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  Subjects -> PSYCHOLOGY (Total: 875 journals)
Showing 1 - 174 of 174 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acción Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Colombiana de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Comportamentalia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta de Investigación Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Psychologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Activités     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Actualidades en Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ad verba Liberorum : Journal of Linguistics & Pedagogy & Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Addictive Behaviors Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ADHD Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorders     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
ADHD Report The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Experimental Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Advances in Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 73)
Advances in Physiotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Advances in Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 59)
Advances in the Study of Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 30)
African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Aggression and Violent Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 401)
Aggressive Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Aging, Neuropsychology, and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Ágora - studies in psychoanalytic theory     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aletheia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Behavioral Scientist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Imago     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Journal of Applied Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 35)
American Journal of Community Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Health Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Orthopsychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Psychoanalysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
American Psychologist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 173)
Anales de Psicología     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Análise Psicológica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Análisis y Modificación de Conducta     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Annual Review of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 67)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Annual Review of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 214)
Anuario de Psicología / The UB Journal of Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anxiety, Stress & Coping: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Applied and Preventive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Applied Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 67)
Applied Neuropsychology : Adult     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Applied Neuropsychology : Child     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Applied Psychological Measurement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Applied Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 135)
Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Applied Psychophysiology and Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archive for the Psychology of Religion / Archiv für Religionspychologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Archives of Scientific Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arquivos Brasileiros de Psicologia     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Asia Pacific Journal of Counselling and Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Asia-Pacific Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian American Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Assessment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
At-Tajdid : Jurnal Ilmu Tarbiyah     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Attachment: New Directions in Psychotherapy and Relational Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Attention, Perception & Psychophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian and Aotearoa New Zealand Psychodrama Association Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Journal of Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Australian Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Autism Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Autism Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Autism's Own     Open Access  
Autism-Open Access     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Avaliação Psicológica     Open Access  
Avances en Psicologia Latinoamericana     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Aviation Psychology and Applied Human Factors     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Balint Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Barbaroi     Open Access  
Basic and Applied Social Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Behavior Analysis in Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Behavior Analyst     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Behavior Modification     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Behavior Research Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Behavior Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Behavioral Development Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription  
Behavioral Interventions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Behavioral Neuroscience     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Behavioral Sleep Medicine     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Behaviormetrika     Hybrid Journal  
Behaviour     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Behaviour Research and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Behavioural Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Biofeedback     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
BioPsychoSocial Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BMC Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Body, Movement and Dance in Psychotherapy: An International Journal for Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Boletim Academia Paulista de Psicologia     Open Access  
Boletim de Psicologia     Open Access  
Brain Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Clinical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 130)
British Journal of Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 36)
British Journal of Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
British Journal of Health Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
British Journal of Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
British Journal of Social Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Cadernos de psicanálise (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access  
Cadernos de Psicologia Social do Trabalho     Open Access  
Canadian Art Therapy Association     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Canadian Psychology / Psychologie canadienne     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Sport and Exercise Psychology     Hybrid Journal  
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
Child Development Perspectives     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Child Development Research     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Ciencia Cognitiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia e Interculturalidad     Open Access  
Ciências & Cognição     Open Access  
Ciencias Psicológicas     Open Access  
Clínica y Salud     Open Access  
Clinical Medicine Insights : Psychiatry     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Practice in Pediatric Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Clinical Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Clinical Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 68)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Clinical Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Clinical Schizophrenia & Related Psychoses     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Coaching Psykologi - The Danish Journal of Coaching Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cogent Psychology     Open Access  
Cógito     Open Access  
Cognition & Emotion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Cognitive Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Cognitive Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 63)
Cognitive Research : Principles and Implications     Open Access  
Consciousness and Cognition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Construção Psicopedagógica     Open Access  
Consulting Psychology Journal : Practice and Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contagion : Journal of Violence, Mimesis, and Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Contemporary Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Contemporary School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Contextos Clínicos     Open Access  
Counseling Outcome Research and Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Counseling Psychologist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Counseling Psychology and Psychotherapy     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Counselling and Psychotherapy Research : Linking research with practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Counselling and Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Counselling Psychology Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Couple and Family Psychoanalysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Couple and Family Psychology : Research and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Creativity Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Creativity. Theories - Research - Applications     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Criminal Justice Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Cuadernos de Neuropsicología     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Psicologia del Deporte     Open Access  
Cuadernos de Psicopedagogía     Open Access  
Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Cultural-Historical Psychology     Open Access  
Culturas Psi     Open Access  
Culture and Brain     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Addiction Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Current Behavioral Neuroscience Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Current Directions In Psychological Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 48)
Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Current Psychological Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Current Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Current psychology letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Current Research in Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Decision     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Depression and Anxiety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Depression Research and Treatment     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Developmental Neuropsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Developmental Psychobiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Developmental Psychology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 45)
Diagnostica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Dialectica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Discourse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Diversitas: Perspectivas en Psicologia     Open Access  
Drama Therapy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Dreaming     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Drogues, santé et société     Full-text available via subscription  
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Ecopsychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
ECOS - Estudos Contemporâneos da Subjetividade     Open Access  
Educational Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Educational Psychology: An International Journal of Experimental Educational Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Educazione sentimentale     Full-text available via subscription  
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Elpis - Czasopismo Teologiczne Katedry Teologii Prawosławnej Uniwersytetu w Białymstoku     Open Access  
Emotion     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Emotion Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
En-Claves del pensamiento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Enseñanza e Investigacion en Psicologia     Open Access  
Epiphany     Open Access   (Followers: 3)

