for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help

 A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z  

  First | 1 2     

  Subjects -> SOCIAL SERVICES AND WELFARE (Total: 190 journals)
Journal of Social Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of Social Policy and Social Work in Transition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Social Service Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 143)
Journal of Social Work Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Social Work in Disability & Rehabilitation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Social Work Practice in the Addictions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Just Policy: A Journal of Australian Social Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
L'Orientation scolaire et professionnelle     Open Access  
Learning in Health and Social Care     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Maltrattamento e abuso all’infanzia     Full-text available via subscription  
Mental Health and Social Inclusion     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Mental Health and Substance Use: dual diagnosis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Merrill-Palmer Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Migration Action     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Mortality: Promoting the interdisciplinary study of death and dying     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Mundos do Trabalho     Open Access  
National Emergency Response     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
New Zealand Journal of Occupational Therapy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Nonprofit Policy Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Nordic Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Northwestern Journal of Law & Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Nouvelles pratiques sociales     Full-text available via subscription  
Parity     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Partner Abuse     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Pedagogia i Treball Social : Revista de Cičncies Socials Aplicades     Open Access  
Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129)
Personality and Social Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Philosophy & Social Criticism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Practice: Social Work in Action     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Psychoanalytic Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Public Policy and Aging Report     Hybrid Journal  
Qualit@s Revista Eletrônica     Open Access  
Qualitative Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Race and Social Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Research in Social Stratification and Mobility     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Research on Economic Inequality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Research on Language and Social Interaction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Research on Social Work Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 116)
Review of Social Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Revista Internacional De Seguridad Social     Hybrid Journal  
Revista Katálysis     Open Access  
Revista Trabajo Social     Open Access  
Safer Communities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Science and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Self and Identity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Service social     Full-text available via subscription  
Serviço Social & Sociedade     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Sexual Abuse in Australia and New Zealand     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Sexualidad, Salud y Sociedad (Rio de Janeiro)     Open Access  
Social & Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Social Action : The Journal for Social Action in Counseling and Psychology     Free   (Followers: 1)
Social and Personality Psychology Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Behavior and Personality : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Social Care and Neurodisability     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Choice and Welfare     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Social Cognition     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Social Compass     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Influence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Justice Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Social Philosophy and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Social Policy & Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Social Policy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 117)
Social Science Japan Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Social Semiotics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Social Studies of Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Work     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Social Work & Social Sciences Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Social Work Education: The International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Social Work Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Social Work Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Social Work With Groups     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Sociedade e Estado     Open Access  
Sociedade em Debate     Open Access  
Society and Mental Health     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
SourceOCDE Questions sociales/Migrations/Sante     Full-text available via subscription  
Soziale Passagen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Sozialer Fortschritt     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Technical Aid to the Disabled Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Tempo Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
The Milbank Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Third Sector Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Third World Planning Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Transnational Social Review     Hybrid Journal  
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription  
Violence and Victims     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Youth Studies Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Zeitschrift für Hochschulrecht, Hochschulmanagement und Hochschulpolitik: zfhr     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)

  First | 1 2     

Journal Cover Social Justice Research
   [12 followers]  Follow    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
     ISSN (Print) 1573-6725 - ISSN (Online) 0885-7466
     Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2209 journals]   [SJR: 0.688]   [H-I: 26]
  • Right-Wing Authoritarianism and Social Dominance Orientation Predict
           Different Moral Signatures
    • Abstract: Abstract Moral Foundations Theory posits five distinct foundations of morality: Harm/Care, Fairness/Reciprocity, In-group/Loyalty, Authority/Respect, and Purity/Sanctity. In combination, this should yield between four-to-six moral signatures—distinct combinations or patterns of support for these aspects of morality. We extend previous research by examining the replicability of these moral signatures in a New Zealand-based national sample (n = 3,635). Latent Profile Analysis identified four distinct moral signatures: Individuators, Moderates, Neutrals, and High Moralists. We integrate these moral signatures within the Dual Process Model (DPM) framework and show that Social Dominance Orientation predicts membership in the Neutral moral signature (moderate/lukewarm support for multiple moral foundations); whereas Right-Wing Authoritarianism predicts membership in the High Moralist signature (undifferentiated high support across moral foundations). These findings were observed controlling for Big-Six personality and various demographics. Thus, the authoritarian and dominance-based motives identified by the DPM independently predict categorical differences in the signatures people use to judge morality.
      PubDate: 2014-05-22
       
