Subjects -> BIOLOGY (Total: 3397 journals)
    - BIOCHEMISTRY (264 journals)
    - BIOENGINEERING (141 journals)
    - BIOLOGY (1617 journals)
    - BIOPHYSICS (49 journals)
    - BIOTECHNOLOGY (262 journals)
    - BOTANY (249 journals)
    - CYTOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY (31 journals)
    - ENTOMOLOGY (75 journals)
    - GENETICS (171 journals)
    - MICROBIOLOGY (280 journals)
    - MICROSCOPY (12 journals)
    - ORNITHOLOGY (28 journals)
    - PHYSIOLOGY (72 journals)
    - ZOOLOGY (146 journals)

BIOLOGY (1617 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 801 - 1000 of 1720 Journals sorted alphabetically
IRBM     Full-text available via subscription  
IRBM News     Full-text available via subscription  
iScience     Open Access  
Islets     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Israel Journal of Ecology and Evolution     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Istituto Lombardo - Accademia di Scienze e Lettere - Incontri di Studio     Open Access  
Italian Journal of Mycology     Open Access  
ITBM-RBM     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ITBM-RBM News     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
IUBMB Life     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
IUFS Journal of Biology     Open Access  
Izvestiya Atmospheric and Oceanic Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Izvestiya, Physics of the Solid Earth     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Jahangirnagar University Journal of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Japanese Journal of Applied Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
JCI Insight     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
JDREAM : Journal of interDisciplinary REsearch Applied to Medicine     Open Access  
JETP Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Jornal Interdisciplinar de Biociências     Open Access  
Journal Biastatistics : Biomedics, Industry & Business And Social Statistics     Open Access  
Journal of Bacteriology & Parasitology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Bioanalysis & Biomedicine     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Bioequivalence & Bioavailability     Open Access  
Journal of Bioremediation & Biodegradation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Computer Science & Systems Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Advanced Laboratory Research in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Advances in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Advances in Biology & Biotechnology     Open Access  
Journal of Agricultural, Biological & Environmental Statistics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Amino Acids     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Anatomy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of AOAC International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Applied Biobehavioral Research     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Applied Bioinformatics & Computational Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Applied Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Biosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Applied Ichthyology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Applied Life Sciences International     Open Access  
Journal of Applied Phycology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Applied Virology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Aquatic Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Arachnology     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Asia-Pacific Biodiversity     Open Access  
Journal of Astrobiology & Outreach     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Avian Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Basic Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Bio-Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Biobased Materials and Bioenergy     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Biodiversity Management & Forestry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Biogeography     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Bioinformatics and Intelligent Control     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bioinformatics and Sequence Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Biological Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biological Dynamics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Biological Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biological Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Biological Methods     Open Access  
Journal of Biological Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Biological Research - Thessaloniki     Open Access  
Journal of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Biological Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology and Life Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biology, Agriculture and Healthcare     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Biomechanics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Journal of Biomedical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biomedical Informatics     Partially Free   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Biomedical Informatics : X     Open Access  
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B : Applied Biomaterials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Biomedical Physics and Engineering     Open Access  
Journal of Biomedical Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Bionic Engineering     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Bioresource Management     Open Access  
Journal of Biorheology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Biosafety and Biosecurity     Open Access  
Journal of Bioscience and Bioengineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Biosciences and Medicines     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Biosocial Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Bryology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 48)
Journal of Cell Communication and Signaling     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Cell Death     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Cell Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Cellular Biochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Cellular Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Chromatography B     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Clinical Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Clinical Toxicology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Communications Technology and Electronics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Contemporary Physics (Armenian Academy of Sciences)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Crustacean Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Developmental Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Ecology and The Natural Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Education, Health and Sport     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Electrical Bioimpedance     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Electromyography and Kinesiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Environment and Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Environment and Sociobiology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Environmental Analysis and Progress     Open Access  
Journal of Environmental Radioactivity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Environmental Science and Natural Resources     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Ethnobiology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Ethnobiology and Ethnomedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Ethology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Evolutionary Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Journal of Evolutionary Biology Research     Open Access  
Journal of Experimental and Clinical Anatomy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Experimental Life Science     Open Access  
Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Fish Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Journal of Functional Biomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Fungi     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Genomics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Great Lakes Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Green Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Health and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Heredity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Huazhong University of Science and Technology [Medical Sciences]     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Human Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Hymenoptera Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Ichthyology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Insect Behavior     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Insect Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Insect Conservation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Institute of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Journal of Integrated OMICS     Open Access  
