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  Subjects -> ENGINEERING (Total: 2272 journals)
    - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (190 journals)
    - CIVIL ENGINEERING (183 journals)
    - ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (102 journals)
    - ENGINEERING (1204 journals)
    - ENGINEERING MECHANICS AND MATERIALS (381 journals)
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    - MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (89 journals)

ENGINEERING (1204 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 1205 Journals sorted alphabetically
3 Biotech     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
3D Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
AAPG Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
AASRI Procedia     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Abstract and Applied Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aceh International Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ACS Nano     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 247)
Acta Geotechnica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Acta Polytechnica : Journal of Advanced Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Scientiarum. Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitatis Cibiniensis. Technical Series     Open Access  
Active and Passive Electronic Components     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Adaptive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Adıyaman Üniversitesi Mühendislik Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Adsorption     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Engineering Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advanced Science     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advanced Science Focus     Free   (Followers: 3)
Advanced Science Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advanced Science, Engineering and Medicine     Partially Free   (Followers: 7)
Advanced Synthesis & Catalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Calculus of Variations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Complex Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Engineering Software     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Fuzzy Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Geosciences (ADGEO)     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Heat Transfer     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Advances in Human Factors/Ergonomics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 26)
Advances in Magnetic and Optical Resonance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Natural Sciences: Nanoscience and Nanotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Advances in Operations Research     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Advances in OptoElectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Physics Theories and Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Advances in Porous Media     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Remote Sensing     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
Advances in Science and Research (ASR)     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aerobiologia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Science, Technology, Innovation and Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
AIChE Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Ain Shams Engineering Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Akademik Platform Mühendislik ve Fen Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Alexandria Engineering Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AMB Express     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 28)
American Journal of Engineering and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Engineering Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Analele Universitatii Ovidius Constanta - Seria Chimie     Open Access  
Annals of Combinatorics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Pure and Applied Logic     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annals of Regional Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Applicable Algebra in Engineering, Communication and Computing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Applicable Analysis: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Applied Catalysis A: General     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Applied Catalysis B: Environmental     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Applied Clay Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Computational Intelligence and Soft Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Applied Magnetic Resonance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Nanoscience     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Applied Network Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Applied Numerical Mathematics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Applied Physics Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Applied Spatial Analysis and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Arabian Journal for Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Archives of Computational Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Foundry Engineering     Open Access  
Archives of Thermodynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Arkiv för Matematik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ASEE Prism     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Asian Engineering Review     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Applied Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asian Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Asian Journal of Control     Hybrid Journal  
Asian Journal of Current Engineering & Maths     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Technology Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Assembly Automation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
at - Automatisierungstechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
ATZagenda     Hybrid Journal  
ATZextra worldwide     Hybrid Journal  
Australasian Physical & Engineering Sciences in Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Australian Journal of Multi-Disciplinary Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Autonomous Mental Development, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Avances en Ciencias e Ingeniería     Open Access  
Balkan Region Conference on Engineering and Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific and Industrial Research     Open Access  
Basin Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Batteries     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bautechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bell Labs Technical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Beni-Suef University Journal of Basic and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bharatiya Vaigyanik evam Audyogik Anusandhan Patrika (BVAAP)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biofuels Engineering     Open Access  
Biointerphases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biomaterials Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Biomedical Engineering and Computational Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Biomedical Engineering Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Reviews in     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Biomedical Engineering, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Biomedical Engineering: Applications, Basis and Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biomedical Microdevices     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Biomedical Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Biomedizinische Technik - Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Biomicrofluidics     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
BioNanoMaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biotechnology Progress     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
Boletin Cientifico Tecnico INIMET     Open Access  
Botswana Journal of Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Boundary Value Problems     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Brazilian Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Broadcasting, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bulletin of Canadian Petroleum Geology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Bulletin of Engineering Geology and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Bulletin of the Crimean Astrophysical Observatory     Hybrid Journal  
Cahiers, Droit, Sciences et Technologies     Open Access  
Calphad     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Geotechnical Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Canadian Journal of Remote Sensing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Case Studies in Engineering Failure Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Studies in Thermal Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Catalysis Communications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Catalysis Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Catalysis Reviews: Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Catalysis Science and Technology     Free   (Followers: 7)
Catalysis Surveys from Asia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Catalysis Today     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
CEAS Space Journal     Hybrid Journal  
Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Central European Journal of Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
CFD Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Chaos : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Chaos, Solitons & Fractals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Journal of Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chinese Science Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencia e Ingenieria Neogranadina     Open Access  
Ciencia en su PC     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ciencias Holguin     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CienciaUAT     Open Access  
Cientifica     Open Access  
CIRP Annals - Manufacturing Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
CIRP Journal of Manufacturing Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
City, Culture and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clay Minerals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clean Air Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Coal Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Coastal Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Coastal Engineering Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Coatings     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cogent Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cognitive Computation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Color Research & Application     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
COMBINATORICA     Hybrid Journal  
Combustion Theory and Modelling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Combustion, Explosion, and Shock Waves     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Communications Engineer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Communications in Numerical Methods in Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Components, Packaging and Manufacturing Technology, IEEE Transactions on     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Composite Interfaces     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Composite Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 267)
Composites Part A : Applied Science and Manufacturing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 187)
Composites Part B : Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 283)
Composites Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 179)
Comptes Rendus Mécanique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Computation     Open Access  
Computational Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Computational Optimization and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Computational Science and Discovery     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Computer Applications in Engineering Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Computer Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Computers & Geosciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Computers & Mathematics with Applications     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Computers and Electronics in Agriculture     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Computers and Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computing and Visualization in Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Computing in Science & Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
Conciencia Tecnologica     Open Access  
Concurrent Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Continuum Mechanics and Thermodynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Control and Dynamic Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Control Engineering Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Control Theory and Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Corrosion Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
CT&F Ciencia, Tecnologia y Futuro     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CTheory     Open Access  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 | Last