  • How Much Does Effortful Thinking Underlie Observers’ Reactions to
           Victimization'
    • Abstract: Abstract From blaming to helping innocent victims, just-world research has revealed that observers react to victimization in a variety of ways. Recent research suggests that such responses to victimization require effortful thought, whereas other research has shown that people can react to these situations intuitively. Along with manipulating just-world threat, across seven experiments, we manipulated or measured participants’ level of mental processing before assessing judgments of victim derogation, blame, willingness to help, and ultimate justice reasoning. The effect of just-world threat on these responses held constant over a range of manipulations/measures, suggesting that the processes involved in maintaining a belief in a just world are not restricted to the rational, deliberative level of mental processing but also occur intuitively.
      PubDate: 2014-05-15
       
  • Examining Self-Advantage in the Suffering of Others: Cross-Cultural
           Differences in Beneficiary and Observer Justice Sensitivity Among Chinese,
           Germans, and Russians
    • Abstract: Abstract Other-related concerns for justice are fundamental components of morality and interpersonal behaviors. In this paper, we investigated macro/cultural and micro/individual differences in justice concerns for others. More specifically, beneficiary sensitivity (BS) and observer sensitivity (OS) were compared across China as a typical collectivist society, and Germany and Russia as two individualistic societies. Individualism–collectivism was assumed to mediate the cultural variance of BS and OS. In Study 1, Chinese participants exhibited more BS but less OS compared to German participants. In Study 2, the Chinese participants exhibited more BS but not significantly different OS compared to Russian participants. Moreover, collectivism mediated this cultural difference in BS but not OS. In Study 3, collectivist participants identified according to their proposals in social value games exhibited more BS than did individualistic participants, while the two groups revealed no significant difference in OS. Taken together, our studies consistently show that higher collectivism both on the cultural and individual levels is related to BS but not to OS, suggesting that collectivist values make people sensitive to self-advantage in comparison to the suffering of others.
      PubDate: 2014-05-13
       
  • Revisiting the Instrumentality of Voice: Having Voice in the Process Makes
           People Think They Will Get What They Want
    • Abstract: Abstract Research on procedural justice has found that processes that allow people voice (i.e., input) are perceived as fairer, and thus elicit more positive reactions, than processes that do not allow people voice. Original theorizing attributed these effects to beliefs that the provision of voice enhances people’s sense of process control, which people were assumed to value because it impacts their perceived likelihood of receiving desired outcomes (the instrumental perspective of procedural justice). Subsequent research questioned this perspective, arguing that outcome expectations do not account for the effects of voice. However, this subsequent research failed to directly examine the interplay of voice, outcome expectations, and reactions. The current studies revisit and extend research on this topic by asking whether manipulations of voice act as shared circumstance effects. Confirming an untested implication of the instrumental perspective, we show that giving everyone voice increases their belief, ex-ante, that they are likely to win an upcoming competition. However, this instrumental belief accounts for only part of the effects of voice on perceived procedural fairness and on general reactions to outcomes. Results suggest that voice does indeed have instrumental significance, an implication not adequately recognized in current justice theorizing. However, this instrumentality does not, by itself, explain why people value having a voice in processes that affect them.
      PubDate: 2014-05-07
       
  • Theoretical Developments and Applications of the Social Resource Theory: A
           Review of Törnblom & Kazemi (2012)
    • PubDate: 2014-05-01
       
  • The Role of Overall Organizational Justice Perceptions Within the
           Four-Dimensional Framework
    • Abstract: Abstract Given the recent interest in a global model of organizational justice, the purpose of the present paper is to examine the role of overall justice within Colquitt’s (J Appl Psychol 86:386–400, 2001) four-dimensional framework. In two studies (using a student and professional sample), confirmatory factor analysis results supported a five-factor model of justice. Analyses demonstrated that overall justice is likely an independent construct, can be predicted from the facet measures of justice, and is not a second-order hierarchical construct. In both studies, structural equation modeling indicated that overall justice partially mediated the relationship between the four dimensions of justice and both global and specific outcomes examined by Colquitt (2001) and Ambrose and Schminke (J Appl Psychol 94:491–500, 2009), respectively. Taken together, this research demonstrates that there is a need for both overall justice and the four justice dimensions in comprehensive models of organizational justice. Implications for research and practice are discussed.
      PubDate: 2014-04-08
       
