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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 946 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ad verba Liberorum : Journal of Linguistics & Pedagogy & Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 44)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Advances in Methods and Practices in Psychological Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 452)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 200)
Anales de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analitika : Jurnal Magister Psikologi Uma     Open Access  
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 77)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 246)
Anuario de investigaciones (Facultad de Psicología. Universidad de Buenos Aires)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 75)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psycholinguistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 170)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 53)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Art Therapy Online     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Behavioural Studies     Open Access  
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Australasian Journal of Organisational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Australian Journal of Rehabilitation Counseling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Autism Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Autism's Own     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 55)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviour Change     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 145)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access  
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 159)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 38)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 63)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 35)
Buletin Psikologi     Open Access  
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access  
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Castalia : Revista de Psicología de la Academia     Open Access  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Coaching Psykologi - The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 74)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling et spiritualité / Counselling and Spirituality     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Creativity. Theories ? Research ? Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Psicopedagogía     Open Access  
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Culturas Psi     Open Access  
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Opinion in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Current Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current psychology letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Development and Psychopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 47)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Discourse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Diversitas : Perspectivas en Psicologia     Open Access  

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Journal Cover
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.72
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 23  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1866-6647 - ISSN (Online) 1866-6116
Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2351 journals]
  • Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, joint hypermobility-related
           disorders and pain: expanding body-mind connections to the developmental
           age
    • Authors: Carolina Baeza-Velasco; Lorenzo Sinibaldi; Marco Castori
      Pages: 163 - 175
      Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and generalized joint hypermobility (JH) are two separated conditions, assessed, and managed by different specialists without overlapping interests. Recently, some researchers highlighted an unexpected association between these two clinical entities. This happens in a scenario of increasing awareness on the protean detrimental effects that congenital anomalies of the connective tissue may have on human health and development. To review pertinent literature to identify possible connections between ADHD and GJH, special emphasis was put on musculoskeletal pain and syndromic presentations of GJH, particularly the hypermobile Ehlers–Danlos syndrome. A comprehensive search of scientific databases and references lists was conducted, encompassing publications based on qualitative and quantitative research. Impaired coordination and proprioception, fatigue, chronic pain, and dysautonomia are identified as potential bridges between ADHD and JH. Based on these findings, a map of the pathophysiological and psychopathological pathways connecting both conditions is proposed. Although ADHD and JH are traditionally separated human attributes, their association may testify for the dyadic nature of mind-body connections during critical periods of post-natal development. Such a mixed picture has potentially important consequences in terms of disability and deserves more clinical and research attention.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0252-2
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Factor structure and clinical correlates of the 61-item Wender Utah Rating
           Scale (WURS)
    • Authors: Matthew Calamia; Benjamin D. Hill; Mandi W. Musso; Russell D. Pella; Wm. Drew Gouvier
      Pages: 177 - 188