Journal Cover Canadian Geotechnical Journal
  [SJR: 2.093]   [H-I: 75]   [22 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0008-3674 - ISSN (Online) 1208-6010
   Published by NRC Research Press Homepage  [21 journals]
  • Special issue: Geoenergy and Geoenvironment (GeGe) / Numéro spécial : La
           géoénergie et le géoenvironnement (GeGe)
    • Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, Volume 54, Issue 11, Page v-v, November 2017.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-30T12:07:02Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0601
       
  • Reply to the discussion by Noor on “Effect of fines on liquefaction
           behaviour in well-graded materials”
    • Authors: Katherine Kwa, David Airey
      Pages: 1 - 1
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T07:14:17Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0384
       
  • Discussion of “Effects of fines on liquefaction behaviour in
           well-graded materials”
    • Authors: Sarah Tahsin Noor
      Pages: 1 - 2
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-11-03T07:12:37Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0306
       
  • Reply to the discussion by Kootahi on “Accuracy of determining
           pre-consolidation pressure from laboratory tests”
    • Authors: Abouzar Sadrekarimi
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-31T07:16:20Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0349
       
  • Discussion of “Accuracy of determining pre-consolidation pressure
           from laboratory tests”
    • Authors: Karim Kootahi
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-31T07:14:43Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0278
       
  • Reply to the discussion by Danziger and Jannuzzi on “Development of
           global correlation models between in situ stress-normalized shear wave
           velocity and soil unit weight for plastic soils”
    • Authors: Sung-Woo Moon, Taeseo Ku
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-25T06:23:06Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0284
       
  • Discussion of “Development of global correlation models between in situ
           stress-normalized shear wave velocity and soil unit weight for plastic
           soils”
    • Authors: Fernando Artur Brasil Danziger, Graziella Maria Faquim Jannuzzi
      Pages: 1 - 3
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.

      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-25T06:22:08Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0239
       
  • Effect of soft soil layer on local dynamic response of floating pile under
           harmonic lateral loading
    • Authors: Kullachai Tantayopin, Punchet Thammarak
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Full-scale experiments of long floating piles under lateral harmonic excitation at the pile head were conducted to examine local resonant effects caused by the soft soil layer’s dynamic characteristic. Three 0.35 m diameter concrete piles with different lengths — 6, 10, and 15 m — in 19 m thick soft Bangkok clay were studied. Small-amplitude sweep excitations were applied in the frequency range that triggers resonance of the top soft soil layer, but will not reach the first fundamental frequency of the pile–soil system. The experiments show that the top soft soil layer produced local peaks of pile response at frequencies associated with predominant frequencies of the soil layer that agree well with the previous study of the dynamic characteristic of a soil layer in the Bangkok basin area by microtremor measurement. A comparison of experimental results with numerical solutions, i.e., the reduced dimension finite element model (RDFEM) and Winkler’s beam on spring and dashpot foundation (WBSDF), to evaluate their ability to simulate local resonance effects was carried out. Dynamic moduli of soil at different depths, to be used in numerical simulations, were measured by crosshole seismic test. Satisfactory matches between experimental results and numerical simulations by RDFEM were observed whereas WBSDF predictions are not close because the soft soil layer cannot be incorporated in WBSDF.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-10-24T06:42:21Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0371
       
