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  Subjects -> BIOLOGY (Total: 3121 journals)
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BIOLOGY (1487 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 1720 Journals sorted alphabetically
AAPS Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Achievements in the Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
ACS Synthetic Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Acta Biologica Colombiana     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Acta Biologica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Acta Biologica Sibirica     Open Access  
Acta Biomaterialia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Acta Biotheoretica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Chiropterologica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
acta ethologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Acta Limnologica Brasiliensia     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Médica Costarricense     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Musei Silesiae, Scientiae Naturales     Open Access  
Acta Neurobiologiae Experimentalis     Open Access  
Acta Parasitologica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Acta Scientiarum. Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Scientifica Naturalis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis     Open Access  
Actualidades Biológicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advanced Health Care Technologies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Advanced Journal of Graduate Research     Open Access  
Advanced Studies in Biology     Open Access  
Advances in Antiviral Drug Design     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Bioinformatics     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Biological Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Advances in Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Advances in Biosensors and Bioelectronics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Cell Biology/ Medical Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Advances in Cellular and Molecular Biology of Membranes and Organelles     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Advances in Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Advances in DNA Sequence-Specific Agents     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Ecological Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 43)
Advances in Environmental Sciences - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Advances in Enzyme Research     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Advances in Experimental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Genome Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in Human Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Life Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Advances in Life Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Advances in Marine Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Advances in Molecular and Cell Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Organ Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Planar Lipid Bilayers and Liposomes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Regenerative Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Advances in Space Biology and Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Structural Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Virus Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Range & Forage Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
AFRREV STECH : An International Journal of Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ageing Research Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Aging Cell     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Agrokémia és Talajtan     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Agrokreatif Jurnal Ilmiah Pengabdian kepada Masyarakat     Open Access  
AJP Cell Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
AJP Endocrinology and Metabolism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
AJP Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Al-Kauniyah : Jurnal Biologi     Open Access  
Alasbimn Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alces : A Journal Devoted to the Biology and Management of Moose     Open Access  
AMB Express     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ambix     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
American Biology Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Fern Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Agricultural and Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
American Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Plant Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
American Journal of Primatology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Malacological Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
American Naturalist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 73)
Amphibia-Reptilia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Anadolu University Journal of Science and Technology : C Life Sciences and Biotechnology     Open Access  
Anaerobe     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Analytical Methods     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Anatomical Science International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Animal Cells and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Models and Experimental Medicine     Open Access  
Annales de Limnologie - International Journal of Limnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Annales françaises d'Oto-rhino-laryngologie et de Pathologie Cervico-faciale     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Annales Henri Poincaré     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Annals of Applied Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Annals of Biomedical Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Annals of Human Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Annual Review of Biomedical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Annual Review of Biophysics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Annual Review of Cancer Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 37)
Annual Review of Food Science and Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Annual Review of Phytopathology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Anthropological Review     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Anti-Infective Agents     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Antibiotics     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Antioxidants     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Antioxidants & Redox Signaling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Antonie van Leeuwenhoek     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Anzeiger für Schädlingskunde     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Apidologie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Apmis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
APOPTOSIS     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Applied Bionics and Biomechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Applied Vegetation Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Aquaculture Environment Interactions     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Aquaculture International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Aquaculture Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aquaculture, Aquarium, Conservation & Legislation - International Journal of the Bioflux Society     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Aquatic Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Aquatic Ecology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Aquatic Ecosystem Health & Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Aquatic Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Aquatic Toxicology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Archaea     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archiv für Molluskenkunde: International Journal of Malacology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Biological Sciences     Open Access  
Archives of Microbiology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Archives of Natural History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Archives of Oral Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Archives of Virology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Archivum Immunologiae et Therapiae Experimentalis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arid Ecosystems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arquivos do Instituto Biológico     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arquivos do Museu Dinâmico Interdisciplinar     Open Access  
Arthropod Structure & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Arthropods     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Artificial DNA: PNA & XNA     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Bioethics Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Biodiversity     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Biological Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Cell Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of Developmental Biology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Medical and Biological Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Nematology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Poultry Science     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Atti della Accademia Peloritana dei Pericolanti - Classe di Scienze Medico-Biologiche     Open Access  
Australian Life Scientist     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Mammalogy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Autophagy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Avian Biology Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Avian Conservation and Ecology     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Bacteriology Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bacteriophage     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bangladesh Journal of Bioethics     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Plant Taxonomy     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Scientific Research     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Batman Üniversitesi Yaşam Bilimleri Dergisi     Open Access  
Berita Biologi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Between the Species     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Bio Tribune Magazine     Hybrid Journal  
BIO Web of Conferences     Open Access  
BIO-Complexity     Open Access  
Bio-Grafía. Escritos sobre la Biología y su enseñanza     Open Access  
Bioanalytical Reviews     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biocatalysis and Biotransformation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
BioCentury Innovations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Biochemistry and Cell Biology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Biochimie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
BioControl     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biocontrol Science and Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biodemography and Social Biology     Hybrid Journal  
BioDiscovery     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Biodiversitas : Journal of Biological Diversity     Open Access  
Biodiversity Data Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Biodiversity Informatics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biodiversity Information Science and Standards     Open Access  
Biodiversity: Research and Conservation     Open Access   (Followers: 26)
Bioedukasi : Jurnal Pendidikan Biologi FKIP UM Metro     Open Access  
Bioeksperimen : Jurnal Penelitian Biologi     Open Access  
Bioelectrochemistry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bioelectromagnetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Bioenergy Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bioengineering and Bioscience     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BioEssays     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Bioethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
BioéthiqueOnline     Open Access  
Biofabrication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Biofilms     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Biogeosciences (BG)     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Biogeosciences Discussions (BGD)     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bioinformatics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 299)
Bioinformatics and Biology Insights     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Bioinspiration & Biomimetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Biointerphases     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biojournal of Science and Technology     Open Access  
Biologia     Hybrid Journal  
Biologia on-line : Revista de divulgació de la Facultat de Biologia     Open Access  
Biological Bulletin     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Biological Control     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Biological Invasions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Biological Journal of the Linnean Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Biological Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biological Procedures Online     Open Access  
Biological Psychiatry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Biological Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Biological Research     Open Access  
Biological Rhythm Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Biological Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Biological Trace Element Research     Hybrid Journal  
Biologicals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover
Archives of Biological Sciences
Number of Followers: 0  

  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
ISSN (Print) 1821-4339 - ISSN (Online) 1821-4339
Published by U of Belgrade Homepage  [7 journals]
  • Toxicity and Poisoning Symptoms of selected Insecticides to Honey Bees
           (Apis mellifera mellifera L.)

