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  Subjects -> AGRICULTURE (Total: 878 journals)
    - AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS (77 journals)
    - AGRICULTURE (621 journals)
    - CROP PRODUCTION AND SOIL (99 journals)
    - DAIRYING AND DAIRY PRODUCTS (29 journals)
    - POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (52 journals)

POULTRY AND LIVESTOCK (52 journals)

Showing 1 - 52 of 52 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Agriculturae Scandinavica, Section A - Animal Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Acta Scientiarum. Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Animal Biosciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
African Journal of Livestock Extension     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Alces : A Journal Devoted to the Biology and Management of Moose     Open Access  
Animal Biotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Animal Cells and Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Animal Frontiers     Hybrid Journal  
Animal Nutrition     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Animal Production     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Animal Production Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Animal Reproduction Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Animal Research International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Animal Science Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Archives Animal Breeding     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian-Australasian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access  
Bangladesh Journal of Animal Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boletim de Indústria Animal     Open Access  
Bulletin of Animal Health and Production in Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Canadian Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Hayvansal Üretim     Open Access  
Indian Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences     Open Access  
International Journal of Health, Animal Science and Food Safety     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Livestock Production     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Animal Breeding and Genetics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Animal Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Animal Science and Biotechnology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Animal Science and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Applied Animal Nutrition     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Applied Animal Welfare Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Applied Poultry Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of World's Poultry Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Jurnal Agripet     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Ilmu Produksi dan Teknologi Hasil Peternakan     Open Access  
La Chèvre     Full-text available via subscription  
Nigerian Journal of Animal Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Nutrición Animal Tropical     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Online Journal of Animal and Feed Research     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Open Journal of Animal Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Porcine Health Management     Open Access  
Poultry Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Poultry Science Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Research in Agriculture, Livestock and Fisheries     Open Access  
Revista Brasileira de Saúde e Produção Animal     Open Access  
Revista de Producción Animal     Open Access  
Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Pecuarias     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Professional Animal Scientist     Hybrid Journal  
Tropical Animal Health and Production     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Veeplaas     Full-text available via subscription  
World Rabbit Science     Open Access  
Journal Cover
Animal Reproduction Science
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.704
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 6  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0378-4320
Published by Elsevier Homepage  [3159 journals]
  • Prostaglandin (PTG) E and F receptors in the porcine corpus luteum; effect
           of tumor necrosis factor-α
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): J. Chang, S. Frandsen, M. D’Annibale-Tolhurst, N. Palumbo, J. GadsbyAbstractThe porcine corpus luteum (CL) is NOT sensitive to the luteolytic effects of PGF-2α until days 12–13 of cycle. The control of “luteolytic sensitivity” (LS) of the pig CL to PGF-2α is unknown, but it is temporally associated with macrophage infiltration into the CL. Since macrophages are the predominant source of TNF-α in the porcine CL, in other studies we examined the effects of TNF-α on porcine luteal cells in culture and showed that TNF-α induces LS in vitro. In Experiment 1 of this study possible mechanisms involved in the control of LS were examined, and involved measurement of the protein levels of PTGER2/EP-2, and PTGER3/EP-3 in porcine CL collected before (days 7–10), versus after (day 13), the onset of the LS. In Experiment 2, an examination of potential mechanisms involved in the control of LS by TNF-α, was carried out in which the effects of TNF-α on mRNA and protein expression of EP-2, EP-3 and FP in cultured luteal cells, were examined. The results of Experiment 1 showed that PTGER-3/EP-3 (but not PTGER-2/EP-2) levels decreased in porcine CLs after (day 13) compared to before (day 7–10) LS. In Experiment 2, the data obtained showed that TNF-α decreased PTGER-3/EP-3 and increased PTGFR/FP protein (in EARLY stage CL). In conclusion, these studies suggest a role for PTGER-3/EP-3 in the acquisition of LS, and support the hypothesis that TNF-α from CL macrophages plays a critical role in the control of LS in the porcine CL, by increasing PTGFR/FP, and decreasing PTGER-3/EP-3 protein.
       
  • Effects of adding egg yolks of different avian species to Tris glycerol
           extender on the post-thawing quality of buck semen
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Ayman Abdel-Aziz Swelum, Islam M. Saadeldin, Masad B. Alanazi, Hani Ba-Awadh, Mohamed Afifi, Abdullah N. AlowaimerAbstractThe effects of adding egg yolks (EY) of different avian species to the Tris glycerol extender was evaluated for post-thawing quality of buck semen. The semen samples collected from seven Aardi bucks were pooled and diluted 1:4 with the Tris glycerol diluents containing the egg yolks of chicken (C), pigeon (P), goose (G), Japanese quail (Q), duck (D), or turkey (T). The diluted semen samples were gradually cooled to 5 °C within 2 h, equilibrated at 5 °C for 2 h, and then frozen in liquid nitrogen vapor for 8 min before storing them at −196 °C. The frozen straws were thawed at 37 °C for 30 s and evaluated for sperm motility, vitality, abnormality, plasma-membrane integrity, and DNA fragmentation. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and reduced glutathione (GSH) activities were measured. The egg yolk samples of the above-mentioned avian species (n = 7/species) were analyzed for moisture, ash, protein, fatty acid (FA), and trace element contents. The use of the chicken EY (C) diluent resulted in better post-thawing buck semen quality, including the total progressive sperm motility parameters, sperm vitality, plasma membrane intactness, DNA integrity, and sperm abnormalities percentages, in comparison with the EY diluents of the other avian species. The lowest MDA and the highest GSH activities were observed in the C diluent. The chicken EY had the highest percentages of margaric and linolenic FAs and the lowest percentages of palmitoleic and myristic FAs. Moreover, the percentage of oleic FA was lower in the chicken EY than in the EYs of other species, except turkey. Additionally, the chicken EY had the significantly lowest concentration of Cu, Zn, Fe, and Mn. In conclusion, the use of chicken egg yolk extender is recommended for buck semen cryopreservation. The egg yolks of the other avian species studied cannot substitute the chicken EY as they gave poorer post-thawing semen quality. The EY composition, especially FA profile and trace elements concentration, significantly affected the post-thawing quality of buck semen.
       
  • Oocyte developmental competence is improved by relatively greater
           circulating progesterone concentrations during preovulatory follicular
           growth
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): A. Menchaca, F. Cuadro, P.C. dos Santos-Neto, D. Bosolasco, N. Barrera, V. de Brun, M. CrispoAbstractThis study evaluated the effect of progesterone priming during follicular growth on oocyte competence to undergo oocyte cleavage and embryo development in sheep. Two experiments were performed on a total of 195 females that either received or did not receive a progesterone treatment (CIDR-type device) during the first follicular wave, beginning soon after ovulation (i.e., Day 0 of the experiment). On Day 3, the follicular population and oocyte quality (Experiment 1 and 2) and the competence of oocytes for cleavage and embryo development (Experiment 2) were evaluated after laparoscopic ovum pickup (LOPU) and in vitro fertilization. In Experiment 1, in a 2 × 2 factorial study the progesterone priming treatment (treated or not) was or was not associated with a single dose of FSH in a slow-release hyaluronic acid preparation given on Day 0. The follicular population on Day 3 and the number and morphology of recovered cumulus oocyte complexes (COCs) were not affected by the progesterone treatment (P = NS) but were improved by the FSH administration (P 
       
  • Bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) sperm revisited: Motility,
           morphology and ultrastructure of fresh sperm of consecutive ejaculates
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Gerhard van der Horst, Katarina Medger, Daniela Steckler, Ilse Luther, Paul BartelsAbstractComputer aided sperm analysis systems allow detailed examination of sperm motility and morphology variables, which are important for the understanding of the spermatology of a species and the development of assisted reproductive techniques. Cetacean biology is too complex to study in the wild and data from captive individuals provide an important alternative for the conservation of these charismatic animals. The present study evaluates ejaculate and sperm characteristics, including sperm motility, kinematic variables and quantitative sperm morphology and ultrastructure, of consecutive ejaculates from Atlantic bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus). Sperm concentrations and total and progressive motilities were greater in the second than the first ejaculate, with all ejaculates being of very high quality (6.9–1127 × 106/ml sperm concentration, 75% to 91% total motility and 89% to 96% normal sperm). Most sperm in an ejaculate (≥84%) were highly (VCL>150 μm/s) and progressively motile with very few abnormal sperm. The sperm have small heads, a short but very bulky midpiece and a long tail. Detailed sperm morphometrics using CASA indicated there were similarities from one ejaculate to the next. The large mitochondria with extensive cristae mitochondriales are tightly packed in the midpiece resulting in a large midpiece volume. All the semen and sperm characteristics indicate high quality sperm and support the assumption that a multimale mating system is present in T. truncatus.
       
  • Reestablishment of sperm quality after long-term deslorelin suppression in
           tomcats
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Romina Nuñez Favre, María Florencia García, María Carla García Mitacek, Ramiro Rearte, Christelle Fontaine, Rodolfo Luzbel de la Sota, María Alejandra StornelliAbstractThe aim of the study was to determine the time after treatment with a 4.7 mg deslorelin implant until Tomcat spermatogenesis activity was restored, and seminal parameters reached pre-implant values. Tomcats (n = 6) were randomly assigned to one of two treatments. Three cats (n = 3) received a deslorelin implant (4.7 mG; Suprelorin®, Virbac, France) in the interscapular subcutaneous region whereas three (n = 3) received no implant and served as control group. Semen samples were collected by electroejaculation every 4 wk from 3 mo before treatment (pretreatment samples) until reestablishment of pre-treatment sperm quality, 32 mo post-implant insertion (PI). Each semen sample was assessed for motility, velocity, concentration, total sperm count, viability, acrosome integrity, plasma membrane integrity and sperm morphology. After semen collection, testicular volume and presence/absence of penile spines were recorded. Additionally, blood samples were taken to measure testosterone concentration. An increase in sperm concentration and total sperm count was present 1 mo PI despite of an abrupt decrease in serum testosterone concentrations after 2–4 weeks. This initial stimulatory effect was followed by a decrease in seminal parameters, reduction of testicular volume and disappearance of penile spines 2 mo PI. A single Suprelorin® 4.7 mg implant suppressed sperm production for 22–25 months. No clinically side effect was observed during the study period. All toms returned to their initial seminal quality 23–28 months after treatment. Therefore, we conclude that Suprelorin® 4.7 mg is a safe option for reversible reproduction control during long periods in tomcats.
       