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Journal Cover Australian Journal of Psychology
  [SJR: 0.384]   [H-I: 30]   [18 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0004-9530 - ISSN (Online) 1742-9536
   Published by John Wiley and Sons Homepage  [1576 journals]
  • Exploring the predictors and mediators of personal wellbeing for young
           Hazaras with refugee backgrounds in Australia
    • Authors: Carly Copolov; Ann Knowles, Denny Meyer
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe Hazara people have historically been persecuted because they are an ethnic and religious minority group in Afghanistan. While there has been research into the wellbeing of young refugees from other ethnic backgrounds, little research has focused on the wellbeing of young Hazaras. Path analysis was used to determine the predictors and mediators of personal wellbeing for young Hazaras with refugee backgrounds in Australia. These included presence of immediate family in Australia, absence of trauma symptoms, acculturation, resilience, and spirituality.MethodSeventy Hazaras, 50 males and 20 females, aged 16–30 years (M = 21.56, SD = 4.29) who had spent an average of 5 years and 2 months (SD = 3.40) in Australia completed an online survey which comprised demographic items and three questionnaires.ResultsThe hypotheses were supported in that acculturation, absence of trauma symptoms, and presence of immediate family in Australia predicted personal wellbeing. Resilience and spirituality were not direct predictors of personal wellbeing, however acculturation mediated the relationship between both resilience and personal wellbeing and between spirituality and personal wellbeing. As expected, both resilience and spirituality, and resilience and absence of trauma symptoms, were positively correlated.ConclusionsThe model identifies possible pathways to wellbeing for young Hazaras with refugee backgrounds in Australia. Findings suggest the young people sampled are positively engaged with education and work in Australia and report an absence of trauma symptoms. The online survey methodology provided access to a relatively large sample in a short period of time. Implications for refugee policy, practice, and research are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-07-24T06:50:23.971679-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12171
       