    • Authors: Vrushali Vijaykumar Pashte, Chidanand Shivshankar Patil
      Pages: 005 - 012
      Abstract: Bees are potential pollinators of wide variety of crops. The European dark bee, Apis mellifera mellifera (L.) is widely used for crop pollination. However, pesticide usage in modern agriculture has threatened the plant-bee pollinator interaction. There is lack of data regarding lethal time, insecticide concentration and poisoning symptoms, especially for formulated insecticides that are widely used in insect management. This study shows that the intrinsic toxicity of insecticides (LC50) to A. mellifera mellifera (L.) was in the following order: imidacloprid (0.0070) > fipronil (0.0125) > indoxacarb (0.0266)> cypermethrin (0.0370) > dimethoate (0.0385). The lethal time (LT50) values (h) in the ascending order of toxicity of insecticides were as follows: fipronil (6.56), cypermethrin (6.69), dimethoate (8.00), imidacloprid (9.85) and indoxacarb (13.45). Distinct poisoning symptoms observed in A. mellifera mellifera were extended proboscis, expanded wings, unhooked wings, extended legs and twisted bodies, defecation on cage covers, sting in release-out position and anus with excreta. All the tested pesticides are harmful to the honey bee except azadirachtin. The tested pesticides exhibited different poisoning symptoms in bees, which could be useful for beekeepers in identifying the cause of colony mortality. In conclusion, the pesticide toxicological research on bees is an important safety aspect for beneficial organisms. This study reveals a realistic acute toxicity in the field of commonly used insecticides. The information is important for insecticide selection in order to minimize direct killing of foraging honey bees while maintaining effective management of crop pests.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170131020PReceived:January 31, 2017; Revised:April 26, 2017; Accepted: May 16, 2017; Published online: June 12, 2017How to cite this article: Pashte VV, Patil CS. Toxicity and poisoning symptoms of selected insecticides to honey bees (Apis mellifera mellifera L.). Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):5-12.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Cancer antigen 125 concentrations in patients on chronic peritoneal
           dialysis: relationship with dialysis quality and membrane transport
           properties

    • Authors: Nataša Ž. Jovanović, Jasna B. Trbojević-Stanković, Dejan M Nešić, Radmila Ž. Obrenović, Novica I. Boričić, Biljana B. Stojimirović
      Pages: 013 - 020
      Abstract: The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal changes in drained dialysate cancer antigen 125 (dCA-125) levels and to assess relationships between dCA-125 and dialysis quality, peritoneal membrane transport rates, dialysate glucose load, peritonitis and use of erythropoiesis stimulating agents (ESA), angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and statins in patients with end-stage renal failure during the first 6 months of peritoneal dialysis (PD) treatment. This prospective study included 20 patients (11 males and 9 females; mean age 62.90±12.69 years) who were followed-up during the first 6 months of PD using conventional low pH glucose-based dialysis fluids. The concentration of dCA-125 was measured in all patients, and the peritoneal equilibration test (PET), peritoneal dialysis treatment adequacy (Kt/V), normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and total, peritoneal and residual clearances of urea and creatinine were calculated. Information on peritonitis occurrence, the use of ESA, ACEi and statins were collected. Data were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney test, Wilcoxon matched pairs test and Spearman’s rank correlation. The concentration of dCA-125 significantly decreased during the follow-up (p=0.016). After 6 months of PD treatment, the concentration of dCA-125 decreased significantly (p=0.016) in all patients. The decrease was present in all patients, but was statistically significant in patients on ACEi therapy (p=0.006) and in patients not using statins (p=0.005) or ESA (p=0.012). No correlation was found between dCA-125 and glucose load, but a statistically significant negative correlation between dCA-125 and the PET for creatinine was observed (p=0.013). These findings challenge the role of dCA-125 in predicting mesothelial cell integrity in PD patients.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170324021JReceived: March 24, 2017; Revised: May 7, 2017; Accepted: May 9, 2017; Published onlione: June 12, 2017How to cite this article: Jovanović NŽ, Trbojević-Stanković JB, Nešić DM, Obrenović RŽ, Boričić NI, Stojimirović BB. Cancer antigen 125 concentrations in patients on chronic peritoneal dialysis: Relationship with dialysis quality and membrane transport properties. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):13-20.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Dynamics and deformability of α-, 310- and π-helices

    • Authors: Tarun Jairaj Narwani, Pierrick Craveur, Nicolas K Shinada, Hubert Santuz, Joseph Rebehmed, Catherine Etchebest, Alexandre G. de Brevern
      Pages: 021 - 031
      Abstract: Protein structures are often represented as seen in crystals as (i) rigid macromolecules (ii) with helices, sheets and coils. However, both definitions are partial because (i) proteins are highly dynamic macromolecules and (ii) the description of protein structures could be more precise. With regard to these two points, we analyzed and quantified the stability of helices by considering α-helices as well as 310- and π-helices. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulations were performed on a large set of 169 representative protein domains. The local protein conformations were followed during each simulation and analyzed. The classical flexibility index (B-factor) was confronted with the MD root mean square flexibility (RMSF) index. Helical regions were classified according to their level of helicity from high to none. For the first time, a precise quantification showed the percentage of rigid and flexible helices that underlie unexpected behaviors. Only 76.4% of the residues associated with α-helices retain the conformation, while this tendency drops to 40.5% for 310-helices and is never observed for π-helices. α-helix residues that do not remain as an α-helix have a higher tendency to assume β-turn conformations than 310- or π-helices. The 310-helices that switch to the α-helix conformation have a higher B-factor and RMSF values than the average 310-helix but are associated with a lower accessibility. Rare π-helices assume a β-turn, bend and coil conformations, but not α- or 310-helices. The view on π-helices drastically changes with the new DSSP (Dictionary of Secondary Structure of Proteins) assignment approach, leading to behavior similar to 310-helices, thus underlining the importance of secondary structure assignment methods.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170215022NThis article was presented on the Belgrade Bioinformatics Conference 2016 (BelBI2016) [http://belbi2016.matf.bg.ac.rs/]Received: February 15, 2017; Revised: May 2, 2017; Accepted: May 30, 2017; Published online: June 23, 23017How to cite this article: Narwani TJ, Craveur P, Shinada NK, Santuz H, Rebehmed J, Etchebest C, de Brevern AG. Dynamics and deformability of α-, 310- and π-helices. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):21-31.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • A small molecule for a big transformation: topical application of a
           20-nucleotide-long antisense fragment of the DIAP-2 gene inhibits the
           development of Drosophila melanogaster female imagos

