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  Subjects -> ENGINEERING (Total: 2358 journals)
    - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (201 journals)
    - CIVIL ENGINEERING (192 journals)
    - ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (107 journals)
    - ENGINEERING (1240 journals)
    - ENGINEERING MECHANICS AND MATERIALS (394 journals)
    - HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING (56 journals)
    - INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (72 journals)
    - MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (96 journals)

ENGINEERING (1240 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 1205 Journals sorted alphabetically
3 Biotech     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
AAPG Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aceh International Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS Nano     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 266)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Acta Polytechnica : Journal of Advanced Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Scientiarum. Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitatis Cibiniensis. Technical Series     Open Access  
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Adıyaman Üniversitesi Mühendislik Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Engineering Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advanced Science Focus     Free   (Followers: 5)
Advanced Science Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advanced Science, Engineering and Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Advances in Calculus of Variations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Complex Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Geosciences (ADGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Science and Research (ASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AIChE Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Ain Shams Engineering Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Akademik Platform Mühendislik ve Fen Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alexandria Engineering Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AMB Express     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Engineering Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Analele Universitatii Ovidius Constanta - Seria Chimie     Open Access  
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Pure and Applied Logic     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Antarctic Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applicable Analysis: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Catalysis A: General     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Applied Catalysis B: Environmental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Clay Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Nanoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Applied Network Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Applied Numerical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Arabian Journal for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Foundry Engineering     Open Access  
Archives of Thermodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ASEE Prism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Asian Engineering Review     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Applied Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Control     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Journal of Current Engineering & Maths     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Technology Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
at - Automatisierungstechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ATZagenda     Hybrid Journal  
ATZextra worldwide     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Physical & Engineering Sciences in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Avances en Ciencias e Ingeniería     Open Access  
Balkan Region Conference on Engineering and Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research     Open Access  
Basin Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Batteries     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bell Labs Technical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Beni-Suef University Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bhakti Persada : Jurnal Aplikasi IPTEKS     Open Access  
Bharatiya Vaigyanik evam Audyogik Anusandhan Patrika (BVAAP)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biofuels Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biointerphases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Engineering Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Biomedical Engineering: Applications, Basis and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biomedical Microdevices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Biomedical Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedizinische Technik - Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Biomicrofluidics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BioNanoMaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Boletin Cientifico Tecnico INIMET     Open Access  
Botswana Journal of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Boundary Value Problems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Bulletin of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory     Hybrid Journal  
Cahiers, Droit, Sciences et Technologies     Open Access  
Calphad     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Geotechnical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Case Studies in Engineering Failure Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Case Studies in Thermal Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Catalysis Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Catalysis Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Catalysis Reviews: Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Catalysis Science and Technology     Free   (Followers: 8)
Catalysis Surveys from Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Catalysis Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
CEAS Space Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Central European Journal of Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
CFD Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chaos : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Chaos, Solitons & Fractals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Journal of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Science Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Ingenieria Neogranadina     Open Access  
Ciencia en su PC     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Holguin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CienciaUAT     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cientifica     Open Access  
CIRP Annals - Manufacturing Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
CIRP Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clay Minerals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clean Air Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Coal Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Coastal Engineering Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Coatings     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cognitive Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Color Research & Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
COMBINATORICA     Hybrid Journal  
Combustion Theory and Modelling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Combustion, Explosion, and Shock Waves     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Communications Engineer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Composite Interfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Composite Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 274)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 211)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 249)
Composites Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 184)
Comptes Rendus Mécanique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Computation     Open Access  
Computational Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Computational Optimization and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Computer Applications in Engineering Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Computer Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Computers & Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Computers & Mathematics with Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Computers and Electronics in Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Computers and Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Computing and Visualization in Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Computing in Science & Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Conciencia Tecnologica     Open Access  
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Control and Dynamic Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Control Engineering Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Control Theory and Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Corrosion Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Journal Cover Canadian Geotechnical Journal
  [SJR: 2.093]   [H-I: 75]   [31 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0008-3674 - ISSN (Online) 1208-6010
   Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Discussion of “Rock quality designation (RQD): time to rest in
           peace”
    • Authors: Demetrious C. Koutsoftas
      Pages: 584 - 592
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 584-592, April 2018.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2018-02-22T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0497
       
  • Reply to the discussion by Koutsoftas on “Rock quality designation
           (RQD): time to rest in peace”
    • Authors: P.J. Pells, S.E. Pells
      Pages: 593 - 593
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 593-593, April 2018.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2018-02-22T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0550
       
  • Discussion of “Framework to assess Newmark-type simplified methods for
           evaluation of earthquake-induced deformation of embankments”
    • Authors: Ashok K. Chugh
      Pages: 594 - 602
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 594-602, April 2018.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0433
       
  • Reply to the discussion by Chugh on “Framework to assess Newmark-type
           simplified methods for evaluation of earthquake-induced deformation of
           embankments”
    • Authors: Mojtaba E. Kan, Mahdi Taiebat
      Pages: 603 - 606
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 603-606, April 2018.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0593
       