  • Embryonic development, luteal size and blood flow area, and concentrations
           of PGF2α metabolite in dairy cows fed a diet enriched in polysaturated or
           polyunsaturated fatty acid
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): A. Kraisoon, C. Navanukraw, W. Inthamonee, T. BunmaAbstractThe objective of this study was to examine effects of sunflower (SO) and palm oil (PO) supplements in the diet on embryonic development, luteal size and blood flow area, PGF2α metabolite (PGFM), and progesterone (P4) concentrations. Prepartum cows (n = 42) were randomly assigned to one of three dietary treatments (control, 4% PO, and 4% SO supplements). Animals were fed diets individually from day 28 prepartum to day 111 postpartum. Luteal size and blood flow area were determined throughout the estrous cycle by Doppler ultrasonography. Oocytes were collected in three ovum pick-up sessions at 2 week intervals for the in vitro embryo production. Oocyte characteristics and embryonic development were not affected by dietary treatments. Cows fed 4% SO had a greater (P < 0.05) concentration of PGFM from day 15 to day 35 postpartum than those cows fed 4% PO and the control group. On day 11 of the estrous cycle (mid-luteal phase), serum P4 concentrations (6.0 ± 0.7, 5.7 ± 0.5, and 4.7 ± 0.6 ng/ml), luteal size (7.0 ± 0.2, 6.5 ± 0.2, and 5.3 ± 0.1 cm2) and luteal blood flow area (1.3 ± 0.2, 1.2 ± 0.1, and 0.9 ± 0.1 cm2) were greater (P < 0.05) in cows fed 4% SO and 4% PO than the control group, respectively. Thus, plant oil supplements in diets affected luteal size and serum P4 and PGFM concentrations, but not early embryonic development. Such changes in secretion of PGF2α and P4 indicate that plant oil supplements during pre- and postpartum may alter uterine and luteal functions.
       
  • Superstimulation with eCG prior to ovum pick-up improves follicular
           development and fertilization rate of cattle oocytes
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Bibiana Noal Ribas, Daniele Missio, Isac Junior Roman, Normélio Alves Neto, Izaias Claro, Daniela dos Santos Brum, Fabio Gallas LeivasAbstractThis study aimed to evaluate the effect of equine chorionic gonadotrophin (eCG) stimulation prior to ovum pick-up (OPU) on follicular development, number and quality of recovered oocytes, fertilization rate, and early embryo development in vitro. There were four OPU sessions (cross over) conducted on 16 Braford cows to evaluate the effect of various eCG doses. The timing of the wave of ovarian follicular development was synchronized, and three days after, the respective eCG dose was administrated (0, 200, 400, or 800 IU). The OPU was performed on Day 6, and viable oocytes were used for IVM and IVF according to the respective treatment. After IVF treatment, the fertilization and cleavage rates, time of cleavage, and the cell number at 48 h were evaluated. There was no difference in the number of follicles, oocyte quantity, and morphological quality of oocytes among treatments (P> 0.05). The oocyte recovery rate was similar among the eCG-treated groups, but was less than in the control group (P < 0.01). The eCG800 group, however, had a greater recovery rate of follicles>6 mm in diameter (P < 0.01). In addition, the eCG800 group had a greater rate of normal fertilization (P < 0.01) and lesser rate of polyspermy (P < 0.02). The cleavage rate of the eCG800 group was greater than the other treatment groups but similar to that of the control. In conclusion, the use of eCG800 increased the proportion of follicles> 6 mm, with improved rate of normal fertilization and reduced occurrence of polyspermy, without affecting early embryonic development in vitro.
       
  • Morphological, biochemical and histological analysis of mud crab ovary and
           hepatopancreas at different stages of development
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Mohd Amran Aaqillah-Amr, Ariffin Hidir, Mat Noordin Noordiyana, Mhd IkhwanuddinAbstractThis study describes the fatty acids, total carotenoids, and cell diameter characteristics of the female ovary and hepatopancreas of the mud crab, Scylla olivacea, with comparisons at different ovarian maturation stages. Seventy-one S. olivacea individuals at all stages of ovarian maturation were sampled from the Setiu wetlands, Terengganu, Malaysia. The ovary and hepatopancreas of each crab were used for morphological studies, histological and biochemical analyses (fatty acid composition and total carotenoids). Morphological observations indicated there was an increase in ovarian gonado-somatic index (GSI), with color changes from translucent to dark red; however, a relatively consistent hepato-somatic index (HSI) in the hepatopancreas, with the color ranging from yellow to yellowish-brown. Histological analysis indicated that oocyte diameter was positively correlated with GSI. Hepatopancreatic tubules had a relatively constant diameter from Stage 2 to 4, with increased proportions of R- and B-cells. Biochemical analysis indicated there was a significant increase in total carotenoids in the ovary during maturation. The hepatopancreas, however, had relatively consistent total carotenoid concentrations that were greater than those of the ovary. Overall, the lipid analysis results indicated there were lesser concentrations of fatty acids in the hepatopancreas, while in the ovary there were increasing concentrations during maturation. The lesser concentrations of fatty acids in the hepatopancreas than ovary suggested that energy was transferred to the ovary for future embryonic and larval development. The relationship between the hepatopancreas and the ovary in nutrient content is an important finding in providing a baseline to formulate an optimal diet for improved mud crab hatchery practices.
       
  • Beneficial and harmful effects of cyclodextrin-vitamin E complex on
           cryopreserved ram sperm
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Karim Benhenia, Hamza Rahab, Mustapha-Adnane Smadi, Hamza Benmakhlouf, Ali Lamara, Takfarinas Idres, Mokrane Iguer-OuadaAbstractVitamin E is a potent molecule, especially when loaded in cyclodextrin, in modulating oxidative stress during the freeze-thawing process. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of different concentrations of cyclodextrin-vitamin E complex (CD-Vit E) on cryopreserved ram sperm. Ejaculates collected from five adult rams were pooled and divided into four aliquots. All aliquots were treated in Tris-extender (Tris-glucose-citric acid) containing 2 mg cholesterol-loaded methyl-β- cyclodextrin/120 × 106 spermatozoa and either 0 (Control), 2, 4 or 6 mg CD-Vit E/120 × 106 spermatozoa, corresponding to 0, 0.5, 1 or 1.5 of pure vitamin E, respectively. After incubation at 22 °C for 15 min and the addition of Tris-extender containing glycerol and egg yolk (v/v), all aliquots were frozen in liquid nitrogen. After thawing, motility (computer aided sperm analysis), viability (eosin staining), membrane integrity (HOST), acrosome integrity (Coomassie G-250 staining) and lipid peroxidation (Thiobarbituric acid assay) were evaluated. Compared to control, 2 mg CD-Vit E had a significant positive effect on total motility, progressive motility, movement linearity (LIN%), viability and lipid peroxidation. At 4 mg, however, CD-Vit E had a significant negative effect on total motility, progressive motility, membrane functionality and acrosome integrity. At a greater concentration (6 mg), the negative effects were greater as compared with inclusion of 4 mg in the cryoprotectant and the percentage of rapidly and moderately motile gametes and viability were also altered. In conclusion, the effect of CD-Vit E on cryopreserved ram sperm was concentration-dependent with the 2 mg amount having a beneficial effect while greater concentrations (4 and 6 mg) had a harmful effect on sperm motility and gamete integrity but without affecting oxidative stress status.
       
  • Effect of long-term dietary beta-carotene supplementation on sperm
           concentration and motility in an endangered amphibian
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Leesa M. Keogh, Phillip G. Byrne, Aimee J. SillaAbstractDietary carotenoids have a high antioxidant capacity, so it has been hypothesised that carotenoid supplimentation will improve sperm production and quality by protecting sperm from oxidative damage. The effects of carotenoids on sperm have only been assessed in three vertebrate species, and evidence for improved sperm concentration and motility remains equivocal. One reason for this might be that in most studies there has not been an assessment of the effects of single carotenoid compounds over a range of doses. Applied research focused on developing ways to improve sperm quality could benefit the captive breeding and conservation of threatened species. The aim of the present study was to assess a dose-dependent effect of beta-carotene supplementation on sperm concentration and motility in the endangered booroolong frog (Litoria booroolongensis). Individuals were supplemented with one of four beta-carotene doses (0, 0.1, 1 and 10 mg/g) from hatching until sexual maturity (53 weeks). Sperm concentration was determined prior to activation, and percent sperm motility and sperm velocity were measured at 0, 3 and 6 h post-activation using computer-assisted sperm analysis. Unexpectedly, beta-carotene had no significant effect on sperm concentration, percent motility or velocity at any time point, providing no evidence for beneficial effects. Findings of the present study indicate there are likely to be species-specific differences in sperm production and motility that influence the risk of oxidative damage to sperm and dependence on dietary antioxidants to inhibit these detrimental effects.
       
  • Functional insights into the role of seminal plasma proteins on sperm
           motility of buffalo
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Viviane Maria Codognoto, Paulo Henrique Yamada, Rúbia Alves Schmith, Felipe Rydygier de Ruediger, Caroline Scott, Patrícia de Faria Lainetti, Suzane Brochine, Camila de Paula Freitas-Dell’Aqua, Fabiana Ferreira de Souza, Eunice ObaAbstractThe objective of the present study was to describe the proteins from the seminal plasma of buffalo and correlate these proteins with sperm motility. Ejaculates from sixteen Murrah buffalo were used. Semen collection was performed by electroejaculation, and the ejaculate was evaluated by macroscopic (volume) and microscopic analysis (subjective motility and vigor, as well as sperm concentration). After the analysis, the samples were centrifuged (800g for 10 min and 10,000 for 30 min at 4 °C), and the supernatant (seminal plasma) was used to determine total protein concentration by the Bradford method. Based on total protein concentration, an aliquot (50 μg) was taken to conduct protein in-solution digestion for nano-LC–ESI-Q-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. Samples were divided into two groups, minimal (little sperm motility) and greater (typical sperm motility), based on non-hierarchical clustering considering motility and emPAI protein value. The data were analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial analysis of minimum squares discrimination (PLS-DA). Forty-eight proteins were detected in the seminal plasma, and fifteen were common to two groups. There were six proteins that were significantly different between the groups. The main functions of proteins in seminal plasma were catalytic and binding activity. Spermadhesin protein, ribonuclease, 14-3-3 protein zeta/delta and acrosin inhibitor were in greater amounts in seminal plasma from the group with greater sperm motility; prosaposin and peptide YY were in greater amounts in the group with little sperm motility. The proteins detected in the greater motility group were correlated with sperm protection, including protection against oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, protease inhibition and prevention of premature capacitation and acrosome reaction. In the group with little sperm motility, one of the identified proteins is considered to be an antifertility factor, whereas the function of other identified protein is not definitive. Results from the present study add to the knowledge base about the molecular processes related with sperm motility, and these findings can be used for determining potential markers of semen quality.
       