    • Authors: Palmah M. Nyadar, Volodymyr V. Oberemok, Ilya V. Zubarev
      Pages: 033 - 039
      Abstract: Several genes have been identified to play important roles associated with sex selection in Drosophila melanogaster. An essential part is attributed to the sex-lethal gene that depends on the expression of the X:A (number of chromosomes to autosomes) ratio signal controlling both sex selection and dosage compensation processes in D. melanogaster. Interestingly, for sex selection in D. melanogaster there are no documented data addressing the role of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) genes and their signaling influence on this biological process. In this study, we found that topical application of a 20-nucleotide-long antisense DNA fragment (oligoDIAP-2) from the death-associated inhibitor of apoptosis (DIAP)-2 gene interferes with D. melanogaster development and significantly decreases the number of female imagos and their biomass. We show that the applied antisense oligoDIAP-2 fragment downregulates the target DIAP-2 gene whose normal concentration is necessary for the development of female D. melanogaster. These data correspond to the results on downregulation of the target host IAP-Z gene of Lymantria dispar L. female imagos after topical treatment with an 18-nucleotide-long antisense DNA fragment from the Lymantria dispar multicapsid nuclear polyhedrosis virus IAP-3 gene at the larval stage. The observed novel phenomenon linking the downregulation of insect IAP genes and the low rate of female imago development could have practical application, especially in insect pest control and molecular pathology.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170302023NReceived: March 2, 2017; Revised: April 29, 2017; Accepted: May 17, 2017; Published online: July 19, 2017How to cite this article: Nyadar PM, Oberemok VV, Zubarev IV. A small molecule for a big transformation: Topical application of a 20-nucleotide-long antisense fragment of the DIAP-2 gene inhibits the development of Drosophila melanogaster female imagos. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):33-9.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Environmental drivers of raccoon (Procyon lotor L.) occurrences in Austria
           – established versus newly invaded regions

    • Authors: Tanja Duscher, Samuel I. Zeveloff, Frank-Uwe Michler, Ursula Nopp-Mayr
      Pages: 041 - 053
      Abstract: As we are faced with the imminent spread of the raccoon (Procyon lotor L.), a successful and highly adaptable invader in Europe, it is necessary to identify the drivers of its distribution and focal areas of its future management. Being an omnivorous species, raccoons can exert considerable influence on prey species of various taxa. Species distribution models for this invasive species can be useful tools for its management. Using a presence-only model (MaxEnt) based on environmental variables selected by raccoon experts, the presence of raccoons in Austria was predicted. Core areas of raccoon colonization are mainly located in and around cities and river valleys. Identified ecological drivers of raccoon distribution comprise climate and land-cover variables, with temperature parameters (e.g. the number of hot days, mean January temperature), the proportion of coniferous forests, settlements and elevation mainly influencing the model output. The importance of habitat parameters changes with the stage of invasion. In Austria’s established regions, the probability of raccoon presence was best predicted by variables chosen by an expert of the raccoon’s native range, while the predictors chosen by an expert in its introduced range better reflected the situation in recently invaded regions. The significance of climate and land cover in understanding the probability of raccoon presence was shown.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170512024DReceived: May 12, 2017; Revised: June 18, 2017; Accepted: July 3, 2017; Published online: July 25, 2017How to cite this article: Duscher T, Zeveloff SI, Michler FU, Nopp-Mayr U. Environmental drivers of raccoon (Procyon lotor L.) occurrences in Austria - established versus newly invaded regions. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):41-53.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Recombination homeostasis of meiosis during spermatogenesis under nicotine
           treatment

    • Authors: Jingli Zhai, Qingqing Yuan, Tianqi Yang, Xianglong Zhao, Meixing Zhang, Dong Zhang, Wangjie Xu, Zhongdong Qiao
      Pages: 055 - 062
      Abstract: Cigarette smoking can affect male fertility via the quality of semen. To explore the effects of nicotine, a major component of cigarettes, on meiotic recombination during spermatogenesis, C57BL/6J male mice were injected with nicotine at a dosage of 0.2 mg/100 g body weight daily for 35 days (nicotine-treated group); mice in the control group were injected with isopycnic normal saline. According to previous expression profiles of mouse sperm, a subset of meiosis-related genes was pooled using bioinformatic analysis. Protein expression was compared between the two groups using by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Recombination frequency during the meiosis phase of spermatogenesis was estimated by combined use of chromosome spread and immunofluorescence staining in mouse testes. Data mining analysis indicated that 4 genes that express meiotic topoisomerase-like protein SPO11, MutS protein homolog 4 (MSH4), strand exchange protein RAD51 and MutL protein homologue 1 (MLH1), were associated with the meiosis recombination process. The results of Western blotting and immunohistochemistry further showed that the protein expression of SPO11 (0.73-fold) and MSH4 (0.73-fold) was downregulated in murine testes after nicotine treatment, whereas the protein expression of both RAD51 (2.06-fold) and MLH1 (1.40-fold) was upregulated. Unexpectedly, we did not detect a significant difference in recombination frequency in meiosis during spermatogenesis in the nicotine-treated group as compared to the control. Taken together, these results indicate that nicotine can affect the expression profile of restructuring-related genes, but it does not significantly change the recombination frequency during male meiosis. These findings suggest there is a self-regulating mechanism during meiotic chromosome restructuring in male mice that responds to environmental stress.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170419025ZReceived: April 19, 2017; Revised: May 15, 2017; Accepted: May 18, 2017; Published online: July 26, 2017How to cite this article: Zhai J, Yuan Q, Yang T, Zhao X, Zhang M, Zhang D, Xu W, Qiao Z. Recombination homeostasis of meiosis during spermatogenesis under nicotine treatment. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):55-62.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Differences in bioactivity of three endemic Nepeta species arising from
           main terpenoid and phenolic constituents