  • Corrigendum: Framework to assess Newmark-type simplified methods for
           evaluation of earthquake-induced deformation of embankments
    • Authors: Mojtaba E. Kan, Hossein A. Taiebat, Mahdi Taiebat
      Pages: 607 - 607
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 607-607, April 2018.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2018-02-15T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2018-0068
       
  • Influence of water and lubricant fluids on peak strength of Queenston
           shale from southern Ontario
    • Authors: Hayder Mohammed Salim Al-Maamori, Mohamed Hesham El Naggar, Silvana Micic, K.Y. Lo
      Pages: 455 - 476
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 455-476, April 2018.
      The strength of Milton Queenston shale (MQS) before and after soaking in water and lubricant fluids (LFs) was examined. The investigated LFs (i.e., bentonite and polymer solutions) are utilized in the microtunnelling technique (MTT) to facilitate the installation of tunnel or pipe sections. To investigate the relevant mechanical properties of MQS under different wetting conditions, a series of laboratory tests including Brazilian split, uniaxial compression, and triaxial compression were carried out. These tests were performed on vertically and horizontally cored specimens with respect to the rock bedding. Fresh specimens (i.e., intact) and specimens soaked for 100 days in LFs and in water were examined. The 100 day period was selected, as it may reasonably represent the construction period where some swelling of the Queenston shale can occur. It was revealed that the strength of MQS substantially decreased after soaking. With greater impact in the vertical direction, both water and bentonite solution caused similar decrease in MQS strength of 23%–70%, while polymer solution caused a smaller decrease of 10%–57%. Accordingly, strength envelopes of MQS were established for vertical and horizontal directions before and after soaking.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-21T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0238
       
  • Failure potential of infinite slopes in bonded soils with tensile strength
           cut-off
    • Authors: Radoslaw L. Michalowski
      Pages: 477 - 485
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 477-485, April 2018.
      Infinite slope analyses are used in practice to assess the safety of slopes against shallow slides, with much of the soil mass moving parallel to a plane failure surface. Stability calculations typically involve the Mohr–Coulomb yield function, but the limitation on tensile strength is discussed and applied in stability considerations for bonded soils. Once the strength envelope is truncated in the tensile regime, the envelope becomes nonlinear and the normality flow rule admits deformation with large volumetric strains. For gentle slopes and in the absence of seepage, the difference in factors of safety calculated with and without tensile strength cut-off is small. However, in the presence of seepage and with increasing inclination of slopes, the difference becomes significant. As the deformation regime moves into the nonlinear portion of the yield envelope, application of the traditional definition of the factor of safety is not straightforward. If the strength envelope is truncated with a circular arc, then the envelope reduced by the factor of safety assumes an elliptical shape. The novelty in this paper is in presenting an analysis for bonded geomaterials with tensile strength cut-off, and indicating that tension cut-off can have a significant impact on the outcome of stability analysis for steep slopes subjected to seepage.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-24T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0041
       
  • Durability, strength, and stiffness of compacted gold tailings –
           cement mixes
    • Authors: Nilo Cesar Consoli, Anderson Peccin da Silva, Helena Paula Nierwinski, Jonatas Sosnoski
      Pages: 486 - 494
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 486-494, April 2018.
      Compaction and Portland cement addition are amongst promising ground improvement procedures for enhancing the mechanical properties of gold tailings. The present investigation intends to compute the impact of Portland cement content and dry density on the properties (durability, stiffness, and strength) of compacted gold tailings – cement mixes. Its main significant addition to knowledge is the quantification of accumulated loss of mass (ALM) after wetting–drying cycles, shear modulus at small strains, and unconfined compressive strength (qu) as a function of the porosity/cement index. In addition, the existence of an exclusive relation connecting ALM divided by the number of wetting–drying cycles and porosity/cement index is revealed empirically. This broadens the applicability of such an index by demonstrating that it controls not only mechanical but also endurance performance of compacted gold tailings – Portland cement mixes.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-21T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0391
       
  • A rigorous method for three-dimensional asymmetrical slope stability
           analysis
    • Authors: Qinghui Jiang, Chuangbing Zhou
      Pages: 495 - 513
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 495-513, April 2018.
      Most slope failures exhibit remarkable asymmetrical variation in the transverse direction. A rigorous method satisfying all six equilibrium conditions is proposed for evaluating three-dimensional (3-D) asymmetrical slope stability. As there is no need to predefine a symmetrical plane in this analysis, the method is applicable to slopes with complex geometries, geologies, and loading conditions. The proposed method can not only calculate the factor of safety, but also predict the direction of sliding of the potential failure mass. Global equilibrium equations are formulated in light of the safety factor, sliding direction, and an assumed distribution of normal stress on the slip surface. The Newton method is then used to solve these equations, which has been proven to enjoy both a large range of convergence and a fast convergence rate. Thereafter, physical admissibility conditions of the solutions, and the effects of the size of discretized columns on solution accuracy, are discussed in the present 3-D analysis. The method is validated by using five typical examples documented in the literature. The failure of the Kettleman, California, waste landfill slope is also re-evaluated using the proposed method. The calculated stability and direction of sliding match field observations.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0317
       