  • Immunohistochemical determination of Ang-1, Ang-2 and Tie-2 in placentas
           of sows at 30, 60 and 114 days of gestation and validation through a
           bioinformatic approach
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Mariana Rita Fiorimanti, María Belén Rabaglino, Andrea Lorena Cristofolini, Cecilia Inés MerkisAbstractAngiopoietins (Ang-1, Ang-2) participate in vascular development and placental growth, both bind to Tie-2. This study aimed to determine the localization of angiopoietins in placental development of sows by immunohistochemistry and to validate the gene expression during gestation through a bioinformatic approach. Samples were collected from fifteen maternal-fetal interface from approximately 30 (n = 5), 60 (n = 5) and 114 (n = 5) days of gestation for immunohistochemistry. A bioinformatic approach was performed by re-analysis of public datasets to determine the increase or decrease of genes involved in angiogenesis during pregnancy. There was no significant statistical difference of Ang-1 during gestation, although there was a tendency to increase from mid- to term-gestation (P = 0.7680). A notable decrease of Ang-2 was observed from early- to term-pregnancy (P ≤ 0.05), consistent with the gene expression determined through bioinformatics. Furthermore, there were greater abundances of Tie-2 at both early and at term periods, but lesser abundances at mid-gestation (P ≤ 0.05). The bioinformatics approach indicated that genes related to biological processes such as angiogenesis (i.e., development and morphogenesis of blood vessels) were expressed to a greater extent in early gestation as compared with later in gestation. The Ang-1 gene expression related to cell maturation, response to hypoxia and apoptosis, however, increased as gestation period advanced. In conclusion, angiopoietins may have an important role in the vascular development thus ensuring adequate placental growth in sows. The presence of angiopoietins in the trophoblast suggests a specific role for these pro-angiogenic factors in the tissue formation at the maternal-fetal interface.
       
  • Effects of implants containing the GnRH agonist deslorelin on testosterone
           release and semen characteristics in Shetland stallions
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Camille Gautier, Kathrin Schmidt, Jörg Aurich, Christine AurichAbstractThe hypothesis in this study was continuous treatment of stallions with the GnRH agonist deslorelin inhibits reproductive functions. A 2-week pre-experimental period was followed by an 11-week deslorelin implant treatment. Stallions received 4.7 (D1, n = 7), or 18.8 mg deslorelin (D2, n = 5) or remained untreated (C, n = 5). Libido, sperm motility, membrane integrity, DNA fragmentation, estrogen receptors, basal plasma testosterone and Anti Muellerian hormone (AMH) concentrations were evaluated once weekly during the treatment period. The testosterone response to the GnRH agonist buserelin and hCG was evaluated twice. In Week 2, stallions in Group C but not Groups D1 and D2 responded to buserelin with testosterone release (P < 0.001), while in Week 9, stallions in Group C and D1 but not D2 released testosterone after buserelin administration (group P < 0.01, week P = 0.01). Stallions of all groups responded to hCG with testosterone release at both times of hCG administration (P < 0.001). The AMH concentration was similar in all groups. Deslorelin thus reduced pituitary responsiveness to GnRH but only with a large dose and this effect persisted for several weeks. Total sperm count increased transiently with the D2 treatment but not in stallions of the D1 and C groups after implant insertion (time P < 0.01, time x group P < 0.001). The percentage of ESR1-positive spermatozoa decreased transiently in Group D2 (time P < 0.01, time × group P < 0.01). There was no difference among groups at any time during the study in percentage of motile and membrane-intact spermatozoa and sperm with DNA fragmentation. In conclusion, deslorelin implants modulate pituitary function in stallions but not to an extent that affects testicular function.
       
  • Diet and internal physiological changes of female orange mud crabs, Scylla
           olivacea (Herbst, 1796) in different ovarian maturation stages
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): A. Hidir, M.A. Aaqillah-Amr, M.N. Noordiyana, M. IkhwanuddinAbstractRecently, there has been a growing interest in the ovarian maturation of mud crabs, genus Scylla. Studies regarding the factors that affect ovarian maturation in mud crabs, however, are still lacking. This study, therefore, evaluates the relationship between diet and internal physiological changes of female orange mud crabs, Scylla olivacea. Sixty female adult S. olivacea were sampled from Setiu Wetland, Malaysia. Foreguts were sampled to study fullness and content. The hepatopancreas was sampled to study digestive enzyme activity, biochemical composition, and histology. Ovaries were sampled to study ovarian biochemical composition and histology. Foregut fullness data suggest that there is an increase in feeding with advancing ovarian maturation in mud crabs. Data for foregut contents indicated that when the ovary was in Stage 3 of maturation the diet was animal-based. The activity of amylase, cellulase, lipase, and trypsin during Stages 1 and 4 of ovarian maturation were less than during Stage 3 of ovarian maturation. Biochemical composition (protein and lipid) was greater during Stage 3 of ovarian maturation. Histological analysis of the hepatopancreas indicated an increase in hepatopancreas tubules, B and R cells during Stage 3 as compared with Stage 1 of ovarian maturation. Histological analysis of the ovary indicated increases in oocyte diameter due to concentrated large yolk globules. Based on these results, it is concluded that vitellogenesis mainly occurred during Stage 3 of ovarian maturation, based on evidence of increased feeding with the diet being predominantly animal-based. Likewise, digestive enzyme activities, proteins, lipids, B cells, and R cells were all greater during Stage 3 of ovarian maturation.
       
  • Heritability estimates and effect on lifetime reproductive performance of
           age at puberty in sows
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Qingqing Li, Xiaolong Yuan, Zitao Chen, Ailing Zhang, Zhe Zhang, Hao Zhang, Jiaqi LiAbstractAge at puberty closely correlates to the lifetime reproductive performance in sows. This study aimed to estimate the heritability of age at puberty and analyze the effect of age at puberty on lifetime reproductive performance in sows. In total, 1492 Duroc, 2142 Landrace and 3176 Yorkshire gilts with pubertal records were collected from two genetically independent breeding farms in southern China. Heritability estimates of age at puberty were 0.25–0.42. Based on the distribution of age at puberty, gilts in each breed were classified into 1) early puberty (EP); 2) intermediate puberty (IP); and 3) late puberty (LP). Age at first mating/farrowing and parity at culling were significantly influenced by age at puberty (P  0.05). Reproductive problems were the main reason for culling females. The frequency of culling due to reproductive problems in females was highest in IP, intermediate in LP, and lowest in EP in Duroc and Landrace (P ≤ 0.05). Understanding the effect of age at puberty on lifetime reproductive performance could help to improve swine production. Farmers could take measures to detect and keep gilts with the desired age at puberty.
       
  • Anti-Müllerian hormone and Oestradiol as markers of future reproductive
           success in juvenile gilts
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Alicia Steel, Rebecca Z. Athorn, Christopher G. GrupenAbstractThere is a need for an early marker for reproductive success in gilts as the traditional process for selecting breeding females is inefficient. There is evidence that circulating anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) is indicative of ovarian reserve, antral follicle populations, gonadotropin responsiveness and fertility in various species other than the pig. Additionally, oestradiol (E2) has been shown to mark antral follicle populations in cattle and pregnancy outcomes in women, after gonadotropin treatment. The aims of this study were to determine whether 1) serum levels of AMH or E2, prior to or after gonadotropin injection at 60, 80 or 100 days of age, and 2) hormonal changes in response to gonadotropin stimulation (i.e. declining, plateauing or increasing hormone levels), are associated with future reproductive success in juvenile gilts. Serum samples were obtained at 0, 2 and 4 days after injection and mating and litter data were collected until parity three. Results showed that, regardless of age group and parity, Day 0 E2 levels were positively associated with the probability of stillbirth (P = 0.035) and E2 levels on Day 0 (P = 0.032), Day 2 (P = 0.045) and Day 4 (P = 0.019) were negatively associated with the number of piglets born alive. Further, both a single measurement of serum AMH levels at Day 2 (P = 0.048) and the AMH response type were associated with gestation length (P = 0.012). These findings suggest that serum AMH and E2 levels can be used to inform the selection of gilts for the breeding herd.
       
  • Glyphosate affects swine ovarian and adipose stromal cell functions
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Paolo Gigante, Melissa Berni, Simona Bussolati, Francesca Grasselli, Stefano Grolli, Roberto Ramoni, Giuseppina BasiniAbstractAlthough Glyphosate (GLY) is a widely used pesticide, its effects on ovarian function and stem cell differentiation are still largely unknown. Therefore, as a contribution on this subject, the present work reports an investigation of the in vitro effects of GLY on swine granulosa cells and adipose stromal cells (ASCs).The effect of GLY at different doses (0.2, 4 and 16 μg/mL) was evaluated on granulosa cells growth (BrDU incorporation and ATP production), steroidogenesis (17-β estradiol and progesterone secretion) and redox status (superoxide and nitric oxide production and non-enzymatic scavenging activity). GLY has been shown to inhibit cell growth, 17-β estradiol and non-enzymatic scavenging activity and to increase progesterone and nitric oxide secretion (P < 0.05). In addition, GLY significantly decreased the viability of ASCs (P < 0.001), and inhibited their adipogenic differentiation. These data indicate that GLY alters the main features of granulosa cells and ASCS thus suggesting that GLY could affect both reproductive function and adipose tissues homeostasis.
       