    • Authors: Jasmina Milan Nestorović Živković, Suzana Živković, Branislav Šiler, Neda Aničić, Slavica Dmitrović, Aleksandra Divac Rankov, Zlatko Giba, Danijela Mišić
      Pages: 063 - 076
      Abstract: Methanol extracts of three endemic Nepeta species were analyzed for their main secondary metabolites, terpenes and phenolics, and further investigated for antioxidant capacity and embryonic toxicity in zebrafish. UHPLC/DAD/(±)HESI-MS/MS analysis showed that the dominant compound in N. rtanjensis was trans,cis-nepetalactone, the cis,trans isomer of this monoterpene lactone was dominant in N. sibirica, while nepetalactone was detected only in traces in N. nervosa. In all investigated species, rosmarinic acid was the dominant phenolic compound, while other identified phenolic acids (chlorogenic, neochlorogenic and caffeic) were present in considerably lower amounts. ABTS and DPPH assays showed that the methanol extracts of N. rtanjensis, N. sibirica and especially N. nervosa possessed strong antioxidant activities, with the FRAP assay revealing high ferric-reducing abilities for all three tested species. Such a strong antioxidant potential, especially as manifested in the DPPH and FRAP assays, can be attributed to phenolic acids, and in the first place to rosmarinic acid. Increased lethality of zebrafish embryos in any of the treatments was not observed, but several toxic effects on embryonic development were recorded, such as pericardial and yolk sac edema. As in other Nepeta species, the three studied endemic species possessed a great potential for food conservation or as medicinal supplements if applied in optimized concentrations; however, alternative sources of plant material (e.g. field cultivation) should be established bearing in mind their vulnerability in nature.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170616026NReceived: June 16, 2017; Revised: July 20, 2017; Accepted: July 20, 2017; Published online: July 26, 2017How to cite this article: Nestorović-Živković J, Živković S, Šiler B, Aničić N, Dmitrović S, Divac-Rankov A, Giba Z, Mišić D. Differences in bioactivity of three endemic Nepeta species arising from main terpenoid and phenolic constituents. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):63-76.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prevention of diet-induced obesity in rats by oral application of collagen
           fragments

    • Authors: Nataliia G. Raksha, Pavlo Y. Potalitsyn, Alona V. Yurchenko, Tetyana I. Halenova, Oleksii M. Savchuk, Lydmila I. Ostapchenko
      Pages: 077 - 086
      Abstract: The aim of the present study was to determine whether orally applied collagen fragments (CFs) could affect the development of obesity in obese rats. To this end, experimental rats that were exposed to a high-calorie diet (HCD) for four weeks were randomly divided into two groups: HCD and HCD+CFs, with both groups continuing to receive the HCD. However, rats from the HCD+CFs group were also provided with CFs in a 0.05-M citrate buffer (pH 5.0) (1 g·kg-1 of body weight) by intragastric administration, every other day for the next six weeks. Selected parameters associated with obesity development and insulin resistance, as well as serum markers of oxidative stress and the cytokine profile were assessed at the end of the 10th week. Supplementation with CFs resulted in a decrease in body weight and body mass index when compared to animals exposed to a HCD. The observed changes were assumed to be caused by a lower food intake and increased water intake by obese rats treated with CFs. Enhanced activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and decreased malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration were detected in the HCD+CF group of animals when compared to untreated HCD-fed rats. Administration of CFs also lowered the serum concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-12, whereas the concentration of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly increased and the concentration of cytokine IL-4 was near the control value. Decreased concentrations of fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin (GHbA1c) and serum insulin and increased tolerance to glucose in the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were observed in the HCD+CF group of animals when compared to rats in the HCD group. We concluded that CFs mediated a therapeutic effect on obesity development in rats exposed to a HCD by affecting pathways involved in obesity pathogenesis.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170401027RReceived: April 1, 2017; Revised: June 1, 2017; Accepted: June 13, 2017; Published online: August 1, 2017How to cite this article: Raksha NG, Potalitsyn PY, Yurchenko AV, Halenova TI, Savchuk OM, Ostapchenko LI. Prevention of diet-induced obesity in rats by oral application of collagen fragments. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):77-86.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Genome-wide identification and characterization of stress-associated
           protein (SAP) gene family encoding A20/AN1 zinc-finger proteins in
           Medicago truncatula

    • Authors: Yong Zhou, Liming Zeng, Rongrong Chen, Yihua Wang, Jianbo Song
      Pages: 087 - 098
      Abstract: Stress associated proteins (SAPs) play important roles in developmental processes, responses to various stresses and hormone stimulation in plants. However, little is known about the SAP gene family in Medicago truncatula. In this study, a total of 17 MtSAP genes encoding A20/AN1 zinc-finger proteins were characterized. Out of these 17 genes, 15 were distributed over all 8 chromosomes at different densities, and two segmental duplication events were detected. The phylogenetic analysis of these proteins and their orthologs from Arabidopsis and rice suggested that they could be classified into five out of the seven groups of SAP family genes, with genes in the same group showing similar structures and conserved domains. The cis-elements of the MtSAP promoters were studied, and many cis-elements related to stress and plant hormone responses were identified. We also investigated the stress-responsive expression patterns of the MtSAP genes under various stresses, including drought, exposure to NaCl and cold. The qRT-PCR results showed that numerous MtSAP genes exhibited transcriptional responses to multiple abiotic stresses. These results lay the foundation for further functional characterization of SAP genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a genome-wide analysis of the SAP gene family in Medicago truncatula.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170529028ZReceived: May 29, 2017; Revised: July 28, 2017; Accepted: July 31, 2017; Published online: August 24, 2017How to cite this article: Zhou Y, Zeng L, Chen R, Wang Y, Song J. Genome-wide identification and characterization of stress-associated protein (SAP) gene family encoding A20/AN1 zinc-finger proteins in Medicago truncatula. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):87-98.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Prevalence and genetic variability of Plesiomonas shigelloides in
           temperate climate surface waters of the Pannonian Plain

