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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 881 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ad verba Liberorum : Journal of Linguistics & Pedagogy & Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 56)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 61)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 406)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 37)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 229)
Anales de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 68)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 220)
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 152)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
At-Tajdid : Jurnal Ilmu Tarbiyah     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autism's Own     Open Access  
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 127)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 135)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access  
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access  
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Coaching Psykologi - The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Creativity. Theories - Research - Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Psicopedagogía     Open Access  
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Culturas Psi     Open Access  
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Current psychology letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Discourse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Diversitas: Perspectivas en Psicologia     Open Access  
Drama Therapy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Drogues, santé et société     Full-text available via subscription  
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ecopsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
ECOS - Estudos Contemporâneos da Subjetividade     Open Access  
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Educazione sentimentale     Full-text available via subscription  
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Elpis - Czasopismo Teologiczne Katedry Teologii Prawosławnej Uniwersytetu w Białymstoku     Open Access  
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
En-Claves del pensamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Enseñanza e Investigacion en Psicologia     Open Access  
Epiphany     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback
  [SJR: 0.677]   [H-I: 47]   [8 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1573-3270 - ISSN (Online) 1090-0586
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2353 journals]
  • Brief Biofeedback Intervention on Anxious Freshman University Students
    • Authors: Paulo Chaló; Anabela Pereira; Patrícia Batista; Luis Sancho
      Pages: 163 - 168
      Abstract: Abstract The increasing number of mental health disorders on university students represents a growing problem with negative impact on this population. Stress and anxiety issues are two of most predominant problems in this population and most campus health services have limited resources to face them. Research has provided evidence about biofeedback effectiveness. This study aims to verify the impact of a short duration biofeedback programme on freshmen university students with high levels of anxiety. A sample of 50 first-year students, with scores above percentile of 75 on STAI Y-2 were randomly selected and divided into two groups. Biofeedback Group took a 15 min session per week, over 8 weeks. No intervention was made on Control Group. Both groups were assessed before and after the biofeedback programme, and the results of the Trait Anxiety Scale and the Inventory of Stress for College Students were compared. The Biofeedback Group presented significant decreases in anxiety and stress values. Control Group presented slight and non-significant changes in scores. These results are consistent with previous studies and reinforce the evidence of biofeedback’s programmes as a valid solution to help students to manage their anxiety and stress.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9361-5
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Increased HPA Axis Activity and Serum Tryptophan in Naswar (Dipping
           Tobacco) Users: A Case–Control Study
    • Authors: Faiza Sajid; Samina Bano
      Pages: 169 - 178
      Abstract: Abstract Nicotine is the principal addictive agent present in Naswar, a smokeless dipping tobacco product. 5-Hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) has been implicated in the reinforcement properties of nicotine. Also, the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is of vital importance in evaluating the response to stress and nicotine addiction. The study aimed to evaluate serum tryptophan and cortisol levels in Naswar users in relation to addiction. Additionally, serum cotinine levels were also determined to assess daily nicotine exposure. The study comprised 90 healthy Naswar users and 68 non-tobacco users. Estimation of serum cortisol, tryptophan and albumin was carried out. From the Naswar user group, 20 were selected for the estimation of serum cotinine for which blood was drawn twice first in the morning and then in the evening. Serum tryptophan and cortisol levels in Naswar users were significantly raised compared to the control group. However, no difference in the levels of albumin between Naswar users and the control group were found. The mean cotinine values rose from the morning value of 366.0 ± 40.69 ng/ml (mean ± SEM) to an evening value of 503.1 ± 42.96 ng/ml that in turn is equivalent to consumption of 40 cigarettes. Elevated cortisol levels might constitute an important aspect of Naswar addiction. Additionally, raised levels of serum tryptophan in Naswar users could lead to raised concentration of 5-HT which also might be a significant factor contributing to Naswar addiction. Also, serum cotinine concentrations equivalent to an intake of about 40 cigarettes per day is quite alarming.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9363-3
      Issue No: Vol. 42, No. 3 (2017)
       
  • Abstracts of Scientific Oral and Poster Presentations at the 19th Meeting
           of the Biofeedback Federation of Europe
    • PubDate: 2017-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9376-y
       