  • Nitric oxide in frozen-thawed equine sperm: Effects on motility, membrane
           integrity and sperm capacitation
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): André F.C. de Andrade, Rubens P. Arruda, Mariana A. Torres, Naira C.G. Pieri, Ticiano G. Leite, Eneiva Carla C. Celeghini, Leticia Z. Oliveira, Thayna P. Gardés, Maria Clara C. Bussiere, Daniela F. SilvaAbstractNitric oxide (NO) is a reactive nitrogen species (RSN) that, over the years, has been shown to be integrated with biological and physiological events, including reproductive processes. NO can affect the functionality of spermatozoa through free radical scavenging, deactivating and inhibiting the production of superoxide anions (O2.−). However, the role of NO in mammalian spermatozoa physiology seems paradoxical. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of NO on motility, hyperactivation, membrane integrity, peroxidation, and capacitation in cryopreserved equine sperm. Ejaculates were collected and cryopreserved. After thawing, samples were centrifuged, suspended in an in vitro fertilization (IVF) medium and incubated with the following treatments: 1) C = control (IVF); 2) A = l-arginine (10 mM – In); 3) L = L-NAME (1 mM – Ih); 4) M = methylene blue (100 mM – Re); 5) AL = L-arginine + L-NAME (In + Ih); 6) AM = L-arginine + methylene blue (In + Re). The samples were evaluated for spermatic kinetics by CASA and other analyses [plasma and acrosomal membranes used the propidium iodide (PI) and Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), detection of tyrosine residues phosphorylation in the membrane (F0426), nitric oxide (DAF-2/DA), lipid peroxidation (C11-BODIPY581/591)] by flow cytometry. The l-arginine treatments reduced MOT, PROG, RAP and LIN only at time 0 min compared to the control and L-NAME. These treatments (MT and MP, VAP, VSL, LIN, RAP) also reduced the sperm movement characteristics but only at the beginning of the incubation period. After this period of incubation, motility recovered. NO removal by methylene blue almost completely inhibited sperm motility, but these treatments had the highest percentages of intact membranes. l-arginine treatments improved acrosome reactions and differed from M and AM. NO production, tyrosine phosphorylation and lipid peroxidation did not differ among treatments, except for M and AM, where a reduction in these variables was detected. Therefore, equine sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction are part of an oxidative process that involves the participation of ROS, and NO plays an important role in the maintenance and regulation of motility, hyperactivation, induction of acrosome reaction and possibly in capacitation, which are indispensable processes for the fertility of equine sperm.
       
  • Lycopene-loaded nanoliposomes improve the performance of a modified
           Beltsville extender broiler breeder roosters
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Abouzar Najafi, Ramezan Ali Taheri, Mahdieh Mehdipour, Gholamreza Farnoosh, Felipe Martínez-PastorAbstractAntioxidants may ameliorate the effects of the freeze-thawing stress on cryopreserved spermatozoa. Lycopene is an effective antioxidant yet to be tested for rooster sperm cryopreservation and nanoliposomes, a technology recently applied to sperm cryopreservation, could improve conservation and antioxidant delivery to spermatozoa. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of 0.1, 0.2, and 0.3 mM lycopene and lycopene-loaded nanoliposomes (LnL) on the cryopreservation of rooster sperm in Beltsville extender. Post-thawing evaluation included sperm motility, membrane integrity, abnormal morphology, mitochondria activity, apoptotic status, malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant activities: Glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC). Total and progressive motility, membrane integrity and mitochondria activity were higher with 0.2 mM lycopene and LnL (P 
       
  • Semen analysis parameters from a captive population of the endangered
           Chacoan peccary (Catagonus wagneri) in Paraguay
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Camille Goblet, Gary West, Juan M. Campos-Krauer, Annie E. Newell-FugateAbstractBaseline information about the reproductive physiology of an endangered species is vital to captive breeding programs. This study analyzed reproductive parameters from eleven captive Chacoan peccaries (Catagonus wagneri) (mean age: 10.5 ± 1.2 years old) in Paraguay. After immobilization, testis length, width and firmness (hard to flaccid, 1–3) were assessed, followed by electroejaculation and analysis of semen. Samples were examined for percentage and progressive motility, total cell count, percentage live spermatozoa and morphology. Mean (±SEM) testis volume and firmness were 24.7 ± 1.8 cm3 and 2.1 ± 0.1, respectively. Mean ejaculate volume was 2.9 ± 0.7 ml with a pH of 7.7 ± 0.3. Few male peccaries had motile spermatozoa (n = 5/9) with a mean percentage and progressive motility of 18.3 ± 8.5% and 0.6 ± 0.3, respectively. The mean percentage of live spermatozoa was 25.1 ± 5.6%. Male peccaries had a low percentage of normal spermatozoa (12.4 ± 2.5%). The mean total count of spermatozoa per ejaculate was also quite low at 1.58 ± 1.01 million total spermatozoa per ejaculate. Spermatozoa defects were predominantly primary (77.7%) with the most common spermatozoa defects being tapered head (19.0 ± 7.4%), diadem/crater (17.7 ± 2.8%), and excess residual cytoplasm (9.6 ± 2.5%). Male age was not correlated with semen parameters (percent live: r=-0.19; motility percentage: r = 0.01; percent normal spermatozoa: r = 0.38; total count: r = 0.29; p>0.05). Evaluation of additional males from this population as well as other captive populations at various time points during the year is warranted.
       
  • Effect of different levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids rich fish
           oil supplementation on the ovarian and endometrial functions in the goat
           (Capra hircus)
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Atul Kumar Verma, Ajit Singh Mahla, Ravjibhai Karshanbhai Chaudhari, Amit Kumar Singh, Amit Khatti, Sanjay Kumar Singh, Narayan Dutta, Gyanendra Singh, Mihir Sarkar, Harendra Kumar, Dushyant Yadav, Narayanan KrishnaswamyAbstractDecreasing the ratio of n-6 to n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) through dietary manipulation improves the reproductive functions in the dairy cow. This study was conducted to determine the effect of dietary supplementation of n-3 PUFA rich fish oil that provided different levels of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) to determine the optimum dose with respect to endometrial and ovarian functions in the doe. Normal cyclic goats (n = 20) were divided into four groups (n = 5/group) and the fish oil was supplemented for 55 days such that EPA and DHA content were 0, 72, 156 and 312 mg/Kg body weight for CON, LOW, MED and HIGH groups, respectively. The diet was made isonitrogenous and isocaloric. Estrus was synchronized by two PG regimen at 11 days apart with first PG on day 25 of supplementation. Experimental does were observed from second PG till day 17 post-estrus. Ovarian ultrasound revealed that the follicular attributes were comparable among the groups; however, the diameter of CL on day 5 post-estrus was significantly larger in the MED group. Fish oil supplementation even at the lowest dose significantly decreased the serum estradiol (E2) and basal as well as oxytocin (OXT) induced PGFM during the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle (P  0.05). It is concluded that the dietary fish oil inhibited OXT induced PGF2α release and decreased E2 during the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle in the doe, which will have a favourable effect on the maternal recognition of pregnancy. In addition, MED level (156 mg/Kg body weight) increased the CL size and circulating P4 during the luteal phase.
       
  • Effect of prior insemination of dead sperm and gestation housing
           management on gilt fertility
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): C. Mazzoni, F. De Rensis, R.N. KirkwoodAbstractDanbred gilts at about 120 kg were group housed for estrous detection. At detection of estrus, gilts either remained in pens (P) or were re-housed into individual gestation stalls (S) and were inseminated (DS), or not (SC), with a dose of frozen/thawed dead semen. Groups were P-DS (n = 81), P-SC (n = 70), S-DS (n = 98) and S-SC (n = 90). All gilts were inseminated with semen containing viable sperm at the second detected estrus and 24 h later. Pregnant gilts that were stall housed were moved to pens 35 d after insemination. There were no effects of insemination or housing management on farrowing rates or litter sizes.
       
  • Angiography of ovarian and uterine vessels of the dog
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Mohammad Saeed Ahrari Khafi, Asghar Mogheiseh, Sina Salavati, Saghar KarimiAbstractA thorough knowledge about anastomoses between uterine and ovarian arteries could have great impact in surgical interventions. The present study aimed to use an angiographic procedure to show the vascular relationship between uterus and ovaries, possible anastomoses between uterine arteries during pregnancy, blood supply to gestational sacs, and the vascular pattern in the uterus of a bitch with pyometra. Uteri from 6 dogs (3 non-pregnant, 2 pregnant, and one with a pyometra uterus) were collected after ovariohysterectomy. A suspension of barium sulfate was injected into the middle uterine artery and, dorso-ventral radiographs were taken. In non-pregnant uteri, a contrast medium flowed into the middle uterine artery and, after covering all of its branches, the medium entered the ovarian parenchymal vessels. In addition, in the 35-day pregnant uteri, by injecting the contrast medium into the middle uterine artery of one horn the contralateral middle uterine artery received the media once the arteries of the initial horn were filled. The results showed some anastomoses between arteries of the two horns at this age of the pregnancy. The blood circulation of the gestational sacs in each uterine horn started from the base of the horn and continued to the apex. In conclusion, there are anastomoses between uterine and ovarian arteries in non-pregnant, and between arteries of different uterine horns in pregnant bitch.
       
  • Evaluation of environmental effects on reproductive characteristics of
           Mangalarga Marchador mares in a commercial embryo transfer program
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Miguel Alejandro Silva Rua, Celia Raquel Quirino, Ana Cláudia Cerqueira Rodrigues, Mirela Mendes Christo, Marcus Antônio Pessanha BarretoAbstractThe objective of this study was to evaluate the environmental effects on embryo recovery rate and pregnancy rate of Mangalarga Marchador mares. The reproductive characteristics of donor and recipient mares were evaluated during five years in Brazilian tropical environment. The mares were used throughout the year and seasons were classified as: October to April (breeding season – BS); May (autumn transition out of the breeding season - ATBS); June to August (non-breeding season – nBS); and September (vernal transition into the breeding season – VTBS). Daily temperature rainfall and hours of daylight (photoperiod) were measured during all months and years of evaluation. The embryo recovery rate (ERR) and the pregnancy rate (PR) were observed and frequencies were calculated. The effect of environmental variables, day of flushing, and hormonal treatments (estradiol benzoate and progesterone) were determined for the reproductive measures using the Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Significant effects were noted of the year, season and temperature on ERR (P  0.05). The day of uterine flush affected ERR (P  0.05). In addition, hormone treatment also supported favorable results of PR in recipient mares during nBS. The conclusion is that mares of this breed can be used in reproduction all year long, with good pregnancy rates, in Brazil’s tropical environment. The hormone treatment also supported favorable pregnancy rates in recipient mares during the non-breeding season. It seems that mares can have good pregnancy rates throughout the year in Brazil´s tropical environment.
       
