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  Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 755 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (690 journals)
    - POLLUTION (22 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (34 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (9 journals)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (690 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7     

International Journal of Chinese Culture and Management     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
International Journal of Corrosion     Open Access   (10 followers)
International Journal of Critical Infrastructures     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
International Journal of Disaster Risk Science     Open Access   (9 followers)
International Journal of Ecological Economics and Statistics     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
International Journal of Ecology     Open Access   (8 followers)
International Journal of Ecology & Development     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
International Journal of Energy and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (2 followers)
International Journal of Environment     Open Access   (3 followers)
International Journal of Environment and Health     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
International Journal of Environment and Pollution     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
International Journal of Environment and Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal   (13 followers)
International Journal of Environment and Waste Management     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
International Journal of Environment, Workplace and Employment     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Health Engineering     Open Access  
International Journal of Environmental Health Research     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Policy and Decision Making     Hybrid Journal   (10 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Protection     Open Access   (12 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health     Open Access   (13 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
International Journal of Environmental Studies     Hybrid Journal   (11 followers)
International Journal of Exergy     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
International Journal of Forest, Soil and Erosion     Open Access   (3 followers)
International Journal of Global Environmental Issues     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
International Journal of Global Warming     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control     Partially Free   (5 followers)
International Journal of Health Planning and Management     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
International Journal of Logistics Research and Applications: A Leading Journal of Supply Chain Management     Hybrid Journal   (9 followers)
International Journal of Philosophical Studies     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
International Journal of Phytoremediation     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
International Journal of Process Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
International Journal of Recycling of Organic Waste in Agriculture     Open Access   (1 follower)
International Journal of Regulation and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
International Journal of Reliability and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
International Journal of Renewable Energy Development     Open Access   (4 followers)
International Journal of Social Sciences and Management     Open Access  
International Journal of Soil, Sediment and Water     Open Access   (8 followers)
International Journal of Stress Management     Full-text available via subscription   (8 followers)
International Journal of Sustainable Construction Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (7 followers)
International Journal of Sustainable Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
International Journal of Sustainable Materials and Structural Systems     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
International Journal of Sustainable Society     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
International Journal of Testing     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
International Journal of the Commons     Open Access   (2 followers)
International Journal of Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering     Open Access  
International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics     Full-text available via subscription  
International Studies in the Philosophy of Science     Hybrid Journal   (10 followers)
Interventions : International Journal of Postcolonial Studies     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Investigación ambiental Ciencia y política pública     Open Access   (1 follower)
IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science     Open Access   (7 followers)
Iranian Journal of Environmental Health Science & Engineering     Open Access   (1 follower)
Iranian Journal of Health and Environment     Open Access   (2 followers)
Iranian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Irish Educational Studies     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Irish Journal of Earth Sciences     Full-text available via subscription  
Irish Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Isotopes in Environmental and Health Studies     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Israel Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (5 followers)
ISRN Ecology     Open Access   (3 followers)
ISRN Environmental Chemistry     Open Access  
Italian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (6 followers)
Jahangirnagar University Environmental Bulletin     Open Access  
Journal of Bioremediation & Biodegradation     Open Access   (2 followers)
Journal of Earth Science & Climatic Change     Open Access   (8 followers)
Journal of Petroleum & Environmental Biotechnology     Open Access   (2 followers)
Journal of Waste Water Treatment & Analysis     Open Access   (10 followers)
Journal of Advances in Environmental Health Research     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
Journal of Agricultural Biotechnology and Sustainable Development     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Environment     Open Access  
Journal of Agriculture and Environment for International Development     Open Access   (5 followers)
Journal of Agrobiology     Open Access   (2 followers)
Journal of Applied Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (110 followers)
Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology     Full-text available via subscription   (7 followers)
Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Sciences in Environmental Sanitation     Open Access   (4 followers)
Journal of Applied Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Journal of Applied Volcanology     Open Access   (6 followers)
Journal of Arid Environments     Hybrid Journal   (8 followers)
Journal of Asian Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (20 followers)
Journal of Biochemical and Molecular Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Journal of Black Studies     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Journal of Chemical Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Journal of Chemical Health and Safety     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
Journal of Climate     Full-text available via subscription   (20 followers)
Journal of Coastal Research     Full-text available via subscription   (9 followers)
Journal of Contaminant Hydrology     Hybrid Journal   (9 followers)
Journal of Contemporary European Studies     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Journal of East African Natural History     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
Journal of Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (34 followers)
Journal of Ecosystems     Open Access   (4 followers)
Journal of Empirical Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Journal of Environment and Earth Science     Open Access   (8 followers)
Journal of Environment and Ecology     Open Access   (9 followers)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7     

