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  Subjects -> CHEMISTRY (Total: 762 journals)
    - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY (45 journals)
    - CHEMISTRY (527 journals)
    - CRYSTALLOGRAPHY (22 journals)
    - ELECTROCHEMISTRY (24 journals)
    - INORGANIC CHEMISTRY (40 journals)
    - ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (40 journals)
    - PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (64 journals)

CHEMISTRY (527 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Accreditation and Quality Assurance: Journal for Quality, Comparability and Reliability in Chemical Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (30 followers)
ACS Catalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (21 followers)
ACS Chemical Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (10 followers)
ACS Combinatorial Science     Full-text available via subscription   (6 followers)
ACS Macro Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (16 followers)
ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Full-text available via subscription   (16 followers)
ACS Nano     Full-text available via subscription   (151 followers)
ACS Photonics     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
ACS Synthetic Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (7 followers)
Acta Chemica Iasi     Open Access  
Acta Chimica Slovaca     Open Access   (5 followers)
Acta Chromatographica     Full-text available via subscription   (9 followers)
Acta Facultatis Medicae Naissensis     Open Access   (1 follower)
Acta Metallurgica Sinica (English Letters)     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
adhäsion KLEBEN & DICHTEN     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Adhesion Adhesives & Sealants     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Adsorption Science & Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (5 followers)
Advanced Functional Materials     Hybrid Journal   (29 followers)
Advances in Chemical Engineering and Science     Open Access   (19 followers)
Advances in Chemical Science     Open Access   (6 followers)
Advances in Colloid and Interface Science     Full-text available via subscription   (12 followers)
Advances in Drug Research     Full-text available via subscription   (13 followers)
Advances in Fluorine Science     Full-text available via subscription   (6 followers)
Advances in Fuel Cells     Full-text available via subscription   (10 followers)
Advances in Heterocyclic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (6 followers)
Advances in Materials Physics and Chemistry     Open Access   (7 followers)
Advances in Nanoparticles     Open Access   (9 followers)
Advances in Organometallic Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (7 followers)
Advances in Polymer Science     Hybrid Journal   (35 followers)
Advances in Protein Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Advances in Protein Chemistry and Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (8 followers)
Advances in Quantum Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
African Journal of Chemical Education     Open Access  
African Journal of Pure and Applied Chemistry     Open Access  
Afrique Science : Revue Internationale des Sciences et Technologie     Open Access  
Agrokémia és Talajtan     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Alchemy     Open Access   (2 followers)
Alkaloids: Chemical and Biological Perspectives     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
AMB Express     Open Access   (1 follower)
Ambix     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
American Journal of Applied Sciences     Open Access   (27 followers)
American Journal of Biochemistry and Biotechnology     Open Access   (77 followers)
American Journal of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology     Open Access   (7 followers)
American Journal of Chemistry     Open Access   (14 followers)
American Journal of Plant Physiology     Open Access   (9 followers)
American Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Analyst     Full-text available via subscription   (33 followers)
Angewandte Chemie     Hybrid Journal   (12 followers)
Angewandte Chemie International Edition     Hybrid Journal   (140 followers)
Annales UMCS, Chemia     Open Access   (2 followers)
Annual Reports in Computational Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Annual Reports Section A (Inorganic Chemistry)     Full-text available via subscription   (2 followers)
Annual Reports Section B (Organic Chemistry)     Full-text available via subscription   (4 followers)
Annual Review of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (8 followers)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (11 followers)