  • Using EEG Frontal Asymmetry to Predict IT User’s Perceptions Regarding
           Usefulness, Ease of Use and Playfulness
    • Authors: Christos N. Moridis; Vasileios Terzis; Anastasios A. Economides; Anna Karlovasitou; Vasileios E. Karabatakis
      Abstract: Abstract Information systems (IS) community is increasingly interested in employing neuroscience tools and methods in order to develop new theories concerning Human–computer interaction (HCI) and further understand IS acceptance models. The new field of NeuroIS has been introduced to address these issues. NeuroIS researchers have proposed encephalography (EEG), among other neuroscience instruments, as a valuable usability metric, when used effectively in appropriately designed experiments. Moreover, numerous researchers have suggested that EEG frontal asymmetry may serve as an important metric of user experience. Based on the aforementioned evidence, this study aims to integrate frontal asymmetry with Technology acceptance model (TAM). Particularly, we assumed that frontal asymmetry might predict users’ perceptions regarding Usefulness and Ease of Use. Furthermore, we hypothesized that frontal asymmetry might also affect (influence) users’ Perceived Playfulness. Specifically, 82 (43 females and 39 males) undergraduate students were chosen to use a Computer-Based Assessment (while being connected to the EEG) in the context of an introductory informatics course. Results confirmed our hypothesis as well as points of theory about Information technology (IT) acceptance variables. This is one of the first studies to suggest that frontal asymmetry could serve as a valuable tool for examining IT acceptance constructs and better understanding HCI.
      PubDate: 2017-09-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9379-8
       
  • Psychophysiological Reactivity in Couples During a Marital Interaction
           Task
    • Authors: J. Coutinho; P. Oliveira-Silva; A. R. Mesquita; M. Barbosa; K. M. Perrone-McGovern; O. F. Gonçalves
      Abstract: Abstract The ability to regulate our own physiological arousal when dealing with the emotional expression of our partner is crucial for satisfactory and stable intimate relationships. In previous physiological studies of marital interactions, researchers have found greater levels of psychophysiological arousal for members of the couple in conflictual interactions in comparison with positive interactions. Past researchers have established that intense and prolonged autonomic and neuroendocrine arousal during marital conflict can have negative consequences for mental and physical health. In this study we examined the physiological reactivity, as measured by skin conductance level, heart rate and cortisol levels, from both partners during a couple's interaction task consisting of a structured conversation about positive and negative aspects of their relationship. Participants were thirty-two heterosexual couples (N = 64) in a committed monogamous relationship with a minimum duration of one year. We found higher heart rate and cortisol levels during negative interaction condition when compared with the positive condition. Skin conductance was higher in the positive interaction condition, when compared with the negative interaction condition. In addition, we found a significant negative association between heart rate variability and autonomic arousal evoked by the interaction task. The implications of these findings for the effects of marital strain on health as well as for the design of risk-reducing interventions, namely biofeedback are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-09-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9380-2
       
  • Auditory Event-Related Potentials in the Interictal Phase of Migraine
           Indicate Alterations in Automatic Attention
    • Authors: Jeffrey J. Sable; Toni A. Patrick; Patrick L. Woody; Katelyn R. Baker; Stephanie Allen-Winters; Frank Andrasik
      Abstract: Abstract Migraine has been characterized by interictal cortical hyperresponsivity. We compared event-related brain potentials (ERPs) to unattended tone pairs in migraineurs (interictal) versus non-headache controls, with particular interest in attention-related activity (i.e., the N1 component). Electroencephalograms were recorded from 11 interictal migraineurs and 14 headache-free controls while they watched a silent video. Pairs of 50-ms tones with 500-ms inter-tone intervals were presented with inter-pair intervals of 1 or 5 s. P1, N1, P2, and N2 components were analyzed. N1 peak amplitudes were larger in migraineurs than in controls, especially after the 5-s inter-pair interval. However, there was no difference between groups in the attenuation of the N1 (i.e., no interaction). P2 peak amplitudes were larger in migraineurs, but only after the first tone in the pair. The three migraineurs without aura had larger N1s than the eight with aura. Our findings are consistent with interictal hyperresponsivity of cortical generators of these ERPs in migraineurs. However, areas that inhibit the responses with stimulus repetition do not seem to be affected.
      PubDate: 2017-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9378-9
       