  • Determination of permeability of overconsolidated clay from pressuremeter
           pressure hold tests
    • Authors: Lang Liu, David Elwood, Derek Martin, Rick Chalaturnyk
      Pages: 514 - 527
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 514-527, April 2018.
      A method was developed to interpret the horizontal permeability (kh) from pressuremeter pressure hold tests (PHTs) of approximately 3 min duration. The method relies on a regression analysis of the numerical analysis simulating the consolidation of clay under a constant pressure boundary during undrained expansion. The method was applied to a series of PHTs performed in deep clay formations in the Seattle area. The interpreted permeabilities are thought to be more representative of in situ conditions than those determined by laboratory testing by virtue of reduced disturbance during sample recovery and preparation. Results could be improved with a further exclusion of the creep effect on PHTs.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0279
       
  • Sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP)-amended calcium bentonite for slurry
           trench cutoff walls: workability and microstructure characteristics
    • Authors: Yu-Ling Yang, Krishna R. Reddy, Yan-Jun Du, Ri-Dong Fan
      Pages: 528 - 537
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 528-537, April 2018.
      This study aims to investigate workability and microstructural characteristics of sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP)-treated calcium bentonite (Ca-bentonite) as a potential material for soil–bentonite slurry trench cutoff walls. First, a series of Marsh viscosity, filtrate loss, density, and pH experiments are performed on bentonite – tap water slurries containing Ca-bentonite amended with 0%–8% SHMP dosages. Subsequently, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and zeta potential tests are conducted to explore microstructural characteristics that control the mechanisms of SHMP treatment. The results indicate that the workability of the slurry is significantly improved with SHMP addition. The SEM, XRD, and zeta potential analyses show that SHMP-amended Ca-bentonite possesses a more dispersed structure and higher negative zeta potential relative to the unamended Ca-bentonite. The mechanisms of SHMP amendment are identified to be exchange of bivalent calcium cations in Ca-bentonite by monovalent sodium cations in the SHMP, sorption of the SHMP anions that give the clay system a steric stabilization and increased negative surface charge density, and sequestration of the bivalent calcium cations on the Ca-bentonite. Overall, the SHMP treatment is effective in making the Ca-bentonite slurry amenable for use in the soil–bentonite slurry trench wall construction.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-05T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0291
       
  • Use of pore pressure build-up as damage metric in computation of
           equivalent number of uniform strain cycles
    • Authors: Marwan Khashila, Mahmoud N. Hussien, Mourad Karray, Mohamed Chekired
      Pages: 538 - 550
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 538-550, April 2018.
      The build-up of earthquake-induced excess pore-water pressure may be viewed as analogous to the cumulative damage of saturated granular materials caused by cyclic loading, and consequently as a damage metric when converting an irregular earthquake loading to an equivalent number of uniform cycles, Neq. In this paper, a comprehensive series of strain-controlled tests have been conducted using the new combined triaxial simple shear (TxSS) apparatus developed at Institute de Recherche d’Hydro-Quebec (IREQ) in collaboration with the geotechnical group at the Université de Sherbrooke to verify the hypothesis of adopting the pore-water pressure ratio, Ru, as a damage metric when converting earthquakes to an equivalently damaging number of uniform strain cycles. Different reconstituted saturated samples of Baie-Saint-Paul, Carignon, and Quebec sands have been tested under undrained conditions up to liquefaction. The experimental results from this study have been utilized to develop an empirical expression to compute Neqγ from both the number of cycles required to trigger liquefaction, Nliq, and the material parameter, r. The parameter r had been experimentally calibrated a priori from a separate set of tests using uniform strain cycles following the theoretical framework outlined by Green and Lee in 2006. The present results reveal that the measured pore-water pressure ratio, Ru, is in agreement with predicted cumulative damage using the Richart and Newmark (R–N) hypothesis. However, the Palmgren–Miner (P–M) hypothesis underestimates the cumulative damage (i.e., the generated pore-water pressure) during cyclic loading.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-23T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0231
       