      Abstract: The objective of this study was to assess the factor structure and clinical correlates of a 61-item version of the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS), a self-report retrospective measure of childhood problems, experiences, and behavior used in ADHD assessment. Given the currently mostly widely used form of the WURS was derived via a criterion-keyed approach, the study aimed to use latent variable modeling of the 61-item WURS to potentially identify more and more homogeneous set of items reflecting current conceptualizations of ADHD symptoms. Exploratory structural equation modeling was used to generate factor scores which were then correlated with neuropsychological measures of intelligence and executive attention as well as a broad measure of personality and emotional functioning. Support for a modified five-factor model was found: ADHD, disruptive mood and behavior, negative affectivity, social confidence, and academic problems. The ADHD factor differed somewhat from the traditional 25-item WURS short form largely through weaker associations with several measures of personality and psychopathology. This study identified a factor more aligned with DSM-5 conceptualization of ADHD as well as measures of other types of childhood characteristics and symptoms which may prove useful for both research and clinical practice.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0251-3
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Intolerance of uncertainty in children with
           attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
    • Authors: Colette Gramszlo; Nicholas D. Fogleman; Paul J. Rosen; Janet Woodruff-Borden
      Pages: 189 - 197
      Abstract: Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has often been studied in the context of internalizing disorders, but no studies to our knowledge have explored the relation between IU and externalizing disorders. Given the proposed link between IU and emotion regulation, the current study sought to examine levels of IU in an externalizing clinical population with known emotion regulation difficulties—attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). IU levels in this population were compared to a clinical population known to experience elevated levels of IU. Participants in present study were ninety-three children (36 anxiety disorder, 28 ADHD, 29 unaffected children) ages 7–13, who completed the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale—Short Version (IUS). Responses on the IUS were converted to total IU, prospective IU, and inhibitory IU. A linear mixed model analysis of covariance was conducted while controlling for age, sex, and ADHD medications. A significant interaction was observed between diagnostic status and IU scale. Planned contrasts indicated that children with anxiety disorders and ADHD reported significantly higher levels of IU relative to unaffected children, and children with ADHD reported comparable levels of inhibitory IU relative to children with anxiety disorders. The current results contribute to a growing literature on the link between IU and psychopathology. IU appears to be a transdiagnostic construct present among children with internalizing and externalizing disorders, and may be broadly associated with emotion regulation deficits rather than specific disorder symptoms.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-017-0244-7
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Symptom covariance accounts for behavioral approach associations across
           impulse control disorders
    • Authors: Brianne A. Brooker; Dragana Ostojic; Carlin J. Miller
      Pages: 199 - 208
      Abstract: Behavioral approach system (BAS) dysfunction has been identified as a correlate of and a potential mechanism for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and comorbid disorders. This study examined the role of symptom covariation in the relations among BAS dysfunction, ADHD symptoms, and comorbid impulsive personality disorder features. Undergraduates (N = 207) completed measures of BAS functioning, ADHD symptoms, and borderline and antisocial personality disorder symptoms, and associated features (i.e., relational aggression). Hierarchical regression suggested that age, impulsive ADHD symptoms, and relational aggression were associated with BAS functioning. Adding other ADHD symptom dimensions (inattention, hyperactivity) and antisocial and borderline scores to the model did not increase variance accounted for beyond that accounted for by ADHD impulsivity scores. Results highlight a role of symptom covariance in the previously demonstrated relation between BAS, impulsive presentations of ADHD, and comorbid impulsive personality pathology. Implications for etiological models of ADHD and its co-occurrence with other disorders are discussed.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-017-0245-6
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Relation between internalizing behaviors, externalizing behaviors, and
           peer victimization among children with and without ADHD
    • Authors: Nicholas D. Fogleman; Kirsten D. Leaberry; Paul J. Rosen; Danielle M. Walerius; Kelly E. Slaughter
      Pages: 209 - 222
      Abstract: The current study explored the concurrent and longitudinal association between internalizing behaviors, externalizing behaviors, and peer victimization among children with and without ADHD. Eighty children (42 ADHD, 38 non-ADHD) ages 8–12 participated in the present study conducted over a 6-month period. During the baseline session, parents completed a structured diagnostic interview and the Vanderbilt ADHD Parent Rating Scale to determine whether their child met criteria for ADHD, and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) to assess their child’s internalizing and externalizing behaviors; children completed the Perception of Peer Support Scale (PPSS) to assess experiences of peer victimization. At the 6-month follow-up session, parents completed the CBCL and children completed the PPSS. Concurrently, internalizing behaviors were associated with peer victimization among children with and without ADHD; ADHD moderated this relation, such that internalizing behaviors were more strongly related to peer victimization among children with ADHD. Longitudinally, internalizing behaviors at baseline predicted peer victimization at 6-month follow-up; however, further analyses demonstrated there was a covarying change in internalizing behaviors and peer victimization. These findings suggest internalizing behaviors are related to peer victimization concurrently, and over time, and are associated with increased risk for peer victimization in the presence of ADHD. Additionally, internalizing behaviors and peer victimization appear to share a dynamic relationship; that is, decreases in internalizing behaviors predict similar decreases in peer victimization. No significant relations were observed between externalizing behaviors and peer victimization. Implications and limitations are discussed.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0248-y