Journal of Integrated Pest Management     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Integrative Environmental Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Intelligent Transportation Systems: Technology, Planning, and Operations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Invertebrate Pathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Landscape Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Law and the Biosciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Leukocyte Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Life and Earth Science     Open Access  
Journal of Life Sciences Research     Open Access  
Journal of Lipid Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Lipids     Open Access  
Journal of Luminescence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Mammalian Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Mammalian Ova Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Mammalogy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine and Aquatic Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Marine Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Mathematical Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Mechanics in Medicine and Biology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Medical Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Medical Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Medicinal Botany     Open Access  
Journal of Medicine and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Melittology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Membrane Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Membrane Computing     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Membrane Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Journal of Molecular Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Journal of Molecular Biology Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Molecular Catalysis B: Enzymatic     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Molecular Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Molecular Evolution     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Molecular Signaling     Open Access  
Journal of Molecular Structure     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Molluscan Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Muscle Research and Cell Motility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Nanoparticle Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Nanoparticles     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Natural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Natural Products     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Natural Sciences and Mathematics Research     Open Access  
Journal of Natural Sciences Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Negative Results in BioMedicine     Open Access  
Journal of Nematology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Neuroscience and Behavioral Health     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of New Results in Science     Open Access  
Journal of New Seeds     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Nucleic Acids     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Parasitology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Parasitology and Vector Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Pharmacological and Toxicological Methods     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Phycology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Physics D : Applied Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Physics: Conference Series     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Phytopathology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Plankton Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Plant Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Journal of Plant Pathology     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Plasma Physics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Pollination Ecology     Open Access  
Journal of Porphyrins and Phthalocyanines     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Progressive Research in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Proteome Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Proteomics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Purdue Undergraduate Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Radiation Research and Applied Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

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Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Journal of Plankton Research
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.163
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 2  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0142-7873 - ISSN (Online) 1464-3774
Published by Oxford University Press Homepage  [409 journals]
  • Global and local DNA (meta)barcoding reveal new biogeography patterns in
           tintinnid ciliates
    • Authors: Santoferrara L; Rubin E, Mcmanus G.
      Pages: 209 - 221
      Abstract: AbstractTintinnid ciliates are suitable models to study the diversity and biogeography of microbial plankton. In addition to morphological data accumulated over two centuries, most known families and common genera have been linked to DNA sequences in relatively recent barcoding efforts. This backbone of morphologically identified sequences is used here to classify environmental sequences in order to study global and local spatial trends. Analyses of tintinnid SSU rDNA data collected worldwide (about 900 sequences available in NCBI GenBank) and in the northwest Atlantic Ocean (about 500,000 sequences obtained by metabarcoding) support distribution patterns related to salinity, bathymetry and climate/ latitude. In addition to the marine–freshwater dichotomy and a pattern of coastal-only taxa known for tintinnids, there is a global trend of phylotypes restricted to brackish or open waters. Local alpha and beta diversity analyses show that assemblage differences among estuarine, coastal and open waters are not significant regarding richness, but are significant in terms of phylogenetic composition. We also confirm spatial restriction of boreal and austral taxa, and stress that cosmopolitanism cannot be assessed by molecular methods that lump data from potentially endemic and commonly widespread taxa. Heterogeneous diversity, biogeography and phylogenetic resolution within and among tintinnid lineages raise questions about the processes that promote their diversification and determine their spatial distributions.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Apr 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby011
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Quantitative measurement of the optomotor response in free-swimming
           Daphnia
    • Authors: Hathaway C; Dudycha J.
      Pages: 222 - 229
      Abstract: AbstractDaphnia are trophically important, common zooplankton in lakes and ponds worldwide, and hence have become a significant model system in ecology and evolutionary biology. Daphnia have conspicuous eyes that confer both fitness benefits and costs, though little is known about the functional capabilities of Daphnia vision. We sought to determine whether free-swimming Daphnia exhibit an optomotor response, a reflexive behavior present in many animals that could be used in studies of visual function. Optomotor responses are movements that allow an individual to track motion of the surrounding environment and thus stabilize its visual field. We constructed an apparatus that rotates a striped drum around Daphnia, while allowing an observer to quantify swimming behavior. Across a range of angular stripe widths and rotational speeds, we demonstrate that Daphnia have an optomotor response composed of at least two distinct behaviors. Our results suggest Daphnia could use vision for predator avoidance in some circumstances, but could not see other Daphnia individuals beyond more than a few millimeters, or food particles at all. We discuss how the optomotor response may be used to study visual function in Daphnia to better understand visually mediated ecological interactions.
