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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 871 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ad verba Liberorum : Journal of Linguistics & Pedagogy & Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 388)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 33)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychotherapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 162)
Anales de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 66)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 195)
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 125)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
At-Tajdid : Jurnal Ilmu Tarbiyah     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autism's Own     Open Access  
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 49)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 110)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 122)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 66)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 31)
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access  
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access  
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Coaching Psykologi - The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Creativity. Theories - Research - Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Psicopedagogía     Open Access  
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access  
Culturas Psi     Open Access  
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Current Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Current Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current psychology letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Discourse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Diversitas: Perspectivas en Psicologia     Open Access  
Drama Therapy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Drogues, santé et société     Full-text available via subscription  
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
E-Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ecopsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
ECOS - Estudos Contemporâneos da Subjetividade     Open Access  
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Educazione sentimentale     Full-text available via subscription  
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Elpis - Czasopismo Teologiczne Katedry Teologii Prawosławnej Uniwersytetu w Białymstoku     Open Access  
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
En-Claves del pensamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Enseñanza e Investigacion en Psicologia     Open Access  
Epiphany     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Escritos de Psicología : Psychological Writings     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Journal Cover Applied and Preventive Psychology
  [13 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0962-1849
   Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3032 journals]
  • Worry and the anxiety disorders: A meta-analytic synthesis of specificity
           to GAD
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4

      Although worry is central to the diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), it is also commonly observed in other anxiety disorders. In this meta-analytic review, we empirically evaluated the extent to which worry is specific to GAD relative to patients with other anxiety disorders, those with other psychiatric disorders, and nonpsychiatric controls. A total of 47 published studies (N =8,410) were included in the analysis. The results yielded a large effect size indicating greater severity/frequency of worry, meta-worry, and domains of worry among anxiety disorder patients v. nonpsychiatric controls (d =1.64). In contrast to the many differences emerging from comparisons between anxiety disordered patients and nonpsychiatric controls, when anxiety disordered patients were compared to people with other psychiatric disorders they differed only on severity/frequency and not on meta-worry or domains of worry. A large effect size indicating greater severity/frequency of worry, meta-worry, and domains of worry among patients with GAD v. nonpsychiatric controls was also found (d =2.05). However, differences between GAD and those with other psychiatric disorders also emerged for severity/frequency of worry. GAD was associated with greater worry difficulties than other anxiety disorders, which generally did not differ from those with other psychiatric disorders and each other. The implications of these findings for conceptualizing worry in GAD and other anxiety disorders, and the potentially moderating effects of age and gender are discussed.
      Highlights ► There is greater severity/frequency of worry, meta-worry, and domains of worry among anxiety disorder patients relative to nonpsychiatric controls. ► GAD is associated with greater worry than other anxiety disorders, which generally do not differ from those with other psychiatric disorders and each other. ► Differences between those with GAD and those with other psychiatric disorders emerge only for the severity/frequency of worry.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • The cultural theory and model of suicide
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4

      A growing body of research has demonstrated important variations in the prevalence, nature, and correlates of suicide across ethnic and sexual minority groups. Despite these developments, existing clinical and research approaches to suicide assessment and prevention have not incorporated cultural variations in any systematic way. In addition, theoretical models of suicide have been largely devoid of cultural influence. The current report presents a comprehensive analysis of literature describing the relationship between cultural factors and suicide in three major ethnic groups (African Americans, Asian Americans, and Latinos) and LGBTQ 1 1 “LGBTQ” populations are also referred to as “sexual minorities.” LGBTQ is an abbreviation for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender or transsexual individuals, and people questioning their sexual orientation. sexual minority groups. We utilized an inductive approach to synthesize this variegated body of research into four factors that account for 95% of existing culturally specific risk data: cultural sanctions, idioms of distress, minority stress, and social discord. These four cultural factors are then integrated into a theoretical framework: the Cultural Model of Suicide. Three theoretical principles emerge: (1) culture affects the types of stressors that lead to suicide; (2) cultural meanings associated with stressors and suicide affect the development of suicidal tendencies, one's threshold of tolerance for psychological pain, and subsequent suicidal acts; and (3) culture affects how suicidal thoughts, intent, plans, and attempts are expressed. The Cultural Model of Suicide provides an empirically guided cohesive approach that can inform culturally competent suicide assessment and prevention efforts in future research and clinical practice. Including both ethnic and sexual minorities in our investigations ensures advancement along a multiple identities perspective.
      Highlights ► This study performs a literature analysis of culturally specific suicide risk in ethnic and sexual minority groups. ► Four factors accounted for 95% of culturally specific risk data: cultural sanctions, idioms of distress, minority stress, and social discord. ► The four cultural suicide risk factors are integrated into a theoretical framework: the Cultural Model of Suicide. ► Theoretical principles include: cultural meanings impact the suicide developmental process, culture affects suicide-precipitating stressors, and culture affects suicide expression. ► The Cultural Model of Suicide can inform culturally competent suicide assessment and prevention efforts.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Reducing the stigma of mental disorders at work: A review of current
           workplace anti-stigma intervention programs
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4