  • Effect of initial pore pressure on undrained shear behaviour of
           fine-grained gassy soil
    • Authors: Y. Hong, L.Z. Wang, Charles W.W. Ng, B. Yang
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Many of the world reserves of fossil fuels are located at various water depths in fine-grained sediment under the seabed. The fine-grained sediment contains relatively large biogas bubbles, which has been posing challenges to the stability of offshore foundations supporting oil and gas platforms. Although fine-grained gassy soil was found to exhibit different undrained shear strengths (cu) by altering the initial pore pressure, ui (relevant to water depth), systematic studies concerning the effect of ui on undrained shear behaviours of the soil are still lacking. This study reports a series of undrained triaxial tests aiming to compare and investigate the responses of reconstituted fine-grained gassy soil with the same consolidation pressure ([math]), but at a wide range of varying ui (0–1000 kPa). The shearing-induced excess pore pressure (Δu) in the gassy specimens highly depends on ui. It can be either smaller than that of the saturated specimen with the same [math] (due to partial dissipation of Δu into relatively large bubbles at low ui) or larger than that of the saturated specimen (related to collapse of relatively small bubbles at high ui). Consequently, the presence of bubbles had beneficially increased cu at relatively low ui (ui/[math] < 0.6), and vice versa. The critical stress ratio of the reconstituted fine-grained gassy soil, however, did not appear to be altered by ui.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-25T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0015
       
  • Combinations of soil materials for granular capillary barriers for
           minimizing rainfall infiltration and gas emission
    • Authors: L.M. Zhang, Y.Q. Ke
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      This paper presents a coupled air–water flow analysis to evaluate the performance of a three-layer capillary barrier for controlling water infiltration into and gas emission from a waste containment system in a high precipitation environment, and to optimize combinations of local soil layers for barrier construction. A multi-phase flow model is proposed considering the movements of the gas and water phases simultaneously. The governing partial differential equations are solved in COMSOL Multiphysics software. Several combinations of lean clay with sand (CL), clayey sand with gravel (SC), silty sand with gravel (SM), sandy silt (ML), and well-graded gravel with silt (GW–GM) are examined. The rates of percolation water and gas emission are used as indicators to compare the performance of different combinations. A fine-grained surface soil layer reduces both water infiltration and gas emission due to its low desaturation rate and high water-retention capacity. The coarse middle layer plays a critical role, promoting capillary effects and hindering water infiltration during rainfall as well as draining any infiltrated water or percolated gas.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-09-06T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0334
       
  • Steady-state analytical model for vapour-phase volatile organic compound
           (VOC) diffusion in layered landfill composite cover systems
    • Authors: Haijian Xie, Qiao Wang, Huaxiang Yan, Yunmin Chen
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      An analytical model for the diffusion of one-dimensional vapour-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through a four-layer landfill composite cover system consisting of a protective layer, drainage layer, geomembrane (GMB), and compacted clay liner (CCL) is developed. Effects of degree of water saturation (Sr), adsorption, and degradation on vapour-phase VOC diffusion in a cover system are then analyzed. The vapour-phase benzene concentration profile increases with increase of Sr in the drainage and protective layers. When Sr1 = Sr2 = 0.5 (where Sr1 and Sr2 are degree of water saturation of the protective and drainage layers, respectively), surface flux for the case with the degree of water saturation of the CCL layer Sr4 = 0.3 is 1.3 and 1560 times larger than that with Sr4 = 0.7 and = 0.9, respectively. The effect of adsorption of the VOCs in the CCL on performance of the cover system is more important than that in the drainage and protective layers. Surface flux and concentration of benzene tends to be zero when CCL is amended with 0.5% biochar due to an increase of the retardation factor. The effect of degradation rate on benzene concentration increases with increase of degree of water saturation. The influence of half-life of VOCs in the soil layer, t1/2, on vapour-phase VOC concentration can be neglected when Sr ≤ 0.3.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-07-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0293
       
