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  Subjects -> ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (Total: 766 journals)
    - ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (703 journals)
    - POLLUTION (21 journals)
    - TOXICOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SAFETY (34 journals)
    - WASTE MANAGEMENT (8 journals)

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES (703 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8     

Journal of Economic Development, Environment and People     Open Access  
Journal of Ecosystems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Empirical Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Environment and Earth Science     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Environment and Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Environmental and Public Health     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Environmental Assessment Policy and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Environmental Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Environmental Engineering and Ecological Science     Open Access  
Journal of Environmental Engineering and Landscape Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Environmental Extension     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Environmental Health     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Environmental Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Environmental Management and Tourism     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Planning and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Environmental Policy & Planning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Environmental Professionals Sri Lanka     Open Access  
Journal of Environmental Protection     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part B: Pesticides, Food Contaminants, and Agricultural Wastes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Environmental Science and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Environmental Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Environmental Statistics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences     Partially Free  
Journal of Environmental Sustainability     Open Access  
Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Freshwater Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Great Lakes Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Green Building     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Happiness Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Hazardous Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Health Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Health Organisation and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Housing and the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Industrial Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Intercultural Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Iron and Steel Research, International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Leadership Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Lesbian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Management and Sustainability     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Material Cycles and Waste Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Modern African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Natural and Environmental Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Natural Resources and Development     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Natural Resources Policy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Natural Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Near-Death Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Operational Oceanography     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Organizational Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Policy Analysis and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Popular Music Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Renewable and Sustainable Energy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Research in Forestry, Wildlife and Environment     Open Access  
Journal of Safety Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Safety Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of School Violence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Southern African Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Sustainable Development     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Sustainable Development Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Sustainable Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of the American Planning Association     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Journal of the IEST     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of the North Atlantic     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Theological Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Tropical Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Urban and Environmental Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Vietnamese Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Julius-Kühn-Archiv     Open Access  
Kleio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Knowledge Management Research & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Koedoe : African Protected Area Conservation and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
L1-Educational Studies in Language and Literature     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Lake and Reservoir Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Landscape Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Landscapes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Large Marine Ecosystems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Latin American and Caribbean Ethnic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Latin American Journal of Management for Sustainable Development     Hybrid Journal  
Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Leviathan : A Journal of Melville Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Limnological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Living Reviews in Landscape Research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Low Carbon Economy     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Luna Azul     Open Access  
M+A. Revista Electrónica de Medioambiente     Open Access  
Macquarie Journal of International and Comparative Environmental Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Madagascar Conservation & Development     Open Access  
Management International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Marine Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8     

Noise Notes
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     ISSN (Print) 1475-4738
     Published by Multiscience Homepage  [31 journals]
  • From the Ministries
    • Abstract: From the Ministries
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 57-60

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.13.1.57
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 13
      Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / March 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:47:57 GMT
       
  • An overview of automobile noise and vibration control
    • Abstract: In this paper the current state-of-the-art techniques in automobile noise and vibration control are presented. Automobile designers and manufacturers have to pay attention to the global competition of their products, adherence to legislative regulations and passenger/driver comfort while designing an automobile and its components. Designers can take advantage of efficient numerical modeling techniques so that in before the prototype of the automobile is produced, the design can be tweaked and modified by using computer aided models to optimize the design with a target of achieving low noise and vibration levels in the prototype. Here, examples of some typical cases are provided where optimum levels of noise and vibration level are obtained in the design of automobile components using computer aided engineering techniques
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 43-56

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.13.1.43

      Authors
      A. R. Mohanty, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
      S. Fatima, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 13
      Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / March 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:47:57 GMT
       