      Stigma has been described as one of the largest barriers for those who have been diagnosed with a mental disorder, with negative consequences impacting all facets of life, including the workplace. Although many population-based anti-stigma initiatives exist, the need for workplace interventions is being recognized, particularly as the financial costs of mental disorders in the workplace mount. Specific workplace-focused programs are emerging to address this need. The present paper describes efforts to reduce the stigma related to mental disorders in the workplace. Following the review, suggestions are made for future workplace anti-stigma interventions, as well as a discussion of considerations for researchers who evaluate such programs.
      Highlights ► This paper reviews various workplace anti-stigma initiatives from around the world. ► More scientific evaluations of workplace anti-stigma initiatives are needed. ► Future program evaluators should focus more on experimental designs, behavioural outcomes, and the moderating effects of individual difference variables. ► Future program developers could enhance program efficacy by changing norms and culture around mental disorders within an organization.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Improving prevention of depression and anxiety disorders: Repetitive
           negative thinking as a promising target
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4

      Prevention of depression and anxiety disorders is widely acknowledged as an important health care investment. However, existing preventive interventions have only shown modest effects. In order to improve the efficacy of prevention of depression and anxiety disorders, a number of authors have suggested that it is promising to focus on selective prevention programs that are offered to individuals scoring high on clearly established risk factors, whereby the preventive intervention then specifically targets these risk variables. This review presents repetitive negative thinking (worry and rumination) as a promising target for the prevention of depression and anxiety disorders.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Moving the field of prevention from science to servi Integrating
           evidence-based preventive interventions into community practice through
           adapted and adaptive models
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4

      The article addresses the adaptation of evidence-based prevention and positive youth development programs for community use. Two complementary approaches for adapting programs are described. In the “adapted” approach, programs are modified to accommodate the culture, climate, and operations of the organization delivering the program. In the “adaptive” approach, programs are modified to accommodate the characteristics, needs and preferences of the individual or family receiving the program. Two examples are provided that illustrate how both adapted and adaptive intervention strategies have been incorporated by community practitioners into the implementation of the Early Risers conduct problems prevention program.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • The Army National Guard in OIF/OEF: Relationships among combat exposure,
           postdeployment stressors, social support, and risk behaviors
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4

      With the continued operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, studies of the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and related symptoms are now common. However, lacking is how these symptoms relate to precipitating conditions and the mitigating effects of social support on these symptoms. This is particularly relevant for reserve military personnel, who have been shown to be greater at-risk for postdeployment problems. The present study examined questionnaire data obtained from Army National Guard (ARNG) units immediately after their return from deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan during 2010 (N =4329 soldiers in 50 units). Findings showed few soldiers displayed risk behaviors (i.e., daily alcohol use, use of illicit drugs, suicide thoughts, and physically threatening others) during and after deployment. Those most likely to have more postdeployment risk behaviors were also those who showed more risk behaviors during deployment. A substantial percentage of soldiers reported combat exposure, postdeployment negative emotions, and postdeployment loss of a personal relationship. These reported outcomes were all related to increased risk behaviors after deployment. The buffering effect of social support on postdeployment risk behaviors was equally evident when data were examined individually and when grouped by unit memberships. Implications of findings for future research, practice, and policies are discussed.
      Highlights ► The present study examined questionnaire data obtained from Army National Guard (ARNG) units immediately after their return from deployment to Iraq and Afghanistan during 2010 (N =4329 soldiers in 50 units). ► Findings showed few soldiers displayed risk behaviors (i.e., daily alcohol use, use of illicit drugs, suicide thoughts, and physically threatening others) during and after deployment. ► A substantial percentage reported combat exposure, postdeployment negative emotions, and loss of a personal relationship. ► The buffering effect of social support on postdeployment risk behaviors was equally evident when data were examined individually and when grouped by unit memberships.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Author index (Volume 14 (2010))
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Subject index (Volume 14 (2010))
    • Abstract: June 2010
      Publication year: 2010
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 14, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Marvin Goldfried's (1980) American Psychologist paper: (Re) Introducing a
           classic
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Toward the delineation of therapeutic change principles
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4