  • Variation in post-thaw sperm quality of white-tailed deer bucks
           (Odocoileus virginianus) during rut
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Jamie L. Stewart, Clifford F. Shipley, Robyn E. Ellerbrock, Fabio S. Lima, Igor F. CanissoAbstractWhite-tailed deer farming is a growing industry in the United States, with breeding operations contributing significantly to the industry’s economic impact. Artificial insemination with frozen semen allows for selection and dissemination of valuable genetics, yet surprisingly little is known regarding the best time throughout rut to perform semen cryopreservation. The objective of this study was to compare semen quality following cryopreservation of white-tailed deer bucks collected early in the breeding season (September, n = 6), at peak rut (December, n = 8), and late season (March, n = 7). We hypothesized that post-thaw semen quality would be enhanced at peak rut. Mature bucks were anesthetized with tiletamine-zolazepam and xylazine administered intramuscularly via projector. Semen was collected by electroejaculation and cryopreserved using Optixcell extender. Overall and progressive sperm motilities were assessed for each sample before and after cryopreservation using a computer-aided sperm analyzer. Flow cytometry was used for post-thaw assessment of sperm viability (SYBR-14/PI), acrosome integrity (FITC-PNA/PI), and DNA stability (acridine orange). Analysis of variance was applied to normalized data using a general linear mixed model with buck ID as a random variable, and a Tukey HSD test was performed as needed for post-hoc analysis. Pre-freeze overall and progressive sperm motilities were lowest in March, intermediate in September, and highest in December (p ≤ 0.04). Post-thaw overall and progressive motilities were lowest in September (p ≤ 0.02), but did not differ between December and March (p ≥ 0.12). The DNA Fragmentation Index was lowest in December, intermediate in September, and highest in March (p ≤ 0.05). The percentage of spermatozoa with intact plasma membrane was higher in December than September (p 
       
  • Comparison of RNA extraction and microRNA detection protocols for a small
           amount of germinal vesicle oocytes in bovine
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Xiaonan Ma, Ying Zhang, Fang Qiao, Mengyun Wang, Zhenzi Zuo, Yong Zhang, Yongsheng WangAbstractRT-qPCR is a widely used method to detect miRNA expression. Compared with mRNA, miRNA has a shorter length and lower abundance which hinders the acquisition of reliable results. Thus, miRNA detection requires a method with high sensitivity and accuracy. Collecting large amounts of material is particularly difficult for oocytes and pre-implantation embryos of domestic animals. Establishing a set of miRNA detection methods that are suitable to detect trace amounts of such materials is urgently needed. In this study, the total RNA in 50 germinal vesicle (GV) oocytes was isolated through direct lysis and by using mirVana miRNA Isolation Kit and miRNeasy Micro Kit. The OD260/280 values and concentrations of the RNA in these three groups were compared to identify a superior RNA isolation method. In addition, the specificity and sensitivity of common DNA and LNA primers were compared by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction for miRNA detection. Results show that the RNA concentration of in the direct lysis group was significantly higher than that in the other two groups. The specificity between the DNA primers and LNA primers was identical, whereas the sensitivity of LNA primers was superior to that of DNA primers. These results suggest that direct lysis combined with LNA primers might be a suitable protocol for the miRNA detection of a small amounts of GV oocytes and pre-implantation embryos in cattle.
       
  • Evaluation of cooling and freezing systems of bovine semen
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Erika Aline Ribeiro Dias, Suzane Peres Campanholi, Guilherme Fazan Rossi, Camila de Paula Freitas Dell’Aqua, José Antonio Dell’Aqua, Frederico Ozanam Papa, Mariana Furtado Zorzetto, Claudia Cristina Paro de Paz, Letícia Zoccolaro Oliveira, Maria Eugênia Zerlotti Mercadante, Fabio Morato MonteiroAbstractSemen cryopreservation comprises different steps, among them are the cooling and freezing rates which significantly influence the quality of thawed sperm. Different systems with variable freezing rates are used for freezing bull semen in the field, with a consequence of variable success rates. The objective of this study was to compare different systems for freezing bull semen in the field. Five cooling methods of semen and two methods for the subsequent freezing phase (5 × 2 factorial scheme) were used. Two to four ejaculates were collected from 12 bulls with an electroejaculator. The ejaculates were diluted in BotuBov® to a concentration of 50 × 106 spermatozoa/mL in 0.5-mL straws. After dilution, the straws were cooled to 5 °C in five cooling systems: TK 4000® at a cooling rate of −0.25 °C/min (R1); TK 4000® at a rate of −0.5 °C/min (R2); Minitube® refrigerator at a rate of −2.8 °C/min (R3); Botutainer® at a rate of −0.65 °C (R4), and domestic refrigerator at a rate of −2.0 °C/min (R5). After stabilization at 5 °C for 4 h, these straws were then submitted to two freezing systems: TK 4000® at a freezing rate of −15 °C/min (C1) and Styrofoam box with liquid nitrogen at a rate of −19 °C/min (C2). Sperm kinetics were evaluated by computer-assisted sperm analysis at four time points: in fresh semen, after cooling, post-thawing, and after the rapid thermal resistance test (TRT). In addition, plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity, mitochondrial potential and intracellular H2O2 were analyzed after thawing by flow cytometry. The R1, R2 and R4 cooling systems were the most efficient in preserving sperm viability, membrane integrity and intracellular H2O2. Samples frozen in the C1 system exhibited better post-thaw and post-TRT kinetics than C2 samples. In conclusion, slower cooling curves in conjunction with a constant freezing rate obtained with the programmable unit were more efficient for freezing bull semen in the field.
       
  • The influence of inhibition of acid phosphatase,
           β-N-acetylglucosaminidase and lactate dehydrogenase present in the sperm
           of ide (Leuciscus idus) on the percentage of fertilised eggs
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Beata Sarosiek, Katarzyna Dryl, Katarzyna Palińska-Żarska, Daniel ŻarskiAbstractThis study investigated how the inhibition of certain enzymes present in ide sperm influences sperm motility and the percentage of fertilised eggs. The enzymes studied were acid phosphatase (AcP), β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (β-NAGase) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). None of the inhibitors affected ide sperm motility parameters. The addition of gossypol (a LDH inhibitor) caused a considerable increase in the percentage of fertilised eggs (92–95% compared to 63% in the control). The inhibition of AcP caused a considerable decrease in fertility rate – at the highest inhibitor dose, the percentage of fertilised eggs decreased to 26%. A similar effect was seen after the addition of acetamide (a β-NAGase inhibitor), but in this case the highest dose caused complete inhibition of fertilisation. The results presented here indicate the importance of AcP and β-NAGase in the process of ide fertilisation.
       
  • Involvement of lipopolysaccharide in ovarian cystic follicles in dairy
           cow: Expressions of LPS receptors and steroidogenesis-related genes in
           follicular cells of cystic follicles
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Takashi Shimizu, Shiori Ishizawa, Fumie Magata, Momoko Kobayashi, Paul M. Fricke, Akio MiyamotoAbstractIn ovarian cystic follicles, molecular changes in the growing follicle may have a local action and contribute to anovulation and cystic formation. One of the candidate molecules that affect the steroid and gonadotropin signaling systems of cystic follicles is lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a cell wall component of gram-negative bacteria. To examine the molecular characteristics of bovine cystic follicles, we analyzed LPS concentration in follicular fluid of cystic follicles, and the expression of LPS receptors and steroidogenesis-related genes in granulosa and theca cells. Cystic follicles were categorized as estradiol (E2)-active (EACF) and E2-inactive cystic follicle (EICF). Overall, LPS concentration in follicular fluid of EACF and EICF was higher compared with healthy preovulatory follicles (POF). Expression of luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) in granulosa and thecal cells was decreased in EACF and EICF compared with POF. Expression of CYP19 in granulosa cells of EACF and EICF was lower than POF. High expression of StAR in granulosa and thecal cells was observed in EICF. In granulosa cells, the expression of TLR4 and TLR2 mRNA was higher in EICF than other follicles. By contrast, higher expression of TLR2 in thecal cells was observed in EICF. Thus, high LPS concentration in follicular fluid of cystic follicles may be associated with the regulation of expression of steroidogenesis-related genes in granulosa and theca cells. These finding revealed the molecular characteristics of bovine ovarian cysts and possible involvement of LPS in the pathology of cystic follicle diseases.
       
  • Development of the “waveless” bovine model
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): F. Jimenez-Krassel, J.L.H. Ireland, C. Kronemeyer, A. Wilson-Alvarado, J.J. IrelandAbstractDevelopment of a bovine model without ovarian follicular waves (waveless) and transient increases in gonadotropin secretion during estrous cycles may lead to new methods to more consistently regulate ovulatory follicle growth thereby improving efficiency of embryo transfer. We hypothesized that the GnRH antagonist acyline would inhibit gonadotropin secretion thereby blocking follicular waves, ovarian function and ovulation during estrous cycles of cattle. To test this hypothesis, beef heifers (n = 5 per group) were treated twice daily with vehicle (control) or 25 or 50 μg/kg acyline beginning 12 h after GnRH-induced ovulation and ending 21 days later. Each animal was subjected to ovarian ultrasonography for 25 days to monitor number and growth of follicles ≥3 mm in diameter and growth of the corpus luteum (CL). Blood samples were taken at various intervals to determine circulating concentrations of FSH, LH, anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH, marker of small follicle growth) and progesterone. Results show that acyline treatment decreased or blocked: circulating concentrations of LH, transient FSH spikes associated with emergence of follicular waves, preovulatory FSH/LH surges, follicular waves, dominant follicle development, CL growth, and progesterone production. In contrast, the largest acyline dose increased AMH concentrations. In conclusion, long-term acyline treatment blocks follicular waves but not growth of preantral and small antral follicles (≤ 3 mm). Future studies will determine if the waveless bovine model, which has enhanced development of preantral and small antral follicles, can be used to develop new methods to improve predictability of response of cattle to superovulation.
       