  • Beliefs about employment of people living with psychosis
    • Authors: Margaret E. Hampson; Richard E. Hicks, Bruce D. Watt
      Abstract: ObjectiveThis qualitative study aimed to construct knowledge about myths that may exist in relation to the employability of people living with psychosis. This article presents information about work-related beliefs expressed by participants in a qualitative study which investigated the employment barriers and support needs of people living with psychosis. Identified beliefs were critically examined against objective evidence obtained from existing literature as well as the lived experience of participants.MethodFocus groups and individual interviews were conducted with 137 participants drawn from six key stakeholder groups including people with lived experience of psychosis, employers, care-givers, employment service providers, health professionals, and community members. Thematic analysis was used to identify perceived employment barriers and support needs of people living with psychosis. The data were explored and analysed with the assistance of NVivo 10.ResultsThe study found that negative beliefs about the employability of people living with psychosis constituted a significant barrier to their employment. In-depth analysis of the data identified what can be considered ten potential myths regarding the employability of people living with psychosis. The main myths are that employment is too stressful for people living with psychosis and that people living with these conditions are not interested or are incapable of working effectively in competitive employment.ConclusionsThe study suggests that public and professional beliefs may constitute significant barriers to the employment of people living with psychosis and may need to be challenged if people living with psychosis are to receive appropriate support to achieve their vocational goals.
      PubDate: 2017-07-10T03:55:22.484998-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12172
       
  • Psychological distress, help-seeking, and perceived barriers to
           psychological treatment among Australian parents
    • Authors: Brit Tapp; Milena Gandy, Vincent J. Fogliati, Eyal Karin, Rhiannon J. Fogliati, Carol Newall, Lauren McLellan, Nick Titov, Blake F. Dear
      Abstract: ObjectiveParental psychological distress is an influential predictor of maladaptive parenting practices, negative outcomes in children, and poorer outcomes of parenting programs. Despite these negative outcomes, treatment engagement among parents appears to be low. This study aimed to explore Australian parents’ history of help-seeking behaviour and perceived barriers to psychological treatment for their own and their children's psychological wellbeing.MethodA sample of 2,555 Australian parents completed an online survey exploring psychological distress, help-seeking, perceived barriers to treatment for parents and their children, and interest in an online parental wellbeing course.ResultsParents reported high levels of personal psychological distress (70.4% in the moderate to very high ranges) and high rates of emotional and behavioural difficulties in their children (34.2% in abnormal range). Parents were more likely to seek informal types of help-seeking, such as advice from family and friends. They were less likely to enlist formal types of help seeking, such as psychotherapy. The most commonly endorsed barriers to seeking treatment for parents and their children included lack of time and money and the belief that mental health difficulties were insufficient to warrant treatment. However, parents expressed a high level of interest in a free online parental wellbeing course.ConclusionThe findings highlight the need for effective and accessible psychological treatments to target the psychological wellbeing of parents and their dependent children. Early evidence suggests that an online parental wellbeing course may offer an acceptable alternative to face-to-face treatment that may overcome many barriers reported in this study.
      PubDate: 2017-06-29T02:35:59.375652-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12170
       
  • Resisting the temptation of food: Regulating overeating and associations
           with emotion regulation, mindfulness, and eating pathology
    • Authors: Jessica L. Kerin; Haley J. Webb, Melanie J. Zimmer-Gembeck
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe ability to regulate overeating has been recognised as integral to healthy weight management and an alternative approach to dieting in addressing excess weight, yet it has received limited examination. Accordingly, our aim was to identify demographic and psychological correlates of overeating regulation in a sample of university students, to facilitate greater understanding of this self-regulatory capacity. Variables of interest included emotion regulation, mindfulness, eating pathology, age, and gender.MethodSelf-report measures were completed by 312 Australian university students (68% female; Mage = 22 years).ResultsExploratory factor analyses indicated three overeating regulation subscales: (1) general overeating regulation (general ability to resist overeating); (2) discomfort overeating dysregulation (inability to resist overeating when experiencing physical pain or negative emotions); and (3) leisure overeating dysregulation (inability to resist overeating in leisure contexts and/or in the presence of high calorie foods). Overeating regulation was not associated with age; though young men reported better general overeating regulation capacity than young women. Individuals reporting greater ability to regulate overeating (across all three subscales) reported better emotion regulation and mindfulness, and less eating pathology. Multiple regression analyses showed that the emotion regulation subscales of goal-directedness, emotional awareness, and impulse control, and the mindfulness subscales of acting with awareness and non-reactivity to inner experience were unique correlates of the overeating regulation subscales.ConclusionsThis study offers greater understanding about the different facets of overeating regulation, and highlights the relevance of emotion regulation and mindfulness in this adaptive eating practise.
      PubDate: 2017-06-29T02:25:28.263252-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12169
       