Journal of Organizational Behavior    [19 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 0894-3796 - ISSN (Online) 1099-1379
     Published by John Wiley and Sons Homepage  [1594 journals]   [SJR: 2.541]   [H-I: 83]
  • Applying models of employee identity management across cultures:
           Christianity in the USA and South Korea
    • Authors: Brent Lyons; Jennifer Wessel, Sonia Ghumman, Ann Marie Ryan, Sooyeol Kim
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Identity management refers to the decisions individuals make about how they present their social identities to others. We examined cross‐cultural differences in distancing and affirming identity management strategies of Christian‐identified employees utilizing samples from the USA and South Korea. Religious centrality, risks of disclosure, pressure to assimilate to organizational norms, and nation were key antecedents of chosen identity management strategies. Risks of disclosure and pressure to assimilate related to more distancing and less affirming strategies when religious centrality was low, but nation served as a boundary condition for the moderating effects of religious centrality. Distancing strategies related to negative outcomes regardless of religious centrality, but affirming strategies only related to positive outcomes when religious centrality was low. We discuss how this work contributes to theoretical and practical understanding of identity management in the workplace and across cultures. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2014-01-10T12:03:10.258497-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1917
       
  • Analytical mindsets in turnover research
    • Authors: David G. Allen; Julie I. Hancock, James M. Vardaman, D'lisa N. Mckee
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: We propose that there is a dominant analytical mindset (DAM) influencing employee turnover scholarship. We broaden the conceptualization of analytical mindsets to incorporate elements of research design, data collection, and measurement in addition to analytical strategies, and we argue that analytical mindsets are manifested in the methodological choices scholars make as shown in the research published in influential management journals. We content analyze the methods and theory of 447 empirical turnover studies over the past 52 years to uncover these mindsets and find evidence supporting the existence of a DAM. We further argue that, analogous to a physical dam, this DAM may be slowing theoretical progress in at least two ways: by constraining the conceptualization of research questions, variables, and relationships and by encouraging research practices that constrain explanatory power. We provide specific recommendations for shifting analytical mindsets to facilitate the flow of new perspectives in employee turnover research. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-12-17T12:07:44.399735-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1912
       
  • Involuntary retirement, bridge employment, and satisfaction with life: A
           longitudinal investigation
    • Authors: Ellen Dingemans; Kène Henkens
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: The increased popularity of bridge employment has raised questions about its consequences for well‐being in late adult life. This research explored the consequences of bridge employment for the level of life satisfaction of older adults during the retirement transition period. Changes in life satisfaction were considered to be a function of the different intentions and motives for taking bridge jobs. Furthermore, the impact of bridge employment was empirically examined conditional on the voluntariness of the exit from the career job. Panel data on Dutch retirees (N = 1248) were investigated using conditional change models. The results demonstrate that older adults willing to prolong their work careers but unable to find bridge jobs reported lower levels of life satisfaction compared with full retirees not considering bridge employment. In addition, participation in bridge employment for financial motives was associated with decreases in life satisfaction compared with postretirement working based on intrinsic motives. Moreover, compared with voluntary retirement, involuntary retirement was detrimental to life satisfaction, but participation in a bridge job was found to mitigate this negative shock. These findings contribute to the understanding of the consequences of various postretirement employment trajectories for older individuals. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-12-17T12:07:41.022413-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1914
       
  • Leader self‐awareness: An examination and implications of women's
           under‐prediction
    • Authors: Rachel E. Sturm; Scott N. Taylor, Leanne E. Atwater, Phillip W. Braddy
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Self‐awareness represents an important aspect of leadership. However, past research on leader self‐awareness has focused on one component of self‐awareness, self versus others' ratings, leaving the second component, the ability to anticipate the views of others, largely neglected. We examined this second component of self‐awareness by focusing on women leaders who have been found to under‐predict how others rate them. In two studies, we measured how women leaders anticipate the views of their bosses in regard to their leadership. In Study 1, 194 leaders rated their leadership, were rated by their bosses, and then predicted how their bosses rated their leadership. While we found that women under‐predict their boss ratings compared with men, we did not find that boss gender or feedback played a role in this under‐prediction. In Study 2, 76 female leaders identified (via open‐ended questions) possible reasons and consequences of under‐prediction for women in organizations. Results from Study 2 reveal the following: (1) the reasons for women's under‐prediction include a lack of self‐confidence, differences in feedback needs, learned gender roles, and self‐sexism; and (2) the perceived consequences of under‐prediction are negative for both women and the organization. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-12-17T12:03:57.230262-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1915
       