  • The tail in tropical hair ewes (Ovis aries) that are in estrus is used as
           a proceptive signal and favors ram’ copulation
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Ángel Fierros-García, Rodolfo Ungerfeld, Virginio Aguirre, Agustín OrihuelaAbstractTwo experiments were performed to determine if the tail has a role: 1) in proceptive behavior, and 2) in facilitating copulation in hair sheep. The movements and position of the tail of estrous and non-estrous ewes in response to male courtship were compared in the first study. In the second study, the courtship of rams and mating behavior directed towards tailed or tail-docked, in estrus or diestrus ewes, were compared. Both experiments were conducted with restrained ewes during 3 min assessment periods. In Experiment 1, tail movements occurred in short episodes in response to physical contact of the male, but the rest of the time the tail of non-estrous ewes was drawn inward to the body, while in estrous ewes it simply hung naturally straight downward. Ewes in estrus had many tail moving episodes (P
       
  • Single layer centrifugation improves the quality of frozen-thawed sperm of
           giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Z.G. Cai, J.H. An, Y.L. Liu, S.M. Yie, Y. Zhang, F.P. Li, J.S. Chen, X. Wang, J.M. Morrell, R. HouAbstractThe reproductive capacity of captive giant pandas is poor and sperm cryopreservation is necessary for the reproduction and conservation of this species. Cryopreservation, however, leads to a significant decrease in sperm quality, including sperm motility, acrosome integrity and DNA integrity. In the present study, a method was developed based on colloid single layer centrifugation that could significantly improve frozen-thawed sperm quality. Two colloids were compared for post-thaw giant panda sperm preparation; the sperm samples had greater total motility (Colloid 1: 44.5 ± 16.0%, Colloid 2: 42.4 ± 10.1% compared with Control: 25.4 ± 8.4%, P 
       
  • Ovopel® and carp pituitary extract for induction of reproduction in
           Colossoma macropomum females
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Francielle Novaes Souza, Edenilce de Fatima Ferreira Martins, Ruy Alberto Caetano Corrêa Filho, Janessa Sampaio de Abreu, Luana Barbosa Pires, Danilo Pedro Streit Jr., Nelson Mauricio Lopera-Barrero, Jayme Aparecido PovhAbstractThe aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of the hormonal inducers Ovopel® and carp pituitary extract (CPE) for induction of reproduction in Colossoma macropomum females. The treatments were CPE at the dose of 5.5 mg/kg divided into two applications (10%; and 90% after 12 h) and Ovopel® at doses of 0.2 and 0.4 pellet/kg body weight in a single application. Eight replicates were used in each of the three treatments, totaling 24 experimental units. The females spawned when treated with the 0.2 pellet of Ovopel® (100.0%), 0.4 pellet of Ovopel® (62.5%), and CPE (87.5%), but there were no significant differences among the treatment groups in spawning rate. When there was treatment with Ovopel® spawning occurred with greater (P 
       
  • Cinnamtannin B-1, a novel antioxidant for sperm in red deer
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): F. Sánchez-Rubio, M.R Fernández-Santos, L. Castro-Vázquez, O. García-Álvarez, A. Maroto-Morales, A.J. Soler, F. Martínez-Pastor, J.J. GardeAbstractCinnamtannin B-1 (CNB-1) is a naturally occurring trimeric A-type proanthocyanidin contained in several plants such as cinnamon (Cinnamomum zeylanicum). It is considered to be a potent antioxidant. The protective effect of CNB-1 against oxidative stress was assessed in red deer epididymal sperm incubated at 37 °C. Cryopreserved sperm from six stags were thawed, pooled and extended to 400 × 106 sperm/ml in BGM (bovine gamete medium). After being aliquoted, the samples were supplemented with different concentrations of CNB-1 (0, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 μg/mL), with or without induced oxidative stress (100 μM Fe2+/ascorbate). The samples were evaluated after 0, 2 and 4 h of incubation at 37 °C. This experiment was replicated six times. Spermmotility (CASA), viability, mitochondrial membrane potential, acrosomal status, lipoperoxidation (C11 BODIPY 581/591), intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA status (TUNEL) were assessed. After 4 h of incubation, CNB-1 prevented the deleterious effects of oxidative stress, thus improved sperm progressivity and velocity (P
       
  • Interferon epsilon is constitutively expressed in equine endometrium and
           up-regulated during the luteal phase
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Carrie D. Fischer, Garrett L. Wachoski-Dark, Danielle M. Grant, Sarah A. Bramer, Claudia KleinAbstractInterferon epsilon (IFNE) is type I interferon which stands out through its unusual expression profile and differing regulation compared to classic type I interferons such as interferon alpha and interferon beta. Unlike other type I interferons, the expression of IFNE is not stimulated through exposure to viral agents. Expression of IFNE is most abundant in mouse and human endometrium where it is constitutively expressed in luminal and glandular epithelial cells and expression levels are up-regulated with estrogen exposure. The aim of the current study was to determine whether a cycle or pregnancy dependent expression pattern of IFNE is existent in equine endometrium and to localize IFNE expression within the endometrium. Additionally, endometrial explant culture and culture of mixed epithelial/stromal cells populations was used to determine the effects estrogen and seminal plasma on IFNE transcript abundance. Samples collected during diestrus and pregnancy expressed significantly higher levels of IFNE than samples obtained from anestrous or estrous mares (P  0.05). Upon in situ hybridization, staining was exclusively present in luminal and glandular epithelial cells, with stromal displaying absent staining intensity. Both diestrous and pregnant samples were characterized by markedly stronger staining of glandular epithelial cells than anestrous and estrous samples. The progesterone-dependent increase in IFNE abundance during the estrous cycle likely implies that IFNE is part of the innate immune system in endometrium that gives protection against uterine infections during progesterone-dominated phase of the estrous cycle.
       
  • Is boar sperm freezability more intrinsically linked to spermatozoa than
           to the surrounding seminal plasma'
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Junwei Li, Jordi Roca, Cristina Pérez-Patiño, Isabel Barranco, Emilio A. Martinez, Heriberto Rodriguez-Martinez, Inmaculada ParrillaAbstractThis study aimed to elucidate the effect of seminal plasma (SP) from post-SRF on boar sperm freezability and, in addition, to determine the relevance of sperm itself to sustain cryopreservation, regardless of the SP surrounding them. Twelve ejaculates from three boars were manually collected in fractions/portions, P1: the first 10 mL of the SRF, P2: the rest of the SRF and the post-SRF. Immediately, samples were centrifuged to separate spermatozoa from the surrounding SP. Spermatozoa from P1 and P2 were then incubated with its own SP or that from post-SRF, diluted in BTS (1:1, v/v) at 17 °C overnight before being frozen in 0.5 mL straws using a standard protocol. Sperm motility (total and progressive) deteriorated (P 
       
  • Effect of semen processing methods on lumpy skin disease virus status in
           cryopreserved bull semen
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): C. Henry Annandale, Mario P. Smuts, Karen Ebersohn, Lizette du Plessis, Estelle H. Venter, Tom A.E. StoutAbstractLumpy skin disease is an economically important disease of cattle, caused by the lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV; Capripoxvirus). It has a variable clinical appearance but, in severely affected animals, is associated with extensive skin damage, pneumonia and death. The LSDV can be found in the semen of infected bulls for prolonged periods of time, from where it can be transmitted by mating or artificial insemination and cause clinical disease in heifers and cows. In this study, an ejaculate was collected from a LSDV seronegative bull and confirmed free from LSDV DNA by PCR. The ejaculate was split into a control sample (C), a sample spiked with a 4 log TCID50 dose of an LSDV isolate (HD) and a 103 dilution of the virus suspension (ND) and frozen routinely. Two straws from each of the different semen treatment groups (HD, ND and C) were subsequently thawed and subjected to swim-up, single layer centrifugation, Percoll® density gradient and a Percoll® density gradient with added trypsin. For one set of straws, semen quality variables were recorded, and viral DNA status determined using PCR; the other set was used for positive staining electron microscopy. Samples determined to be positive for LSDV DNA by PCR were then subjected to virus isolation (VI). Complete elimination of LSDV from semen did not occur with use of any of the processing methods. Trypsin did reduce the viral load, and eliminated LSDV from the ND sample, but severely negatively influenced semen quality. The LSDV virions, as assessed by electron microscopy, were associated with the sperm plasma membrane. Further investigation is needed to establish the efficacy of immuno-extenders for rendering semen free from LSDV.
       
  • Insertion of 275-bp SINE into first intron of PDIA4 gene is associated
           with litter size in Xiang pigs
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Chang Liu, Xueqin Ran, Xi Niu, Sheng Li, Jiafu Wang, Qin ZhangAbstractThe aim of the study was to investigate the SINE polymorphism in Xiang, Kele, Qianbei black, Jiangkouluobo, Large White, and Duroc pig breeds. The PCR based detection method was conducted to identify the short interspersed nuclear element (SINE) polymorphism in the PDIA4 gene. There were greater frequencies of the SINE−/− genotypes in Xiang pigs (55.9%) as compared with other pig breed groups. There was an association between this 275 bp SINE polymorphism and litter size (P = 0.003). The homozygous SINE+/+ genotype of the PDIA4 gene had a 1.45-piglets larger litter sizes compared to those with the homozygous SINE−/− genotype. Furthermore, there were assessments of mRNA and protein abundances as a result of PDIA4 gene expression in the ovaries of Xiang pigs for the three different SINE genotypes, and the results indicated that relative abundances of PDIA4 mRNA and protein was greater for the SINE−/− and SINE−/+ genotypes compared with the SINE+/+ genotype (P 
       
  • Does lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage differ in cryopreserved
           semen samples from young, adult and aged Nellore bulls'
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Juliane Teramachi Trevizan, Janaina Torres Carreira, Isadora Resende Carvalho, Bruna Helena Kipper, Walter Bertequine Nagata, Silvia Helena Venturoli Perri, Maria Emilia Franco Oliveira, Julia Cestari Pierucci, Marion Burkhardt de KoivistoAbstractThe aims of this study were to evaluate cryopreserved semen of Nellore bulls of different ages and verify whether sperm quality declines with advancing age and whether lipid peroxidation and DNA damage are involved in this process. For this purpose, 40 Nellore bulls were divided into three age groups: Young, aged 1.8–2 years (n = 9); Adult, aged 3.5–7.0 years (n = 19); and Seniors, aged 8.0–14.3 years (n = 12). Three ejaculates were collected from each bull, cryopreserved and evaluated for various parameters including membrane integrity, mitochondrial potential (FITC-PSA and JC1), lipid peroxidation (C-11BODIPY 581 / 591) and oxidative DNA damage (8OHdG) using flow cytometry. The thawed semen of senior bulls was characterized by a low percentage of motile sperm (33.7 ± 6.1%), higher damage to the plasma and acrosomal membrane (37.5 ± 9.8%), and low mitochondrial potential (29.1 ± 13.8%), as well as higher percentages of peroxidated cells (53.6 ± 12.2%) and DNA damage (44.1 ± 11.0%; P 
       
  • Comparison of semen samples collected from wild and captive jaguars
           (Panthera onca) by urethral catheterization after pharmacological
           induction
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Gediendson Ribeiro de Araujo, Tarcízio Antônio Rego de Paula, Thyara de Deco-Souza, Ronaldo Gonçalves Morato, Letícia C.F. Bergo, Leanes Cruz da Silva, Deiler Sampaio Costa, Cindy BraudAbstractThis study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of medetomidine anesthesia for semen collection through urethral catheter in wild and captive jaguars. Six captive and five wild jaguars were chemically restrained with a combination of medetomidine (0.08–0.1 mg/kg) and ketamine (5 mg/kg). After medetomidine administration the urethra was catheterized using a urinary tomcat catheter (1 mm diameter × 130 mm length) to collect semen from all animals. By using this technique, we could collect an average of 347.2 μl of semen containing 2,635.2 sperm/ml. Forward progressive motility, sperm progressive motility, and sperm morphology analysis demonstrated that the methodology did not affect sperm quality. Thus, urethral catheterization after medetomidine administration is a practical and efficient method to collect high-quality semen from wild and captive jaguars; this will enable the development of reproductive assisted technologies for jaguars.
       