  • Respiratory Sinus Arrhythmia in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for
           Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in Children: Preliminary Treatment and
           Gender Effects
    • Authors: Rebecca S. Lipschutz; Sarah A. O. Gray; Carl F. Weems; Michael S. Scheeringa
      Abstract: Abstract Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an efficacious treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, but the effect of CBT on physiological indicators is largely unknown. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) is an established parasympathetic marker of self-regulatory capacity and stress responsivity. The present study tested if and how resting RSA and RSA reactivity changed following treatment among a sample of children (n = 48) who experienced at least one traumatic event and presented with PTSD symptoms. RSA reactivity was measured in response to personalized trauma-related scripts. Results indicated that changes in RSA after treatment were dependent on pretreatment resting levels of RSA, with individuals with high and low pretreatment resting RSA levels appearing to converge over time in both resting RSA and RSA reactivity by the 3-month follow up. Specific to RSA reactivity, a sex difference was evident, as following treatment, females showed less RSA withdrawal whereas males showed more RSA withdrawal. PTSD symptoms were significantly reduced after CBT but symptom change was not associated with pretreatment resting RSA levels. Overall, these results suggest that there may be multiple physiological patterns within children with PTSD and the direction of the physiological changes after CBT may depend on initial differences in resting RSA levels.
      PubDate: 2017-08-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9377-x
       
  • Biofeedback-Aided Relaxation Training Helps Emotional Disturbances in
           Undergraduate Students Before Examination
    • Authors: Zahra Gholami Tahsini; Shahrokh Makvand Hosseini; Farahnaz Kianersi; Shahrzad Rashn; Elahe Majdara
      Abstract: Abstract The main aim of the present research was to determine the effectiveness of biofeedback-aided relaxation training (BFRT) for alleviating symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress for undergraduate students as they prepared for their final examinations. In a randomized controlled trial design, 29 male and female students, with heightened levels of depression, anxiety and stress scores on the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale, were chosen and randomly assigned to BFRT or a no-treatment control condition. Subjects assigned to BFRT received eight sessions of BFRT spaced over 4 weeks, during which they were trained to decrease electromyography (EMG) and respiration rate (RESP) and to increase skin temperature (TEMP). Data were extracted and analyzed by GLM statistical analysis. Students receiving BFRT revealed significant reductions in symptoms when compared to the untreated controls. Those receiving BFRT also showed significant changes for the three targeted psychophysiological modalities (EMG, RESP, and TEMP). It was concluded that BFRT can be useful for reducing symptoms of emotional disturbance in undergraduate students during a particularly stressful period and that this may, in turn, help promote overall psychological health.
      PubDate: 2017-07-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9375-z
       
  • The More Vivid the Imagination the Better: The Role of the Vividness of
           Imagination in Vasoconstriction Training and Vasodilatation Training
    • Authors: Julia E. Graef; Winfried Rief; Yvonne Nestoriuc; Cornelia Weise
      Abstract: Abstract Blood volume pulse biofeedback represents an effective non-pharmacological treatment for migraine. However, the underlying mechanisms of blood volume pulse biofeedback are still unclear. This study investigated the influence of vividness of imagination, private body consciousness, perfectionism, and general self-efficacy on physiological (blood volume pulse amplitude) and psychological (session performance rated by participants and by trainers) success. Changes in skin conductance and skin temperature indicating habituation to training context were examined. Forty-five healthy male participants were randomized to four sessions of vasoconstriction training or vasodilatation training. Hierarchical linear models were estimated. Results showed significant changes of session performance rated by participants (UC = 0.62, p < .05), by trainers (UC = 0.52, p < .001), and skin temperature (UC = 0.01, p < .001) over time. A change of blood volume pulse amplitude could not be observed (UC = −0.01, p = .65). Vividness of imagination was highly important for both psychological achievement ratings (UC participants  = 1.3, p < .001; UC trainers  = 0.29, p < .01). Relations between skin temperature and general self-efficacy or personal standards were small (UC self-efficacy  = 0.002, p < .10; UC personal standards  = 0.002, p < .05). A time × group interaction regarding trainers’ achievement ratings indicated a specific judgement effect. In conclusion, biofeedback trainers should pay attention to their beliefs and participants’ vividness of imagination.
      PubDate: 2017-07-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9373-1
       