      PubDate: Mon, 07 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby014
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Assessing the efficiency of non-parametric estimators of species richness
           for marine microplankton
    • Authors: Branco M; Figueiras F, Cermeño P.
      Pages: 230 - 243
      Abstract: AbstractNon-parametric asymptotic estimators rely on the assumption that rare species are indicative of the degree of undersampling. We evaluate the performance of 11 non-parametric asymptotic species richness estimators and an individual-based rarefaction and extrapolation (R/E) method using marine microplankton data. These species richness estimators were evaluated by sequentially increasing sampling effort. Their bias was diminished as sample (size) completeness increased. Jackknife estimators were more accurate than others such as Chao’s estimators. Underestimates were larger than 10% of species when applied to more than 30% of the individuals present in the community. The magnitude of bias varied as a function of community structure. R/E curves sorted samples by species richness but with a significant sampling error associated. We find that the use of these analytical methods lacks validity for the comparison of marine microplankton species richness estimates from sample collections spanning large spatial and temporal scales.
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Mar 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby005
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • The distribution of phytoplankton in the Baltic Sea assessed by a
           prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene primer system
    • Authors: Bennke C; Pollehne F, Müller A, et al.
      Pages: 244 - 254
      Abstract: AbstractDue to the evolutionary relationship between cyanobacteria and chloroplasts of all oxygenic eukaryotic photoautotrophs, both can be amplified by prokaryotic 16S rRNA gene primers. In marine water samples, chloroplast sequences often make up as much as 50% of a 16S rRNA gene library, yet because of the comparatively low phylogenetic resolution within limited chloroplast databases, they are usually removed from further analyses. However, chloroplast 16S rRNA gene databases are constantly improving and our aim was to test if the combined 16S rRNA gene sequences of phototrophic prokaryotes and eukaryotes generated by a prokaryotic primer set could be used to characterize their distribution. Using the phytoREF database, in situ 16S rRNA gene distribution characterization was performed for samples throughout the Baltic Sea (cells >0.2 μm) and compared to microscopic (cells >20 μm) as well as flow-cytometric (cells <7 μm) data. Generally, microscopic and molecular methods revealed similar distribution patterns of diatoms, chlorophytes and filamentous cyanobacteria. Although not directly comparable, flow cytometry delivered semi-quantitative patterns, on a very broad classification level, to the molecular approach. In conclusion, the combination of molecular and non-molecular analyses provided an improved overview of the phototrophic community, demonstrating its usefulness as a tool in monitoring strategies.
      PubDate: Sat, 07 Apr 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby008
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Feeding ecology of autumn-spawned Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus)
           larvae in Trinity Bay, Newfoundland: Is recruitment linked to main prey
           availability'
    • Authors: Wilson C; Murphy H, Bourne C, et al.
      Pages: 255 - 268
      Abstract: AbstractAtlantic herring (Clupea harengus) populations in Newfoundland, Canada, are characterized by spring- and autumn-spawning components, targeted as a mixed fishery. The spring-spawning component accounted for ~90% of the total catch until the early 2000s, but autumn-spawning herring now dominate the catch in most areas. We explored the links between recruitment of autumn-spawning herring and variability in larval prey and temperature during first winter. The main prey during the early larval stage was nauplii of the copepods Temora longicornis and Oithona similis. In the mid-larval stage, Pseudocalanus sp. strongly dominated the diet. In the late-larval stage, larvae shifted to the larger calanoid copepods Calanus sp. The phenology of Pseudocalanus sp. shifted from a spring to autumn bloom during the mid-2000s, concurrent with the change of the spring- and autumn-spawning components. This change in zooplankton phenology suggests that conditions for herring larval survival have improved during autumn, although no significant relationships were found between recruitment and prey abundance or temperature. Our results suggest that multiple factors, rather than a single driver, interact in the regulation of herring year-class strength. Survival is the outcome of growth and mortality, making it important considering predation pressure along with prey availability in future studies.
      PubDate: Mon, 26 Mar 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby003
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Appendicularians in the southwestern Sea of Japan during the summer:
           abundance and role as secondary producers
    • Authors: Kodama T; Iguchi N, Tomita M, et al.