  • Shortened daily photoperiod during the non-breeding season can improve the
           reproductive performance of camel bulls (Camelus dromedarius)
    • Abstract: Publication date: August 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 195Author(s): Ayman Abdel-Aziz Swelum, Islam M. Saadeldin, Hani Ba-Awadh, Abdullah N. AlowaimerAbstractThe effects of a shortened photoperiod on the reproductive performance and hormones of mature dromedary camel bulls (Camelus dromedarius) were evaluated. A group of 6 bulls were blindfolded to induce a daily photoperiod that was ∼2.55 h shorter than the natural day length (10.83L:13.17D), whereas 6 others served as the control group. The trial started in June and continued for 10 weeks during the non-breeding season. The reproductive performance of all animals was evaluated weekly during this time and also during the breeding season, starting in December and continuing for 10 weeks. Camel bulls in the treatment group showed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in testicular volume, scrotal circumference, sexual desire, reaction time, and mating ability scores, and serum melatonin and testosterone concentrations, relative to the control group, during the non-breeding season. In addition, sexual desire and reaction time and mating ability scores were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in the treatment group than in the control during the breeding season. There was no significant difference between the treatment groups in both seasons and the control group in the breeding season regarding semen volume, sperm cell concentration, total motility, progressive motility, plasma membrane integrity, and viability. Shortening the daily photoperiod by blindfolding can improve the reproductive performance of dromedary camel bulls during the non-breeding season and the following breeding season. This simple, inexpensive, and easily applicable method can enable breeders to collect semen of acceptable quality during the non-breeding season.
       
  • Non-invasive metabolomic profiling of culture media of ICSI- and
           IVF-derived early developmental cattle embryos via Raman spectroscopy
    • Abstract: Publication date: Available online 6 July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction ScienceAuthor(s): Xiao-Xia Li, Ping-Hua Cao, Wen-Xia Han, Ya-Kun Xu, Hua Wu, Xue-Li Yu, Jun-Yi Chen, Fan Zhang, Ying-Hua LiAbstractThe aim of the present study was to compare differences in composition between in vitro cultured early developmental embryos resulting from either in vitro fertilization (IVF) or intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Non-invasive metabolomic profiling of culture media was conducted with laser tweezer Raman spectroscopy (LTRS), providing molecular information that was used to aid the diagnosis or treatment of embryos that were adversely affected by ICSI treatment, ultimately improving the ICSI embryonic developmental potential. Cattle embryos were generated via ICSI and IVF with development to the 2-, 4-, 8-, 16-,32-cell, and blastocyst stages with individual in vitro culturing occurring for 4 h. The culture media for embryos in different developmental stages were separately analyzed using LTRS. The resulting composition of culture media used for culturing IVF- and ICSI-derived embryos was mainly altered in contents of carbohydrates, lipids, DNA, and proteins. Bands at 1004 cm-1 (phenylalanine) and 1529 cm-1 (-C = C-carotenoid) had specific patterns related to the metabolicactivity of embryos; using LTRS, and these may be considered as biomarkers for embryonic development. Furthermore, the vibrations of lipids at different stages increased more with assessment of ICSI culture media than in IVF media. Discriminant function analysis can be utilized for the classification of culture media used for culture of ICSI- and IVF-derived embryos. In conclusion, LTRS can be used for development of an independent assay to assess embryo status during both ICSI and IVF procedures, which provides novel insights into differences in structure and components of single cells.
       
  • Addition of iodixanol in bull freezing extender improves the sperm
           membranes integrity
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Fernanda Nunes Marqui, Alicio Martins, Tairini Erica da Cruz, Tatiana Issa Uherara Berton, Camila de Paula Freitas-Dell’Aqua, José Antonio Dell’Aqua Júnior, Eunice Oba
       
  • Evaluation of Percoll PLUS as a cushion solution during single layer
           centrifugation of fresh bull semen: Effects on frozen/thawed spermatozoa
           motility
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Alicio Martins, Tairini E. da Cruz, Fernanda N. Marqui, Diego G. de Souza, Tatiana I.U. Berton
       
  • Evaluation of lipid membrane peroxidation, mitochondrial membrane
           potential and oxidative stress on bull semen frozen with reduced sperm
           number after colloidal single layer centrifugation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Tairini Erica da Cruz, Alicio Martins, Fernanda Nunes Marqui, Tatiana Issa Uherara Berton, Camila de Paula Freitas-Dell’Aqua, José Antonio Dell’Aqua
       
  • Bacterial presence in commercial straws of bull sperm diminished sperm DNA
           longevity
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Carmen López Fernández, Carlos García de la Vega, Eva Tvrdá, Laura González-Calero, Javier Bartolomé-Nebreda, Jaime Gosálvez
       
  • Canine semen evaluation using traditional and emerging methods in purebred
           Labrador Retriever Studs – Comparison of fresh and thawed semen
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Alejandro de la Fuente, Andrea Hesser, Stuart Meyers
       
  • Concentration of proAKAP4 as a pertinent read-out of sperm quality in
           mammals
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Maryse Delehedde, Didier Bloomaert, Nathalie Jouy, Julie Scabello, Hortense Miersman, Thierry Franck, Didier Serteyn, Valérie Mitchell, Nicolas Sergeant
       
  • Characterization of interleukin-6 in the caprine testis
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Khalda Fadlalla, Ebony Gilbreath, Olga Bolden-Tiller
       
  • IntelliGen technology creates sexed semen that exhibits physiological
           markers associated with fertilization competency and concomitant positive
           field fertility
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Michael R. Botts, Asheber Sewalem, Elon C. Roti Roti, Katie Olson
       
  • A(xoneme) to z(inc): New paradigm of mammalian sperm zinc ion fluctuation
           from spermiogenesis to fertilization and its importance to livestock
           production
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Karl Kerns, Michal Zigo, Wei Xu, Erma Z. Drobnis, Lauren Hamilton, Miriam Sutovsky, Richard Oko, Peter Sutovsky
       
  • Advances in honeybee drone sperm quality assays
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Jill A. Jenkins, Lilia I. de Guzman
       
  • Freezing donkey semen with six different freezing extender
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Claudia De Beris, Debora Casarini, Samuel Buff, Loris Commin, Anne Josson-Schramme
       
  • l-cystein+and+reduced+glutathione+in+tris-citric+acid+based+extender+improves+the+post+thaw+quality+of+dromedary+camel+spermatozoa&rft.title=Animal+Reproduction+Science&rft.issn=0378-4320&rft.date=&rft.volume=">Combination of l-cystein and reduced glutathione in tris-citric acid based
           extender improves the post thaw quality of dromedary camel spermatozoa
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): S.M. Hassan, M. Ahmad, S.J. Akbar
       
  • Use of principal component analysis to evaluate variability in CASA and
           flow cytometer sperm characteristics
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Saulo Menegatti Zoca, Bahman Shafii, William J. Price, Matthew D. Utt, Bo Harstine, Kristina McDonald, Mel DeJarnette, Joseph C. Dalton
       
  • Ejaculation effect on prostatic Pulsed-Wave Doppler ultrasound in dogs
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Salvatore Alonge, Monica Melandri, Raffaella Leoci, Giovanni Lacalandra, Michele Caira, Giulio Aiudi
       
  • Bovine sperm nucleus isolation and proteomic characterization for
           fertility studies: Preliminary results
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Leticia Castro, Adriano Siqueira, Mariana Antoniassi, Ricardo Bertolla, Mayra Assumpção
       
  • Cryopreservation of sperm influences on conceptus development in mares
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Jose M. Ortiz-Rodriguez, Cristina Ortega Ferrusola, Cruz Gil, Alberto Álvarez-Barrientos, Angel Román, Fernando J. Peña
       
  • Effect of two different non-permeable cryoprotectants (NPC) on equine
           sperm viability after vitrification
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Sónia Macedo, Miguel Bliebernicht, António Rocha, Graça Lopes
       
  • Effect of cryopreservation on semen progressive motility
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Tanya Kogan, Yoel Zeron, Ronit Laor, Ronit Mesilati-Stahy, Nurit Argov-Argaman, Zvi Roth
       
  • Treatment of rams with melatonin in the non-breeding season improves the
           post-thaw quality of spermatozoa
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Kelsey Pool, Jessica Rickard, Tamara Leahy, Taylor Pini, Simon P. de Graaf
       
  • Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) regulates spermadhesin release during
           boar sperm capacitation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Michal Zigo, Pavla Postlerova, Vera Jonakova, Peter Sutovsky
       
  • Antibacterial effects of scent leaf extract (Ocimum gratissimum L) on
           quality of extended porcine semen
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Olufemi Alaba, Olujide A. Sokunbi
       
  • Effects of vitamin D-induced chronic renal disease on quality and
           cryopreservation of spermatozoa from the endangered Iberian lynx
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Trinidad Leon-Quinto, Juan M. Moreno, Alejandro Lopez-Lopez, Arturo Serna
       
  • Hematologic indices in infertile and fertile goats of the Zaanen breed
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Anastasia Voinova, Georgy Nikitin, Polina Anipchenko, Anatoly Stekolnikov, Kirill Plemyashov, Hamidulla Baimishev
       
  • Influence of physical and psychoemotional stress on the clinical and
           hormonal parameters of rats’ blood
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Elena Korochkina, Anatoly Stekolnikov, Kirill Plemyashov, Polina Anipchenko
       
  • Influence of sperm quality (cryopreserved and native) on the duration of
           spermatozoa storage in reproductive tracts of turkeys
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Tatiana Mavrodina, Olga Stanishevskaya, Sergey Cherepanov, Yulia Silyukova
       
  • Influence of age on fertility rate and chicken hatchability at artificial
           insemination by semen diluted with VNIIGRZH extender
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Oksana Perinek, Irina Galpern, Elena Nikitkina, Kirill Plemyashov
       