  • Response of suction caissons for tidal current turbine applications in
           soft clay to monotonic and cyclic vertical loading
    • Authors: Jeff F. Wallace, Cassandra J. Rutherford
      Pages: 551 - 562
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 551-562, April 2018.
      In soft marine clays, suction caissons provide a foundation system for tidal current turbines that further promote the sustainable nature of the system by allowing for their removal at the end of the structure’s design life. When configured as a multipod, the moment loads resulting from the horizontal flow of water will be transferred to the suction caissons as compression–uplift loads on opposing foundation legs. The behavior of a suction caisson in soft clay was investigated at aspect ratios of 1 and 2 under monotonic and cyclic vertical loading applicable to multipod-supported tidal current turbine design. Installation and solely monotonic vertical load tests indicated lower back-calculated adhesion factor, α, values and higher back-calculated bearing capacity factor, Nc, values than design standards recommend. The capacity and stiffness response of the foundation after undergoing cyclic loading was found to be largely dependent on the magnitude of displacement the foundation underwent during cyclic loading. Additionally, a threshold of elastic foundation response was observed during cyclic loading defined by a cyclic displacement amplitude. These results indicate serviceability constraints will be critical in the design of suction caisson foundations for tidal current turbine applications.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-09T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0133
       
  • Test fill brought to failure on soft plastic marine clay at Onsøy,
           Norway
    • Authors: Toralv Berre
      Pages: 563 - 576
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 563-576, April 2018.
      A test fill at Onsøy, close to the town of Fredrikstad in Norway, was built on a very soft marine clay with in situ vane strength as low as 11 kPa and a plasticity index varying from 34 to 50. The dimensions at the bottom of the long test fill were 20 m × 60 m with a height of 2.3 m. The fill, as placed in the first stage, had a computed factor of safety against foundation failure of 1.35 based on in situ vane strength. The fill was allowed to sit for about 3 years (from 1972 to 1975) before it was, in a second stage, brought to failure in about 4.3 days by raising the height. This second stage is the subject of this paper. Back-calculation of the failure by undrained stability analysis based on in situ vane tests performed shortly before the start of the second stage, based on undrained triaxial and constant volume direct simple shear tests on specimens from tube samples taken shortly before the start of the second stage and reconsolidated to the in situ effective stresses, gave factors of safety varying from 0.88 to 1.45 depending on type of analysis. Settlement values computed at the centreline of the fill for the second stage based on the results from undrained compression triaxial tests agreed reasonably well with the field measurements.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-12T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0078
       
  • Lower-bound analytical solution for bearing capacity factor using modified
           Hoek–Brown failure criterion
    • Authors: Xiao-Li Yang
      Pages: 577 - 583
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 55, Issue 4, Page 577-583, April 2018.
      The bearing capacity factor Nσ of a strip footing resting on homogenous rock masses is investigated by a lower-bound approach with the modified Hoek–Brown failure criterion. Three types of admissible stress fields — three stress legs, nine stress legs, and infinite stress legs — are used to calculate the bearing capacity factor. The new analytical expressions are derived, and the results are compared with existing solutions. Agreement shows that the new analytical expressions are effective for evaluating the bearing capacity factor. The influences of parameters in the modified Hoek–Brown failure criterion on the bearing capacity are discussed. Design tables are presented for practical use in engineering.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0694
       
  • A dual porosity model of high-pressure gas flow for geoenergy applications
    • Authors: L.J. Hosking, H.R. Thomas, M. Sedighi
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      This paper presents the development of a dual porosity numerical model of multiphase, multicomponent chemical–gas transport using a coupled thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and mechanical formulation. Appropriate relationships are used to describe the transport properties of nonideal, reactive gas mixtures at high pressure, enabling the study of geoenergy applications such as geological carbon sequestration. Theoretical descriptions of the key transport processes are based on a dual porosity approach considering the fracture network and porous matrix as distinct continua over the domain. Flow between the pore regions is handled using mass exchange terms and the model includes equilibrium and kinetically controlled chemical reactions. A numerical solution is obtained with a finite element and finite difference approach and verification of the model is pursued to build confidence in the accuracy of the implementation of the dual porosity governing equations. In the course of these tests, the time-splitting approach used to couple the transport, mass exchange, and chemical reaction modules is shown to have been successfully applied. It is claimed that the modelling platform developed provides an advanced tool for the study of high-pressure gas transport, storage, and displacement for geoenergy applications involving multiphase, multicomponent chemical–gas transport in dual porosity media, such as geological carbon sequestration.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0532
       
  • Incorporating chemical shrinkage volume into Gibson’s solution
    • Authors: Megan L. Walske, James Doherty
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Rapid filling of low-permeability cemented paste backfill (CPB) into underground stopes results in the generation of significant excess pore pressures. These are dissipated through conventional consolidation and shrinkage due to cement hydration. Gibson’s solution for excess pore pressures in an accreting sediment can be used to assess the self-weight consolidation of CPB in a stope. In this paper, numerical modelling is used to determine the chemical shrinkage–induced pore pressure response for hydration of CPB for an accreting material and the results presented in a series of dimensionless design charts. It is shown that superposition can be used to combine Gibson’s solution with the newly developed charts for chemical shrinkage–induced pore pressures. This allows a qualitative assessment of potential pore pressure development in a CPB backfilled stope.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-24T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0028
       