  • Subjective and objective evaluation of impact noise sources in wooden
           buildings
    • Abstract: Multi-storey timber buildings up to 6 and more floors are increasingly built in many European countries. The challenge with these buildings can be that with traditional intermediate floor constructions in timber it can be difficult to fulfill the standard requirements and even when they are met, low frequency transmission can still cause complaints. Additionally it is difficult to develop appropriate light weight floor constructions since it is well known that the correlation between the standardized evaluation methods using the tapping machine and the human perception of impact noise can be poor, especially in buildings with light weight structures. In the AcuWood project, measurements and recordings on different intermediate timber floor constructions in the laboratory and the field were performed covering a wide range of modern intermediate timber floor constructions. Additionally, one intermediate concrete floor with different floor coverings was included in the study. Besides the standardized tapping machine, the modified tapping machine and the Japanese rubber ball and "real" sources were employed. Subjective ratings from listening tests were correlated to many technical single number descriptors including the standardized descriptors and non-standardized proposals. It was found that the Japanese rubber ball represents walking noise in its characteristics and spectrum best, taking into account the practical requirement of a strong enough excitation for building measurements. The standardized tapping machine, with an appropriate single number descriptor, L'nT,w + C1,50-2500 or slightly better, L'nT,w Hagberg 03, leads also to an acceptably high determination coefficient between the descriptor and the subjective ratings. Additionally, the study delivered data, from which proposals for requirements for the suggested single number ratings are deduced, based on the subjective ratings.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 25-42

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.13.1.25

      Authors
      Moritz Späh, Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
      Klas Hagberg, SP Wood Technology and Engineering Acoustics, Lund University, Box 857, 501 15 Boras, Sweden
      Olin Bartlomé, Lignum, Holzwirtschaft Schweiz, Mühlebachstrasse 8, 8008 Zürich, Switzerland
      Lutz Weber, Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
      Philip Leistner, Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
      Andreas Liebl, Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Nobelstrasse 12, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 13
      Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / March 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:47:56 GMT
       
  • Using a high resolution motion capture system to determine 6-DOF
           whole-body vibration accelerations
    • Abstract: Comprehensive investigations of the human response to vibration require many markers, accelerometers, and electrodes. The use of multiple measurement systems can result in time intensive subject preparation, large memory requirements for data storage and processing, skin motion artifacts, and subject encumbrance. The purpose of this study was to determine if a VICON™ motion capture system could reliably and accurately measure translational and rotational acceleration levels produced by mobile machines, thereby eliminating the need for accelerometers and potentially minimizing the aforementioned problems. Simulating these vibration exposures in a laboratory, it was found that translational displacements ≥0.1 mm produced absolute peak and RMS average acceleration measurement differences less than 5% between the VICON™ system and an accelerometer. The absolute peak and RMS rotational accelerations determined by the VICON™ system and those produced by a PRSCO™ hexapodrobot differed by 5.44 ± 3.87% and 3.57 ± 2.44% respectively. Accounting for the vibration attenuation of the human body, the VICON™ system also appears well suited for determining 6-DOF acceleration levels in laboratory seat-to-head vibration transmission studies.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 13-24

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.13.1.13

      Authors
      Robert J. Jack, School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, P3E 2C6
      Michele Oliver, School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada, N1G 2W1
      Gordon Hayward, School of Human Kinetics, Laurentian University, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, P3E 2C6
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 13
      Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / March 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:47:55 GMT
       
  • The influence of refraction on wind turbine noise
    • Abstract: A semi-empirical method is employed to calculate the time-average sound level of the wind turbine noise generation and propagation. Both are affected by refraction due to wind speed gradient. Under upwind conditions the partially ensonified zone separates the fully ensonified zone (close to the turbine) and the shadow zone (far away from the turbine). Refraction is described in terms of the wind speed linear profile fitted to the power law profile. The rotating blades are treated as a two-dimensional circular source in the vertical plane. Inside the partially ensonified zone the effective A-weighted sound power decreases when the receiver moves from the turbine toward the shadow zone. It is assumed that no sound energy is diffracted and scattered into the shadow zone.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 3-12

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.13.1.3

      Authors
      Rufin Makarewicz, Institute of Acoustics A. Mickiewicz University, 61-614 Poznan, Umultowska 85, Poland
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 13
      Journal Issue Volume 13, Number 1 / March 2014
      PubDate: Mon, 14 Jul 2014 16:47:54 GMT
       