  • Use of cement-chelated, solidified, municipal solid waste incinerator
           (MSWI) fly ash for pavement material: mechanical and environmental
           evaluations
    • Authors: Qiang Tang, Yu Zhang, Yufeng Gao, Fan Gu
      Pages: 1 - 14
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      As a by-product from the incineration of municipal solid waste (MSW), fly ash usually contains mobile heavy metals that may engender severe pollution when reused. In this study, fly ash was solidified with cement and a chelating agent to immobilize these polluting elements. The possibility of using the solidified fly ash for pavement materials was also assessed through mechanical and environmental perspectives. According to the results, the strength of solidified fly ash was found proportional to both the cement/fly ash ratio and curing time. This indicated that the increase of fly ash loading reduced the concentration of products from cement hydration, and thus destroyed the structure of the products of hydration. With the increase of freeze–thaw cycles, the compressive strength of cement-stabilized fly ash decreased between days 7 and 14, and then increased between days 14 and 28. Subsequently, the finite element analysis showed that placing the solidified fly ash layer as a pavement material between an unbound base course and subgrade was beneficial to prolong fatigue life and reduce rutting distress of asphalt pavements. Finally, leachability of metals from the mixtures was tested, which showed that leaching concentration decreased as the cement/ash ratio, curing time, and chelating agent content increased.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-07-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0007
       
  • Analysis of plant root–induced preferential flow and pore-water pressure
           variation by a dual-permeability model
    • Authors: Wei Shao, Junjun Ni, Anthony Kwan Leung, Ye Su, Charles Wang Wai Ng
      Pages: 1 - 16
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Vegetation can affect slope hydrology and stability via plant transpiration and induced matric suction. Previous work suggested that the presence of plant roots would induce preferential flow, and its effects may be more significant when the planting density is high. However, there is a lack of numerical studies on how planting density affects soil pore-water pressure and shear strength during heavy rainfall. This study aims to investigate the impact of plant root–induced preferential flow on hydromechanical processes of vegetated soils under different planting densities. Two modelling approaches, namely single- and dual-permeability models, were integrated with an infinite slope stability approach to simulate pore-water pressure dynamics and slope stability. Laboratory tests on soils with two different planting densities for a plant species, Schefflera heptaphylla, were conducted for numerical simulations. The single-permeability model overestimated the pore-water pressure in shallow soil and underestimated the infiltration depth. The dual-permeability model, which is able to model the effects of preferential flow, can better capture the observations of rapid increase of pore-water pressure and deeper pressure response in the vegetated soil. However, caution should be taken on the choice of pore-water pressure when using the dual-permeability model to assess the factor of safety. The dual-permeability model using the pore-water pressure in the preferential flow domain and that in the matrix domain would result in a lower and higher factor of safety, respectively.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-07-17T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0629
       
  • Centrifuge modeling of municipal solid waste landfill failures induced by
           rising water levels
    • Authors: Yun-min Chen, Jun-chao Li, Chun-bao Yang, Bin Zhu, Liang-tong Zhan
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      New types of synthetic municipal solid wastes (MSWs) were developed, exhibiting engineering characteristics similar to those of real MSWs at different states of degradation in terms of total unit weight, void ratio, water content, compressibility, permeability, stress–strain relationship, and shear strength. Using these synthetic MSWs, several centrifuge model tests on the stability of geosynthetics-lined landfills with rising water levels were performed. The test results revealed the developing processes of MSW landfill failures induced by rising water levels. In most tests, a continuous slide occurred once a critical water level was attained. The ratio of critical water level and landfill height was 0.75–0.92 for present model tests using fresh or partly degraded synthetic MSWs with landfill slope ratio of 1:1–1:3, increasing with the increases of MSW degradation states and decreases of the slope ratio. An engineered berm increased the critical water level by 1.3%–9.5%. The landfills without an engineered berm tended to slide along the bottom liner; however, for normal landfills with an engineered berm and a slope ratio of 1:3, penetrating cracks developed when the failures occurred. These results provide a good reference for water level and stability control of the landfill, and the construction of an engineered berm is suggested to improve the stability of these landfills.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-06-08T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0046
       