Anti-Infective Agents     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Applied Organometallic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Applied Spectroscopy     Full-text available via subscription   (11 followers)
Applied Surface Science     Hybrid Journal   (13 followers)
Arabian Journal of Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (5 followers)
ARKIVOC     Open Access   (1 follower)
Asian Journal of Biochemistry     Open Access   (1 follower)
Australian Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
Autophagy     Full-text available via subscription  
Avances en Quimica     Open Access   (1 follower)
Biocell     Open Access  
Biochemical Pharmacology     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Biochemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (118 followers)
Biochemistry Insights     Open Access   (3 followers)
Biochemistry Research International     Open Access   (3 followers)
BioChip Journal     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Bioinorganic Chemistry and Applications     Open Access   (4 followers)
Biointerface Research in Applied Chemistry     Open Access   (1 follower)
Biointerphases     Open Access  
Biomacromolecules     Full-text available via subscription   (16 followers)
Biomass Conversion and Biorefinery     Partially Free   (5 followers)
Biomedical Chromatography     Hybrid Journal   (7 followers)
Biomolecular NMR Assignments     Hybrid Journal   (2 followers)
BioNanoScience     Partially Free   (4 followers)
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (26 followers)
Bioorganic & Medicinal Chemistry Letters     Hybrid Journal   (20 followers)
Bioorganic Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)
Biopolymers     Hybrid Journal   (12 followers)
Biosensors     Open Access   (3 followers)
Biotechnic and Histochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (1 follower)
Boletin de la Sociedad Chilena de Quimica     Open Access  
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia     Open Access   (1 follower)
Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Japan     Full-text available via subscription   (11 followers)
Canadian Association of Radiologists Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (3 followers)
Canadian Journal of Chemistry     Full-text available via subscription   (6 followers)
Canadian Mineralogist     Full-text available via subscription   (1 follower)
Carbohydrate Research     Hybrid Journal   (10 followers)
Carbon     Hybrid Journal   (33 followers)
Catalysis for Sustainable Energy     Open Access   (1 follower)
Catalysis Reviews: Science and Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Catalysis Science and Technology     Free   (3 followers)
Catalysis Surveys from Asia     Hybrid Journal   (3 followers)
Catalysts     Open Access   (5 followers)
Cellulose     Hybrid Journal   (4 followers)
Central European Journal of Chemistry     Hybrid Journal   (5 followers)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Chemistry & Biodiversity    [7 followers]  Follow    
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1612-1872 - ISSN (Online) 1612-1880
     Published by John Wiley and Sons Homepage  [1594 journals]   [SJR: 0.541]   [H-I: 35]
  • Chemical Composition of the Essential Oils of Three Endemic Species of
           Anthemis Sect. Hiorthia (DC.) R.Fern. Growing Wild in Sicily and
           Chemotaxonomic Volatile Markers of the Genus Anthemis L.: An Update
    • Abstract: The chemical composition of the essential oils isolated from the aerial parts of Anthemis pignattiorum Guarino, Raimondo & Domina and A. ismelia Lojac. and the aerial parts and flowers of Anthemis cupaniana Tod. ex Nyman, three endemic Sicilian species belonging to the section Hiorthia, was determined by GC‐FID and GC/MS analyses. (Z)‐Muurola‐4(14),5‐diene (27.3%) was recognized as the main constituent of the A. pignattiorum essential oil, together with isospathulenol (10.6%), sabinene (7.7%), and artemisyl acetate (6.8%), while in the oil obtained from the aerial parts of A. ismelia, geranyl propionate (8.8%), bornyl acetate (7.9%), β‐thujone (7.8%), neryl propionate (6.5%), and τ‐muurolol (6.5%) prevailed. α‐Pinene was the main compound of both the aerial part and flower oils of A. cupaniana (18.4 and 13.2%, resp.). Also noteworthy are the considerable amounts of artemisyl acetate (12.7%) and β‐thujone (11.8%) found in the oil from the aerial parts and those of tricosane (9.8%) and sabinene (7.6%) evidenced in the flower oil. Furthermore, an update on the main compounds identified in the essential oils of all the Anthemis taxa studied so far was presented, and cluster analyses were carried out, to compare the essential oils of these taxa.
       