  • From the Ministries
    • Abstract: From the Ministries
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 61-64

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.4.61
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 4 / December 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 06 May 2014 16:43:07 GMT
       
  • An electro-acoustic implementation of Tibetan bowls: Acoustics and
           perception
    • Abstract: Tibetan singing bowls are employed worldwide for meditation, music, relaxation, personal wellbeing, and religious practices. Each Tibetan bowl can produce a limited number of sounds, defined by the size and material of the bowl, and the actuator device used. Usually, there is a need for a second person to actuate the bowl. Addressing these limitations, we built an electronic device, named eBowl, which can mimic the acoustics of Tibetan bowls, and beyond that, can produce a wide range of other sounds. Furthermore, it can be used for relaxation and sound massage without the need for a second person. The eBowl generates auditory beats that are in EEG alpha frequency range, which can cause brainwave entrainment and lead to relaxation. User tests measuring physiological parameters revealed the eBowl's effectiveness for relaxation, showing that eBowl influences skin conductance, heart rate, and respiration rate and induces relaxation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 47-60

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.4.47

      Authors
      Ronald M. Aarts, Smart Sensing and Analysis Group, Philips Research, Eindhoven, 5656 AE, The Netherlands
      Okke Ouweltjes, Smart Sensing and Analysis Group, Philips Research, Eindhoven, 5656 AE, The Netherlands
      Murtaza Bulut, Smart Sensing and Analysis Group, Philips Research, Eindhoven, 5656 AE, The Netherlands
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 4 / December 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 06 May 2014 16:43:06 GMT
       
  • Broadband airfoil trailing-edge noise prediction from measured surface
           pressures and spanwise length scales
    • Abstract: In this paper an effective approach to estimate airfoil Turbulent Boundary-Layer Trailing-Edge (TBL-TE) far-field noise from measured surface pressure fluctuations (SPF) is evaluated. Measurements of both SPF and TE noise were performed on a NACA 0012 airfoil of 0.4 m chord at Reynolds numbers of 1.0-1.9 millions for various angles of attack. A non-homogeneously spaced array of five Kulite-sensors near the TE at x/c = 0.989 is employed to measure point spectra and spanwise two-point correlations of surface pressure fluctuations. Finally spanwise SPF length-scales are derived as function of frequency. Comparisons to measured TE noise and semi-empirical predictions of surface pressures and far-field noise show very good agreement. It is found, that the proposed method can cover a larger frequency range than standard acoustic measurement techniques. Therefore it can provide valuable assistance in extending spectra obtained conventionally, mainly to low frequencies. Furthermore, pressure and suction side contributions to far-field noise can be obtained separately.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 13-36

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.4.13

      Authors
      Andreas Herrig, Universität Stuttgart Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG), Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70550 Stuttgart, Germany
      M. Kamruzzaman, Universität Stuttgart Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG), Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70550 Stuttgart, Germany
      W. Würz, Universität Stuttgart Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG), Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70550 Stuttgart, Germany
      S. Wagner, Universität Stuttgart Institute of Aerodynamics and Gas Dynamics (IAG), Pfaffenwaldring 21, 70550 Stuttgart, Germany
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 4 / December 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 06 May 2014 16:43:02 GMT
       
  • Vibratory sensation induced by low-frequency noise: The threshold for
           "vibration perceived in the head" in normal-hearing subjects
    • Abstract: Our previous study, in which we measured the threshold levels for vibratory sensation induced by low-frequency noise under the condition that the subjects were allowed to perceive vibration in any part of the body, showed that the head was very sensitive to the vibratory sensation. In the present study, in which the head was designated as the body part that would perceive the vibration, we measured the threshold levels for experiencing "vibration perceived in the head" within the 16- to 80-Hz frequency range. The threshold levels for "vibration perceived in the head" were found to be very similar to the threshold levels measured in our previous study, which indicated the superior sensitivity of the head to vibratory sensation induced by low-frequency noise. A gap appeared around 40-50 Hz in the threshold level contour for "vibration perceived in the head". In addition, the threshold levels for "vibration perceived in the head" increased when a subject wore an active noise cancelling earmuff. These results suggested the possibility that experiencing "vibration perceived in the head" was related to the pressure change in the ear.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 37-46