  • Characterization of unsaturated mine waste: a case history
    • Authors: P.K. Robertson, A. Viana da Fonseca, B. Ulrich, J. Coffin
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      It is becoming increasingly common in the mining industry for either crushed ore or filtered mine waste to be stacked to a significant height (>100 m) in a moist state with little compaction, resulting in deposits that can be potentially loose and unsaturated. This paper presents a case history describing the characterization of stacked filtered tailings at a mine site in South America. Cone penetration tests with pore pressure and seismic velocity measurements (SCPTu) were carried out along with selected drilling, sampling, and laboratory testing. Compression wave velocity (Vp) and shear wave velocity (Vs) profiles were obtained and compared with laboratory values on reconstituted saturated and unsaturated samples. Results indicate that shear wave velocity is sensitive to suction hardening effects and appears to capture the correct unsaturated in situ behavior. The cone resistance, which is a large strain measurement, can destroy the beneficial effects of suction hardening and appears to be insensitive to the unsaturated in situ behavior, but may capture the correct behavior after the beneficial effects of suction are removed if the soil becomes saturated.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-06-02T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0129
       
  • Evaluation of jet grout column diameters by acoustic monitoring
    • Authors: Shih-Hao Cheng, Hung-Jiun Liao, Junichi Yamazaki, Ricky K.N. Wong
      Pages: 1 - 9
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      To evaluate the diameter of jet grout columns actually formed under the ground, several methods had been developed over the past years. Nevertheless, uncertainty still exists in different methods mostly due to the variations of ground and grouting conditions. This study proposes an acoustic monitoring system capable of directly recording the jet grouting sounds detected at different distances from the jet nozzle. To correlate the actual diameter of the jet grout column with the monitored sound prints, a field test was conducted in an interlayered sandy and gravelly soil and the jet grout column was excavated for dimension measurement. The recorded sounds show that the distribution of the threshold peak amplitudes at different distances can be represented by the curve of the normal distribution function. In addition, the standard deviation and mean of the normally distributed threshold peak amplitudes can be used as indicators to determine the effective diameter of the jet grout column for a specific jet grouting project. Although this acoustic monitoring method would be costly and time-consuming if used to examine all jet grout columns, it is suitable for frequent use in trial tests for finding reasonable grouting parameters when forming jet grout columns with design diameters.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-06-01T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0025
       
  • Ultimate limit state reliability-based design of augered cast-in-place
           piles considering lower-bound capacities
    • Authors: Seth C. Reddy, Armin W. Stuedlein
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The use of augered cast-in-place (ACIP) piles for transportation infrastructure requires an appropriate reliability-based design (RBD) procedure. In an effort to improve the accuracy of an existing design model and calibrate appropriate resistance factors, this study presents a significantly revised RBD methodology for estimating the shaft and toe bearing capacity of ACIP piles using a large database consisting of static loading tests in predominately granular soils. The proposed design models are unbiased, as opposed to those currently recommended. Based on the reasonable assumption that a finite lower-bound resistance limit exists, lower-bound design lines are developed for shaft and toe bearing resistance by applying a constant ratio to the proposed design models. Resistance factors are calibrated at the strength or ultimate limit state (ULS) for ACIP piles loaded in compression and tension for two commonly used target probabilities of failure with and without lower-bound limits. For piles loaded in compression, separate resistance factors are calibrated for the proposed shaft and toe bearing resistance models. The inclusion of a lower-bound limit for piles loaded in tension results in a 24%–50% increase in the calibrated resistance factor. For piles loaded in compression, the application of a lower-bound limit results in a 20%–150% increase in the calibrated resistance factor, and represents a significant increase in useable pile capacity. Although the impact of a lower-bound limit on resistance factor calibration is directly dependent on the degree of uncertainty in the distribution of resistance, this effect is outweighed by the type of distribution selected (i.e., normal, lognormal) at more stringent target probabilities of failure due to differences in distribution shape at the location of the lower-bound limit. A companion paper explores the use of the revised ULS model in a reliability-based serviceability limit state design framework.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0145
       
  • Interpretation of vane shear tests for geotechnical stability calculations
    • Authors: George Kouretzis, Jubert Pineda, Kristian Krabbenhøft, Lachlan Wilson
      Pages: 1 - 6
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      In this note we consider the problem of calibrating failure criteria for short-term stability calculations based on the results of vane shear tests. Numerical and theoretical considerations supported by experimental data provide evidence that we can use the vane shear test to obtain the undrained strength of a sample tested under simple shear conditions at a normal stress equal to the horizontal effective stress at the given depth. Consequently, it is argued that there is no need to correct the field vane undrained strength to obtain the mobilized strength for embankment stability calculations, provided that soil strength is normalized to the normal effective stress acting on the slip surface and rate effects are properly considered. We further show that the standard Tresca failure criterion, albeit simplistic, will provide reasonable estimates of the mobilized strength if properly calibrated against field vane tests.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-31T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0209
       