  • Testing the efficacy of a virtual reality-based simulation in enhancing
           users’ knowledge, attitudes, and empathy relating to psychosis
    • Authors: Nicholas J. Formosa; Ben W. Morrison, Geoffrey Hill, Daniel Stone
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe current study examined the efficacy of a virtual reality (VR) education system that simulates the experience of the positive symptomology associated with schizophrenic spectrum and other psychotic disorders.MethodThe sample comprised of 50 participants from the general public and various psychology undergraduate programs. Participants completed pre-test measures exploring knowledge of diagnosis, attitudes, and empathetic understanding, before being exposed to an immersive VR simulation of a psychotic episode. Participants then completed the original measures with the addition of a user-experience scale, which explored sub-factors understood to share a relationship with VR effectiveness (i.e., fidelity, immersion, presence, and user buy-in).ResultsParticipants’ scores were significantly enhanced at post-test across each outcome measure, with significant correlations found between a number of the gain and user-experience scores.ConclusionsThe findings suggest that VR-based simulations of psychopathology may offer a promising platform for delivering a constructionist approach to psychology education.
      PubDate: 2017-06-23T07:01:26.050377-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12167
       
  • The moderating role of trust in the relationship between work locus of
           control and psychological safety in organisational work teams
    • Authors: Suellen M. Triplett; Jennifer M. I. Loh
      Abstract: ObjectivePrevious studies have found that psychological safety is central to effective team functioning and teamwork. Research has also found that psychological safety is dependent on work locus of control (WLOC). Specifically, external WLOC (i.e., perceived lack of personal control over work life) is negatively associated with psychological safety. However, there is limited understanding of underlying mechanisms, such as trust, which may affect this relationship.MethodSurveys from 131 adult employees from Western Australia were collected from four different organisations.ResultsResults indicated a negative relationship between participants’ expression of external WLOC and psychological safety. Results also indicated that trust significantly moderated the relationship between WLOC and psychological safety.ConclusionThese findings are valuable for all organisations that wish to increase psychological safety among team members for enhanced productivity and employee wellbeing.
      PubDate: 2017-06-23T06:55:42.864704-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12168
       
  • Multiple mediation modelling exploring relationships between specific
           aspects of attachment, emotion regulation, and non-suicidal self-injury
    • Authors: Ruth Tatnell; Penelope Hasking, Louise Newman
      Abstract: ObjectiveNon-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is physically harmful behaviour, primarily used to regulate emotions. Emotion regulatory ability is theorised to develop in the context of primary attachment relationships and to be impacted by the quality of these relationships. We propose a developmental perspective for why some people engage in NSSI.MethodA questionnaire assessing aspects of attachment, emotion regulation, and NSSI was completed by 237 young adults.ResultsParticipants reporting NSSI were more likely to report difficulties in attachment relationships and emotion relation. Using multiple mediation modelling, anxiety related to mothers, and a fearful attachment model predicted NSSI through non-acceptance of emotional responses and lack of regulatory strategies; the fearful model also predicted NSSI through difficulties in engaging in goal-directed behaviour and impulse control.ConclusionsRisk of NSSI may increase as a result of attachment difficulties and associated emotional development; early prevention measures may be useful. Treatment of NSSI should target attachment constructs as well as understanding, expression, and regulation of emotion.
      PubDate: 2017-06-09T04:25:23.452994-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12166
       