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • The efficacy of cognitive–behavioral therapy for older adults with ADHD:
           a randomized controlled trial
    • Authors: Mary V. Solanto; Craig B. Surman; Jose Ma. J. Alvir
      Pages: 223 - 235
      Abstract: Older adults with ADHD exhibit significant functional impairment, yet there is little research to guide clinicians in evidence-based care of these adults. This study examined response to treatment in older adults who participated in a previous study of the efficacy of cognitive–behavioral treatment (CBT) in adult ADHD. It was hypothesized that older adults would respond less well to CBT than younger adults, given the cognitive demands of the treatment. As described in the original publication, 88 adults who met DSM-IV criteria for ADHD were randomized to receive either a manualized 12-week CBT group intervention targeting executive dysfunction or a parallel Support group. In the current study, outcomes for 26 adults, aged 50 or older, were compared with those of 55 younger adults with respect to inattentive symptoms assessed on a structured interview by a blind clinician, as well as on ratings by self and/or collateral on measures of attention, executive dysfunction, and comorbidity. Contrary to the hypothesis, older and younger adults were equally responsive to CBT on measures of attention. The older adults also responded as well to Support as to CBT on several outcome measures. The results provide preliminary evidence that CBT is an effective intervention for older adults with ADHD. The unexpected response to support highlights a possible age-specificity of effective therapeutic intervention that requires further investigation.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0253-1
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Exploratory study of barriers to successful office contacts for attention
           deficit hyperactivity disorder
    • Authors: Jayde T. Hooven; Benjamin N. Fogel; James G. Waxmonsky; Deepa L. Sekhar
      Pages: 237 - 243
      Abstract: The American Academy of Pediatrics published attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) guidelines, but significant variability exists in care. This exploratory study aimed to understand barriers to compliance with primary care office contacts for ADHD medication management. The study was conducted at a single academic medical center via retrospective chart review between 6/1/15 and 5/31/16 in combination with telephone interviews. Participants included 306 children 6–12 years old with an ADHD-related ICD-9/ICD-10 diagnosis. Factors affecting compliance were assessed via multivariable linear regression using the outcome of unsuccessful office contacts based on the percentage of missed, canceled, or rescheduled appointments. ADHD patients averaged 28.3% (SD 23.8%) unsuccessful office contacts. Unsuccessful contacts significantly increased by 15% for Hispanic ethnicity, 8% for public insurance, 8% for inattentive subtype, and 3% for every 10 miles additional distance from the office. Telephone interviews were attempted for those missing ≥ 3 appointments, which represented 18.3% (56/306) of the sample. Interviews were successfully completed with 37.5% (21/56). Of these, 52.3% (11/21) of parents preferred in-person visits. Structural barriers were not a concern, but 52.3% (11/21) reported high caregiver strain and fatigue. The results indicate that cultural barriers to understanding of ADHD and its management must be reconsidered. Use of Internet-based platforms may be a novel approach to address issues of distance, financial difficulty, and parental stress.
      PubDate: 2018-09-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-017-0246-5
      Issue No: Vol. 10, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Internalized stigma, anticipated discrimination and perceived public
           stigma in adults with ADHD
    • Authors: Theresa Vera Masuch; Myriam Bea; Barbara Alm; Peter Deibler; Esther Sobanski
      Abstract: The objective of this study is to assess internalized stigma, perceived public stigma, anticipated discrimination and their associations with demographic, psychiatric and psychosocial characteristics in adult ADHD. Stigmatization was assessed with the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale, the Questionnaire on Anticipated Discrimination and the Questionnaire on Public Stereotypes Perceived by Adults with ADHD. The sample comprised n = 104 adults with ADHD, of whom n = 24 (23.3%) reported high internalized stigma, n = 92 (88.5%) anticipated discrimination in daily life and n = 70 (69.3%) perceived public stigma. Internalized stigma and/or anticipated discrimination correlated with ADHD symptoms, psychological distress, self-esteem, functional impairment and quality of life and was associated with ADHD family history and employment status. Most frequently perceived stereotypes were doubts about the validity of ADHD as a mental disorder. Internalized stigma and anticipated discrimination are highly prevalent in adult ADHD and correlate with the burden of disease. ADHD is associated with characteristic public stereotypes, which are distinct from stereotypes related to other mental disorders. Stigmatization should be considered in the clinical management of adult ADHD and evaluated further in future studies.
      PubDate: 2018-10-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0274-9
       