  • Serviceability limit state reliability-based design of augered
           cast-in-place piles in granular soils
    • Authors: Seth C. Reddy, Armin W. Stuedlein
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      This study proposes a reliability-based design procedure to evaluate the allowable load for augered cast-in-place (ACIP) piles installed in predominately granular soils based on a prescribed level of reliability at the serviceability limit state. The ultimate limit state (ULS) ACIP pile–specific design model proposed in the companion paper is incorporated into a bivariate hyperbolic load–displacement model capable of describing the variability in the load–displacement relationship for a wide range of pile displacements. Following the approach outlined in the companion paper, distributions with truncated lower-bound capacities are incorporated into the reliability analyses. A lumped load-and-resistance factor is calibrated using a suitable performance function and Monte Carlo simulations. The average and conservative 95% lower-bound prediction intervals for the calibrated load-and-resistance factor resulting from the simulations are provided. Although unaccounted for in past studies, the slenderness ratio is shown to have significant influence on foundation reliability. Because of the low uncertainty in the proposed ULS pile capacity prediction model, the use of a truncated distribution has moderate influence on foundation reliability.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0146
       
  • Flume-scale experiments on suffusion at bottom of cutoff wall in sandy
           gravel alluvium
    • Authors: Yulong Luo, Min Nie, Ming Xiao
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      This paper presents a series of flume-scale experiments to investigate suffusion at the bottom of a cutoff wall in an internally unstable sandy gravel alluvium. The initiation, progression, and potential failure of suffusion and the interactive effects of geomechanical and hydraulic conditions with the evolution of suffusion were investigated in this particular application. Temporal and spatial development of pore pressure, earth pressure, and settlement demonstrated suffusion was a multi-phase (involving pore water, fine and coarse fractions) and multi-field (involving seepage, seepage-induced fine-fraction variation, and stress–deformation) coupling phenomenon. Suffusion initiated at the downstream side of the tip of the cutoff wall and then generally progressed backward to the upstream side. The monitored earth pressure provided an evidence of the heterogeneous stress distribution in internally unstable soil. Two linear empirical formulas for average hydraulic gradients at the initiation of suffusion and at blowout were derived based on the flume-scale model experiments.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0248
       
  • Experimental investigation of compaction-grouted soil nails
    • Authors: Qiong Wang, Xinyu Ye, Shanyong Wang, Scott William Sloan, Daichao Sheng
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      An innovative compaction-grouted soil nail was designed by injecting grout into a special latex balloon (grouting bag) to avoid bleeding and penetration of grout into the surrounding soil. A series of large-scale model tests was performed to study the surrounding soil responses due to grouting and the subsequent pull-out resistance of the soil nail. The experimental results show that grouting pressure plays an important role in the enhancement of the density and (or) strength of the surrounding soil. In addition, during the pull-out process, the compaction-grouted soil nail exhibits a strain-hardening behaviour without a yield point. This is a significant advantage of this new soil nail, indicating that it can enable soil masses to remain stable against a relatively large deformation before ultimate failure. The main factors behind the improvement of the pull-out resistance of the new soil nail are, first, the compaction–densification of the soil near the grouting bag due to grouting, resulting in the enhancement of the shear strength of the soil, and, second, the enlargement of the grouting bag, causing the increase of the interface shear and end resistance to the pull-out of the soil nail.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-30T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0063
       