  • Perceptions of carotenoid and melanin colouration in faces among young
           Australian adults
    • Authors: Kristine Pezdirc; Megan E. Rollo, Ross Whitehead, Melinda J. Hutchesson, Gozde Ozakinci, David Perrett, Clare E. Collins
      Abstract: ObjectiveHuman skin colour is influenced by three pigments: haemoglobin, carotenoids, and melanin. Carotenoids are abundant in fruits and vegetables, and when consumed accumulate in all layers of the skin, predominantly imparting yellowness (b*). This study investigated the effect of the manipulation of carotenoid-based skin colour, relative to the skin colour conferred by melanin on the perceptions of health amongst a group of Australian adults.MethodFifty-seven participants (n = 4 male; mean age 27.9 ± 7.5 years) completed three computer-based experiments on 50 trial faces. In the first two experiments, face image colour was manipulated along one or two independent single carotenoid or melanin axes on each trial to ‘make the face appear as healthy as possible’. In the third trial, face colour was manipulated on both the carotenoid and melanin axes simultaneously.ResultsFor the single axis, participants significantly increased melanin colouration and added carotenoid colouration to facial images that were initially low in skin yellowness (b*). When carotenoid and melanin axes were simultaneously manipulated, carotenoid colouration was raised (ΔE = 3.15 (SE ±0.19)) and melanin colouration was lowered (ΔE = −1.04 (SE ±0.1)).ConclusionsYoung Australian adults perceive facial skin colouration, associated with both carotenoid intake from fruit and vegetables and melanin due to sun exposure as conveying the appearance of health in young adults. However, carotenoid colouration was more important to health perception.
      PubDate: 2017-05-19T00:54:16.196939-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12163
       
  • Demographic and ideological correlates of negative attitudes towards
           asylum seekers: A meta-analytic review
    • Authors: Joel Anderson; Rose Ferguson
      Abstract: ObjectiveA global increase in forced displacement has led to rapid increases in the number of people seeking asylum. Negative attitudes toward these people are pervasive and the literature attempting to understand the prevalence and impact of these attitudes is growing. This article contains a meta-analysis of the Australian quantitative research in this field.MethodWe combined effect sizes from published and unpublished Australian data. The primary outcomes were effect size estimates for the correlations between reported attitudes towards asylum seekers and a range of demographic factors (age, gender, education, religious affiliation, political orientation, national identification) and ideological variables (right-wing authoritarianism, social dominance orientation, social justice principles).ResultsWe identified 34 suitable studies (Nparticipants = 5,994). Demographic factors of gender, education, religious affiliation, political orientation, and national identification were related to attitudes. More specifically, being male, having less education, being more politically conservative, and higher in national identification were associated with more negative attitudes (rs = .08, –.18, .24, .23, and .15, respectively; ps < .01). Increases in right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientation, and decreases in macrojustice principles were also associated with more negative attitudes (rs = .49, .56, and –.28, respectively; ps < .05).ConclusionMost demographic factors were weakly or moderately related to attitudes. Ideological variables were stronger correlates, with right-wing authoritarianism and social dominance orientations correlating the most strongly. Significant amounts of heterogeneity for most variables suggest that more research is needed to explore interactions between these variables, and to identify relevant moderators of these relationships.
      PubDate: 2017-05-05T06:54:15.438025-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12162
       
  • Predicting support for marriage equality in Australia
    • Authors: Joel Anderson; Christina Georgantis, Tayla Kapelles
      Abstract: ObjectiveThe marriage equality debate is becoming increasingly prominent in Australian political and media discourse. Moreover, as policy that would legislate marriage equality continues to be debated in political circles, public opinion on the topic appears to be becoming increasingly divided. This article presents a cross-sectional study exploring predictors of support for marriage equality.MethodA sample of 137 Australians (66% females) responded to a series of demographic items, a measure of attitudes towards gay men and lesbian women, and a forced-choice question asking whether or not they would support marriage between two people—regardless of their gender.ResultsThe results revealed that support for marriage equality in this sample was predicted by religious affiliation, political orientation, and sexual prejudice. More specifically, individuals in support of marriage equality were more likely to be non-religious, politically liberal, and have more positive attitudes towards gay men (attitudes towards lesbian women were unrelated to support for marriage equality). Age and gender did not predict support for marriage equality.ConclusionsSupport for marriage equality in Australia can be predicted by social attitudes and demographic variables. These findings are discussed in terms of the implications of maintaining the legal status quo, which mandates marriage inequality.
      PubDate: 2017-05-05T06:54:13.478291-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12164
       