  • Editors must be vigilant to guarantee the quality and credibility of
           published scientific work
    • Authors: Manfred Gerlach
      PubDate: 2018-10-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0275-8
       
  • Individual differences in tendencies to attention-deficit/hyperactivity
           disorder and emotionality: empirical evidence in young healthy adults from
           Germany and China
    • Authors: Jennifer Wernicke; Mei Li; Peng Sha; Min Zhou; Cornelia Sindermann; Benjamin Becker; Keith M. Kendrick; Christian Montag
      Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by inattention, hyperactivity, and impulsivity but also by negative emotionality. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether subclinical ADHD tendencies are associated with negative emotionality in healthy adult samples. The present study is of special interest since it investigated negative emotionality with a questionnaire anchored in Neuroscience Theory—the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS). Furthermore, through the investigation of samples in two countries, namely Germany and China, the study aims to replicate the results across different cultures. German (n = 377; age: M = 23.25, SD = 8.47; 117 males) and Chinese (n = 389; age: M = 20.74, SD = 2.47; 279 males) subjects completed ANPS (primary emotional traits) and ASRS (ADHD tendencies) questionnaires in an online survey. Principal component analysis of the ANPS revealed one factor for negative emotionality and one factor for positive emotionality. Partial correlations between ANPS and ASRS (controlled for age) were conducted separately for nation and gender. The same correlation patterns between ADHD tendencies and negative emotionality could be found in male and female German/Chinese participants (range r = .189 to r = .352). Higher negative emotionality was always significantly associated with more inattentive, hyperactive/impulsive, or combined tendencies. However, significant negative correlations between ADHD tendencies and positive emotionality could only be observed in Chinese males (range r = − .264 to r = − .296). The results are in line with former findings in children and show that also in healthy adults, associations between negative emotionality and ADHD tendencies are robustly visible. The results were independent of the cultural background, indicating a general association between ADHD tendencies and negative emotionality, even in healthy adults.
      PubDate: 2018-10-10
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0266-9
       
  • Living “in the zone”: hyperfocus in adult ADHD
    • Authors: Kathleen E. Hupfeld; Tessa R. Abagis; Priti Shah
      Abstract: Adults with ADHD often report episodes of long-lasting, highly focused attention, a surprising report given their tendency to be distracted by irrelevant information. This has been colloquially termed “hyperfocus” (HF). Here, we introduce a novel assessment tool, the “Adult Hyperfocus Questionnaire” and test the preregistered a priori hypothesis that HF is more prevalent in individuals with high levels of ADHD symptomology. We assess (1) a pilot sample (n = 251) and (2) a replication sample (n = 372) of adults with or without ADHD. Participants completed highly validated scales, including the Conners’ Adult ADHD Rating Scale, to index ADHD symptomology. Those with higher ADHD symptomology reported higher total and dispositional HF and more frequent HF across each of the three settings (school, hobbies, and screen time) as well as on a fourth subscale describing real-world HF scenarios. These findings are both clinically and scientifically significant, as this is the first study to comprehensively assess HF in adults with high ADHD symptomology and to present a means for assessing HF. Moreover, the sizable prevalence of HF in adults with high levels of ADHD symptomology leads to a need to study it as a potentially separable feature of the ADHD syndrome.
      PubDate: 2018-09-28
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0272-y
       
  • Effect of physical exercises on attention, motor skill and physical
           fitness in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a
           systematic review
    • Authors: Jeyanthi S; Narkeesh Arumugam; Raju K. Parasher
      Abstract: Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are educated in classrooms along with typically developing children. Those with ADHD, however, find it difficult to participate in routine educational and recreational activities as they encounter problems associated with behaviour, attention, motor skills and physical endurance. Traditionally, the management of children with ADHD has focussed primarily on problems with cognition and has been heavily dependent on pharmaceutical interventions and, to a lesser extent, on non-pharmaceutical measures. More recently, experts have increasingly advocated the use of exercises in alleviating symptoms associated with ADHD. The primary objective of this review was to summarize research that examined the role of exercises on deficits related to attention, motor skills and fitness in children with ADHD. A search of the available literature was conducted using a combination of relevant key words in the following databases: PubMed, MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Embase and Cochrane review. The search filtered 3016 studies of potential relevance, of which 2087 were excluded after screening titles and abstracts as per the inclusion criteria. Thirty-four (34) studies were analysed in greater depth, and 16 were excluded after detailed consideration as they did not match the inclusion (PEDro score > 4) and exclusion criteria. Three (3) additional studies were excluded as they lacked exercise prescription details such as intensity, duration and frequency of exercise. Finally, 15 studies were analysed with a focus on the effects of physical exercises on attention, hyperactive behaviour, motor skills and physical fitness in ADHD children. Overall, the studies reviewed were of moderate-to-high quality and reported benefits of a variety of exercise programmes in improving motor skills, physical fitness, attention and social behaviour in children with ADHD. However, there was limited information regarding school-based programmes, the effects of structured exercise programmes independently or in combination with cognitive-based therapies, and the long-term benefits of exercises in alleviating behavioural problems in these children.
      PubDate: 2018-09-27
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0270-0
       