  • Semen collection, evaluation and freezing in reindeer (Rangifer
           tarandus
    )
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Kirill Plemyashov, Elena Nikitkina, Anna Krutikova, Svetlana Timofeeva, Gennadiy Shiryaev, Artem Musidray, Vasili Goncharov
       
  • Cryotolerance of cocks’ sperm depending on their breed and
           individual properties
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Olga Stanishevskaya, Nikolai Pleshanov
       
  • Identification of six genes related to fertility in alpacas
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Alejandra Ugarelli, Bruna Medranda, Alexei Santiani, Shirley Evangelista-Vargas
       
  • Imaging flow cytometry assessment of viability and mitochondrial membrane
           potential during cryopreservation of alpaca spermatozoa
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Alexei Santiani, Alejandra Ugarelli, Pablo Allauca, Javier Juárez, Shirley Evangelista-Vargas
       
  • Lipid analysis of seminal plasma from Nellore bulls (Bos taurus indicus)
           with high and low resistance to cryopreservation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Mariana Furtado Zorzetto, Erika Aline Ribeiro Dias, Fabio Morato Monteiro, Camila de Paula Freitas Dell’Aqua, Claudia Cristina Paro de Paz, Edson Guimarães Lo Turco, Thaís Regiani Cataldi, Fabiana Ferreira de Souza, Frederico Ozanam Papa, Eunice Oba
       
  • Testicular dimensions in boars
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Jorge Chacón, Gloriana Castillo, Bernardo Vargas
       
  • Breeding soundness evaluation (BSE) in boars from Costa Rica
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Gloriana Castillo, Jorge Chacón
       
  • Ram sperm production estimates
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Françoise J. McPherson, Peter J. Chenoweth
       
  • Sperm characteristics of Bos taurus taurus and Bos taurus indicus bulls
           during winter in Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Ana Beatriz Marques de Almeida, Fábio Morotti, Anne Kemmer Souza, Maria Isabel Mello Martins
       
  • Cryopreservation and subpopulations from epididymal sperm of domestic
           felines
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Anne Kemmer Souza, Luiz Guilherme Corsi Trautwein, Cristiane Sella Paranzini, Ana Beatriz Marques de Almeida, Maria Isabel Mello Martins
       
  • Technical aspects of mesenchymal stem cells transplantation into the
           stallion testes
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Malgorzata A. Pozor, Talaryn M. McCarrel, Erin Porter, Audrey Kelleman, Margo L. Macpherson, Andrew Smith
       
  • Morphological confirmation of the “Dag” defect in birds: Evidence from
           Swainson's francolin (Pternistis swainsonii)
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): John T. Soley, Lizette du Plessis
       
  • Use of anti-phosphotyrosine and PDK1 monoclonal antibodies enables
           observation of the effects of media on bull sperm second messenger
           signaling during capacitation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Phillip H. Purdy, Hymerson C. Azevedo, James K. Graham, María Alexandra Márquez Lema
       
  • Water buffalo bull fertility selection by sperm nuclear shape: Model
           development and evaluation
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Danilda Hufana-Duran, Matt Daniel Peralta, Emma V. Venturina, Fe A. Venturina, Peregrino G. Duran, Felomino V. Mamuad, Hernando V. Venturina, John J. Parrish
       
  • Circulating testosterone dynamics in boars: Effects of age, breed and
           cryptorchidism
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Sameera Premaratne, Lakshitha Fonseka, Suranga P. Kodithuwakku, Indunil N. Pathirana
       
  • Albumin, bicarbonate and cAMP upregulation are prerequisites for
           cholesterol efflux in ram spermatozoa
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Naomi C. Bernecic, Bart M. Gadella, Jos F.H.M. Brouwers, Jeroen W.A. Jansen, Simon P. de Graaf, Tamara Leahy
       
  • Pregnancy rates in post-partum buffaloes treated with GnRH, hCG and
           flunixine meglumine in a timed artificial insemination protocol
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Muhammad Saleem Akhtar, Mushtaq Hussain Lashari, Laeeq Akbar Lodhi, Ijaz Ahmad, Ejaz Ahmad, Irtaza Hussain, Tanveer Ahmad, Masood Akhtar
       
  • Assessment of energy metabolism in equine semen after freezing
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Elena Nikitkina, Kirill Plemyashov, Gennadiy Shiryaev
       
  • Morphological status of bull sperm relative to membrane integrity
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Bradley A. Didion
       
  • Validation of a sample preparation system (eFlow) for semen analysis in
           the AndroVision® CASA-System
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Rudolf Grossfeld, Andrea Reiser, Georg Wippenbeck, Dominika Becherer, Stefan Klingl
       
  • The presence of bacterial species in bovine semen and their impact on the
           sperm quality
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Eva Tvrdá, Ljubica Belić, Michal Ďuračka, Anton Kováčik, Miroslava Kačániová, Norbert Lukáč
       
  • Testicular hyperthermia increases blood flow that maintains aerobic
           metabolism in rams
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Guilherme Rizzoto, Cheryl Hall, John V. Tyberg, Jacob C. Thundathil, Nigel A. Caulkett, John P. Kastelic
       
  • The effect of gentamicin/kanamycin treatment on in vitro contamination of
           rabbit spermatozoa with selected bacterial strains
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Michal Ďuračka, Miroslava Kačániová, Attila Kántor, Eva Tvrdá
       
  • Flow cytometric expression levels of phospholipase C zeta in capacitated
           and acrosome reacted stallion sperm
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Raul Gonzalez-Castro, James Graham, Elaine Carnevale
       
  • Mammalian cell-free system for the study of mitochondria inheritance
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Dalen Zuidema, Won-Hee Song, Peter Sutovsky
       
  • The sperm mitochondrion: Organelle of many functions
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Christa R. Moraes, Stuart MeyersAbstractThis review summarizes current research in sperm mitochondrial function with specific emphasis on mitochondrial metabolism, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial genomics. This organelle is key in many crucial sperm functions including motility, hyperactivation, capacitation, acrosome reaction, and fertilization, thus its role in male fertility cannot be ignored. Recent studies have further elucidated sperm metabolism, placing greater emphasis on the importance of mitochondrial energy production for some species. Additionally, the dogma of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production is changing and is being described by some as an indicator of increased mitochondrial function, potentially representing the most fertile sperm. Further, the mitochondrial genome, specifically mitochondrial DNA copy number, has been indicated as a potential biomarker for sperm quality and fertility in several species. Methods to study the sperm mitochondria are also evolving, allowing for researchers to learn more about the bioenergetics and status of this important organelle. Because of the importance of mitochondrial function for sperm function in most species, it is crucial to better understand the mechanisms involved in order to improve our knowledge of sperm physiology as well as improve handling and storage techniques for the industry.
       
  • Sperm quality assays: How good are they' The horse perspective
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Charles C. LoveAbstractSperm quality assays have increased in number in the last 10 years. Most of these assays are flow cytometry based in application and are modified from assays that have been developed to measure somatic cell function. The goal of any sperm quality assay should be to advance the clinicians/researchers understanding of sperm cell function and the relationship to fertility. While these assays appear to measure somatic cell-like functions in sperm there tends to be little understanding how the results of these assays relate to fertility.
       
  • Identification of genomic variants causing sperm abnormalities and reduced
           male fertility
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Jeremy F. Taylor, Robert D. Schnabel, Peter SutovskyAbstractWhole genome sequencing has identified millions of bovine genetic variants; however, there is currently little understanding about which variants affect male fertility. It is imperative that we begin to link detrimental genetic variants to sperm phenotypes via the analysis of semen samples and measurement of fertility for bulls with alternate genotypes. Artificial insemination (AI) bulls provide a useful model system because of extensive fertility records, measured as sire conception rates (SCR). Genetic variants with moderate to large effects on fertility can be identified by sequencing the genomes of fertile and subfertile or infertile sires identified with high or low SCR as adult AI bulls or yearling bulls that failed Breeding Soundness Evaluation. Variants enriched in frequency in the sequences of subfertile/infertile bulls, particularly those likely to result in the loss of protein function or predicted to be severely deleterious to genes involved in sperm protein structure and function, semen quality or sperm morphology can be designed onto genotyping assays for validation of their effects on fertility. High throughput conventional and image-based flow cytometry, proteomics and cell imaging can be used to establish the functional effects of variants on sperm phenotypes. Integrating the genetic, fertility and sperm phenotype data will accelerate biomarker discovery and validation, improve routine semen testing in bull studs and identify new targets for cost-efficient AI dose optimization approaches such as semen nanopurification. This will maximize semen output from genetically superior sires and will increase the fertility of cattle. Better understanding of the relationships between male genotype and sperm phenotype may also yield new diagnostic tools and treatments for human male and idiopathic infertility.
       
  • Phenotypic varieties of sperm pathology: Genetic abnormalities or
           environmental influences can result in different patterns of abnormal
           spermatozoa
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Hector E. ChemesAbstractThe present paper reviews in detail ultrastructural and molecular studies addressed to characterize different phenotypes of sperm pathology in sterile men. In each case ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, molecular and genetic information is provided to differentiate two main kinds of sperm pathologies: systematic phenotypes with known or suspected genetic origin and non-systematic ones, usually secondary to different pathologies of the male reproductive system. Special attention is paid to detailed ultrastructural features profusely illustrated with electron micrographs. Diagnostic and fertility prognostic values of these phenotypes are also discussed and, when possible, comparison with similar pathologies in mammals and birds are discussed.
       
  • Seminal plasma proteomes and sperm fertility
    • Abstract: Publication date: July 2018Source: Animal Reproduction Science, Volume 194Author(s): Xavier Druart, Simon de GraafAbstractDuring ejaculation, the spermatozoa are transported by the seminal plasma, a fluid resulting from secretions originating mainly from the prostate and the seminal vesicles in mammals. The interaction of the seminal plasma with spermatozoa induces binding of seminal proteins onto the sperm surface and membrane remodeling potentially impacting the sperm transport, survival and fertilizing ability in the female genital tract. The seminal plasma also contains peptides and proteins involved in the inflammatory and immune response of the female tract. Therefore the seminal plasma proteome has been investigated in a large range of taxa, including mammals, birds, fishes and insect species. The association of the seminal plasma with semen preservation or fertility identified proteic markers of seminal plasma function in domestic species. This review summarizes the current knowledge in seminal plasma proteomes and proteic markers of sperm preservation in animal species.
       
 
 
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