  • Generational differences in the workplace: A review of the evidence and
           directions for future research
    • Authors: Sean Lyons; Lisa Kuron
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Generational differences in the workplace have been a popular topic over the past two decades, generating a volume of articles, book chapters and books. We critically review the research evidence concerning generational differences in a variety of work‐related variables, including personality, work values, work attitudes, leadership, teamwork, work–life balance and career patterns, assess its strengths and limitations, and provide directions for future research and theory. Our review indicates that the growing body of research, particularly in the past 5 years, remains largely descriptive, rather than exploring the theoretical underpinnings of the generation construct. Evidence to date is fractured, contradictory and fraught with methodological inconsistencies that make generalizations difficult. The results of time‐lag, cross‐temporal meta‐analytic and cross‐sectional studies provide sufficient “proof of concept” for generation as a workplace variable, but further theoretical and qualitative work is needed to flesh out mediators and moderators in the relationship between generation and work‐related variables. We conclude by arguing for a more nuanced and theoretical research agenda that views generation as a social force in organizations rather than as merely a demographic variable. We also call for qualitative research, greater consideration of context and more methodological rigor. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-12-17T11:38:23.254224-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1913
       
  • A meta‐analytic comparison of self‐reported and
           other‐reported organizational citizenship behavior
    • Authors: Nichelle C. Carpenter; Christopher M. Berry, Lawrence Houston
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Given the common use of self‐ratings and other‐ratings (e.g., supervisor or coworker) of organizational citizenship behavior (OCB), the purpose of this meta‐analysis was to evaluate the extent to which these rating sources provide comparable information. The current study's results provided three important lines of evidence supporting the use and construct‐related validity of self‐rated OCB. The meta‐analysis of mean differences demonstrated that the mean difference in OCB ratings is actually quite small between self‐ and other‐raters. Importantly, the difference between self‐ and other‐raters was influenced by neither the response scale (i.e., agreement vs. frequency) nor the use of antithetical/reverse‐worded items on OCB scales. The meta‐analysis of correlations showed that self‐ and other‐ratings are moderately correlated but that self–other convergence is higher when antithetical items are not used and when agreement response scales are used. In addition, self‐ratings and supervisor‐ratings showed significantly more convergence than self‐ratings and coworker‐ratings. Finally, an evaluation of self‐rated and other‐rated OCB nomological networks showed that although self‐rated and other‐rated OCBs have similar patterns of relationships with common correlates, other‐rated OCB generally contributed negligible incremental variance to correlates and only contributed appreciable incremental variance to other‐rated behavioral variables (e.g., task performance and counterproductive work behavior). Implications and future research directions are discussed, particularly regarding the need to establish a nomological network for other‐rated OCB. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-12-06T10:23:19.916078-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1909
       
  • Reassessing the protean career concept: Empirical findings, conceptual
           components, and measurement
    • Authors: Martin Gubler; John Arnold, Crispin Coombs
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: The protean career concept is a widely acknowledged contemporary career model, but conceptual and empirical analysis of the model is scarce. We provide an integrative literature review of empirical research and note that the research is hampered by inconsistent use of terminology and methodological limitations. First, we show that the two protean metacompetencies—adaptability and identity—have been relatively neglected as the research has evolved. Second, we describe how preexisting protean measures are limited in covering the full range of the concept. Finally, we draw on career theory to suggest four conceptual components as a basis for future model development and offer suggestions for research that tests the utility of the protean career concept in relation to other similar constructs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-11-21T06:15:41.771878-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1908
       