  • Rapid screening for cognitive deficits in attention deficit and
           hyperactivity disorders with the screen for cognitive impairment in
           psychiatry
    • Authors: Smadar Valérie Tourjman; Stéphane Potvin; Fernando Corbalan; Akram Djouini; Scot E. Purdon; Emmanuel Stip; Robert-Paul Juster; Edouard Kouassi
      Abstract: Cognitive impairments constitute a core feature of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), but are infrequently assessed in the clinical setting. We have previously demonstrated the ability of an objective cognitive battery, the Screen for Cognitive Impairment in Psychiatry (SCIP), to differentiate adult ADHD patients from healthy controls in five cognitive domains. Here, we further characterize these subtle cognitive deficits by conducting additional univariate analyses on our ADHD dataset to assess the contributions of various demographic characteristics on SCIP performance and to determine correlations between SCIP scores and scores on other measures evaluating illness severity, perceived cognitive deficits, and overall functioning. Age and years of education were moderately associated with performance on the SCIP and/or its subscales in our ADHD cohort. The SCIP global index score was moderately correlated with clinician-rated measures of illness severity and weakly associated with clinician-rated overall functional status. Intriguingly, overall SCIP performance was only weakly associated with patient self-reported measures of cognitive functioning. Of practical importance, small-to-moderate associations were consistently observed between performances on two subscales of the SCIP and the other measures evaluating illness severity, overall functioning, and patient self-reported cognitive functioning (the working memory and visuomotor tracking subscales). Thus, these data demonstrate that the SCIP, particularly the working memory and visuomotor tracking subscales, is sensitive enough to detect cognitive deficits in adult patients with ADHD, and that these deficits are correlated with functional impairments. Furthermore, these data highlight the importance of integrating both objective and subjective evaluations of cognition in adult ADHD.
      PubDate: 2018-09-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0268-7
       
  • The impact of successful learning of self-regulation on reward processing
           in children with ADHD using fMRI
    • Authors: Sarah Baumeister; Isabella Wolf; Sarah Hohmann; Nathalie Holz; Regina Boecker-Schlier; Tobias Banaschewski; Daniel Brandeis
      Abstract: Neurofeedback (NF) is a non-pharmacological treatment for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that is targeting self-regulation, is efficacious when standard protocols are used and induces partly specific neurophysiological changes in the inhibitory network. However, its effects on reward processing, which is also considered an important aspect of ADHD and has been linked to neurophysiological deficits, remain unknown. Children with ADHD (N = 15, mean age 11.8, SD 1.52) were randomly assigned to either slow cortical potential NF (n = 8) or EMG biofeedback control training (n = 7) and received 20 sessions of training under comparable conditions. Learning was defined as the slope of successful training runs across all transfer sessions. Whole brain analysis, region-of-interest analysis of anticipatory ventral striatal (VS) activation, and analysis of behavioral data were performed. Clinically, the NF group improved more than the EMG group. Whole brain analysis indicated increased activation in the left superior frontal gyrus in the control group only, and in medial prefrontal cortex and dorsolateral prefrontal gyrus (DLPFC) after treatment across all groups. Only successful learners of self-regulation (n = 8) showed increased left inferior frontal gyrus and DLPFC activation after treatment. Left VS activation was increased after treatment and showed a significant time*medication-status interaction. Specific treatment effects were found in left frontal regions for the control treatment and successful learners. Also, unmedicated participants, irrespective of treatment type or successful learning, showed treatment-induced improvement in reward processing. The results suggest no prominent specific effect of NF on reward processing. However, cautious interpretation is warranted due to the small sample.
      PubDate: 2018-09-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0269-6
       