  • A review of existing measures of attentional biases in body image and
           eating disorders research
    • Authors: Michelle Y.W. Jiang; Lenny R. Vartanian
      Abstract: Cognitive theories emphasise the important role of attentional biases in the development and maintenance of body image issues and eating pathology. A wealth of research has been conducted to examine attentional biases toward body-related information among individuals with eating pathology. However, there is considerable variability in the methods that have been used to measure attention and, importantly, these methods tap into different attentional processes. Given the multifaceted nature of attention, it is important for researchers to select the right tools to test their hypotheses. This review critically evaluates the attentional measures that have been used in previous research, primarily the modified Stroop task, dot probe task, visual search task, and eyetracking. The strengths and limitations of each measure will be discussed in order to provide a guide for researchers to further investigate the attentional mechanisms underlying body image issues and eating disorders. Overall, we recommend that researchers use a combination of eyetracking technology and specific reaction-time measures that target the specific attentional mechanism of interest.
      PubDate: 2017-03-30T01:07:52.405946-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12161
       
  • Exploring poor sleep, mental health, and help-seeking intention in
           university students
    • Authors: Marina L. Zochil; Einar B. Thorsteinsson
      Abstract: ObjectiveUniversity students experience common mental health problems such as depression, anxiety, and stress along with poor-sleep quality. This study explores the relationships between these concepts and help-seeking intention in a general Australian university student population. The primary aim was to examine the moderating effects of sleep quality on help-seeking intention for common mental health problems. The secondary aim was to examine sex differences in help-seeking behaviour.MethodUniversity students, between 18 and 55 years of age (M = 30.18, SD = 11.37, N = 117) of which 98 were female, completed an on-line survey assessing help-seeking intentions, common mental health problems, and sleep quality.ResultsHigh levels of depression, anxiety, and stress were significantly associated with decreased sleep quality or decreased help-seeking intention. A multiple regression analysis predicted that students were more likely to report intention to seek help if they had lower scores of depression, but higher scores of stress. Help-seeking intention levels were lower for males than females. Poor-sleep quality was not found to be a moderator of help-seeking intention.ConclusionAlthough the proposed moderation effect of poor-sleep quality on the relationship between common mental health problems and help-seeking intention was not supported, the study advanced our knowledge of university students’ low intention to seek help, despite high scores of poor-sleep quality. Implications for on-campus interventions and raising awareness among students about these issues are discussed.
      PubDate: 2017-03-20T01:55:24.214117-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12160
       
  • Understanding Australian university students’ mental health
           help-seeking: An empirical and theoretical investigation
    • Authors: Wenjing Li; Linley A. Denson, Diana S. Dorstyn
      Abstract: ObjectiveTo investigate correlates of Australian university students’ help-seeking intentions and actual service usage, testing and extending new models based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and the Behavioural Model of Health Services Use.Method611 Australian domestic students (209 males and 402 females, mean age = 21 years; SD = 5.6) completed standardised measures and commented on facilitators, barriers, benefits, and potential improvements to student mental health services.ResultsA model based on Chinese university student data also fit the Australian data best. Bootstrapping revealed relationships between several predictors (knowledge concerning mental health and services, evaluated and perceived need, anticipated benefits, stigma concerns, and Asian values) and help-seeking intentions were significantly mediated by attitudes toward help-seeking and subjective norms. Logistic regression analysis identified predictors of service usage: help-seeking intentions, perceived behavioural control, gender, study major, knowledge of mental health, social support, income, self-rated mental health status, perceived need for help, and Asian values.ConclusionsPractitioners need to consider psycho-educational and marketing approaches to engage students, raise awareness of available services, increase understanding of mental illness and treatments, and reduce stigmatized attitudes.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T07:55:33.87295-05:0
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12157
       