  • Thriving at work: Impact of psychological capital and supervisor support
    • Authors: Ted A. Paterson; Fred Luthans, Wonho Jeung
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Thriving at work is a positive psychological state characterized jointly by learning and vitality. Conventional wisdom and some initial research indicate that such thriving benefits both employees themselves and their organizations. This study specifically tests thriving at work by linking it to a theoretically important personal outcome variable (self‐development), refining its relationship with agentic work behaviors (task focus and heedful relating), and proposing and testing two new antecedent variables (psychological capital and supervisor support climate). Using structural equation modeling on a sample of 198 dyads (employees and their supervisors), strong support was found for the theory‐driven hypothesized relationships. The results contribute to a better understanding of positive organizational scholarship and behavior in general and specifically to the recently emerging positive construct of employees' thriving at work. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-11-14T05:17:34.435573-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1907
       
  • Too much of a good thing: Curvilinear effect of positive affect on
           proactive behaviors
    • Authors: Chak Fu Lam; Gretchen Spreitzer, Charlotte Fritz
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Current organizational theory and research affirm the beneficial effects of experiencing positive affect at work. In recent years, researchers have begun to question the popular notion that the more positive affect at work, the better—that more positive affect is desirable for work‐related outcomes. In this article, we propose a rationale for why more positive affect may not be better for proactive behaviors at work. Findings from two field studies using two unique data sources demonstrate support for our hypothesis, suggesting that intermediate levels of positive affect are most beneficial for proactive behaviors. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-11-06T09:51:52.178362-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1906
       
  • Maturation of work attitudes: Correlated change with big five personality
           traits and reciprocal effects over 15 years
    • Authors: Bart Wille; Joeri Hofmans, Marjolein Feys, Filip De Fruyt
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: As employees grow older, do their attitudes regarding work change over time? Can such long‐term changes be understood from a personality development perspective? The present study addressed these fundamental questions by tracking 504 young professionals' work attitudes (i.e., job satisfaction and work involvement) and Big Five personality traits over the first 15 years of their professional career. We specifically investigated whether trait changes drive peoples' changing attitudes, a mechanism we called maturation of work attitudes. Latent change models first indicated significant associations between traits and attitudes at the beginning of the career, and mean‐level changes in Big Five traits (i.e., increases in Agreeableness and Conscientiousness and decreases in Neuroticism) in the direction of greater functional maturity. Although no significant mean‐level changes in work attitudes were observed, results regarding correlated change indicated that variability in attitude change was related to variability in trait change and that this indeed signaled a maturational process. Finally, reciprocal effect estimates highlighted bidirectional relations between personality and attitudes over time. It is discussed how these results (i) provide a better understanding of potential age effects on work‐related attitudes and (ii) imply a revision of the traditional dispositional approach to attitudes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-11-04T02:59:11.450009-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1905
       
  • Transformational leadership, psychological empowerment, and the moderating
           role of mechanistic–organic contexts
    • Authors: Scott B. Dust; Christian J. Resick, Mary Bardes Mawritz
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: The current study examines the empowering effects of transformational leaders and the extent to which these effects differ across mechanistic–organic organizational contexts. Psychological empowerment is hypothesized to provide a comprehensive motivational mechanism explaining the relationships between transformational leadership and employee job‐related behaviors. In addition, the relationships between transformational leadership, employee psychological empowerment, and job‐related behaviors are hypothesized to be stronger in organizations with more organic as opposed to mechanistic structures. Results based on a cross‐organizational sample of employees and their immediate supervisors provide support for the hypothesized relationships. Psychological empowerment mediated relationships between transformational leadership and employee task performance and organizational citizenship behaviors. The mediating role of psychological empowerment was then found to be conditional upon mechanistic–organic contexts. More specifically, organic structures enhanced, whereas mechanistic structures constrained, the empowering influence of transformational leaders. In highly mechanistic contexts, the indirect effects were no longer statistically significant. Implications for theory, research, and organizational management are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-10-25T09:57:18.649935-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1904
       
  • Adjusting to new work teams: Testing work experience as a multidimensional
           resource for newcomers
    • Authors: Jeremy M. Beus; Steven M. Jarrett, Aaron B. Taylor, Christopher W. Wiese
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: The successful performance adjustment of team newcomers is an increasingly important consideration given the prevalence of job‐changing and the uncertainty associated with starting work in a new team setting. Consequently, using sensemaking and uncertainty reduction theories as a conceptual basis, the present study tested work experience as a potential resource for newcomer performance adjustment in teams. Specifically, we tested work experience as a multidimensional predictor of both initial newcomer performance and the rate of performance change after team entry. We tested hypotheses using longitudinal newcomer performance data in the context of professional basketball teams. Although the traditional quantitative indicators of the length and amount of work experience were not meaningfully associated with newcomer performance adjustment, their interaction was. In addition, the qualitative indicator of newcomers' past transition experience revealed a significant, positive association with the rate of newcomer performance improvement following team entry. These results suggest that work experience is a meaningful facilitator of newcomer adjustment in teams and emphasize the dual consideration of both quantitative and qualitative work experiences. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-10-16T12:07:37.142444-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1903
       