  • Geosynthetic reinforced column supported embankments and the role of
           ground improvement installation effects
    • Authors: Daniel J. King, Abdelmalek Bouazza, Joel R. Gniel, R. Kerry Rowe, Ha H. Bui
      Pages: 1 - 18
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      For geosynthetic reinforced column supported embankments (GRCSE) supporting a high embankment, lateral forces associated with lateral sliding and embankment stability often govern the acceptability of a given design under serviceability conditions. Frequently, the complex soil–structure–geosynthetic interaction, the size, and the three-dimensional nature of a GRCSE necessitate the use of numerical analysis to assess embankment performance relative to serviceability criteria. However, traditional finite element method techniques used to model serviceability behaviour are limited in their ability to model the geotechnical mechanisms associated with column installation, equilibration, and group installation effects. These installation effects are examined herein based on a GRCSE field case study located in Melbourne, Australia, that has been extensively instrumented. The role that these installation effects have on the performance of the GRCSE is highlighted and the behaviour of the columns supporting the embankment is emphasized. It is shown that cracking of the unreinforced columns supporting the embankment is likely inevitable and that the reduction of lateral resistance provided by the columns should be accounted for in design. The suitability of various numerical approaches currently used in design to model the columns supporting the GRCSE, and the embankment itself, are discussed and recommendations are made.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-20T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0036
       
  • Thermal properties of engineered barriers for a Canadian deep geological
           repository
    • Authors: Pedram Abootalebi, Greg Siemens
      Pages: 1 - 18
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Global energy needs continue to rise along with society’s desire for carbon-reduced energy sources to limit climate change effects. One viable carbon-reduced energy source is nuclear power, which provides more than half the electricity requirements of the province of Ontario. Within Canada there are more than 2.5 million bundles of spent nuclear fuel, which will be stored in a deep geological repository. Efficiency of the repository system depends on dissipation of thermal energy. A comprehensive experimental study is presented on thermal properties of barrier materials. The influence of bentonite type, variability, moisture, and temperature on thermal properties is examined. Results show strong influence of moisture on thermal properties, some influence of temperature on low-density bentonite, minor influence of bentonite type, as well as low variability in the experimental measurements. The extensive database of physical measurements is compared with values from the literature and then used to statistically evaluate thermal property models selected from the literature. Using the base parameters from the literature, thermal property models performed adequately; however, soil-specific calibration of the model inputs improved the fit significantly. These results are now available to perform the numerical models for the proposed Canadian deep geological repository for used nuclear fuel.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0150
       
  • Geometrical effects on the load transfer mechanism of pile groups:
           three-dimensional numerical analysis
    • Authors: Yaru Lv, Dongdong Zhang
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      This paper investigates geometrical effects on the load transfer mechanism of off-ground capped pile groups subjected to vertical load by four three-dimensional numerical simulations, including a circular single pile, an X-shaped cross-sectional concrete (XCC) single pile, a 4 × 4 circular pile group, and a 4 × 4 XCC pile group. The ultimate bearing capacities of the XCC and circular piles within pile groups are approximately 0.86 and 0.74 times that of the XCC and circular single piles, respectively. The group efficiency of the XCC pile group is mainly improved by its side resistance. Comparing the XCC pile group to the circular pile group, the increment in side resistance is almost larger than the increment in pile perimeter, indicating that the pile geometry alters the load transfer mechanism via stress concentration and lateral stress arching. A nonuniform load distribution on piles within a capped pile group causes a bending moment along the pile shafts. The bending moment of XCC piles is smaller than that of circular piles because the raft stiffness of an XCC pile group is increased by its larger circumscribing pile diameter.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-16T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0518
       
  • Influence of strain energy released from a test machine on rock failure
           process
    • Authors: Y.H. Xu, M. Cai
      Pages: 1 - 15
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Rock instability occurs if the energy supplied to the rock failure process is excessive. The theoretical analysis on the energy transfer in the process of rock failure revealed that the rock failure process is a result of the strain energy released from the test machine or the surrounding rock masses of wall rock, plus the additional energy input from an external energy source if the deformation of the rock is continued and driven by the external energy source. The strain energy released from the test machine is the focus in this study because it is responsible for some of the unstable rock failures in laboratory testing. A finite element method (FEM)-based numerical experiment was carried out to study the strain energy released from test machines under different loading conditions of loading system stiffness (LSS). The modeling results demonstrated that depending on the LSS of a test machine, the strain energy released from the test machine alone without additional energy supply can drastically affect the rock failure process. The insight gained from this study can explain unstable rock failure in laboratory tests and the mechanism of some delayed rockbursts that occurred sometime after the excavation of the openings.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-16T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0256
       