  • Behavioral adjustment to asymmetric reward availability among children
           with and without ADHD: effects of past and current reinforcement
           contingencies
    • Authors: Emi Furukawa; Brent Alsop; Egas M. Caparelli-Dáquer; Erasmo Barbante Casella; Raquel Quimas Molina da Costa; Priscila de Moura Queiroz; Paula Almeida Galvão; Lúcia Rios da Silva Benevides; Helena Pinheiro Jucá-Vasconcelos; Gail Tripp
      Abstract: Altered reinforcement sensitivity is hypothesized to underlie symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Here we evaluate the behavioral sensitivity of Brazilian children with and without ADHD to a change in reward availability. Forty typically developing children and 32 diagnosed with DSM-IV ADHD completed a signal-detection task in which correct discriminations between two stimuli were associated with different frequencies of reinforcement. The response alternative associated with the higher rate of reinforcement switched, without warning, after 30 rewards were delivered. The task continued until another 30 rewards were delivered. Both groups of children developed a response bias toward the initially more frequently reinforced alternative. This effect was larger in the control group. The response allocation of the two groups changed following the shift in reward availability. Over time the ADHD group developed a significant response bias toward the now more frequently reinforced alternative. In contrast, the bias of the control group stayed near zero after an initial decline following the contingency change. The overall shift in bias was similar for the two groups. The behavior of both groups of children was sensitive to the asymmetric reward distribution and to the change in reward availability. Subtle group differences in response patterns emerged, possibly reflecting differences in the time frame of reward effects and sensitivity to reward exposure.
      PubDate: 2018-09-06
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0265-x
       
  • Work participation in ADHD and associations with social characteristics,
           education, lifetime depression, and ADHD symptom severity
    • Authors: Espen Anker; Anne Halmøy; Trond Heir
      Abstract: The literature refers to high rates of occupational failure in the population of adults with ADHD. The explanation for this is less known. The aim of the present study was to examine associations between social characteristics and clinical features of adults with ADHD and their occupational outcome. Out of 1050 patients diagnosed with ADHD in a specialized outpatient clinic between 2005 and 2017, 813 (77.4%) agreed to participate in the study. ADHD was diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria, and ADHD subtypes recorded accordingly. Lifetime depression was diagnosed using the specific module of the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Occupational status and other social characteristics like marital status and living with children were recorded. Intelligence (IQ) and symptom severity of ADHD (ASRS score) were assessed in subsamples of participants (n = 526 and n = 567, respectively). In this sample of adults with ADHD (mean age 36.9 years, 48.5% women), 55.3% of the women and 63.7% of the men were working at the time of inclusion. Work participation was associated with being male, being married or cohabitant, or living with children, as well as a life story without major depression. Age, education, ADHD subtype, and ADHD symptom severity were not significantly associated with work participation. Neither was IQ when adjusted for other covariates. Occupational outcome in adults with ADHD appears to be more associated with social characteristics and a history of depression, rather than with IQ, ADHD subtype, or ADHD symptom severity.
      PubDate: 2018-09-05
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0260-2
       
  • Correlates of nicotine dependence in men with childhood
           attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: a 33-year follow-up
    • Authors: Lourdes García Murillo; María A. Ramos-Olazagasti; Rachel G. Klein; Salvatore Mannuzza; Francisco Xavier Castellanos
      Abstract: Identify correlates of nicotine dependence [lifetime (l) and ongoing (o)] in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in childhood. We conducted a 33-year prospective follow-up of boys (mean age 8) with combined type ADHD (n = 135/207, 65% original sample). Correlates of nicotine dependence in adulthood were selected from characteristics obtained in childhood and adolescence. Among selected childhood features, only immature behavior was significantly related to nicotine dependence (OR(o) = 0.29, p = 0.02), indexing decreased risk. In contrast, several adolescent variables significantly correlated (p < 0.01) with nicotine dependence at mean age 41, including alcohol substance use disorder (SUD, OR(l) = 4.97), non-alcohol SUD (OR(o) = 4.33/OR(l) = 10.93), parental antisocial personality disorder (OR(l) = 4.42), parental SUD (OR(l) = 3.58), dropped out of school (OR(l) = 2.29), impulsivity (OR(o) = 1.53/OR(l) = 1.59), hyperactivity (OR(o) = 1.38), and number of antisocial behaviors (OR(o) = 1.10/OR(l) = 1.14). Results highlight the role of adolescent psychopathology in the development of nicotine dependence, motivating prospective longitudinal efforts to better define the developmental trajectories of risk and protection.
      PubDate: 2018-08-31
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0263-z
       