  • Semi-analytical approach for time-dependent load–settlement response of
           a jacked pile in clay strata
    • Authors: Lin Li, Jingpei Li, De’an Sun, Weibing Gong
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      Mechanical behaviour of the soil around a jacked pile changes significantly during pile installation and subsequent consolidation. Hence, an axially loaded jacked pile exhibits apparent time-dependent bearing performance after pile installation. This paper presents a semi-analytical approach to predict the time-dependent bearing performance of an axially loaded jacked pile in saturated clay strata. The effects of pile installation and subsequent consolidation on the changes in mechanical properties of the surrounding soil are modeled by the cavity expansion theory and the radial consolidation theory, respectively. An exponential function–based load-transfer (t–z) curve is employed to describe the nonlinear behaviour of the pile–soil interface during pile loading. The evolutions of the three-dimensional strength and shear modulus of the surrounding soil are subsequently incorporated into the two model parameters of the proposed t–z curve to capture the time-dependent pile–soil interaction behaviour. The time-dependent elastic response of the soil outside the pile–soil interface is also considered in the proposed approach. With the proposed load-transfer curve, an incremental algorithm and a corresponding computational code are developed for assessing the time-dependent load–settlement response of a jacked pile. To verify the proposed semi-analytical approach, predictions of the time-dependent load–settlement curves are compared with the measured values from pile tests at two sites. The good agreement shows that the time-dependent bearing performance can be reasonably predicted by the proposed approach.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-29T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0561
       
  • Effects of inclusion contents on resilient modulus and damping ratio of
           unsaturated track-bed materials
    • Authors: Han-Lin Wang, Yu-Jun Cui, Francisco Lamas-Lopez, Jean-Claude Dupla, Jean Canou, Nicolas Calon, Gilles Saussine, Patrick Aimedieu, Ren-Peng Chen
      Pages: 1 - 10
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      For the French conventional railway lines, a layer, namely interlayer, was created in the substructure mainly by the interpenetration of ballast grains and subgrade soils. The in situ investigation indicated that the content of coarse grains decreases over depth. In this study, the resilient modulus and damping ratio of the unsaturated lower part of the interlayer soil were investigated at six different volumetric inclusion contents fv (volumetric ratio of dry coarse grains to the whole sample) by carrying out cyclic triaxial tests following a multi-step loading procedure. The results show that the two dynamic parameters (resilient modulus and damping ratio) change significantly at the beginning of loading and the variation rate decreases as the number of cycles increases. Besides, a mean characteristic volumetric inclusion content fv–cha ranging from 27.8% to 28.9% was identified, separating two zones with different inclusion effects. To verify this observation, X-ray microcomputed tomography (μCT) scans were conducted on as-compacted samples. The results obtained strongly support the existence of fv–cha: when fv ≤ fv–cha, the matrix of fines constitutes the skeleton of the sample with inclusions floating in it, leading to slight changes of the two dynamic parameters with fv. By contrast, when fv> fv–cha, the inclusions dominate the skeleton of the sample, giving rise to significant changes of the two dynamic parameters with fv.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-24T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0673
       
  • Effects of material and drilling uncertainties on artificial ground
           freezing of cement-admixed soils
    • Authors: Yong Liu, Jun Hu, Huawen Xiao, Elton J. Chen
      Pages: 1 - 13
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The artificial ground freezing method can be used jointly with the deep cement mixing method during break-in and break-out processes of shield machines in a tunnel shaft. The frozen ground can fully cut off groundwater seepage, thus ensuring a watertight working platform. Cement-admixed soils can restrict frost heave and thaw-induced settlement because of the decreased permeability. Both methods can also enhance mechanical strength of the soil to enable construction to proceed. Two main sources of heterogeneity are likely to influence the freezing effect: spatial variability in in situ water content in natural soil and spatial variability in binder concentration in cement-admixed soils. Furthermore, positioning error when installing freeze pipes can also affect freezing efficiency. This study simulates in situ water content and binder concentration as Gaussian random fields, whereby variations in the thermophysical properties are estimated. Positioning error is also assessed by prescribing an incline angle in freeze pipes. The influences of those two sources of spatial variability as well as positioning error are examined with random finite-element analyses and statistical characteristics are estimated based on the results. Results are tabulated to offer practitioners a rule of thumb for estimating additional efforts needed in artificial ground freezing, accounting for variations in the thermophysical properties and positioning errors in installing freeze pipes.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-19T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0707
       