  • Co-seismic stress changes and damage to tunnels in the 23 October 2004
           Mid-Niigata Prefecture earthquake
    • Authors: Zaheer Abbas Kazmi, Kazuo Konagai
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Recent near-field earthquakes accompanied by large soil deformations have been clouding the notion that mountain tunnels would be safe places during earthquakes. One of the recent eye-openers was the damage to railway tunnels in the 2004 Mid-Niigata Prefecture earthquake. Changes in stresses in the interior of a half-space of stratified sedimentary rocks, as a representative of the earthquake-hit region, are obtained using the authors’ previous works on co-seismic deformations of this region to study the damage mechanism of deeply embedded railway tunnels. The values of square root of the second invariant of the stress deviator tensor, [math], and the first invariant of Cauchy stress tensor, [math], are compared with the reported damages along the entire stretch of selected tunnels and a very good correlation is observed between the peak values of [math] and the damaged sections of the tunnels. A yield surface is defined as the boundary between clusters of points for damaged and undamaged tunnel sections in the scatter diagram of [math] and [math]. This yield surface and rock–soil deformability can be used to examine the margin of safety of both existing and new tunnels as well as for hazard zonation in a given scenario earthquake.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0658
       
  • Thermo-hydro-mechanical coupling analysis of a thermo-active diaphragm
           wall
    • Authors: Yi Rui, Mei Yin
      Pages: 1 - 16
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Thermo-active diaphragm walls that combine load bearing ability with a ground source heat pump (GSHP) are considered to be one of the new technologies in geotechnical engineering. Despite the vast range of potential applications, current thermo-active diaphragm wall designs have very limited use from a geotechnical aspect. This paper investigates the wall–soil interaction behaviour of a thermo-active diaphragm wall by conducting a thermo-hydro-mechanical finite element analysis. The GSHP operates by circulating cold coolant into the thermo-active diaphragm wall during winter. Soil contraction and small changes in the earth pressures acting on the wall are observed. The strain reversal effect makes the soil stiffness increase when the wall moves in the unexcavated side direction, and hence gives different trends for long-term wall movements compared to the linear elastic model. The GSHP operation makes the wall move in a cyclic manner, and the seasonal variation is approximately 0.5–1 mm, caused by two factors: the thermal effects on the deformation of the diaphragm wall itself and the thermally induced volume change of the soil and pore water. In addition, it is found that the change in bending moment of the wall due to the seasonal GSHP cycle is caused mainly by the thermal differential across the wall during the winter, because the seasonal changes in earth pressures acting on the diaphragm wall are very limited.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-10T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0158
       
  • Behavior of soil heave inside stiffened caissons being installed in clay
    • Authors: Zhifeng Zhao, Mi Zhou, Yuxia Hu, Muhammad Shazzad Hossain
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The length of suction caisson anchors has been increasing to support increasing dimensions and weight of floating facilities, which necessitates employing horizontal ring stiffeners at intervals along the inner wall of the thin skirt of caissons to ensure structural integrity. The addition of these stiffeners has created significant uncertainties regarding soil flow mechanisms, in particular soil heave inside the caisson, which may reduce the caisson final penetration depth and influence the process of installation due to the need to avoid inside soil suction in the pumping equipment. This paper reports results of large-deformation finite element (LDFE) analyses investigating soil heave inside stiffened caissons during installation in nonhomogeneous clay deposits, with the corresponding evolution of soil flow mechanisms and penetration resistance profiles reported by Zhou et al. in 2016. The LDFE analyses have simulated continuous penetration of stiffened caissons from the seabed surface. A detailed parametric study has been undertaken, exploring the relevant range of soil strength nonhomogeneity and normalized strength, stiffened caisson geometry, soil effective unit weight, and caisson roughness. Of particular interest is the influence of stiffeners on soil heave and potential penetration refusal. The results have been validated against previously published centrifuge test data in terms of soil heave and penetration resistance profile, with good agreement obtained. It is shown that the soil normalized strength at the mudline and its nonhomogeneity, caisson diameter relative to the sum of skirt thickness and stiffener width, and caisson penetration depth have significant influence on the inner soil heave and its profile across the caisson radius. An expression, based on the LDFE results is proposed to predict the maximum inner soil heave during installation of stiffened caissons in the field.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-26T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0667
       