  • Parental alienation: Targeted parent perspective
    • Authors: Sian Balmer; Mandy Matthewson, Janet Haines
      Abstract: ObjectivesThe aims of the study were to determine targeted parent experiences of parental alienation post-separation from the alienating parent, and to investigate common targeted parent characteristics.MethodA total of 225 targeted parents completed an online survey.ResultsTargeted parents reported experiencing high severity of exposure to parental alienation tactics. Targeted parent sex and targeted child age significantly predicted variance in exposure to parental alienation. Targeted mothers experienced significantly higher severity of exposure to parental alienation than targeted fathers. Severity of exposure to parental alienation tactics significantly predicted increases in the appraisal of the parental alienation situation as threatening.ConclusionsThe findings offered new insights into targeted parent appraisals of their parental alienation experience. The results signified the seriousness of the impact of exposure to parental alienation for targeted parents, and highlighted a need for empirical research into the effectiveness of interventions and support services to assist targeted parents.
      PubDate: 2017-03-17T07:55:24.854172-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12159
       
  • Anger rumination in Australia and Spain: Validation of the Anger
           Rumination Scale
    • Authors: Juan Ramos-Cejudo; José M. Salguero, Lee Kannis-Dymand, Esperanza García-Sancho, Steven Love
      Abstract: ObjectiveRumination has been empirically supported in the experience of anger. The Anger Rumination Scale (ARS) was developed to assess ruminative processes in anger. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the ARS in Australia and Spain.MethodA large non-clinical sample (N = 1,752) completed a battery including the ARS and measures of trait anger, anger expression and control, aggression, emotional symptoms, and emotion regulation strategies, to determine the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the ARS. Variations between the two cultural samples were also analysed.ResultsConfirmatory factor analysis verified the four-factor structure of Angry Memories, Thoughts of Revenge, Angry Afterthoughts, and Understanding of Causes in both samples. Findings established good psychometric properties, evidence of convergent and discriminant validity, and associations in the expected direction with related variables. Males in both samples endorsed Thoughts of Revenge significantly higher. Spanish participants scored higher on Angry Memories and Understanding of Causes.ConclusionsThe ARS is a valid measure of anger rumination in Australian and Spanish populations. Further, gender and cultural variations may influence the tendency to engage in anger rumination.
      PubDate: 2017-03-03T05:21:09.236323-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12154
       
  • Employee engagement and emotional exhaustion of fly-in-fly-out workers: A
           diary study
    • Authors: Simon L. Albrecht; Jeromy Anglim
      Abstract: ObjectiveAlthough fly-in-fly-out (FIFO) work practices are widely used, little is known about their impact on the motivation and wellbeing of FIFO workers across the course of their work cycles. Drawing from the job demands-resources model, we aimed to test for the within-person effects of time of work cycle, job demands, and job resources on emotional exhaustion and employee engagement at 3-day intervals.MethodA total of 52 FIFO workers filled out three or more online diary surveys after every 3 days of their on-site work roster. The survey consisted of items drawn from previously validated scales. Bayesian hierarchical modelling of the day-level data was conducted.ResultsWorkers, on average, showed a decline in engagement and supervisor support, and an increase in emotional demand over the course of the work cycle. The results of the hierarchical modelling showed that day-level autonomy predicted day-level engagement and that day-level workload and emotional demands predicted emotional exhaustion.ConclusionsThe findings highlight the importance of managing FIFO employees’ day-to-day experiences of job demands and job resources because of their influence on employee engagement and emotional exhaustion. To best protect FIFO worker day-level wellbeing, employing organisations should ensure optimal levels of job autonomy, workload, and emotional demands. Practical implications, study limitations and areas for future research are outlined.
      PubDate: 2017-02-21T23:50:40.931659-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12155
       