    • Authors: Milivoje Petrušić, Dragana Obreht Vidaković, Sava Lazić, Dragan Radnović, Petar Knežević
      Pages: 099 - 108
      Abstract: Plesiomonas shigelloides, a Gram-negative bacterium and the causative agent of intestinal diseases and extraintestinal infections in humans and animals, is most frequently found in aquatic environments in tropical or subtropical areas. The present study was designed to establish the prevalence and genetic variability of P. shigelloides in surface waters (lakes, rivers, ponds, inlets and canals) located in a temperate climate zone, namely the Pannonian Plain of the northern part of Serbia and southern part of Hungary. The strains were isolated directly by plating samples on inositol-brilliant green-bile agar with neutral red or phenol red as indicators. Our results indicate that phenol red effectively facilitates differentiation of P. shigelloides from other bacteria. A number of samples were enriched using alkaline peptone water broth, peptone inositol-bile broth and tetrathionate broth. The recovery of the isolates was more successful with the first medium. Out of a total of 51 water samples collected from 28 different locations, 22 samples (43.1%) were found positive for P. shigelloides. Among the 37 isolated strains, 34 were from lakes (Šatrinci, Ludaš, Panonija, Krivaja, Pecs, Kapetanski rit, Pavlovci, Kovácsszénája, Dobrodol, Vranjaš, Borkovac, Hermann Ottó, Sot, Šelevrenac, Zobnatica, Palić, Orfüí, Jarkovci, Čonoplja) and 3 were from rivers (Danube, Sava). The strains were identified by phenotypic characteristic or by the VITEK2 system and confirmed by PCR using 23S rRNA species-specific oligos. The strains showed a high genetic variability, displaying a variety of RAPD profiles. Our results reveal for the first time a high prevalence of genetically diverse P. shigelloides populations in surface waters located in the temperate climate of central and southeastern Europe.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170530029PReceived: May 30, 2017; Revised: July 17, 2017; Accepted: July 26, 2017; Published online: August 24, 2017How to cite this article: Petrušić M, Obreht Vidaković D, Lazić S, Radnović D, Knežević P. Prevalence and genetic variability of Plesiomonas shigelloides in temperate climate surface waters of the Pannonian Plain. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):99-108.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Trs20, Trs23, Trs31 and Bet5 participate in autophagy through GTPase Ypt1
           in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    • Authors: Shenshen Zou, Yan Liu, Gaoyi Min, Yongheng Liang
      Pages: 109 - 118
      Abstract: TRAPP (transport protein particle) is a large, highly conserved, multi-subunit complex. Four types of TRAPP complexes (I, II, III and most recently IV) have been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on the roles of TRAPP II, TRAPP III and TRAPP IV specific subunits (Trs130, Trs85 and Trs33) have demonstrated that TRAPP II, TRAPP III and TRAPP IV activate the small GTPases that regulate autophagy. Up to now, the roles of the common TRAPP subunits have been well studied in vesicle transport. However, the roles of the common TRAPP subunits and their relationship to Ypt/Rab GTPases in autophagy are not clear. In this paper, we examined Trs20, Trs23, Trs31, and Bet5 (the common TRAPP subunits), which are required for starvation-induced autophagy and the cytoplasm-to-vacuole targeting (Cvt) pathway. During autophagy, GFP-Atg8 accumulates as single or multiple dots and is not recruited into the pre-autophagosomal structures (PAS) in trs20ts, trs23ts, trs31ts and bet5ts mutant cells. Furthermore, these dots are linked to the endoplasmic reticulum in mutant cells. Additionally, overexpression of Ypt1, but not Ypt31, suppresses the autophagy defect in trs20ts, trs23ts, trs31ts and bet5ts mutant cells. Based on these results, we concluded that Trs20, Trs23, Trs31, and Bet5 are required for autophagy, and that these common TRAPP subunits regulate autophagy partially through GTPase Ypt1, but not Ypt31.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170408030ZReceived: April 8, 2017; Revised: June 20, 2017; Accepted: July 29, 2017; Published online: August 28, 2017How to cite this article: Zou S, Liu Y, Min G, Liang Y. Trs20, Trs23, Trs31 and Bet5 participate in autophagy through GTPase Ypt1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):109-18.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Low-level laser irradiation protects the chick embryo chorioallantoic
           membrane from UV cytotoxicity

    • Authors: Amira Hammami, Mohamed Amri, Meherzia Mokni
      Pages: 119 - 127
      Abstract: Low-level laser therapy or photobiomodulation is the medical use of a very low intensity light in the red to near infrared (wavelengths in the range of 630-940 nm). The present work was conducted to explore the effects of both UV and low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) on microcirculation using the in vivo model of the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM). The effects were assessed by measuring lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzyme activity. Cell cytotoxicity, survival and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) of the CAM were also evaluated. We found that UV irradiation induced alterations of the vessels, leading to bleeding and extravasation. This effect was intensified after 60 min of exposure to UV irradiation, leading to marked edema. UVA irradiation increased cell cytotoxicity as assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release (56.23% of control) and reduced cell viability as assessed by decreased fluorescein diacetate (FDA) fluorescence (56.23% of control). Pretreatment with LLLI prior to UV exposure protected the CAM tissue from UV-mediated cell death. This protective effect was supported by the observation of significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation (from 0.3±0.004 for UV, to 0.177±0.012 after LLLI pretreatment), ROS and O2-production, as indicated by respective dihydrorhodamine (DHR) and dihydroethidium (DHE) intensities (from 132.78% of control for UVA, to 95.90% of control for L-UV (DHR), and from 127.34% of control for UVA, to 82.03% of control for L-UV (DHE)), and by preventing the increase in oxidative activities. LLLI efficiently protected CAM cells from UV-induced oxidative stress and appeared as a safe protective pretreatment against UV irradiation.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170706031HReceived: July 6, 2017; Revised: July 26, 2017; Accepted: July 27, 2017; Published online: August 28, 2017How to cite this article: Hammami A, Amri M, Mokni M. Low-level laser irradiation protects the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane from UV cytotoxicityc. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):119-27.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Thigmotropic responses of Oryza sativa L. to external rubbing stimulation