  • My Life for A Voice: The Influence of Voice on Health-Care Decisions
    • Abstract: Abstract Are people willing to give up affordable healthcare and future years of their lives in exchange for having a voice in healthcare decision-making' Drawing upon research on the psychology of justice, we claim that the fairness of healthcare decision-making procedures, expressed by the availability of voice, can be more important than critical health-related outcomes. We examined this proposition using a forced-choice paradigm that required participants to choose between voice and better healthcare outcomes (affordable healthcare and greater life expectancy). Findings from three studies revealed that people maintain a strong preference for voice even at the expense of tangible healthcare outcomes. In study 1, participants preferred a healthcare plan that offered them a voice when it was $3,000–$12,000 more costly than a plan that did not offer such voice privileges. In study 2, participants preferred a voice plan to a no-voice plan when the no-voice plan was 5–20 years greater in its average life expectancy compared with the voice plan. In study 3, which used a more demographically diverse, non-student sample, the preference for the voice plan persisted across all conditions, even when the no-voice plan was 25 years greater in its life expectancy, and even when participants’ expected to personally live longer under the no-voice plan. These results are explained by participants’ expectation to enjoy better personal healthcare outcomes and greater autonomy when afforded voice. These findings demonstrate the importance of voice in hypothetical decision-making relevant to policy-making.
      PubDate: 2014-03-01
       
  • Corporate Volunteerism, the Experience of Self-Integrity, and
           Organizational Commitment: Evidence from the Field
    • Abstract: Abstract We examined the relationship between the motives underlying employees’ participation in corporate-sponsored volunteerism and their organizational commitment. In both a pilot study and in the main study, employees’ motivation to volunteer based on the desire to express personally meaningful values (also known as the values function of volunteerism) was positively related to their organizational commitment. Additional findings from the main study helped to explain why this was so: being motivated by the values function of volunteerism was positively related to how much participants experienced self-integrity in the workplace, which in turn was positively related to their organizational commitment. That is, experiencing self-integrity in the workplace mediated the relationship between how much employees were motivated by the values function and their organizational commitment. The results of subsidiary analyses provided further evidence that corporate volunteerism was positively related to organizational commitment, and that the experience of self-integrity mediated this relationship. Implications for both the corporate volunteerism and functions of volunteerism literatures are discussed, as are practical implications and suggestions for future research.
      PubDate: 2014-03-01
       
  • Betwixt and Between Global and Domestic Forms of Justice: The Israeli Case
           Over Time
    • Abstract: Abstract The article explores the theoretical and empirical links between global and social domestic justice and the ways in which these links are mediated by local heritages. Using Israel as a case study, we examine the links between macro-level globalization trends and domestic ‘‘spheres of justice’’ as evaluated by secular youth in mainstream Jewish secular state schools. We use two separate datasets: one covering 9,140 students in 48 schools in 1986 (hegemonic Zionism), and another covering 2,542 students in 24 schools in 2011 (globalization). We find that while neoliberal globalization trends present a considerable challenge to the foundational Zionist pioneering ethos, Israeli adolescents today do not unanimously embrace neoliberal principles of global justice. This suggests they are guided by complex beliefs encompassing both neoliberal and more domestically driven principles, creating co-existing and at times contradictory social justice judgment profiles.
      PubDate: 2014-03-01
       
  • The German “Wutbürger”: How Justice Sensitivity Accounts
           for Individual Differences in Political Engagement
    • Abstract: Abstract Perceived injustice can trigger strong emotional reactions and motivate political protest. Although there is vast empirical evidence for this chain of reactions, we know little about individual differences in how perceived injustice can motivate people to engage in political actions. In a survey study with 1,005 German participants, we investigated how justice sensitivity as a personality disposition accounts for individual differences in political engagement. Regression analyses revealed that justice sensitivity from an observer perspective promotes political engagement, whereas justice sensitivity from a victim perspective is not related to political engagement . In the concrete case of a political decision regarding the public transport project “Stuttgart 21” in Germany, our data indicated that perceived procedural injustice of the decision process and moral outrage mediated the relation of justice sensitivity from an observer perspective and political protest. The present findings are in line with research on the behavioral outcomes of justice sensitivity and contribute to the understanding of individual differences in political engagement and its underlying motivational processes.
      PubDate: 2014-03-01
       
  • Getting a Grip on Why Incivility Happens Within the Workplace: A
           Commentary Essay
    • PubDate: 2014-03-01
       