      Pages: 269 - 283
      Abstract: AbstractAppendicularian abundance was investigated at a total of 235 stations over 5 years, from 2011 to 2015, in southwestern Sea of Japan to evaluate potential factors influencing abundance and to understand their effects on the marine ecosystem. Oikopleura longicauda was the dominant appendicularian species, present in 232 samples, and with the highest abundance (mean ± SD: 463 ± 694 individuals m−3) among the appendicularians. Warm conditions appear to favour O. longicauda based on a generalized linear model, and salinity and chlorophyll a concentration were not significantly related to abundance. The abundance of O. longicauda was correlated significantly with those of Microsetella and Oncaea, which are the grazers of discarded appendicularian houses, as well as that of carnivorous Sagitta. Oikopleura longicauda houses, discarded daily to the water column, were estimated to represent a carbon flux of 7.7 ± 7.8 mg C m−2 d−1 (mean ± SD), depending on their density and water temperature. We estimate that a minimum of approximately 13% of houses were consumed by Oncaea and Microsettela. Therefore, we suggest that secondary production by O. longicauda in the southwestern Sea of Japan increased during summer and leads to enriched production at higher trophic levels in the epipelagic ecosystem during this season.
      PubDate: Thu, 10 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby015
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Sex-specific starvation tolerance of copepods with different foraging
           strategies
    • Authors: Holm M; Rodríguez-Torres R, van Someren Gréve H, et al.
      Pages: 284 - 294
      Abstract: AbstractPlanktonic copepods have sexual dimorphism that can lead to differences in starvation tolerance between genders. Additionally, mating may be energetically costly and thus reduce starvation tolerance. We investigated the influence of sexual dimorphism and mating on starvation tolerance of copepods with different feeding behaviours: Oithona nana (ambusher), Temora longicornis (feeding-current feeder) and Centropages typicus (cruiser). Males of C. typicus and O. nana had a starvation tolerance lower than females, whereas T. longicornis had a similar starvation tolerance between genders. Only O. nana males and females had reduced starvation tolerance when both genders were incubated together, which suggests that mating activities in ambushers have an energetic cost higher than in active feeding copepods. C:N ratios showed a non-significant difference between genders, which indicates that gender differences in starvation tolerance are not due to dissimilarities in lipid reserves. Gender differences in starvation tolerance can be partially explained by body size differences between sexes. This indicates a minor influence of mate-seeking behaviour on male starvation tolerance, likely due to reduced mate-searching behaviour under prolonged starvation. Our results demonstrate that sexual dimorphism can result in different starvation tolerance between copepod genders and that a negative effect of mating on starvation tolerance depends on the foraging strategy.
      PubDate: Wed, 28 Mar 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby006
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Seasonality of Oithona similis and Calanus helgolandicus reproduction and
           abundance: contrasting responses to environmental variation at a shelf
           site
    • Authors: Cornwell L; Findlay H, Fileman E, et al.
      Pages: 295 - 310
      Abstract: AbstractThe pelagic copepods Oithona similis and Calanus helgolandicus have overlapping geographic ranges, yet contrast in feeding mode, reproductive strategy and body size. We investigate how these contrasting traits influence the seasonality of copepod abundance and reproductive output under environmental variation, using time series data collected over 25 years at the Western Channel Observatory station, L4. The proportional change in egg production rate (EPR, eggs female−1 d−1) over the annual cycle was ~10-fold and similar for both species, although EPR of O. similis was only ~ 11% that of C. helgolandicus. The timing of EPR maxima for O. similis coincided with increased sea surface temperature (SST) in summer, likely due to a temperature-dependent brooding period. Conversely, EPR of broadcast spawning C. helgolandicus was more strongly related to net heat flux and diatom biomass, both parameters associated with the spring phytoplankton bloom. In both species, female body mass correlated negatively with SST, with a 7.5% reduction in body mass per °C in C. helgolandicus compared to just 2.3% in O. similis. Finally, seasonality of EPR and adult and copepodite abundance was strongly decoupled in both species, suggesting that optimum conditions for reproduction and abundance occurred at different times of the year.
      PubDate: Thu, 05 Apr 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby007
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Lipid load triggers migration to diapause in Arctic Calanus
           copepods—insights from underwater imaging
    • Authors: Schmid M; Maps F, Fortier L.