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.4.37

      Authors
      Yukio Takahashi, Human Engineering and Risk Management Research Group, National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan. 6-21-1 Nagao, Tama-ku, Kawasaki 214-8585, Japan
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 4 / December 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 06 May 2014 16:43:02 GMT
       
  • The Interrelationship Between Room Acoustics Parameters as Measured in
           University Classrooms Using Four Source Configurations
    • Abstract: This paper investigates the interrelation of room acoustics parameters as measured in lecture theatres/classrooms using four sound source configurations. Ten typical rooms were selected as representative of university premises and measured to ISO 3382 standards. The study focuses initially on the type of sound source used, to establish the suitability of multi source based measurements in assessing the acoustics of classrooms. Acoustic performance is then discussed in the context of the relationship between room acoustics parameters with and without significant background noise, with a particular focus on speech intelligibility. To facilitate a more efficient discernment of results, EDT, T30, Clarity indices and MTI were considered, as they are commonly included in general room acoustics assessments. Either of the source configurations was found to be suitable for performing general purpose measurements in (small) rooms. Clarity and EDT were found to be linearly related to the modulation transfer index in noiseless conditions, in line with earlier findings, thus an excellent predictor of STI. Background noise could be ascertained as of primary importance in the case of a non linear relation.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 3-12

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.4.3

      Authors
      Christos Nestoras, The Acoustics Group, FESBE, Department of Urban Engineering, London South Bank University, Borough Road, London SE1 0AA, UK
      Stephen Dance, The Acoustics Group, FESBE, Department of Urban Engineering, London South Bank University, Borough Road, London SE1 0AA, UK
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 4 / December 2013
      PubDate: Tue, 06 May 2014 16:42:58 GMT
       
  • Elastic Layers to Reduce Sound Transmission in Lightweight Buildings
    • Abstract: To obtain satisfactory sound insulation is a challenging task when designing lightweight buildings. Poor performance at low frequencies as well as severe flanking transmission has traditionally often been more pronounced compared to heavier constructions. In the present case-study based paper, various aspects of using elastic layers to improve sound insulation in lightweight buildings are considered. The effect on impact and airborne sound insulation by using two different kinds of vibration insulators between floor plans was examined together with the effect of using glues of various degree of elasticity in the construction. In situ measurements were performed inside a four-storey wooden frame based residential building and statistically significant variations in sound insulation were found. The efficiency of the two vibration insulators was further evaluated by vibration reduction measurements over the junctions. The difference in vibration reduction was found to be nearly constant in the frequency range 50-1000 Hz while the improvement of impact sound insulation increased by frequency. A long term test of elastic glues was also conducted, during three years, for stability over time. The best glues preserved a significantly higher damping ratio over time compared to the main part of the glues.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 3-18

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.3.3

      Authors
      Fredrik Ljunggren, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå, Sweden
      Anders Ågren, Luleå University of Technology, 97187 Luleå, Sweden
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / September 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Feb 2014 11:34:37 GMT
       
  • A novel signal processing technique for separating tonal and broadband
           noise components from counter-rotating open-rotor acoustic data
    • Abstract: Renewed interest in counter-rotating open-rotor technology for aircraft propulsion application has prompted the development of advanced diagnostic tools to enable improved design and improved acoustical performance of open rotors. In particular, the determination of tonal and broadband components of open-rotor noise spectra is essential for properly assessing the noise control parameters and for validating noise prediction codes. Techniques that have been successfully used for processing acoustic data from single rotors (fans, propellers, etc.) do not work well for counter-rotating open-rotor systems in that the tonal and broadband noise components cannot be separated from raw acoustic data properly, particularly when the two rotors are driven independently without synchronization. The need for a new signal processing tool for counter-rotating open rotors was thus envisioned and is presented in this work. The new technique has been verified to perform well against simulated data as well as real acoustic data available from scale-model open-rotor tests at NASA-Glenn Research Center. Based on the results, the applicability and limitations of the technique are discussed in the paper.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 19-36