  • Developing a passion for work passion: Future directions on an emerging
           construct
    • Authors: Pamela L. Perrewé; Wayne A. Hochwarter, Gerald R. Ferris, Charn P. McAllister, John N. Harris
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Although the passion that people demonstrate at work would appear to be a topic of considerable interest and importance to organizational scholars and practitioners, we know virtually nothing about it. In response, we introduce the work passion construct, discuss what we currently understand, and provide needed directions for future research. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-10-04T11:04:58.525302-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1902
       
  • The need to consider time, level, and trends: A turnover perspective
    • Authors: Terence R. Mitchell; Tyler C. Burch, Thomas W. Lee
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: We focus on the contributions to research generated by considering attitudes and behaviors as dynamic over time and across different levels. Using turnover research as an example, we demonstrate how a past, present, and future focus, across levels, may enhance both theory and methodology. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-09-18T10:36:02.839919-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1898
       
  • What signals does procedural justice climate convey? The roles of
           group status, and organizational benevolence and integrity
    • Authors: Xiaowan Lin; Kwok Leung
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: We propose and test a theoretical framework to explore why and how procedural justice climate influences individual behaviors after controlling for the influence of individual justice perception. Two types of symbolic information conveyed by procedural justice climate are considered. We argue that procedural justice climate reflects the status of or respect for a justice recipient, a work unit within an organization in our context, which then influences the identification of its members with the work unit. Procedural justice climate also reflects the moral attributes of a justice actor, herein an organization, which then influences organizational identification and perceived job security. Consistent with these arguments, results showed that perceived respect for the work unit mediated the relationship between procedural justice climate and identification with the work unit, and both perceived organizational benevolence and integrity mediated the relationship of procedural justice climate with organizational identification and job security. The two types of social identification and perceived job security were related to several outcome variables differently. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-09-16T10:27:09.469765-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1899
       
  • Learning disability and leadership: Becoming an effective leader
    • Authors: Gil Luria; Yuval Kalish, Miriam Weinstein
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: This study investigates learning disability (LD) as an individual‐differences variable predicting leadership emergence, role occupancy, and effectiveness. We hypothesize that individuals with LD are less likely to occupy leadership roles, and that informal group processes (leadership emergence) will mediate the relationship between LD and leadership role occupancy. We also hypothesized that, among leaders promoted and selected for leadership training, there would be a negative relationship between LD and effective leadership. We first checked for LD in a sample of 1076 soldiers, measuring cognitive ability with a geometric‐analogies test as a control. Some months later, during the soldiers' basic training, we measured leadership emergence. We then identified those who were selected for leadership training, recording, and measuring their effectiveness according to supervisory and peer evaluations. Leadership emergence was found to mediate the negative relationship between LD and leadership role occupancy. There were no significant differences among leaders (n = 308) with and without LD in regard to leadership effectiveness. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-09-10T05:38:13.07886-05:0
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1896
       
  • Do organizations spend wisely on employees? Effects of training and
           development investments on learning and innovation in organizations
    • Authors: Sun Young Sung; Jin Nam Choi
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: The present study examines the effects of training and development on organizational innovation. We specifically suggest that the training and development investments of an organization affect its innovative performance by promoting various learning practices. We empirically tested our hypothesis by using time‐lagged, multi‐source data collected from 260 Korean companies that represent diverse industries. Our analysis showed that corporate expenditure for internal training predicts interpersonal and organizational learning practices, which, in turn, increase innovative performance. The data also revealed that the positive relationship between interpersonal and organizational learning practices and innovative performance is stronger within organizations that have stronger innovative climates. By contrast, investment in employee development through financial support for education outside an organization poses a significant negative effect on its innovative performance and no significant effect on learning practices. The present study provides a plausible explanation for a mechanism through which the investment of an organization in employees enhances its innovative performance. Copyright © 2013 The
      Authors . Journal of Organizational Behavior published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-09-09T10:27:56.3604-05:00
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1897
       