  • Intranasal Odorant Concentrations in Relation to Sniff Behavior
    • Abstract: Knowledge on how odorants are transported through the nasal cavity to the olfactory epithelium is limited. One facet of this is how the sniffing behavior affects the abundance of odorants transferred to the olfactory cleft and in turn influences odor perception. A novel system that couples an online mass spectrometer with an odorant pulse delivery olfactometer was employed to characterize intranasal odorant concentrations of butane‐2,3‐dione (or butanedione, commonly known as diacetyl) at the interior naris and the olfactory cleft. Volunteers (n=12) were asked to perform different modes of sniffing in relation to the sniff intensity that were categorized as ‘normal’, ‘rapid’ and ‘forced’. The highest concentrations of butanedione at both positions in the nose were observed during normal sniffing, with the lowest concentrations correlating with periods of forced sniffs. This corresponded to the panelists' ratings that normal sniffing elicited the highest odor intensities. These feasibility assessments pave the way for more in‐depth analyses with a variety of odorants of different chemical classes at various intranasal positions, to investigate the passage and uptake of odorants within the nasal cavity.
       
  • Chemical Composition and Biological Activity of the Essential Oil of
           Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum from Different Areas in the Southern
           Apennines (Italy)
    • Abstract: The chemical composition of the essential oils of Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum, growing wild in three different localities in the Southern Apennines, was studied by GC‐FID and GC/MS analyses. In total, 103 compounds were identified. The oils were mainly composed of phenolic compounds and all oils belonged to the chemotype carvacrol/thymol. The three essential oils were evaluated for their in vitro phytotoxic activity by determining their influence on the germination and initial radicle elongation of Sinapis arvensis L., Phalaris canariensis L., Lepidium sativum L., and Raphanus sativus L. The seed germination and radicle growth were affected in various degrees. Moreover, the antifungal activity of the three essential oils was assayed against three species causing pre‐ and postharvest fruit decay (Monilinia laxa, M. fructigena, and M. fructicola). At 1000 ppm, the three oils completely inhibited fungal growth. The hemolytic activity of the oils was assayed and showed no effect on the cell membranes of bovine erythrocytes.
       
  • Volatile Compounds in Thymus sect. Teucrioides (Lamiaceae): Intraspecific
           and Interspecific Diversity, Chemotaxonomic Significance and Exploitation
           Potential
    • Abstract: Thymus sect. Teucrioides comprises three species, namely, T. hartvigii, T. leucospermus, and T. teucrioides, distributed in Greece and Albania. The volatile constituents of all species of the section were obtained by hydrodistillation and investigated by GC‐FID and GC/MS analyses. Twenty populations were sampled and a total of 103 compounds were identified, representing 98.0–99.9% of the oil compositions. The oils were mainly characterized by high contents of monoterpene hydrocarbons (42.7–92.4%), with the exception of three oils for which oxygenated monoterpenes were the dominating constituents, viz., that of T. hartvigii ssp. macrocalyx, with linalool as main compound (89.2±0.5%), and those of T. hartvigii ssp. hartvigii and of one population of T. teucrioides ssp. candilicus, containing thymol as major component (46.4±3.1 and 38.2±3.9%, resp.). The most common compound in the oils of the 20 populations of the section was p‐cymene. Considerable variation was detected within and among populations, and seven chemotypes were distinguished, i.e., p‐cymene, linalool, p‐cymene/thymol, p‐cymene/γ‐terpinene, p‐cymene/borneol, p‐cymene/γ‐terpinene/borneol, and p‐cymene/linalool chemotypes. Different chemotypes may exist in the same population. Multivariate statistical analyses enabled the segregation of the oils within Thymus sect. Teucrioides into two groups, one consisting of the three subspecies of T. teucrioides and the second comprising the species T. hartvigii and T. leucospermus. A linalool‐rich chemotype, unique within the section, distinguished the oil of T. hartvigii ssp. macrocalyx from all other oils. The high oil content of p‐cymene and the preference for serpentine substrates render T. teucrioides species promising for future exploitation.
       