      There is a growing discontent among therapists of varying orientations. Psychoanalytic, behavioral, and humanistically oriented clinicians are starting to raise serious questions about the limits of their respective approaches and are becoming more open to contributions from other paradigms. This article documents this trend within the field, which resembles a Kuhnian-type crisis, noting some of the political, economic, and social forces apt to affect our likelihood of ever reaching a consensus within the field and presenting an approach to the delineation and study of commonalities across various orientations.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Principles of change vs. therapy techniques or principles of change and
           therapy techniques: A commentary on Goldfried's 1980 paper
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Searching for therapeutic change principles
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Progress in delineating change principles: A comment on Goldfried (1980)
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • A young scholar's commentary on Goldfried (1980)
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Confessions of a non-believer: The merits and mythology of integration
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Reaction to Goldfried (1980): What about therapist techniques'
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Principles of therapeutic change circa 2010
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4

      The main message of Goldfried's seminal paper on the principles of therapeutic change is reconsidered with regard to three modern issues: the identification of the mediators of treatment outcomes, the methods needed for optimal dissemination of empirically supported treatments, and the struggles associated with therapies that strive to be different. Despite the passage of time, the message holds true.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Common factors in psychotherapy: Three perspectives
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Goldfried's prophecies: The good outcomes, the bad outcomes, and outcomes
           yet to come
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Unification in psychotherapy, in clinical, and in psychology
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • A classic then and now
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • The evolving investigation of therapeutic change principles
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Searching for therapy change principles: Are we there yet'
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4

      Over the past 30 years, the topic of psychotherapy integration has moved from a latent theme to a clear movement, and the commentaries made in this issue of Applied and Preventive Psychology document these changes. More than ever before, the field of psychotherapy has become increasingly interested in achieving a consensus. The question is becoming what, not who is correct. We are now better able to identify stages of change that cut across different orientations, as well as underlying principles of change. Still, we are not “there yet,” and need to confront the limitations stemming from an overvaluation of what is “new,” and to develop a common language with which to communicate what we know. It is also suggested that a two-way bridge between research and practice can represent the future of psychotherapy integration.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Announcement
    • Abstract: December 2009
      Publication year: 2009
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 13, Issues 1–4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Self-harming behavior: Introduction to the special series on non-suicidal
           self-injury and suicide
    • Abstract: October 2008
      Publication year: 2008
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 4

      Suicide and non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) lie along a continuum of self-harming behaviors. Highly prevalent, NSSI is a serious public health concern. It also increases risk for suicide. The present article reviews recent research on NSSI and provides an introduction to the articles in this special edition of the journal.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Actions speak louder than words: An elaborated theoretical model of the
           social functions of self-injury and other harmful behaviors
    • Abstract: October 2008
      Publication year: 2008
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 4

      The question of why some people do things that are intentionally harmful to themselves continues to puzzle scientists, clinicians, and the public. Prior studies have demonstrated that one fairly extreme, direct form of self-harm, non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI), is maintained by both automatic (i.e., intrapersonal) as well as social (i.e., interpersonal) reinforcement. However, the majority of theoretical and empirical papers on this topic focus almost exclusively on the automatic functions. The purpose of this paper is to provide a more comprehensive analysis of the social functions of NSSI. Evidence is presented supporting the notion that NSSI is maintained by social reinforcement in at least a substantial minority of instances. Moreover, an elaborated theoretical model of the social functions of NSSI is outlined that proposes that this behavior represents a high intensity social signal used when less intense communication strategies fail (e.g., speaking, yelling, crying). The model further proposes that NSSI can serve not only as a signal of distress that is reinforced primarily by the caregiving behavior it elicits from others, but that it can also serve as a signal of strength and fitness that is reinforced by warding off potential threats (e.g., peer victimization), and in some cases can strengthen affiliation with others. Support for this theoretical model is drawn from diverse literatures including psychology, evolutionary biology, and cultural anthropology. The paper concludes with specific recommendations for empirical tests of the proposed model of the social functions of NSSI, as well as other harmful behaviors such as alcohol and drug use.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Peer influence and adolescent nonsuicidal self-injury: A theoretical
           review of mechanisms and moderators
    • Abstract: October 2008
      Publication year: 2008
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 4

      Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is an increasingly prevalent health risk behavior among adolescents and represents a significant public health concern. Although researchers have identified numerous antecedents or risk factors that precede engagement in NSSI behaviors, few studies have examined the role of peer influence processes. Yet, recent research suggests that adolescents may be more likely to engage in NSSI when close friends or other peers engage in similar behaviors. The following paper reviews past research on peer influence effects, including potential mechanisms and moderating variables. Methodological considerations for future research on peer influence and NSSI are discussed.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Adolescent non-suicidal self-injurious behavior: The latest epidemic to
           assess and treat
    • Abstract: October 2008
      Publication year: 2008
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 4

      Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) among adolescents is a serious and prevalent problem. This article reviews the epidemiological data as well as the existing treatments for adolescents who engage in NSSI. The authors also present the unique features of dialectical behavior therapy, the gold-standard evidence-based treatment for adults who engage in NSSI, and discuss its promise as an effective treatment for adolescents who engage in NSSI. Finally, the authors present a clinical vignette of an adolescent engaging in NSSI and how DBT works to target this maladaptive behavior. This article reviews first the epidemiological data and then the existing treatments for adolescents engaging in non-suicidal self-injurious behavior (NSSI). Next, the authors present the unique features of one particular therapy, called dialectical behavior therapy, for adolescents who engage in NSSI. Finally, the article concludes with a clinical vignette in which dialectical behavior therapy is applied to an adolescent engaging in NSSI.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • A cognitive model of suicidal behavior: Theory and treatment
    • Abstract: October 2008
      Publication year: 2008
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 4

      With some prominent exceptions, much of the research designed to elucidate the nature, prevalence, and correlates of suicidal behavior has been conducted from an atheoretical perspective. Conversely, psychological theories to explain suicidal behavior are largely untested by rigorous experimental designs. We propose a cognitive model of suicidal behavior that is grounded in the empirical literature on cognitive and behavioral correlates of and risk factors for suicidal behavior. In addition, we demonstrate the manner in which the theoretical components are targeted in cognitive therapy for suicidal patients. We highlight aspects of the model with less empirical support, and we propose ways those constructs can be tested in future research.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Volume Contents
    • Abstract: October 2008
      Publication year: 2008
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 4



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Cognitive inhibition across psychopathologies
    • Abstract: December 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 3



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Inhibition of action, thought, and emotion: A selective neurobiological
           review
    • Abstract: December 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 3

      The neural bases of inhibitory function are reviewed, covering data from paradigms assessing inhibition of motor responses (antisaccade, go/nogo, stop-signal), cognitive sets (e.g., Wisconsin Card Sort Test), and emotion (fear extinction). The frontal cortex supports performance on these paradigms, but the specific neural circuitry varies: response inhibition depends upon fronto-basal ganglia networks, inhibition of cognitive sets is supported by orbitofrontal cortex, and retention of fear extinction reflects ventromedial prefrontal cortex–amygdala interactions. Inhibition is thus neurobiologically heterogeneous, although right ventrolateral prefrontal cortex may support a general inhibitory process. Dysfunctions in these circuits may contribute to psychopathological conditions marked by inhibitory deficits.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • A critical evaluation of cognitive inhibition in dissociative identity
           disorder as inferred by negative priming in the flanker task: Limitations
           and the episodic retrieval alternative
    • Abstract: December 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 3

      Studies examining negative priming in dissociative identity disorder (DID) using the flanker task have reported emotional context effects. Significant negative priming is evident when individuals with DID are assessed in a context deemed emotionally neutral, while in contexts designed to elevate anxiety, DID samples display reduced negative priming. Limitations and considerations are discussed around statistical power, generalizability and reliability, and the use of diagnostic groups over specific clinical symptoms. The negative priming findings in this growing body of work have been interpreted with reference to the functioning of cognitive inhibitory mechanisms. Explored is how the episodic retrieval account of negative priming, with its reliance on memory mechanisms, could account for the DID findings. Encoding and retrieval possibilities are discussed and it is concluded that a failure to encode the prime trial distractor stimulus, in contexts of heightened anxiety, could explain the experimental findings from an episodic retrieval perspective.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Cognitive inhibition in depression
    • Abstract: December 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 3