  • ADHD symptoms in a young patient with central diabetes insipidus
    • Authors: Irene Dupong; Sophie Guilmin-Crepon; Peyre Hugo
      Abstract: Diabetes insipidus is known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. In this case report, we present a child suffering from a central diabetes insipidus (DI) and an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The DI was due to a mutation on the vasopressin gene, impairing its secretion. We discuss the effects of this impairment on the central nervous system and how it might be linked to ADHD symptoms.
      PubDate: 2018-08-29
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0264-y
       
  • Evaluating attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder using ecological
           momentary assessment: a systematic review
    • Authors: Carolina Miguelez-Fernandez; Santiago J. de Leon; Itziar Baltasar-Tello; Inmaculada Peñuelas-Calvo; María Luisa Barrigon; Alba Sedano Capdevila; David Delgado-Gómez; Enrique Baca-García; Juan J. Carballo
      Abstract: Ecological momentary assessment is an excellent tool for the measurement of different day-to-day domains in patients and capturing real-world and real-time data. The purpose of this review is to evaluate feasibility in current ecological momentary assessment studies on emotional and behavioral functioning, functional impairments, and quality of life patients with an attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder diagnosis. This systematic review follows the recommendation of Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines selecting articles published from January 1, 1990, up to the latest access on May 2018, identifying a pool of 23 eligible studies. Twenty-three studies demonstrate the validity of ecological momentary assessment methodology in evaluating different aspects of patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Fifteen studies focus on the child’s or adolescent’s daily behavior, while eight studies only focus on adults. The studies presented in this review monitored patients and their families over a maximum period of 28 days. We can conclude that ecological momentary assessment can be successfully implemented with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder patients to evaluate diverse backgrounds. However, more studies are needed with a longer monitoring period, especially in adolescents, to determine the effectiveness of ecological momentary assessment on patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.
      PubDate: 2018-08-21
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0261-1
       
  • Parent and child neurocognitive functioning predict response to behavioral
           parent training for youth with ADHD
    • Authors: Whitney D. Fosco; Dustin E. Sarver; Michael J. Kofler; Paula A. Aduen
      Abstract: Parental cognitive functioning is thought to play a key role in parenting behavior and may inform response to behavioral intervention. This open-label pilot study examined the extent to which parent and child cognition impacted response to behavioral parent training for children with ADHD. Fifty-four participants (27 parent–child dyads; Mages = 10.6 and 45.2 for children and parents, respectively) completed tasks assessing visuospatial and phonological working memory, inhibitory control, and choice-reaction speed at pre-treatment. Drift diffusion modeling decomposed choice-reaction time data into indicators of processing speed (drift rate) and response caution (boundary separation). Parents completed a 10-week manualized behavioral parent training program. Primary outcomes were pre- and post-treatment child ADHD and conduct problem severity, and parent-reported relational frustration and parenting confidence. Bayesian multiple regressions assessed parent and child cognitive processes as predictors of post-treatment outcomes, controlling for pre-treatment behavior. Better child visuospatial and phonological WM and higher parental response caution were associated with greater reductions in inattention. For conduct problems, better parental self-regulation (stronger inhibitory control and greater response caution) predicted fewer post-treatment conduct problems. Higher parental response caution also predicted lower post-treatment relational frustration and higher parental confidence. Bayesian evidence supported no relation between parent and child cognitive functions and treatment-related changes in hyperactivity. This pilot study demonstrates that cognitive processes central to etiologic theories of ADHD and models of parenting behavior can be successfully integrated into treatment outcome research to inform which families are most likely to benefit from behavioral interventions. This study demonstrates the feasibility of bridging the translational research gap between basic and applied clinical science and facilitates research on the role of cognition in psychosocial interventions.
      PubDate: 2018-07-26
      DOI: 10.1007/s12402-018-0259-8
       
 
 
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