  • The dark side of personality at work
    • Authors: Seth M. Spain; Peter Harms, James M. LeBreton
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Although there has been increasing interest in dark personality traits in the organizational sciences, these characteristics remain relatively understudied and somewhat misunderstood. The present manuscript aims to clarify some of the issues surrounding dark personality traits by discussing the history of dark personality traits, how they relate to normal personality traits, their relative importance as determinants of organizational outcomes, and measurement issues surrounding the assessment of these characteristics. We will then discuss potential future directions for research investigating the causes and consequences of these traits as well as providing guidance on the implementation of dark personality assessment in the workplace for selection and training. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-08-30T07:02:03.524405-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1894
       
  • Identity conflicts at work: An integrative framework
    • Authors: Kate E. Horton; P. Saskia Bayerl, Gabriele Jacobs
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: This review examines workplace identity conflicts, offering three primary contributions. First, it reconciles hitherto fragmented perspectives on identity conflicts to offer an integrative and cross‐level perspective on identity conflicts at work. Second, it elucidates an important distinction between two types of identity conflicts, namely intra‐unit and inter‐unit conflicts, also outlining the different roots, moderators, and reconciliations of these conflict types. Third, it proposes an alternative perspective on identity conflicts as constructive forces for individual and organizational change, also stressing the importance of context and content in shaping identity conflict outcomes. Thus, this paper provides a comprehensive overview of identity conflicts in the workplace, clarifying the current state of the science and offering new directions for future research. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-08-06T08:15:40.306832-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1893
       
  • What does team–member exchange bring to the party? A
           meta‐analytic review of team and leader social exchange
    • Authors: George C. Banks; John H. Batchelor, Anson Seers, Ernest H. O'Boyle, Jeffrey M. Pollack, Kim Gower
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: Both leader–member exchange (LMX) and team–member exchange (TMX) measure the quality of reciprocal exchange among employees in the workplace. Although LMX focuses on supervisor–subordinate relationships while TMX examines the relationships among team members, both have theory‐based and empirically proven relations with workplace outcomes such as job performance, organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and turnover intentions. However, it is not yet known which has more of an impact on such workplace outcomes—specifically, it is not clear if an employee's time is best spent developing vertical relationships among supervisors and subordinates (LMX) or on the horizontal relationships among team members (TMX). Accordingly, this meta‐analysis explores the incremental validity and relative importance of these two social exchange‐based constructs. The theoretical logic underlying LMX and TMX is clarified, and the parameter estimates between LMX, TMX, and work outcomes are reported. Results demonstrate that TMX shows incremental validity above and beyond LMX for some outcomes (organizational commitment and job satisfaction), but not others (job performance and turnover intentions). Also, LMX shows greater relative importance across all four outcomes. In sum, the clarification of the theoretical and empirical landscape lays a foundation for recommendations for future research. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-07-31T07:35:45.694831-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1885
       
  • Examining the influence of climate, supervisor guidance, and behavioral
           
    • Authors: Samantha C. Paustian‐Underdahl; Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben
      Pages: n/a - n/a
      Abstract: In this study, we assess a multilevel approach to work interference with family (WIF) by examining the influence of unit‐level work–family climate, as well as the importance of supervisors' spoken guidance and their behavioral integrity in helping employees process social information about work–family issues. We propose that there are two important ways in which supervisors may influence their subordinates' WIF—through their spoken guidance regarding managing work–family conflict and through their behavioral integrity—employee perceptions of the degree to which supervisors' spoken work–family guidance aligns with their behaviors to help employees manage work and family on the job. Results from a sample of 628 employees of a health system, using path analytic tests of moderated mediation, provide support for the mediated effect of family‐supportive climate on employee work–family conflict (through supervisory work–family guidance) and for a second‐stage moderation in which the effect of guidance on WIF is stronger (weaker) when employees perceive high (low) levels of supervisor work–family behavioral integrity. We discuss the implications of these findings for the study of family‐supportive work environments and work–family conflict. Limitations of this study and directions for future research are also presented. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-07-26T11:54:23.02257-05:0
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1883
       
  • Reviewing JOB's Achievements and Prospects
    • Authors: Neal M. Ashkanasy
      Pages: 1 - 4
      PubDate: 2013-12-13T05:00:06.009704-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1910
       