  • Particle breakage in granular materials — a conceptual framework
    • Authors: Jean-Marie Konrad, Younes Salami
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      A simple, yet complete framework is introduced with the aim of modelling grain breakage in soils and crushable granular materials. The evolution of grain breakage is measured using a specific parameter of the grain-size distribution. The evolution of this new breakage parameter is related to the applied mechanical work, which allows the predictions to be independent of the stress paths. The correlation function proposed is trilinear, and is capable of describing the initiation, development, and stabilization of breakage. The initial state, coupled with three additional parameters, is used to calibrate this function. The three parameters are related to a grain specific quantity representing the strength of the particles that form the granular medium. The theory of fractal fragmentation is adopted, and the final state is considered to be unique and described by a single parameter: the fractal dimension. When tested against experimental results, this model was able to correctly predict the crushable behavior of a sand.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-26T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0224
       
  • Behaviour of saturated railway track foundation materials during undrained
           cyclic loading
    • Authors: Anna Mamou, Jeffrey A. Priest, Christopher R.I. Clayton, William Powrie
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      This paper presents results of a series of hollow cylinder tests carried out to investigate the undrained behaviour of saturated railway track foundation materials during cyclic loading involving principal stress rotation. Four sand–clay mixes representative of real railway track foundation materials were investigated. It was found that moderate additions of clay (up to ∼14% by weight) increased the cyclic shear stress threshold at which significant excess pore pressures started to accumulate. After the cyclic shear stress threshold had been exceeded, the rate of pore pressure increase with the logarithm of axial strain was greatest for the material having a clay content of 11%. Excess pore pressure generation reduced with increasing intergranular and global void ratio, with the global void ratio being perhaps the more useful indicator because of the reduced amount of scatter and higher correlation of the idealized relationship.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-15T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0196
       
  • Laboratory characterization and discrete element modeling of shrinkage and
           cracking in clay layer
    • Authors: Yuan Guo, Chanjuan Han, Xiong (Bill) Yu
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The performance of a variety of geostructures, such as compacted clay liners, earth dams, and pavement embankments, is compromised by soil cracking. Experiments are set up to monitor the drying process of a clay layer under controlled temperature and humidity conditions. The gravimetric water content and images are captured automatically. Volumetric shrinkage of the bentonite sample as well as the crack patterns are determined from images. The monitored volumetric strain development is used to implement the discrete element method (DEM) to simulate the drying shrinkage and desiccation cracking. Model parameters are calibrated through unconfined compression tests on clay specimens at different water contents. This simplified calibration procedure allows characterization of the soil behaviors in the mesoscale and bypass the complex physicochemical processes involved. The initiation and propagation of cracks from the DEM model agree well with the phenomena observed in the laboratory experiments. The influence of boundary constraint and sample thickness on the crack patterns is analyzed, which includes the use of hydrophobic coating to diminish the boundary constraint. Major features of desiccation cracking can be replicated with the computational procedures. Boundary constraint, including surface roughness and strength of boundary layer, is found to significantly influence the final crack patterns.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0674
       
  • Analysis of passive earth pressure modification due to seepage flow
           effects
    • Authors: Z. Hu, Z.X. Yang, S.P. Wilkinson
      Pages: 1 - 14
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Using an assumed vertical retaining wall with a drainage system along the soil–structure interface, this paper analyses the effect of anisotropic seepage flow on the development of passive earth pressure. Extremely unfavourable seepage flow inside the backfill, perhaps due to heavy rainfall, will dramatically increase active earth pressure while reducing passive earth pressure, thus increasing the probability of instability of the retaining structure. A trial and error analysis based on limit equilibrium is applied to identify the optimum failure surface. The flow field is computed using Fourier series expansion, and the effective reaction force along the curved failure surface is obtained by solving a modified Kötter equation considering the effect of seepage flow. This approach correlates well with other existing results. For small values of both the internal friction angle and interface friction angle, the failure surface can be appropriately simplified with a planar approximation. A parametric study indicates that the degree of anisotropic seepage flow affects the resulting passive earth pressure. In addition, incremental increases in the effective friction angle and interface friction angle both lead to an increase in passive earth pressure.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0087
       
  • Field study on axial bearing capacity and load transfer characteristic of
           waveform micropile
    • Authors: Young-Eun Jang, Jin-Tae Han
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The waveform micropile is an advanced construction method that combines the concept of the conventional micropile with the jet grouting method. This new form of micropile was developed to improve shaft resistance, and has enabled a higher bearing capacity and greater cost efficiency. Two field tests were conducted to examine field applicability and to verify the effects of bearing capacity enhancement. In particular, waveform micropile construction using the jet grouting method was performed to evaluate the viability of waveform micropile installation. After testing, the surrounding ground was excavated to check the shape of the waveform micropile. The result showed that waveform micropiles can be installed by adjusting the grouting time and pressure. In the loading tests, the bearing capacity of the waveform micropile increased by 1.4–2.3 times that of the conventional micropile, depending on the shape of the micropile. The load transfer analysis using the strain gauge data showed that the waveform micropile increases the shaft resistance in the soil layer. This not only decreases pile settlement, but also contributes to the increase of overall bearing capacity. The overall results clearly demonstrate that the waveform micropile is an enhanced construction method that can improve bearing capacity.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-13T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0155
       
