and food security, and the remediation of Cd-contaminated soils. Phytoremediation as an emergent technology has stimulated refreshed interest since it is cost effective and ecofriendly, especially the use of metal hyperaccumulating plants to extract or mine heavy metals from contaminated soils. Progress has been made in the understanding of mechanisms that govern Cd accumulation and detoxification in accumulating plants. This review provides recent progress in soil biogeochemistry and plant physiology of Cd, mechanisms of hyperaccumulation of Cd in plant, remediation strategies including chemical and microbiological enhancement, and optimization of field management practices, in the hope to stimulate more research in the future.


      PubDate: 2015-07-30T22:01:32Z
       
 
 
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