  • Dynamics of Fatty‐Acid Composition of Neutral Acylglycerols in
           Maturing Euonymus Fruits
    • Abstract: The dynamics of the fatty‐acid (FA) composition of neutral acylglycerols (NAGs) composed of 1,2,3‐triacyl‐sn‐glycerols (TAGs) and 3‐acetyl‐1,2‐diacyl‐sn‐glycerols (acDAGs) was determined in the fruit seeds and arils of three Euonymus L. species at three stages of their maturity. The NAG composition comprised 29 FAs, linoleic, oleic, palmitic, and α‐linolenic acids being predominant. Noticeable amounts of other FAs, such as lauric, myristic, hexadec‐9‐enoic, stearic, (Z)‐vaccenic, and arachidic acid, etc., could also be present. In the course of maturation, the qualitative composition of major FAs remained nearly unchanged, while the unsaturation index of FAs in seeds and in TAGs, as well as, but to a lesser extent, in arils and in acDAGs, respectively, always decreased. This decline was brought about by a sharp fall of the α‐linolenate level, a decrease of the linoleate content, and a corresponding rise in the oleate content. It is suggested that, in both seeds and arils, both classes of NAGs were formed at the expense of the same FA pool; the quantitative composition of this pool was characteristic of a given fruit part and strongly changed during maturation. The accumulation of TAGs in E. europaeus fruits was accompanied by a conversion of hexadec‐9‐enoic acid into (Z)‐vaccenic acid via the C2‐elongation reaction.
       
  • Seasonal Changes of Flavonoid Content in Melittis melissophyllum L.
           (Lamiaceae)
    • Abstract: Melittis melissophyllum L., a medicinal plant currently used in the folk medicine, was analyzed for the content of flavonoid compounds. The plants were collected in two locations in Poland in May and September. MeOH Extracts from the leaves and flowers (separately) were analyzed by HPLC‐DAD. Eight compounds were identified in all the samples and quantitatively analyzed as cinaroside (=luteolin 7‐O‐glucoside), rutin, myricetin, quercitrin, quercetin, luteolin, kaempferol, and apigenin. M. melissophyllum accumulated the highest total amounts of flavonoids in May (flowers: from 258 to 271 mg/100 g dry weight (dw); leaves: from 143 to 155 mg/100 g dw) and significantly lower ones in September (leaves: from 83 to 92 mg/100 g dw). The main compound was cinaroside (May: up to 249 mg/100 g dw; September: up to 43 mg/100 g dw). Advanced multivariate statistical techniques (cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA)) were used to characterize the sample populations and to analyze the data. We report, for the first time, the results of the quantitative analysis of M. melissophyllum flavonoids and seasonal changes in their accumulation. Our results show that the time of harvesting has a significant influence on the flavonoid content in M. melissophyllum, while the geographical location does not have such an effect.
       
  • Myrtus communis Essential Oil: Chemical Composition and Antimicrobial
           Activities against Food Spoilage Pathogens
    • Abstract: Myrtus communis is a typical plant of the Mediterranean area, which is mainly used as animal and human food and, in folk medicine, for treating some disorders. In the present study, we evaluated in vitro antibacterial and antifungal properties of the essential oils of Myrtus communis (McEO), as well as its phytochemical composition. The GC/MS analysis of the essential oil revealed 17 compounds. Myrtenyl acetate (20.75%), 1,8‐cineol (16.55%), α‐pinene (15.59%), linalool (13.30%), limonene (8.94%), linalyl acetate (3.67%), geranyl acetate (2.99%), and α‐terpineol (2.88%) were the major components. The antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was also investigated on several microorganisms. The inhibition zones and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of bacterial strains were in the range of 16–28 mm and 0.078–2.5 mg/ml, respectively. The inhibitory activity of the McEO against Gram‐positive bacteria was significantly higher than against Gram‐negative. It also exhibited remarkable activity against several fungal strains. The investigation of the mode of action of the McEO by the time‐kill curve against Listeria monocytogenes (food isolate) showed a drastic bactericidal effect after 5 min using a concentration of 312 μg/ml. These results evidence that the McEO possesses antimicrobial properties, and it is, therefore, a potential source for active ingredients for food and pharmaceutical industries.
       