    • Authors: Benliang Zhao, Lili Teng, Jia-en Zhang, Huimin Xiang, Meijuan Li, Kaiming Liang
      Pages: 129 - 139
      Abstract: Our aim was to study the morphological and physiological responses of rice to rubbing stimulation. Rice was subjected to rubbing 30 times/day (R30), 60 times/day (R60), 90 times/day (R90) and 0 times/day (control) for 35 days. The height, elongation rates and second internode length were significantly decreased by the three treatments, whereas stem width increased significantly. The tiller number and chlorophyll contents of the top third and top fifth of leaves increased significantly after R30 and R60. In R90, the aboveground biomass was significantly decreased and dead leaf biomass was increased. In R30 and R60, the transpiration rates were 16% and 13% higher than in the control, whereas photosynthetic rates increased 25% and 23%, respectively. Root biomass was significantly increased in R30, and root/aboveground was enhanced in R90. Stomatal conductance and root triphenyltetrazolium chloride-deoxidizing ability was significantly increased by the three treatments. The SOD activities in all treatments and the control were similar after stimulation. POD and CAT activities increased significantly in R30 and R60, and malondialdehyde increased by 42% in R90. Membrane permeability in R30 and R60 decreased 26% and 15%, respectively. The calcium content and soluble protein content increased in R30, whereas the magnesium content decreased. The nitrogen content increased significantly in R30 and R60. The silicon content and the size of stomata increased significantly in the three treatments. Thus, rubbing stimulation had complex effects on rice growth.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170503032ZReceived: May 3, 2017; Revised: August 13, 2017; Accepted: August 14, 2017; Published online: September 19, 2017How to cite this article: Zhao B, Teng L, Zhang J, Xiang H, Li M, Liang K. Thigmotropicresponses of Oryza sativa L. to external rubbing stimulation. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):129-39.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • In vitro propagation of Silene bolanthoides Quézel, Contandr. & Pamukç.
           and assessment of genetic stability by flow cytometry

    • Authors: Nurşen Çördük, Gülru Yücel, Nihan Akıncı, Metin Tuna, Onur Esen
      Pages: 141 - 148
      Abstract: Silene bolanthoides Quézel, Contandr. & Pamukç. is an endemic species from Kazdagi (Mt. Ida), Canakkale-Balikesir, Turkey. In order to develop an efficient shoot regeneration protocol, the leaf, nodal and internodal explants of S. bolanthoides were cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium containing benzyladenine (BA) alone or in combination with α-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). The highest number of regenerated shoots (5.75±0.1) was obtained from nodal explants that were cultured on MS medium with 8.8 µM BA+0.54 µM NAA. Regenerated shoots were rooted on MS medium without plant growth regulators (PGRs). Rooted plants (2-3 cm) were separately transferred to pots containing a mixture of peat and perlite (3:1 v/v) and acclimatized successfully in a growth chamber. Genetic stability of the propagated plants was assessed by flow cytometry and cytological analysis. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that regenerated plants had 2.61±0.01 pg nuclear DNA (2C) and seed-derived plants had on average 2.58±0.02 pg/2C. Cytological analysis showed that the regenerated plants had the same chromosome number as seed-derived plants of S. bolanthoides (2n=24). It was determined that regenerated plants were uniform in chromosome number and had a similar DNA content to the seed-derived ones, indicating that the described efficient shoot regeneration protocol can be applied for ex situ conservation of this species.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170410033CReceived: April 10, 2017; Revised: August 9, 2017; Accepted: August 16, 2017; Published online: September 12, 2017How to cite this article: Çördük N, Yücel G, Akıncı N, Tuna M, Esen O. In vitro propagation of Silene bolanthoides Quézel, Contandr. & Pamukç. and assessment of genetic stability by flow cytometry. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):141-8.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Effects of 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine on biological parameters of Achroia
           grisella F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    • Authors: Olga Sak
      Pages: 149 - 158
      Abstract: The non-target effects of 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), an epigenetically effective agent, were assessed on different life-history traits of two successive generations of Achroia grisella F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) by trophic exposure. The results did not reveal any prominent effect of 5-Aza-dC on emergence times and morphological disorders of offspring of both sexes, and dry weight of F1 females (except for 0.1 mg/ml) and males according to controls. However, 5-Aza-dC caused a considerable decrease in wet weight of F1 females at >0.1 mg/mL and in F1 males only at 0.5 mg/mL. The mean longevity of F1 and F2 females was almost unchanged after exposure to 5-Aza-dC treatment. However, the longevity was considerably shorter, by 16% at a dose of 0.75 mg/mL for F1 males and 28% longer at 1.0 mg/mL for F2 males with respect to the controls. When the two generations were compared with each other in terms of adult longevity, the differences were not significant for the longevity of females, whereas F2 males lived significantly longer than F1 males in all groups except for the control and 0.5 mg/mL groups. 5-Aza-dC also markedly decreased the total number of both offspring but no dose-related alterations were observed. Analysis of the data for the number of viable and damaged eggs laid per F1 females revealed that 5-Aza-dC adversely affected the reproductive potential of A. grisella based on daily and three-day observations. The most striking effect was a decline in fecundity of females by 57% at 1.0 mg/mL. These observations suggest that 5-Aza-dC has a negative effect on developing moth progeny across trophic levels.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170622034SReceived: June 22, 2017; Revised: August 4, 2017; Accepted: August 9, 2017; Published online: October 4, 2017How to cite this article: Sak O. Effects of 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine on biological parameters of Achroia grisella F. (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae). Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):149-58.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Ultrastructural evaluation of oocyte envelopes of zebrafish (Danio rerio)
           (Hamilton, 1822) after TiO2 nanoparticle exposure