  • Effects of coupled static and dynamic strain rates on mechanical behaviors
           of rock-like specimens containing pre-existing fissures under uniaxial
           compression
    • Authors: Peng Feng, Feng Dai, Yi Liu, Nuwen Xu, Pengxian Fan
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Rocks containing pre-existing fissures in underground engineering are likely to be subjected to static pre-stress and dynamic loads simultaneously. Understanding the deformation and failure mechanism of fissured rocks under coupled static and dynamic strain rates is beneficial for the stability assessment of rock engineering structures. This study experimentally investigates the mechanical behaviors of fissured specimens under coupled static and dynamic loads with different loading parameters. Our experiments reveal that the coupled static–dynamic strain rates significantly affect the strength, deformation, energy characteristics, and failure mode of fissured specimens. For each dynamic strain rate, the strength and elastic modulus of specimens feature an increase first as the static pre-stress increases up to half of the uniaxial compression strength, and then a decrease. However, for each static pre-stress of coupled loads, the strength and elastic modulus increase noticeably with increasing dynamic strain rate. From the perspective of energy partition, for each static pre-stress, the higher dynamic strain rate induces greater energy dissipation of the specimens during the coupled loading, and more elastic energy is released at the end of loading. Moreover, for each dynamic strain rate, the pre-stress of half uniaxial compression strength induces the highest released elastic energy.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0286
       
  • Field measurements of overlap reductions for two reinforced fabric-encased
           geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs)
    • Authors: R. Kerry Rowe, Richard W.I. Brachman, W. Andy Take
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Two geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) reported to have experienced significant shrinkage at other locations are examined on both a 3H:1V south-facing slope and a relatively flat base on a silty sand. The GCLs were overlapped by 300 mm with 400 g/m of supplemental bentonite and covered by a black 1.5 mm high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane to form a composite liner that was left exposed in a full-scale field test embankment for a period of almost 5 years. It is shown that despite the relatively uniform exposure conditions, shrinkage is highly variable with a maximum shrinkage of GCL A being 165 mm on the slope and 415 mm on the base while GCL B shrunk by up to 75 mm on the side slope and only up to 25 mm on the base. The dominant role played by variable overlap stick and heterogeneity to the locations where the overlaps are re-wetted are discussed. Based on this study of shrinkage and a related study of downslope erosion at the same site, it is concluded that neither GCLs A nor B should be left in exposed composite liners when they can be subjected to thermal cycles that can lead to hydration and dehydration of the GCL.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-11T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0375
       
  • A novel technique to monitor subsurface movements of landslides
    • Authors: Amin Askarinejad, Sarah M. Springman
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Slope deformation sensors (SDSs) were developed to monitor profiles of soil deformation at a high frequency during slope-monitoring and landslide-triggering experiments. It was hypothesized that the surface and subsurface movements could be combined to integrate the temporal development of the movements and help monitor the initiation and propagation of the shear bands indirectly, as well as predict the volume of the eventual landslide. Four SDSs were installed in a 38° slope in Northern Switzerland and slope movements due to two artificial rainfall sprinkling experiments in October 2008 and March 2009 were monitored. This paper describes the design, numerical validation, installation details, and performance of the SDSs during the first rainfall event. The data acquired from SDSs in terms of bending strain, deformation profiles, and an indication of the mechanical energy transmitted from the surrounding soil are analysed and compared with the patterns of surface movements of the slope and changes in the horizontal earth pressure. The findings are interpreted based on the applied rainfall, hydrological properties of the slope, bedrock shape, and specifications of the observed failure surface in the subsequent landslide triggering experiment. Details of the data acquired from SDSs during the second experiment in March 2009 are reported and analysed in a forthcoming paper.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0338
       
  • Laboratory pullout resistance of a new screw soil nail in residual soil
    • Authors: H. Tokhi, G. Ren, J. Li
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The ultimate shear strength at the interface between the soil nail and surrounding soil is of practical importance in the design and performance of a soil nail system. The most commonly adopted method of measuring this interface shear strength is by soil nail pullout testing. This study introduces a novel soil nail system in the form of a screw nail and compares its performance with a conventional grouted soil nail. Both types of soil nails are tested in a controlled laboratory setting using residual soil in a large purpose-made pullout box. The development of the screw nail and the laboratory testing procedures are briefly discussed first, followed by presentation and discussion of the results of the interface shear behaviour measured from pullout tests. It is shown that the screw nail offers many advantages in terms of pullout load–displacement behaviour and the interface shear mechanism than that of the conventional grouted soil nail.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-08-23T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0048
       
 
 
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