  • The Role of Emotion and Cognition in Juror Perceptions of Victim Impact
           Statements
    • Abstract: Abstract Recent legislation has contributed to an increasing number of victims participating in the trial process by way of providing victim impact statements (VISs). The present study evaluated jurors’ perceptions of VISs in a jury-eligible sample. Participants were 402 jury-eligible community members in the southwestern United States. Using a vignette-based method, VIS presence and content (i.e., Victim Harm versus Victim Emotion information) were examined for their influence on sentencing decisions and blame attribution. Individual differences of need for affect (NFA) and need for cognition (NFC) were featured as moderators of these relations. Notable results included significantly lengthier sentencing recommendations and decreased levels of victim blame in the presence of a VIS, regardless of content. In addition, juror NFC was significantly positively associated with perpetrator blame, while NFA moderated the relation between VIS content and sentencing length. The presence of a VIS impacted blame and sentencing, although jury panel member individual differences moderated such effects. Implications for victim rights policy, trial consultation, and social–emotional theory are discussed.
      PubDate: 2014-03-01
       
  • Justice for All? Factors Affecting Perceptions of Environmental and
           Ecological Injustice
    • Abstract: Abstract Moving beyond the typical focus on individual injustices, we examine individual-level and contextual factors affecting perceptions of justice with regard to the environment. Specifically, we examine decision-making procedures pertaining to environmental resource use and harms across groups of people; the distribution of environmental harms; and the direct treatment of the natural environment (i.e., procedural environmental justice, distributive environmental injustice, and ecological injustice, respectively). To test our hypotheses, we use data from a survey administered to a cohort of first-year college students at a southeastern university. Results demonstrate that environmental identity and perceptions of the extent to which the university context encourages sustainability consistently enhance perceptions of all three types of justice. Other factors differentially affect each type of justice. We discuss the importance of the patterns that emerge for environmental and sustainability education and speculate on the implications of moving from thinking about (in)justice related to the environment as an individual issue to one of the collectivity.
      PubDate: 2013-12-15
       
  • The Deterioration of Democratic Political Culture: Consequences of the
           Perception of Inequality
    • Abstract: Abstract Using survey data from nine East European members of the European Union, I find that citizens’ political and social disengagement is strongly related to their perceptions of inequalities in society. Specifically, individuals’ perceptions that income and social inequalities are excessive clearly coordinates with lower levels of trust and political efficacy, as well as higher levels of both a general suspicion of others and political apathy. This is troubling as these attitudes and orientations are part of what constitute a healthy democratic political culture and thus germane to the long-term legitimacy of both national and EU governance. Further, in contrast to much of the work on inequality, this effect is neither contingent on individuals’ income levels nor clearly linked to national-level economic indicators.
      PubDate: 2013-12-01
       
  • Revolution for Breakfast: Intersections of Activism, Service, and Violence
           in the Black Panther Party’s Community Service Programs
    • Abstract: Abstract While there is a small body of research on service provision by groups that espouse a willingness to use violence, this research often is based on a presumption that service provision is used solely as a utilitarian tool to recruit members for political or violent activities. Through an examination of service provision by the Black Panther Party (BPP), the authors seek to problematize the utilitarian notion of service provision by reframing political activism, service, and violence as parallel acts of resistance serving similar purposes of countering oppression and healing communities. During field research in Oakland, California, extensive information was collected through interviews with former BPP members and recipients of BPP social services, as well as archival documents and audiovisual materials produced both about and by the BPP. The analysis explores several examples of the BPP offering free healthcare, breakfast, and education services. The data provide evidence that an organization that has been traditionally framed as militant not only acted rationally, but also provided an important defense for their community. Both their social service provision and their commitment to bear arms were viewed locally as acts of compassion, protection, and love.
      PubDate: 2013-12-01
       
  • “Why There?” Islamophobia, Environmental Conflict, and
           Justice at Ground Zero
    • Abstract: Abstract Conflicts over environmental spaces that are sites of trauma or have been designated as sacred involve questions about who has a legitimate stake in determining the use of the site, and where the hallowedness attached to that space ends. We examine these questions in a study of the 2009–2010 controversy about the Park51 [sic] Islamic Community Center, sometimes called the “Ground Zero Mosque,” to examine how issues of distributive, procedural, and inclusionary justice play out in a conflict over valuable land close to Ground Zero. This conflict, though in a specifically fraught locale, speaks to resistance to mosque construction in the USA and Europe. Using newspaper articles on the public debate as data (N = 65), and performing a thematic analysis, we identified four key themes: (1) views of Islam, (2) conflict, (3) American identity and ideals, and (4) proximity and place. Utilizing Chi square analyses to examine the effect of propinquity on support for Park51, we found that people living within New York City were more likely to support Park51 than those outside of the city. Our conclusion discusses constructs that link values, space, and social relations—hallowed ground, place attachment, social distance—and discuss their relationship to justice. We argue that while several kinds of justice are relevant, at its heart, this conflict concerns inclusionary questions about who can speak, who belongs, and who should be excluded.
      PubDate: 2013-12-01
       