    • Authors: Cansu Akbulut, Tuğba Kotil, Nazan Deniz Yön
      Pages: 159 - 165
      Abstract: Titanium dioxide (TiO2)is one of the most widely used nanoparticles, and aquatic organisms are especially exposed to it. To examine reproductive toxicology, zebrafish were exposed to different concentrations (1, 2 and 4 mg/L) of TiO2 nanoparticles. The ultrastructure of the theca cell, zona radiata structure and follicular epithelium were examined in detail by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). No abnormalities were observed in the control group; however, degeneration of pore and microvilli structures of the zona radiata, vacuolization in the ooplasm, mitochondrial swelling and mitotic catastrophe (the mechanism for eliminating mitosis-incompetent cells in eukaryotes) were detected in the exposure groups. These results indicate that TiO2 nanoparticle exposure causes paraptotic-type cell death in zebrafish oocytes, follicular and theca cells. In light of the observed histopathological changes, it was concluded that TiO2 exposure inhibited oogenesis and the reproductive capability in zebrafish.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170303035AReceived: March 3, 2017; Revised: August 8, 2017; Accepted: September 20, 2017; Published online: October 3, 2017How to cite this article: Akbulut C, Kotil T, Yön DN. Ultrastructural evaluation of oocyte envelopes of zebrafish (Danio Rerio) (Hamilton, 1822) after TiO2 nanoparticle exposure. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):159-65.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Maize seedling performance as a potential index for drought tolerance

    • Authors: Natalija Kravić, Vesna Hadži-Tašković Šukalović, Vojka Babić, Jelena Srdić, Jelena Mesarović, Violeta Anđelković
      Pages: 167 - 177
      Abstract: Twenty-six maize landraces were tested in order to evaluate maize seedling performance as an index for drought tolerance in adult plants. Samples were subjected to polyethylene glycol-induced osmotic stress at the early seedling stage. Grain yield was obtained in field experiments under well-watered (OC) and a combination of drought and high plant density (HD) conditions. Osmotic stress caused a reduction in seedling growth (length, fresh and dry weight), and increases in the shoot and in particular the root proline contents in the majority of landraces, and variations in root peroxidase (POD) activity. Genotypes displaying more pronounced root growth reduction and higher proline contents exhibited decreased POD activity under osmotic stress. Direct positive correlations between the proline content and growth inhibition, and between the proline and soluble protein content were established. Correlations between the changes in POD activity and growth parameters were significant and positive, and significant but negative with the changes in the proline content. In the field, water stress led to a reduction in grain yield in all of the tested landraces. Correlations between grain yield from both experimental sets (OC and HD) and osmotic-induced changes in seedling root growth were negative, which was opposite to the highly significant and positive correlations between the changes in the seedling root proline content and yield. Also, genotypes with the highest seedling root proline content increase under osmotic stress, exhibited the highest stress tolerance index (STI) based on grain yield achieved under both field conditions. Our results indicate that lower changes in POD activity and especially an increased proline content after exposure to osmotic stress during the early seedling stage could be considered as useful indices to facilitate selection efficiency for drought tolerance in adult plants.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170504036KReceived: May 4, 2017; Revised: August 31, 2017; Accepted: September 28, 2017; Published online: October 6, 2017How to cite this article: Kravić N, Hadži-Tašković Šukalović V, Babić V, Srdić J, Mesarović J, Anđelković V. Maize seedling performance as a potential index for drought tolerance. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):167-77.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • The effects of β-lactam antibiotics and hygromycin B on de novo shoot
           organogenesis in apple cv. Golden Delicious

    • Authors: Mariana Stanišić, Slavica Ninković, Jelena Savić, Tatjana Ćosić, Nevena Mitić
      Pages: 179 - 190
      Abstract: Since the genetic transformation of the apple is strongly genotype-dependent and generally inefficient, the evaluation of factors affecting shoot regeneration are crucial for the establishment of a successful transformation process. In this report, we evaluated the effects of the β-lactam antibiotics meropenem and timentin on in vitro regeneration via de novo shoot organogenesis from leaf explants of apple cv. Golden Delicious, as well as on the growth of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain EHA 105, and compared them with the commonly used β-lactam cefotaxime. Also, we report for the first time the effect of hygromycin B as a selective agent in the domesticated apple, as regards shoot regeneration and shoot multiplication efficiency. We observed that cefotaxime and timentin at concentrations higher than 100 mg L-1 were sufficient to prevent Agrobacterium growth during a two-week period, while meropenem exhibited an inhibitory effect on bacterial growth at all tested concentrations (25-150 mg L-1). Cefotaxime at a concentration of 300 mg L-1 increased the number of regenerated shoots per explant (9.39) in comparison with the control (7.67). In contrast to cefotaxime, meropenem and timentin caused a decrease in shoot regeneration efficiency, but larger and more developed shoots were obtained on meropenem (25-125 mg L-1) after the same period of cultivation. Hygromycin B at a concentration of 5 mg L-1 or higher completely inhibited shoot regeneration and induced explant tissue necrosis. Therefore, the selection procedure with a final concentration of 4 mg L-1 throughout organogenesis and 10 mg L-1 for further shoot growth and multiplication is recommended for an efficient transformation process in apple cv. Golden Delicious.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170731037SReceived: July 31, 2017; Revised: September 23, 2017; Accepted: September 25, 2017; Published online: October 11, 2017How to cite this article: Stanišić M, Ninković S, Savić J, Ćosić T, Mitić N. The effects of β-lactam antibiotics and hygromycin B on de novo shoot organogenesis in apple cv. Golden Delicious. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):179-90.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • CXC chemokine ligand 12α-mediated increase in insulin secretion and
           survival of mouse pancreatic islets in response to oxidative stress
           through modulation of calcium uptake