  • Effective use of geosynthetics to increase bearing capacity of shallow
           foundations
    • Authors: Hossain Md. Shahin, Teruo Nakai, Yukihiro Morikawa, Saki Masuda, Susumu Mio
      Pages: 1 - 12
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      In this research, a reinforcement mechanism for shallow foundations is determined through laboratory model tests and numerical analyses. The numerical analyses are performed with the finite element program FEMtij-2D using the elastoplastic subloading tij model. The frictional behavior between the reinforcement and the ground is simulated using an elastoplastic joint element. Several tests were performed whereby the installation depth, length, roughness, and fixity conditions at the edges of the reinforcement were varied. Results show that the effectiveness of the reinforcement and the bearing capacity of the reinforced ground depend on the position, length, roughness, and fixity condition of the reinforcement. A significant increase in the bearing capacity can be achieved if the geosynthetics are properly placed at an optimum length with the boundary fixed to the ground. The effect of the loading position is also investigated because in reality the load on a foundation does not always act at the center of the foundation. The numerical results accurately describe the experimental results; the simulations accurately account for the mechanical behaviors of both the soil and reinforcement and the frictional behavior between them. Therefore, the simulation technique can be used to predict the bearing capacity of reinforced ground.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0505
       
  • Long-term performance of high-density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembrane
           seams in municipal solid waste (MSW) leachate
    • Authors: R. Kerry Rowe, Mohamad Shoaib
      Pages: 1 - 14
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The effect of a synthetic municipal solid waste leachate on the long-term performance of dual-wedge welds in a 1.5 mm thick high-density polyethylene geomembrane (GMB) is reported based on 4 years of testing at 40, 65, 75, and 85 °C. The effect of leachate on the GMB well away from the weld, in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) beside the weld, and in the welded zone are investigated. The slowest antioxidant depletion rate was in the weld itself and the fastest rate for the HAZ adjacent to the weld. The shear break and peel break properties started to decrease after the standard oxidative induction time had depleted to residual, but before the high-pressure oxidative induction time had reached residual. Failures occured at the HAZ adjacent to weld in both the shear and peel tests. No failure of the seam itself was observed. The times to nominal failure of the GMB in the critical HAZ are predicted. The rate of degradation in the weld and sheet are compared.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-05-09T07:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2017-0049
       
  • Effects of grass roots on soil-water retention curve and permeability
           function
    • Authors: Apiniti Jotisankasa, Teerapat Sirirattanachat
      Pages: 1 - 11
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      The effects of Vetiver grass (Chrysopogon zizanioides) roots on the soil-water retention curves (SWRCs), permeability (k) function, and saturated permeability, ksat, have been investigated on clayey sand (SC) and low-plasticity silt (ML). For ML soil, when the root biomass per soil volume was lower than 6.5 kg/m3, the saturated permeability increased, the air-entry suction decreased slightly, and the SWRC became steeper with increasing root contents, probably due to the formation of cracks caused by wetting and drying cycles during the plant growing period. Nevertheless, roots appeared to decrease the saturated permeability and increase the air-entry suction of ML soil, after reaching this threshold with a root content of about 6.5 kg/m3 as roots occupied the macropores and tended to suppress cracks and swelling. For SC soil for all root contents, only a slight variation of the saturated permeability with root content could be observed for the upper bounds on saturated permeability. However, the lower bounds on saturated permeability appeared to decrease as root content increased. It has also been shown that for a suction range beyond 30 kPa, the influence of roots on permeability appeared to be less significant.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-03-07T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0281
       
  • Seismic performance of soil-nailed walls using a 1g shaking table
    • Authors: Majid Yazdandoust
      Pages: 1 - 18
      Abstract: Canadian Geotechnical Journal, e-First Articles.
      To assess the seismic performance of soil-nailed walls, a series of 1g shaking table tests was conducted on 0.8 m high wall models with different nail lengths. It was found that the seismic deformation mode of walls highly depends on the nail length and input motion parameters. The combination of a base sliding and rotating deformation mode was observed as the predominant mode of deformation and the length to height (L/H) ratio of 0.7 was presented as the critical ratio in seismic conditions. The pattern of the observed failure mechanisms was similar to a third-degree polynomial failure surface with a specific inflection point. Irrespective of different nail lengths, the threshold acceleration corresponding to the onset of plastic displacements was similar and equal to 0.5g for all models. Based on the formation of initial cracks, a range of Δx/H = 0.33%–0.56% (where Δx is the lateral displacement of the facing) was found as a transitional level from quasi-elastic to plastic state. Also, based on the initial development of the active wedge failure, a range of Δx/H = 3.3%–4.3% was found as a transitional level from plastic to failure state.
      Citation: Canadian Geotechnical Journal
      PubDate: 2017-02-06T08:00:00Z
      DOI: 10.1139/cgj-2016-0358
       
 
 
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