  • Further Antibacterial Geranium macrorrhizum L. Metabolites and Synthesis
           of Epoxygermacrones
    • Abstract: 4,5‐ and 1,10‐Epoxygermacrones were isolated from the essential oil of aerial parts of Geranium macrorrhizum L. (Geraniaceae). The structures of the epoxy derivatives were deduced from their 1D‐ and 2D‐NMR spectra, molecular modeling, and confirmed by synthesis starting from germacrone. The epoxy compounds were screened for their antimicrobial activities by a microdilution assay, which revealed high activities of both compounds against Bacillus subtilis (minimum inhibitory concentrations (M/Cs) determined were 4.3 and 43 nmol/ml for 1,10‐ and 4,5‐epoxygermacrone, resp.) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (0.043 and 0.855 μmol/ml for 1,10‐ and 4,5‐epoxygermacrone, resp.). The discovery and observed activity of the two epoxides fills the gap in our knowledge of the active principles in this highly renowned ethnomedicinal plant species.
       
  • The Role of the Conformational Profile of Polysaccharides on Skin
           Penetration: The Case of Hyaluronan and Its Sulfates
    • Abstract: The literature data suggest the capacity of biomacromolecules to permeate the human skin, even though such a transdermal permeation appears to be governed by physicochemical parameters which are significantly different compared to those ruling the skin permeation of small molecules. On these grounds, the present study was undertaken to investigate the in vitro diffusion properties through the human epidermis of hyaluronic acid and their sulfates. Low‐ and medium‐molecular‐weight hyaluronic acids and the corresponding derivatives at two degrees of sulfation were then tested. In vitro studies evidenced that the sulfated polymers permeate better than the corresponding hyaluronic acid, despite their vastly greater polarity, while the observed permeation markedly decreases when increasing the polymer's molecular weight regardless of the sulfation degree. Using a fluorescent‐labeled polysaccharide, it was also evidenced that hyaluronans have a great affinity for corneocytes and likely cross the stratum corneum mainly through a transcellular route. The molecular‐dynamics study revealed how the observed permeations for the investigated polysaccharides can be rationalized by monitoring their conformational profiles, since the permeation was found to be directly related to their capacity to assume extended and flexible conformations.
       
  • Extraordinary Thermal Stability of an Oligodeoxynucleotide Octamer
           Constructed from Alternating 7‐Deaza‐7‐iodo guanine and
           5‐Iodocytosine Base Pairs – DNA Duplex Stabilization by
           Halogen Bonds'
    • Abstract: A reinvestigation of the published X‐ray crystal‐structure analyses of 7‐halogenated (Br, I) 8‐aza‐7‐deaza‐2′‐deoxyguanosines Br7c7z8Gd; 1a and I7c7z8Gd, 1b, as well as of the structurally related 7‐deaza‐7‐iodo‐2′‐deoxy‐β‐D‐ribofuranosyladenine (β‐I7c7Ad; 2=6e in Table 1) and its α‐D‐anomer (α‐I7c7Ad; 3) clearly revealed the existence of halogen bonds between corresponding halogen substituents and the adjacent N(3)‐atoms of neighboring nucleoside molecules within the single crystals. These halogen bonds can be rationalized by the presence of a region of positive electrostatic potential, the σ‐hole, on the outermost portion the halogen's surface, while the three unshared pairs of electrons produce a belt of negative electrostatic potential around the central part of the halogen substituent. The N(3) atoms of the halogenated nucleosides carry a partial negative charge. This novel type of bonding between nucleosides was tentatively used to explain the extraordinary high stability of oligodeoxynucleotides constructed from halogenated nucleotide building blocks.
       