    • Authors: Melita Vidakovic, Ernesto Caballero Garrido, Mirjana Mihailovic, Jelena Arambasic Jovanovic, Marija Sinadinovic, Jovana Rajic, Aleksandra Uskokovic, Svetlana Dinic, Nevena Grdovic, Milos Djordjevic, Anja Tolic, Goran Poznanovic
      Pages: 191 - 204
      Abstract: We examined whether CXCL12α improves insulin secretion by influencing the Ca2+ oscillation pattern and Ca2+ influx ([Ca2+]i), thereby enhancing the viability of pancreatic islet cells in oxidative stress. The islets of Langerhans were isolated from male OF1 mice and pretreated with 40 ng/mL of CXCL12α prior to exposure to 7.5 µM hydrogen peroxide, which served to induce oxidative stress. Incubation of islets with CXCL12α induced pancreatic β-cell proliferation and improved the ability of β-cells to withstand oxidative stress. Consecutive treatments of isolated islets with hydrogen peroxide caused a decline in β-cell functioning over time, while the CXCL12α pretreatment of islets exhibited a physiological response to high glucose that was comparable to control islets. The attenuated response of islets to a high D-glucose challenge was observed as a partial to complete abolishment of [Ca2+]i. Treatments with increasing concentrations of CXCL12α decreased the number of Ca2+ oscillations that lasted longer, thus pointing to an overall increase in [Ca2+]i, which was followed by increased insulin secretion. In addition, treatment of islets with CXCL12α enhanced the transcription rate for insulin and the CXCR4 gene, pointing to the importance of CXCL12/CXCR4 signaling in the regulation of Ca2+ intake and insulin secretion in pancreatic islet cells. We propose that a potential treatment with CXCL12α could help to remove preexisting glucotoxicity and associated temporary β-cell stunning that might be present at the time of diabetes diagnosis in vivo.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS170711040VReceived: July 11, 2017; Revised: October 23, 2017; Accepted: October 24, 2017; Published online: October 30, 2017How to cite this article: Vidaković M, Garrido EC, Mihailović M, Arambašić-Jovanović J, Sinadinović M, Rajić J, Uskoković A, Dinić S, Grdović N, Đorđević M, Tolić A, Poznanović G. CXC chemokine ligand 12α-mediated increase in insulin secretion and survival of mouse pancreatic islets in response to oxidative stress through modulation of calcium uptake. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):191-204.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • Integrated response of antioxidant biomarkers in the liver and white
           muscle of European hake (Merluccius merluccius L.) females from the
           Adriatic Sea with respect to environmental influences

    • Authors: Slađan Z. Pavlović, Slavica S. Borković-Mitić, Tijana B. Radovanović, Branka R. Gavrilović, Svetlana G. Despotović, Jelena P. Gavrić, Marko D. Prokić, Zorica S Saičić
      Pages: 205 - 214
      Abstract: We investigated the integrated response of antioxidant defense enzymes (total superoxide dismutase (TotSOD), manganese-containing superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), copper-zinc-containing superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR) and phase II biotransformation enzyme, glutathione-S-transferase (GST)) in the liver and white muscle of females of European hake (Merluccius merluccius L.) from the Adriatic Sea (Montenegro) in winter and spring. The activity of GSH-Px in the liver was significantly increased, while GST activity was decreased in spring compared to the winter. In white muscle, the activities of TotSOD and CuZnSOD were increased, while the activities of MnSOD, CAT, GSH-Px, GR and GST were decreased in spring when compared to the matching values in winter. The activities of TotSOD and CuZnSOD in winter were markedly lower in the muscle than in the liver, while the activity of MnSOD in the muscle was higher when compared to the liver. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed clear separation of the investigated antioxidant biomarkers between tissues and seasons, while the integrated biomarker response (IBR) showed that the most intensive antioxidant biomarker response was in the liver in spring. Star plots of IBR showed a dominant contribution of glutathione-dependent biomarkers (GSH-Px, GR and GST) and CAT in both tissues and seasons with respect to SOD isoenzymes. All enzyme activities (except MnSOD) were greater in the liver in comparison to the white muscle. Our results show that the liver possesses a greater capacity to establish and maintain homeostasis under changing environmental conditions in winter and spring. At the same time, seasonal effects are more pronounced in muscle tissue.https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS171009059PReceived: October 9, 2017; Revised: December 26, 2017; Accepted: December 27, 2017; Published online: December 28, 2017How to cite this article: Pavlović SZ, Borković-Mitić SS, Radovanović TB, Gavrilović BR, Despotović SG, Gavrić JP, Prokić MD, Saičić ZS. Integrated response of antioxidant biomarkers in the liver and white muscle of European hake (Merluccius merluccius L.) females from the Adriatic sea with respect to environmental influences. Arch Biol Sci. 2018;70(1):205-14.
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • CORRIGENDUM: Georgieva E, Yancheva V, Velcheva I, Becheva M, Stoyanova S.
           Histological alterations under metal exposure in gills of European perch
           (Perca fluviatilis L.) from Topolnitsa Reservoir (Bulgaria). Arch Biol
           Sci. 2015;67(2):729-737

    • Authors: Editorial Team
      Pages: 215 - 215
      Abstract: https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS1801215EThe corresponding author of the article Georgieva E, Yancheva V, Velcheva I, Becheva M, Stoyanova S. Histological alterations under metal exposure in gills of European perch (Perca fluviatilis L.) from Topolnitsa Reservoir (Bulgaria). Arch Biol Sci. 2015;67(2):729-737 has requested to change the affiliations of author Maria Becheva.The affiliations of author Maria Becheva are as follows:Maria BechevaMedical College, Medical University of Plovdiv, Plovdiv, BulgariaLink to the corrected article:https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS141020034G
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
  • CORRIGENDUM: Tomić Z, Bijedić Z, Vilotić D, Gačić D.P.
           Phytocenological research into the meadow associations on forest hunting
           grounds of Serbia. Arch Biol Sci. 2010;62(2):363-372

    • Authors: Editorial Team
      Pages: 217 - 217
      Abstract: https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS1801217EThe authors of the article Tomić Z, Bijedić Z, Vilotić D, Gačić D.P. Phytocenological research into the meadow associations on forest hunting grounds of Serbia. Arch Biol Sci. 2010;62(2):363-372 737 have informed the Editorial Office of the spelling error in one of the authors last names, Bijedić, which should be written as Bijelić. The authors have requested for this error to be corrected. Therefore, the journal is publishing this Corrigendum. The authors of this article are:Tomić Zorica, Bijelić Zorica, Vilotić Dragica, Gačić Dragan P.Link to the corrected article:https://doi.org/10.2298/ABS1002363T
      PubDate: 2018-03-13
      Issue No: Vol. 70, No. 1 (2018)
       
 
 
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