  • Social Justice Attitudes and Their Demographic Correlates Among a
           Nationally Representative Sample of U.S. Adolescents
    • Abstract: Compared to extant studies, this study uses more rigorous analyses to describe social justice attitudes and their correlates among a nationally representative sample of 2,811 U.S. ninth-graders. Females and adolescents with more educated mothers tended to express more support for social justice. Strikingly, about 90 % of adolescents believed that equal opportunity to obtain a good education exists in the U.S. Adolescents were also more likely to support abstract social justice principles rather than solutions that promote social justice: about 80 % agreed that all races and genders should have equal opportunities, but only 55 % reported that government should be responsible for individuals’ economic needs. Differences between U.S. adolescents’ and adults’ attitudes are noted, and implications for future research are presented.
      PubDate: 2013-10-17
       
  • Is it Fair to Share? Perceptions of Fairness in the Division of
           Housework Among Couples in 22 Countries
    • Abstract: Abstract This study explores the relationship between the actual division of housework and men’s and women’s perceived fairness in this regard. The central question is how the actual sharing of housework influences the perceptions of fairness in the division of housework. It is hypothesised that the perceptions of fairness differ between policy models. In countries where gender equality has been more present on the political agenda and dual-earner policies have been introduced, people are expected to be more sensitive to an unfair sharing or division of housework. By analysing the relationship between actual division of housework and perceptions of fairness in household work for 22 countries representing different family policy models, the study takes on a comparative perspective with the purpose of analysing the normative impact of policy. The analysis draws on data from the 2002 round of the International Social Survey Programme on family and changing gender roles. The results show that in countries that have promoted gender equality through the introduction of policies with an aim to promote dual roles in work and family, both women and men are more sensitive to an unfair division of household labour. The difference between perceptions in the different policy models is greater among men than among women, indicating that a politicization of the dual-earner family is more important for men’s equity perceptions than women’s.
      PubDate: 2013-09-18
       
  • Integrating Organizational Justice and Affect: New Insights, Challenges,
           and Opportunities
    • Abstract: Abstract Building on the foundation offered by Cropanzano et al. in their recent book titled Social Justice and the Experience of Emotion (Cropanzano et al. in Social justice and the experience of emotions, Routledge, New York, 2011), we argue that further integrating the literatures on organizational justice and affect has the potential to create important insights that can further our understanding of both literatures. In order to capitalize on these opportunities, however, we argue that justice scholars must increase the clarity of our constructs, address critical gaps in the literature, and question underlying assumptions in the field as well as within the paradigms that have traditionally been adopted to explore justice issues. We propose a number of research avenues that can not only facilitate our understanding of organizational justice by addressing challenges and gaps in the literature, but can also help further integrate the organizational justice and affect literatures. We conclude by discussing methodologies and approaches that can help organizational justice researchers to explore these new research opportunities.
      PubDate: 2013-08-21
       
  • What is Fair Punishment for Alex or Ahmed? Perspective Taking        class="a-plus-plus">Increases Racial Bias in
           Retributive Justice Judgments
    • Abstract: Abstract Previous research frequently found that perspective taking may reduce various sorts of racial biases. In the present research, we propose that perspective taking may increase racial bias in the specific context of retributive justice judgments, that is, evaluations of what punishment is considered fair for offenders. In two studies, we manipulated whether or not participants took the perspective of a target offender, who was named either Alex or Ahmed. Results revealed evidence for racial bias under conditions of perspective taking in both studies: Perspective taking increased punishment for Ahmed, but not for Alex, in a theft case (Study 1). Furthermore, perspective taking decreased punishment for Alex, but not for Ahmed, in the case of less severe offense that is less clearly intentional (Study 2). The consequence is similar in both studies: More severe retributive justice judgments for Ahmed than for Alex under conditions of perspective taking.
      PubDate: 2013-08-14
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2014