  • Limonoids from Azadirachta indica var. siamensis Extracts and Their
           Cytotoxic and Melanogenesis‐Inhibitory Activities
    • Abstract: Six new limonoids, 7‐benzoyl‐17‐epinimbocinol (5), 3‐acetyl‐7‐tigloylnimbidinin (8), 1‐isovaleroyl‐1‐detigloylsalanninolide (15), 2,3‐dihydro‐3α‐methoxynimbolide (16), deacetyl‐20,21‐epoxy‐20,22‐dihydro‐21‐deoxyisonimbinolide (26), and deacetyl‐20,21,22,23‐tetrahydro‐20,22‐dihydroxy‐21,23‐dimethoxynimbin (27), along with 28 known limonoids, 1–4, 6, 7, 9–14, 17–25, and 28–34, and two known flavonoids, 35 and 36, have been isolated from the extracts of bark, leaves, roots, and seeds of Azadirachta indica A. Juss. var. siamensis Valeton (Siamese neem tree; Meliaceae). The structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analysis and comparison with literature data. All of these compounds were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against leukemia (HL60), lung (A549), stomach (AZ521), and breast (SK‐BR‐3) cancer cell lines. Eleven compounds, 1, 2, 4–7, 13, 16, 17, 29, and 30, exhibited potent cytotoxicities against one or more cell lines with IC50 values in the range of 0.1–9.3 μM. Compound 16 induced apoptotic cell death in AZ521 cells upon evaluation of the apoptosis‐inducing activity by flow cytometric analysis. Western blot analysis on AZ521 cells revealed that compound 16 activated caspases‐3, ‐8, and ‐9, while increasing the ratio of Bax/Bcl‐2. This suggested that 16 induced apoptosis via both mitochondrial and death receptor pathways in AZ521. In addition, upon evaluation of all compounds against the melanogenesis in B16 melanoma cells induced with α‐melanocyte‐stimulating hormone (α‐MSH), 20 limonoids, i.e., 1–3, 6, 9–11, 18, 19, 21–29, 32, and 34, and two flavonoids, 35 and 36, exhibited melanogenesis‐inhibitory activities, with no, or almost no, toxicities to the cells at lower and/or higher concentrations, which were more potent than the reference arbutin, a known melanogenesis inhibitor. Western blot analysis showed that nimbin (18) reduced the protein levels of microphtalmia‐associated transcription factor (MITF), tyrosinase, tyrosine‐related protein 1 (TRP‐1), and TRP‐2 mostly in a concentration‐dependent manner, indicating that 18 inhibits melanogenesis on a α‐MSH‐stimulated B16 melanoma cells by, at least in part, inhibiting the expression of MITF, followed by decreasing the expression of tyrosinase, TRP‐1, and TRP‐2.
       
  • Cytotoxic and Apoptosis‐Inducing Activities, and
           Anti‐Tumor‐Promoting Effects of Cyanogenated and Oxygenated
           Triterpenes
    • Abstract: Two of each semisynthetic lanostane‐ and cycloartane‐type triterpenes with a cyano‐enone functionality, i.e., 13 and 18, and 23 and 28, respectively, sixteen of their synthetic intermediates, 9–12, 14–17, 19–22, and 24–27, along with seven semisynthetic oxygenated triterpene acetates, 29–35, and eight natural hydroxy triterpenes, 1–8, were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against leukemia (HL60), lung (A549), stomach (AZ521), and breast (SK‐BR‐3) cancer cell lines. One natural triterpene, 8, and ten semisynthetic triterpenes, 9, 13, 15, 18, 23, 25, 28, 29, 32, and 33, exhibited potent cytotoxicities against one or more cell lines with IC50 values in the range of 1.4–9.9 μM. Two lanostane‐type triterpenes with a cyano‐enone functionality, 3‐oxolanosta‐1,8,24‐triene‐2‐carbonitrile (13) and 3‐oxolanosta‐1,8‐diene‐2‐carbonitrile (18), induced apoptosis in HL60 cells, as observed by membrane phospholipid exposure in flow cytometry. Western blot analysis showed that 13 and 18 significantly reduced procaspases‐3, ‐8, and ‐9, and increased cleaved caspases‐3, ‐8, and ‐9. These findings indicated that compounds 13 and 18 induced apoptosis in HL60 cells via both the mitochondrial and the death receptor‐mediated pathways. In addition, upon evaluation of the inhibitory effects on EpsteinBarr virus early antigen (EBV‐EA) activation induced with 12‐O‐tetradecanoylphorbol‐13‐acetate (TPA) in Raji cells, seven natural triterpenes, 1–6 and 8, and ten semisynthetic triterpenes, 9, 10, 14, 15, 19, 20, 24, 25, 29, and 30, exhibited inhibitory effects which were higher than that of β‐carotene, a vitamin A precursor studied widely in cancer‐chemoprevention animal models.
       
  • Contents: C&B 4/2014
    •  
 
 
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