  • Analysis of Subjects’ Vulnerability in a Touch Screen Game Using
           Behavioral Metrics
    • Authors: Payam Parsinejad; Rifat Sipahi
      Abstract: Abstract In this article, we report results on an experimental study conducted with volunteer subjects playing a touch-screen game with two unique difficulty levels. Subjects have knowledge about the rules of both game levels, but only sufficient playing experience with the easy level of the game, making them vulnerable with the difficult level. Several behavioral metrics associated with subjects’ playing the game are studied in order to assess subjects’ mental-workload changes induced by their vulnerability. Specifically, these metrics are calculated based on subjects’ finger kinematics and decision making times, which are then compared with baseline metrics, namely, performance metrics pertaining to how well the game is played and a physiological metric called pnn50 extracted from heart rate measurements. In balanced experiments and supported by comparisons with baseline metrics, it is found that some of the studied behavioral metrics have the potential to be used to infer subjects’ mental workload changes through different levels of the game. These metrics, which are decoupled from task specifics, relate to subjects’ ability to develop strategies to play the game, and hence have the advantage of offering insight into subjects’ task-load and vulnerability assessment across various experimental settings.
      PubDate: 2017-07-24
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9374-0
       
  • Characterization of the Sensorimotor Rhythm in 4-Month-Old Infants Born at
           Term and Premature
    • Authors: Milene Roca-Stappung; Minerva Moguel-González; Thalía Fernández; Thalía Harmony; Omar Mendoza-Montoya; José Luis Marroquín; Salvador Ruiz-Correa; Lourdes Díaz-Comas; Gloria Otero-Ojeda
      Abstract: Abstract The sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) is an electroencephalographic rhythm associated with motor and cognitive development observed in the central brain regions during wakefulness in the absence of movement, and it reacts contralaterally to generalized and hemibody movements. The purpose of this work was to characterize the SMR of 4-month-old infants, born either healthy at term or prematurely with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL). Two groups of infants were formed: healthy and premature with PVL. Their electroencephalograms (EEGs) were recorded in four conditions: rest, free movement, right-hand grasping and left-hand grasping, in order to explore general reactivity to free movement and contralateral reactivity in hand-grasping conditions. Associations between SMR, and cognitive and motor performance were analyzed. The healthy infants showed a SMR between 5.47 and 7.03 Hz, with clear contralateral reactivity to free movement and right-hand grasping. However, the premature infants with PVL did not show enough electroencephalographic characteristics to evidence the presence of SMR. Poor performance, characteristic of children with PVL, was related to low-frequency SMR, while good performance was associated with a higher frequency rhythm in the left hemisphere. The presence of SMR in the group of healthy infants could be considered a sign of health at this age. Thus, poor SMR evidence in the EEG of infants with PVL is probably a sign of brain immaturity or brain dysfunction. Our results provide data on infant SMR development that is needed to design neurofeedback protocols for infants with PVL.
      PubDate: 2017-07-22
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9370-4
       
  • Time is of the Essence: A Review of Electroencephalography (EEG) and
           Event-Related Brain Potentials (ERPs) in Language Research
    • Authors: Anna M. Beres
      Abstract: Abstract The discovery of electroencephalography (EEG) over a century ago has changed the way we understand brain structure and function, in terms of both clinical and research applications. This paper starts with a short description of EEG and then focuses on the event-related brain potentials (ERPs), and their use in experimental settings. It describes the typical set-up of an ERP experiment. A description of a number of ERP components typically involved in language research is presented. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of using ERPs in language research are discussed. EEG has an extensive use in today’s world, including medical, psychology, or linguistic research. The excellent temporal resolution of EEG information allows one to track a brain response in milliseconds and therefore makes it uniquely suited to research concerning language processing.
      PubDate: 2017-07-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9371-3
       
  • Thirst at Work Implies More Than Just Inadequate Facilities for Breaks
    • Authors: Maria U. Kottwitz; Romy Schnyder; Martial Berset; Achim Elfering
      Abstract: Abstract Early signs of dehydration, such as headaches, are not unusual in the working population. Even slight deficiencies of water intake may have negative effects on both health and performance. However, little is known about work-related fluid intake. We expect the daily experience of interruptions to distract from perceived thirst, resulting in reduced daily fluid intake. This effect may be more pronounced when the workload is generally less predictable due to the assignment of tasks that are beyond the definition of the worker’s professional role (unreasonable tasks). Data were gathered from 29 female service employees across five workdays. Multilevel analyses revealed daily work interruptions to be negatively associated with fluid intake, especially when there were frequent unreasonable task-assignments. Results suggest that interruptions at work might reduce daily fluid intake. However, adequate allocation of tasks by managers can protect employees against insufficient drinking.
      PubDate: 2017-07-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9369-x
       