  • When mentors feel supported: Relationships with mentoring functions and
           protégés' perceived organizational support
    • Authors: Changya Hu; Sheng Wang, Chun‐Chi Yang, Tsung‐yu Wu
      Pages: 22 - 37
      Abstract: We surveyed full‐time employees of ongoing mentoring relationships to investigate relationships among mentors' perceived organizational support (POS), the extent of mentoring functions protégés received, and protégés' POS. Moreover, we examined the moderating role of mentors' altruistic personality in the relationship between mentors' POS and mentoring functions received. Results showed that mentors' POS was positively related to the extent of mentoring protégés reported receiving, which was then related positively to protégés' POS. Furthermore, the extent of mentoring received partially mediated the relationship between mentors' POS and protégés' POS. We also found that mentors' altruistic personality moderated the positive relationship between mentors' POS and the extent of mentoring received such that this relationship was stronger for low altruistic mentors. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-01-10T03:09:20.038354-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1851
       
  • Human capital diversity in the creation of social capital for team
           creativity
    • Authors: Jing Han; Jian Han, Daniel J. Brass
      Pages: 54 - 71
      Abstract: We highlight the social aspects of team creativity by proposing that team creativity is influenced by two types of team social capital: bridging and bonding social capital. Going beyond the structural perspective, we posit that team‐level human capital diversity is one of the potential antecedents of social capital for team creativity. We suggest that network structures are formed by teammates' interactions, which are largely the result of differences in their individual characteristics. The results of an empirical study using 36 teams of MBA students showed that the interaction of team‐bridging social capital with team‐bonding social capital was positively and significantly related to team creativity. Knowledge variety and knowledge disparity had a joint effect on team‐bridging social capital, and knowledge separation was negatively related to team‐bonding social capital. Moreover, team social capital mediated the effects of knowledge diversity on team creativity. Our study has several important implications for team creativity, social networks, and diversity research. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-02-01T06:49:58.262634-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1853
       
  • A longitudinal examination of role overload and work–family
           conflict: The mediating role of interdomain transitions
    • Authors: Russell A. Matthews; Doan E. Winkel, Julie Holliday Wayne
      Pages: 72 - 91
      Abstract: Through the lens of boundary theory, we examine whether the relationship between role overload and work–family conflict is explained by the use of interdomain transitions. With a sample of 250 working adults, we examined whether individuals respond to role overload by engaging in interdomain transitions and how the frequency of these transitions influences work–family conflict both concurrently and over time. Results support our expectation that at a given time, interdomain transitions function as an episodic coping mechanism with short‐term costs (greater work–family conflict) and benefits (less role overload). Also, engaging in interdomain transitions was an explanatory variable linking role overload and work–family conflict. We expected that, over time, engaging in interdomain transitions would function as a preventive coping mechanism, serving to reduce role overload. Interestingly though, several of the longitudinal hypotheses were counter to prediction. Our findings provide further evidence for the use of boundary theory in examinations of the work–family interface. Insights on areas within the literature that require further theoretical development are discussed, along with a consideration of the application of emerging methodologies within our empirical designs. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-01-03T03:46:53.525896-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1855
       
  • The two faces of high self‐monitors: Chameleonic moderating effects
           of self‐monitoring on the relationships between personality traits
           and counterproductive work behaviors
    • Authors: In‐Sue Oh; Steven D. Charlier, Michael K. Mount, Christopher M. Berry
      Pages: 92 - 111
      Abstract: This study examines whether and how self‐monitoring moderates the relationships between two personality traits (agreeableness and conscientiousness) and counterproductive work behavior directed toward the organization (CWB‐O) and toward other employees (CWB‐I). High self‐monitors strive to attain personal goals related to status and prestige enhancement by adjusting their behavior to what the situation requires or allows for. We propose that the status enhancement motive can take on two different yet related forms—impression management (interpersonal potency) and opportunism (win‐at‐all‐costs)—depending on relevant situational cues. We hypothesize that in public, interpersonal settings where their behavior is visible to others, high self‐monitors' desire to enhance their status by looking good to others suppresses the natural expression of low agreeableness via increased engagement in CWB‐I. Conversely, we hypothesize that in private, non‐interpersonal settings where their behavior is rarely visible to others, high self‐monitors' desire to enhance their status by doing whatever it takes to get what they want intensifies the natural expression of low conscientiousness via increased engagement in CWB‐O. On the basis of two independent samples of participants, results of moderated multiple regression analyses provided support for the hypotheses. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-01-22T01:33:16.82819-05:0
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1856
       