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.3.19

      Authors
      Dave Sree, Mechanical Engineering Department, Tuskegee University, Tuskegee, AL 36088, USA
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / September 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Feb 2014 11:34:37 GMT
       
  • The impact of external environments and wheel-rail friction on noise
           inside a train car
    • Abstract: Trains travel through various environments typically on tracks above ground or in tunnels. When trains pass through different environments, the perceived noise inside a train car can change. For example, there are three main types of noise caused by wheel-rail interaction, namely, rolling, impact, and curve squeal. Each type can be perceived differently. To consider appropriate remedial measures, the effects of the external environment and wheel-rail interaction on noise inside train cars were investigated. Spectral analysis of noise from inside a train car traveling through tunnels featured a noticeable sound frequency around 250 Hz. More reflections enter train cars from tunnels with circular cross-section, namely those constructed by a boring machine. Impact noise had larger components at lower frequencies. Curve squeal noise had larger components at frequencies between 125 and 500 Hz.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 49-66

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.3.49

      Authors
      Yoshiharu Soeta, Health Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka, 563-8577, Japan
      Ryota Shimokura, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery Nara Medical University, Shijo-cyo, Kashihara, Nara, 634-8522, Japan
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / September 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Feb 2014 11:34:37 GMT
       
  • From the Ministries
    • Abstract: From the Ministries
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 67-72

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.3.67
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / September 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Feb 2014 11:34:37 GMT
       
  • Case Studies of Field Measurements of Low Frequency Sound and Complaints
           by a Non Profit Organization for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low
           Frequency Noise Complainants in Japan
    • Abstract: The number of noise complaints of Japan is around 15,000 a year and there are about 200 complaints of low frequency noise. In our NPO (Non Profit Organization), the specialists as volunteers on noise, vibration and low frequency noise take counsel with the complaints and measure the low frequency noise. It is difficult to measure the noise in the night by local government, and in such cases we measure the noise in the night for a long-time in complainant's house. However, sometimes we cannot find the appropriate level of low frequency noise, though the complainant appeals for the serious damage by low frequency noise. Therefore we measured the complaint's reaction at the same time with low frequency noise in the complainant's house. We analyzed the correlation between the complaint's reaction and measured low frequency noise. In many cases, we cannot find out the correlation between the measured low frequency noise and complainant's reaction.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 37-48

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.3.37

      Authors
      Shinji Yamada, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Yukio Inukai, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Kimiaki Takagi, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Tsutae Sebayashi, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Shota Koyama, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Yukiko Tanaka, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Yuji Horie, NPO for Supporting Noise, Vibration and Low Frequency Noise Complainants, 1-9-3 Shiobe, Kofu, Yamanashi, 400-0026 Japan
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 3 / September 2013
      PubDate: Thu, 06 Feb 2014 11:34:37 GMT
       
  • Prediction of jet noise for realistic flow problems using large eddy
           simulation
    • Abstract: A systematic procedure is described to predict the noise emissions from realistic aero-propulsive jets. Large Eddy Simulation (LES) is used to compute the jet flowfield and coupled with the Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings (FW-H) equation for far-field noise predictions. A low-dissipation fifth-order upwind biased finite-volume reconstruction procedure is used along with selective fourth order inviscid flux blending. Higher order explicit time integrators are used for enhanced wave propagation. Also, non-contiguous block interfacing is employed to eliminate the traditional limitations of structured grid topologies for complex geometries. For simple jet configurations the LES/FW-H method is validated with University of Mississippi's National Center for Physical Acoustics (NCPA) experimental measurements. Four unique and more realistic applications are then shown. The first is a hot faceted jet with lobed corrugations, followed by an over-expanded military gas turbine engine exhaust with and without chevrons. Then a twin jet impinging on a jet blast deflector is shown, and lastly are two high aspect-ratio nozzles, one with and one without a bevel. The LES/FW-H methodology is shown to produce reasonable agreement with experimental measurements at modest grid resolutions. Details are discussed about the selected example problems highlighting the challenges associated with applying the tools to realistic geometries and jet configurations.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 27-54