  • Skin Conductance Reactivity to Standardized Virtual Reality Combat Scenes
           in Veterans with PTSD
    • Authors: Mascha van ’t Wout; Christopher M. Spofford; William S. Unger; Elizabeth B. Sevin; M. Tracie Shea
      Abstract: Abstract Interest in virtual reality (VR) as a clinical tool to augment posttraumatic stress (PTSD) treatment has grown substantially in recent years due to advances in VR technology. Moreover, its potential assisted use in the PTSD diagnostic process has been recognized. In this study we examined physiological responding, skin conductance, to a standardized presentation of non-personalized combat-related VR events (e.g. encountering enemy fire; explosions) as compared to non-combat classroom VR events in 19 Veterans with and 24 Veterans without combat-related PTSD who had been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan. Veterans watched a total of 12 VR scenarios—six combat-related and six non-combat-related—with each scenario gradually increasing in emotional intensity by adding more VR events in addition to repeating prior VR events. Results show that Veterans with PTSD displayed larger skin conductance reactivity across VR combat events, but not for non-combat VR events, as compared to combat Veterans without PTSD. Nevertheless, Veterans with and without PTSD showed a similar reduction of emotional arousal to repeated presentation of the same VR combat events. Within the PTSD sample, the elevated level of VR combat-related arousal correlated marginally with severity of hyperarousal symptoms. This study confirms that the use of a non-personalized and standardized VR presentation successfully distinguishes Veterans with PTSD from those without on a measure of psychophysiological arousal to combat-related VR stimuli. The assessment of physiological reactivity during the repeated presentation of standardized, trauma-related VR events highlights its use for PTSD assessment as well as treatment.
      PubDate: 2017-06-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9366-0
       
  • Relevance of the Clinical and Psychophysiological Variables in the
           Dyssynergic Defecation: A Comparative Study in Elderly Subjects
    • Authors: Miguel A. Simón; Ana M. Bueno
      Abstract: Abstract The relevance of several clinical and psychophysiological variables in the dyssynergic defecation in elderly subjects was investigated in this study. To accomplish this, 30 elderly subjects (10 without anorectal disorders, 10 with chronic constipation and 10 with dyssynergic defecation) were repeatedly assessed once per week for 4 weeks, with the following measures being collected at each session: EMG-activity (µV) of the external anal sphincter (at rest, during squeezing, and during straining to defecate), stool frequency, difficulty defecation level, pain grade during defecation, and satisfaction level after evacuation. A 3 (group) × 4 (sessions) mixed-measures MANOVA revealed a significant main effect for group (Wilks’s lambda = 0.006; F = 28.45; p < 0.01), but not for sessions (Wilks’s lambda = 0.874; F = 0.94; p > 0.05) or for the group x sessions interaction (Wilks’s lambda = 0.811; F = 1.45; p > 0.05). One-way ANOVA and Scheffé’s posthoc tests were used to isolate the differences between the groups with respect to the seven different measures. These analysis showed significant differences between the groups on all four clinical variables but only for one psychophysiological variable, EMG-activity during straining to defecate. Significant differences were evidenced between all pairs examined for the difficulty defecation level and pain grade. The complete results of these analysis are presented and the conclusions drawn from them are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-06-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9368-y
       
  • Reducing Anxiety and Improving Academic Performance Through a Biofeedback
           Relaxation Training Program
    • Authors: Aitor Aritzeta; Goretti Soroa; Nekane Balluerka; Alexander Muela; Arantxa Gorostiaga; Jone Aliri
      Abstract: Abstract The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of a biofeedback relaxation training program on anxiety and academic performance. The program consisted of five biofeedback sessions coupled with three training activities focused on deep breathing, guided imagery, and muscle relaxation. The participants were second-year psychology undergraduates from the University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU, northern Spain). The experimental group comprised 152 students (M age  = 19.6, SD = 0.74; 74% women) and the control group 81 students (M age   = 19.4, SD = 0.92; 71% women). Results showed that after participating in the program, students in the experimental group had lower levels of anxiety and increased academic performance. Furthermore, they scored lower on anxiety and higher on academic performance in comparison with the control subjects. This suggests that the inclusion of biofeedback training programs in educational contexts could be a way of reducing anxiety and improving academic performance. It may also deepen our understanding of the dynamic interplay between psychophysiological, cognitive, and emotional processes.
      PubDate: 2017-06-16
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9367-z
       