  • Examining the effects of feeling trusted by supervisors in the workplace:
           A self‐evaluative perspective
    • Authors: Dora C. Lau; Long W. Lam, Shan S. Wen
      Pages: 112 - 127
      Abstract: Trusting and feeling trusted are related but unique components of a trusting relationship. However, we understand relatively little about the effects of felt trust on work performance and organizational citizenship behavior. From a self‐evaluative perspective, this study argued that when employees perceive that their supervisors trust them, their organization‐based self‐esteem is enhanced, leading them to perform better in the workplace. We tested our hypotheses on a sample of 497 teachers using two trust measures, that is, reliance and disclosure, and found support for them on the basis of the reliance (but not the disclosure) measure. The effect of felt trust especially reliance on the employees' work performances were mediated by their organization‐based self‐esteem. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-04-19T12:27:05.994756-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1861
       
  • Episodic envy and counterproductive work behaviors: Is more justice always
           good?
    • Authors: Abdul Karim Khan; Samina Quratulain, Chris M. Bell
      Pages: 128 - 144
      Abstract: The authors examined how perceived event‐specific procedural and distributive justice about own and envied others' outcomes interacts with episodic envy to predict counterproductive work behaviors. Our results were consistent with the attribution model of justice, finding that episodic envy significantly predicted counterproductive work behaviors aimed at envied others in the workplace and that this relationship was more pronounced when perceptions of procedural, but not distributive, justice about own or envied others' outcomes were high rather than low. We tested a moderated‐mediation model in which self‐attributions for the outcome mediated the effect of episodic envy on counterproductive work behaviors and that the effect of envy was stronger when perceptions of own or others' procedural justice were high rather than low. This research contributes to the literature on envy processes in the workplace and is the first to use a specific emotion, envy, as a proxy for a negative outcome in a demonstration of the attribution model of justice. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2013-04-29T08:47:36.09916-05:0
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1864
       
  • Impact of authentic leadership on performance: Role of followers' positive
           psychological capital and relational processes
    • Authors: Hui Wang; Yang Sui, Fred Luthans, Danni Wang, Yanhong Wu
      Pages: 5 - 21
      Abstract: Authentic leadership has received considerable attention and research support over the past decade. Now the time has come to refine and better understand how it impacts performance. This study investigates the moderating role followers' positive psychological capital (PsyCap) and the mediating role that leader–member exchange (LMX) may play in influencing the relationship between authentic leadership and followers' performance. Specifically, we tested this mediated moderation model with matched data from 794 followers and their immediate leaders. We found that authentic leadership is positively related to LMX and consequently followers' performance, and to a larger degree, among followers who have low rather than high levels of PsyCap. Our discussion highlights the benefits of understanding the roles of relational processes and followers' positive psychological resources involved in the effectiveness of authentic leadership and how they can be practically implemented. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2012-12-14T07:22:26.814474-05:
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1850
       
  • Abusive supervision and feedback avoidance: The mediating role of
           emotional exhaustion
    • Authors: Marilyn V. Whitman; Jonathon R. B. Halbesleben, Oscar Holmes
      Pages: 38 - 53
      Abstract: The occurrence of abusive supervision is steadily rising. Extant literature continues to expand the number of destructive consequences linked to such improper workplace behavior. This study tested a model linking abusive supervision to feedback avoidance through emotional exhaustion. We invoked conservation of resources theory in our examination of the role that the loss of valued resources plays in instances where abuse is perceived. Results from three rounds of matched data from 460 nurses and 220 working adults demonstrated support for our model, suggesting a mediating effect for exhaustion on the relationship between abuse and feedback avoidance. Findings also revealed that feedback avoidance was associated with subsequent exhaustion, representing a loss spiral. These findings are important as they reveal the link between a subordinate's reactions (exhaustion) and coping behavior (feedback avoidance) when supervisory abuse is perceived. Theoretical and practical implications, limitations, and directions for future research are offered. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
      PubDate: 2012-12-27T03:06:39.49269-05:0
      DOI: 10.1002/job.1852
       
 
 
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