      Cognitive inhibition is a key mechanism in the regulation of emotion. There is emerging evidence that depression is characterized by deficits in the inhibition of mood-congruent material. These deficits could result in prolonged processing of negative, goal-irrelevant aspects of presented information thereby hindering recovery from negative mood and leading to the sustained negative affect that characterizes depressive episodes. Indeed, it has been suggested that deficits in cognitive inhibition lie at the heart of memory and attention biases in depression, and set the stage for ruminative responses to negative events and negative mood states. A ruminative response style results in a heightened vulnerability to experience episodes of major depression. Recent research has demonstrated that deficient inhibition of negative material is associated with heightened rumination. In this article, we review the depression literature with a focus on studies that investigate cognitive inhibition in depressed participants and in participants who report a history of major depressive episodes. In addition, we summarize neurobiological findings that indicate a strong relation between depression and deficits in inhibition and we take a closer look at the relation of inhibition, rumination and mood regulation.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Attentional window in schizophrenia and schizotypal personality: Insight
           from negative priming studies
    • Abstract: December 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 3

      One of the core deficits that characterizes schizophrenia is an increase in distractibility and disinhibition at all levels of information processing. Patients with schizophrenia seem unable to focus attention on the relevant events while ignoring the irrelevant stimuli. This pattern of behavior is also observed in unmedicated schizotypal individuals who may carry liability for schizophrenia. In this review, we focus on studies of attentional inhibition, as assessed by the negative priming paradigm, to elucidate the relationships among deficits in inhibition, clinical symptoms and medication effects. We then consider models of the etiology of deficits in negative priming in schizophrenia and schizotypal personality. Finally, we discuss the potential power of utilizing hypothesis-driven cognitive paradigms in psychiatric research.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Impairments in inhibition or cognitive control in psychological disorders
    • Abstract: December 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 3

      Contributions to this special issue of Applied & Preventive Psychology richly elucidate connections between a variety of psychological disorders and performance in a number of tasks that are used to reason about inhibitory deficits. This commentary calls attention to the different uses of the concept of inhibition – vernacular, neural, operational, and theoretical – and suggests that the term cognitive control avoids claims about dampened memory representations that are difficult to support. Central findings from the reviews are summarized; evidence concerning suppression-induced forgetting is featured and directions to foster application are discussed.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • The role of discrete emotions in health outcomes: A critical review
    • Abstract: November 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 2

      Global aspects of emotion have been central to psychosocial theories of health and health behavior for several decades. A growing body of research has documented key roles for several broad affective constructs – notably anxiety, depression, and anger/hostility – in areas ranging from basic physiological processes, health behaviors, and symptom reporting, to screening and detection behaviors and decision making. Despite this growth, however, the emotions-health literature remains scattered. Mechanisms are poorly understood and several key emotions – embarrassment, disgust, guilt and hope – have scarcely been examined. In presenting the advantages of a discrete emotions perspective, the current report reviews and critiques data describing the relations between discrete emotions and health. It presents a developmental-functionalist framework within which to more systematically consider the links between emotions and health. It is suggested that discrete emotions perspectives provide guidance for understanding the physiological, motivational, and cognitive pathways linking emotions and health and thus their impact on health outcomes.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Acculturation and mental health: Current findings and recommendations for
           future research
    • Abstract: November 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 2

      Results of existing literature suggest that the relationship between acculturation and mental health is complex. Some studies have found a beneficial association between increased acculturation and mental health, whereas others have found a detrimental association or no relationship at all. We reviewed literature on acculturation and mental health in Hispanics/Latino Americans, Asians/Asian Americans, and other ethnic groups. Results indicate that greater acculturation is associated with increased substance use and abuse. Findings for other disorders and symptoms demonstrate considerable heterogeneity and potential reasons for this variation are provided. Acculturation involves a complex set of processes that appear to have differential impact on mental health outcomes. Critical issues in the measurement of acculturation are discussed, and recommendations for future research are offered.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Academic clinical psychology in the 21st Century: Challenging the sacred
           cows
    • Abstract: October 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 1



      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
  • Investigation and its discontents Some constraints on progress in
           psychological research
    • Abstract: October 2007
      Publication year: 2007
      Source:Applied and Preventive Psychology, Volume 12, Issue 1

      This article examines a number of prominent trends in the conduct of psychological research and considers how they may limit progress in our field. Failure to appreciate important differences in temperament among researchers, as well as differences in the particular talents researchers bring to their work, has prevented the development in psychology of a vigorous tradition of fruitful theoretical inquiry. Misplaced emphasis on quantitative “productivity,” a problem for all disciplines, is shown to have particularly unfortunate results in psychology. Problems associated with the distorting effects of seeking grant support are shown to interact with the first two difficulties. Finally, the distorting effects of certain kinds of experimental studies are discussed, together with their implications for progress in this field.

      PubDate: 2012-12-18T18:06:19Z
       
 
 
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