  • Transitive Versus Intransitive Complex Gesture Representation: A
           Comparison Between Execution, Observation and Imagination by fNIRS
    • Authors: Michela Balconi; Davide Crivelli; Livia Cortesi
      Abstract: Abstract The aim of the present study was to examine cortical correlates of motor execution, motor observation and motor imagery of hand complex gestures, in particular by comparing meaningful gestures implying the use of an object (transitive action) or not (intransitive action). Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) was used to verify the presence of partial overlapping between some cortical areas involved in those different tasks. Participants were instructed to observe videos of transitive vs. intransitive gestures and then to execute or imagine them. Gesture execution was associated to greater brain activity (increased oxygenated hemoglobin levels) with respect to observation and imagination in motor areas (premotor cortex, PMC; primary sensorimotor cortex, SM1). In contrast, the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) was more relevantly involved in both execution and observation tasks compared to gesture imagination. Moreover, execution and observation of transitive gestures seemed primarily supported by similar parietal posterior areas when compared with intransitive gestures, which do not imply the presence on a object.
      PubDate: 2017-06-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9365-1
       
  • Effect of Heart Rate Variability Biofeedback on Sport Performance, a
           Systematic Review
    • Authors: Sergio Jiménez Morgan; José Arturo Molina Mora
      Abstract: Abstract Aim is to determine if the training with heart rate variability biofeedback allows to improve performance in athletes of different disciplines. Methods such as database search on Web of Science, SpringerLink, EBSCO Academic Search Complete, SPORTDiscus, Pubmed/Medline, and PROQUEST Academic Research Library, as well as manual reference registration. The eligibility criteria were: (a) published scientific articles; (b) experimental studies, quasi-experimental, or case reports; (c) use of HRV BFB as main treatment; (d) sport performance as dependent variable; (e) studies published until October 2016; (f) studies published in English, Spanish, French or Portuguese. The guidelines of the PRISMA statement were followed. Out of the 451 records found, seven items were included. All studies had a small sample size (range from 1 to 30 participants). In 85.71% of the studies (n = 6) the athletes enhanced psychophysiological variables that allowed them to improve their sport performance thanks to training with heart rate variability biofeedback. Despite the limited amount of experimental studies in the field to date, the findings suggest that heart rate variability biofeedback is an effective, safe, and easy-to-learn and apply method for both athletes and coaches in order to improve sport performance.
      PubDate: 2017-06-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9364-2
       
  • Erratum to: Effects of Mental Stress Induction on Heart Rate Variability
           in Patients with Panic Disorder
    • Authors: Katja Petrowski; Susann Wichmann; Timo Siepmann; Gloria-Beatrice Wintermann; Stefan R. Bornstein; Martin Siepmann
      PubDate: 2017-03-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9357-1
       
  • Resonance Frequency Breathing Biofeedback to Reduce Symptoms of
           Subthreshold PTSD with an Air Force Special Tactics Operator: A Case Study
           
    • Authors: Lorene M. Petta
      Abstract: Abstract The prevalence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been estimated to be several times higher in military populations compared to the national average. Special Tactics operators are a group that is more likely to avoid seeking psychological care due to the stigma and other consequences the diagnosis may have on their military careers. There is a need for more effective and less stigmatizing interventions to treat this population. Psychophysiological methods have been proven to be efficacious in treating PTSD, yet have received less attention as an adjunctive intervention. Resonance frequency (RF) biofeedback is a form of cardiorespiratory intervention that has shown promise as an effective treatment. The current case study examined the use of RF biofeedback in combination with other physiological and evidence-based methods as part of a comprehensive treatment approach. The client showed a significant drop from his initial scores on a screening assessment by the end of treatment, and demonstrated continued progress despite a 3-month break from the therapy. This author proposed that the synergistic effects of the multi-phased treatment approach contributed to the client’s progress. Furthermore, a case was made for using multiple techniques when treating subthreshold PTSD and related symptoms within a treatment resistant population.
      PubDate: 2017-03-20
      DOI: 10.1007/s10484-017-9356-2
       
 
 
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