  • Biculturalism amongst ethnic minorities: Its impact for individuals and
           intergroup relations
    • Authors: Eileen Chu; Fiona A. White, Stefano Verrelli
      Abstract: This review article offers an integration of acculturation, biculturalism, and intergroup relations research. Additionally, it argues that bicultural identities can be more accurately conceptualised as a third, hyphenated cultural identity (e.g., Chinese-Australian), in addition to one's ethnic and the dominant national identity. In doing so, this article proposes that hyphenated cultural identities may be personally meaningful for many ethnic minorities and discusses the function of hyphenated cultural identification for individuals and society. Given the relevance of bicultural identification, it is argued that recognising and understanding a hyphenated cultural identity is fundamental to ethnic minorities' wellbeing, as well as improving the quality of intergroup relations in multicultural societies, such as Australia.
      PubDate: 2017-01-19T01:15:48.270524-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12153
       
  • The impact of coping and resilience on anxiety among older Australians
    • Authors: Wendy Wen Li; Daniel J. Miller
      Abstract: Objective: This study aims to explore the relationships between various coping types, resilience, and anxiety among older Australians. Particular attention is paid to whether resilience moderates coping's effect on anxiety. Method: A total of 324 Australians aged between 55 and 90 (M = 66.7, SD = 8.6) were surveyed as part of the study. Moderation was assessed using structural equation modelling and plots of simple slopes. Results: Significant negative correlations were detected between anxiety and both proactive coping and preventive coping. Higher levels of resilience were associated with lower levels of anxiety. Age moderated both proactive coping and reflective coping's effects on anxiety and gender moderated avoidance coping's effect on anxiety. Resilience was found to moderate the relationships between proactive coping and anxiety, and instrumental support seeking and anxiety. For those high in resilience, there was little association between anxiety and proactive coping or anxiety and instrumental support seeking. Among low resilience individuals, there was a negative association between proactive coping and anxiety, but a positive association between instrumental support seeking and anxiety. Conclusion: Resilience, proactive coping, and preventive coping are all important predictors of anxiety among older people. Among those who are low in resilience, proactively coping with stress may be particularly important for good mental health. The results of the study highlight the complexity of the relationship between resilience, coping, and anxiety among older people.
      PubDate: 2017-01-19T01:15:45.33459-05:0
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12152
       
  • Outcome proportions, numeracy, and attribute-framing bias
    • Authors: Eyal Gamliel; Hamutal Kreiner
      Abstract: ObjectivesAn object presented positively is often judged more favourably than the same object described negatively even when the descriptions are logically equivalent. This difference, termed the attribute-framing bias, has been shown to be affected by numeracy, such that less numerate individuals are more susceptible to the bias than highly numerate individuals. This article examines the hypothesis that less numerate individuals are less attentive to numerical information than highly numerate individuals; hence, their judgements rely more heavily on positive and negative words that elicit the bias.MethodIn two experiments, participants’ numeracy was measured, and they were asked to rate different scenarios while attribute framing was manipulated by presenting logically equivalent scenarios described with either positive or negative outcomes in three different proportions.ResultsSignificant attribute-framing effects were found in both experiments. Critically, less numerate participants were as sensitive to different outcome proportions as highly numerate participants. Nevertheless, numeracy affected attribute framing as hypothesised: Less numerate participants were typically more susceptible to attribute-framing bias than highly numerate individuals.ConclusionsIndividual differences in sensitivity to numerical information did not modulate the effect of numeracy on attribute framing. We discuss the implications of these findings to understanding the cognitive processes underlying attribute-framing bias.
      PubDate: 2017-01-13T06:10:36.922908-05:
      DOI: 10.1111/ajpy.12151
       
 
 
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