      Pages: 311 - 325
      Abstract: AbstractCopepod lipids fuel the Arctic marine ecosystem, but information on the fine-scale distribution of copepods and lipids is nonexistent. This study investigated the fine-scale (1 m) vertical distribution of the copepods Calanus hyperboreus, Calanus glacialis and Metridia longa during a Lagrangian drift in the North Water Polynya using the Lightframe On-sight Keyspecies Investigation (LOKI) imaging system. A copepod species- and stage-specific automatic identification model based on machine learning, a subcategory of artificial intelligence, was used to identify images taken by LOKI. Lipids were measured from images of copepods taken over the whole water column (1 m resolution). Diel vertical migration (DVM) in all three species was detected. In C. hyperboreus and C. glacialis C4-females as well as M. longa C5-females lipid load of deep copepod individuals was significantly higher than that of shallower individuals. Vertical distribution profiles and individual lipid loads suggested that individuals with lower lipid load continued DVM, while others with high lipid load ceased migrating, remaining at depth. Calanus hyperboreus individuals seemed to migrate to diapause at lower lipid fullness (50%) than C. glacialis (60%). A bioenergetics model showed that Calanus females had enough lipids to diapause for over a year, highlighting the significant lipid overhead they use for capital breeding.
      PubDate: Mon, 16 Apr 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby012
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Variations in the hatching response of rotifers to salinity and waterbird
           ingestion
    • Authors: Conde-Porcuna J; Pérez-Martínez C, Moreno E.
      Pages: 326 - 341
      Abstract: AbstractClimate change is increasing the salinity of waters in the Mediterranean region. This effect may negatively affect the resilience of aquatic communities and modify regional dynamics, favouring the colonization of salt-tolerant species. Our objective was to test the effects of salinity on the resilient capacity and dispersal response of rotifers at different temperatures through the study of their hatching success. Hatching responses are compared between diapausing eggs isolated from the sediments of two peridunal lakes and from waterbird faecal samples collected in the same area. Experiments were performed at two temperatures (15 and 25°C) with four salinity treatments (0.2, 1, 4 and 8 g L−1). Results showed species-specific hatching response of rotifers to salinity, which varied with temperature. No overall differences in hatching were observed between the lake sediments and waterbird faecal samples. However, the only diapausing eggs hatching from waterbird faecal samples were those isolated from faecal droppings of Anas platyrhynchos and A. clypeata. We observed that hatching success of Brachionus angularis was higher for dispersed diapausing eggs by waterbirds than for sedimentary diapausing eggs. Our results show that high water salinities and/or particular species of disperser waterbirds may limit the potential dispersal of rotifers by waterbirds.
      PubDate: Thu, 12 Apr 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby010
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Broad plasticity in the salinity tolerance of a marine copepod species,
           Acartia longiremis, in the Baltic Sea
    • Authors: Dutz J; Christensen A.
      Pages: 342 - 355
      Abstract: AbstractWe assessed feeding, reproduction, survival and respiration in the boreal–polar copepod Acartia longiremis over the salinity range of 3–16 in the Baltic Sea. Feeding and egg production were not affected at a salinity of 7–16, representing the range in which the species naturally occurs, but decreased significantly at a lower salinity. Survival experiments showed a broad physiological plasticity with no increase in mortality upon immediate exposure to salinities of 16–7. Acclimation of females to low salinity extended the survival range to a salinity of 5. While the response in vital rates was characteristic of a tolerant, brackish water species, unusually high respiration rates at a salinity of 7–16 indicated that the species experienced osmotic stress, and that the mechanism maintaining physiological integrity was energetically expensive. Divergent responses of an increase in respiration rate and a decrease in feeding rate at a salinity below 7 indicated a disruption of the energetic balance under which the osmotic stress could not be counteracted. Our results show that A. longiremis persists close to its physiological limit in the Baltic Sea, which makes the species vulnerable to small changes in future salinity.
      PubDate: Thu, 03 May 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby013
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
  • Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Invertebrate Larvae
    • Authors: Dolan J.
      Pages: 356 - 357
      Abstract: Evolutionary Ecology of Marine Invertebrate Larvae. Tyler J. Carrier, Adam M., Reitzel, and Andreas Heyland (Oxford: Oxford University Press) 2018. 328 pp. ISBN 978-0-19-87896-9 (paperback). £39.99.
      PubDate: Mon, 09 Apr 2018 00:00:00 GMT
      DOI: 10.1093/plankt/fby009
      Issue No: Vol. 40, No. 3 (2018)
       
 
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