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.2.27

      Authors
      Neeraj Sinha, Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc., Pipersville, PA 18947 USA
      James P. Erwin, Combustion Research and Flow Technology, Inc., Pipersville, PA 18947 USA
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / June 2013
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 15:35:52 GMT
       
  • A Comparison of Measurement Standard Methods for the Sound Insulation of
           Building Façades
    • Abstract: This paper focuses on the limits of measurement of the sound insulation of building façades at low frequencies. Three standard methods are compared mainly for the position of the equipment. In particular, the positions proposed by the international standard ISO 140-5 and the national standards ASTM E 966 (USA) and JIS A 1430 (Japan) are considered. The limits of measurement of the sound pressure level in front of the façade are investigated. Different placements of the external source and receiver are considered. Moreover, different placements of the receiver inside small rooms are compared by focusing on corner vs. center room positions. The uncertainties of room averaged sound pressure levels measured according to different standards are discussed. The problems of measurement of the reverberation time in small rooms and of sound insulation in irregular shaped rooms are introduced because these measurements present several critical challenges. Finally, suggestions to improve the future version of the ISO 140-5 are reported.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 55-68

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.2.55

      Authors
      Umberto Berardi, Politecnico di Bari, via Orabona 4, Bari, I-70125, Italy
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / June 2013
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 15:35:52 GMT
       
  • From the Ministries
    • Abstract: From the Ministries
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 69-72

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.2.69
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / June 2013
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 15:35:52 GMT
       
  • Ground vibration induced by high-speed trains on bridge structures
    • Abstract: Ground vibration induced by high-speed trains can reach levels that cause annoyance to humans and interruption of sensitive instrumentation. To address this issue, the characteristics of ground vibration induced by Taiwan high-speed rail on bridge structures are evaluated using a wide range of field-measured data. The measurements for analysis consist of various foundation types, geological conditions, and train speeds. Both near-field vibration (25 m from track center) and far-field vibration propagation are evaluated. Specific influence factors for ground vibration assessment are also presented.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 3-14

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.2.3

      Authors
      Yit-Jin Chen, Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan
      Ting-Jui Chiu, Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan
      Kuo-Yen Chen, Department of Civil Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / June 2013
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 15:35:52 GMT
       
  • Helping sufferers to cope with noise using distance learning cognitive
           behaviour therapy
    • Abstract: Unresolved noise complaints cause considerable distress to sufferers, and a deterioration in quality of life as a consequence of failure to cope with the noise stress. The environmental noise control structure is directed towards higher frequency noises, which can be assessed by use of A-weighted measurements and this results in some low frequency noise problems receiving an inadequate evaluation. A number of countries now have limits for low frequency noise, but these are not yet well known or widely used. (Leventhall, 2009). Is there a solution to the problem of what can be done to help the small number of people who are adversely affected by perception of a low frequency noise, which it has not been possible to control? This paper describes how Cognitive Behaviour Therapy can be a solution.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Category Research Article
      Pages 15-26

      DOI 10.1260/1475-4738.12.2.15

      Authors
      Geoff Leventhall, Noise and Vibration Consultant
      Donald Robertson, CBT Practitioner
      Steve Benton, Westminster University
      Lyn Leventhall, E-Learning Consultant
      Journal Noise Notes
      Print ISSN 1475-4738
      Journal Volume Volume 12
      Journal Issue Volume 12, Number 2 / June 2013
      PubDate: Fri, 12 Jul 2013 15:35:51 GMT
       
 
 
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