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  Subjects -> ENGINEERING (Total: 2298 journals)
    - CHEMICAL ENGINEERING (192 journals)
    - CIVIL ENGINEERING (192 journals)
    - ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING (104 journals)
    - ENGINEERING (1209 journals)
    - ENGINEERING MECHANICS AND MATERIALS (385 journals)
    - HYDRAULIC ENGINEERING (55 journals)
    - INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING (69 journals)
    - MECHANICAL ENGINEERING (92 journals)

CIVIL ENGINEERING (192 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 192 of 192 Journals sorted alphabetically
ACI Structural Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Acta Polytechnica : Journal of Advanced Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Structilia : Journal for the Physical and Development Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Advances in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 36)
Advances in Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 28)
Agregat     Open Access  
Ambiente Construído     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 31)
Architectural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Archives of Civil and Mechanical Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Archives of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Archives of Hydro-Engineering and Environmental Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ATBU Journal of Environmental Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Baltic Journal of Road and Bridge Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Building and Construction : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
BER : Building Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Building Sub-Contractors' Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Bioinspired Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Bridge Structures : Assessment, Design and Construction     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Building & Management     Open Access  
Building and Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Building Women     Full-text available via subscription  
Built Environment Project and Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Bulletin of Pridniprovsk State Academy of Civil Engineering and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Canadian Journal of Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Case Studies in Engineering Failure Analysis     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Case Studies in Nondestructive Testing and Evaluation     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Structural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Cement and Concrete Composites     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Challenge Journal of Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Challenge Journal of Structural Mechanics     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Change Over Time     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Civil and Environmental Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Civil And Environmental Engineering Reports     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Civil and Environmental Research     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Civil Engineering = Siviele Ingenieurswese     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Civil Engineering and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Civil Engineering and Environmental Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Civil Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Civil Engineering Dimension     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Civil Engineering Infrastructures Journal     Open Access  
Cohesion and Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Composite Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 270)
Computer-aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Computers & Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 36)
Concrete Research Letters     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Construction Economics and Building     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Construction Management and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Construction Science     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Constructive Approximation     Hybrid Journal  
Curved and Layered Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
DFI Journal : The Journal of the Deep Foundations Institute     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Earthquake Engineering and Structural Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Enfoque UTE     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Engineering Project Organization Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Engineering Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Engineering Structures and Technologies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Environmental Geotechnics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
European Journal of Environmental and Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Fatigue & Fracture of Engineering Materials and Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Frattura ed Integrità Strutturale : Fracture and Structural Integrity     Open Access  
Frontiers in Built Environment     Open Access  
Frontiers of Structural and Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Geomaterials     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Geosystem Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Geotechnik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Géotechnique Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
GISAP : Technical Sciences, Construction and Architecture     Open Access  
HBRC Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Hormigón y Acero     Full-text available via subscription  
HVAC&R Research     Hybrid Journal  
Indonesian Journal of Urban and Environmental Technology     Open Access  
Indoor and Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Infrastructure Asset Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Infrastructures     Open Access  
Ingenio Magno     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Insight - Non-Destructive Testing and Condition Monitoring     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
International Journal for Service Learning in Engineering     Open Access  
International Journal of 3-D Information Modeling     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Advanced Structural Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Civil, Mechanical and Energy Science     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Concrete Structures and Materials     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Condition Monitoring     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Construction Engineering and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
International Journal of Geo-Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Geosynthetics and Ground Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Masonry Research and Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Pavement Research and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Protective Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Steel Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Structural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Structural Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Structural Stability and Dynamics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Sustainable Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Sustainable Construction Engineering and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
International Journal on Pavement Engineering & Asphalt Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
International Journal Sustainable Construction & Design     Open Access  
Journal of Bridge Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Building Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Building Materials and Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Building Performance Simulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Construction Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Civil Engineering and Science     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Civil Engineering Research     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Civil Engineering, Science and Technology     Open Access  
Journal of Civil Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Civil Structural Health Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Composites for Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Journal of Computing in Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
Journal of Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Construction Engineering and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Journal of Constructional Steel Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Earth Sciences and Geotechnical Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Fluids and Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Frontiers in Construction Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Green Building     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Highway and Transportation Research and Development (English Edition)     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Infrastructure Systems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Legal Affairs and Dispute Resolution in Engineering and Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Materials and Engineering Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Nondestructive Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Performance of Constructed Facilities     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Pipeline Systems Engineering and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Rehabilitation in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Solid Waste Technology and Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Structural Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 40)
Journal of Structural Fire Engineering     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Journal of Sustainable Architecture and Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Sustainable Design and Applied Research in Innovative Engineering of the Built Environment     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of the Civil Engineering Forum     Open Access  
Journal of the South African Institution of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Water and Environmental Nanotechnology     Open Access  
Jurnal Spektran     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Jurnal Teknik Sipil dan Perencanaan     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Konstruksia     Open Access  
KSCE Journal of Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Latin American Journal of Solids and Structures     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Materiales de Construcción     Open Access  
Mathematical Modelling in Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Nondestructive Testing And Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
npj Materials Degradation     Open Access  
Obras y Proyectos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Open Journal of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Photonics and Nanostructures - Fundamentals and Applications     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Practice Periodical on Structural Design and Construction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Bridge Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Civil Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Management, Procurement and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Municipal Engineer     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers - Structures and Buildings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Random Structures and Algorithms     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Research in Nondestructive Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revista IBRACON de Estruturas e Materiais     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Road Materials and Pavement Design     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Russian Journal of Nondestructive Testing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Science and Engineering of Composite Materials     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Selected Scientific Papers - Journal of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Slovak Journal of Civil Engineering     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Soils and foundations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Steel Construction - Design and Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Structural and Multidisciplinary Optimization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Structural Concrete     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Structural Control and Health Monitoring     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Structural Engineering International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Structural Mechanics of Engineering Constructions and Buildings     Open Access  
Structural Safety     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Structural Survey     Hybrid Journal  
Structure     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Structure and Infrastructure Engineering: Maintenance, Management, Life-Cycle Design and Performance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Study of Civil Engineering and Architecture     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Superlattices and Microstructures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Surface Innovations     Hybrid Journal  
Technical Report Civil and Architectural Engineering     Open Access  
Teknik     Open Access  
The IES Journal Part A: Civil & Structural Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
The Structural Design of Tall and Special Buildings     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Thin Films and Nanostructures     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Thin-Walled Structures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Transactions of the VŠB - Technical University of Ostrava. Construction Series     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Transportation Geotechnics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Transportation Infrastructure Geotechnology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Underground Space     Open Access  
Water Science & Technology     Partially Free   (Followers: 25)
Water Science and Technology : Water Supply     Partially Free   (Followers: 22)

           

Journal Cover Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
  [SJR: 0.541]   [H-I: 28]   [14 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 0969-9988
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Case study of “project controlling” on a large HOPSCA project
           in China
    • Pages: 862 - 874
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 862-874, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed case study on the methods and organisational structure used for controlling the time schedule for a large and complex project. The paper discusses the use of “project controlling”, a term used to describe project control by a third-party organisation. Design/methodology/approach The researchers used action research to collect data for the case study. A member of the research team was a “participant-observer” on the project on a day-to-day basis for a period of 18 months collecting and analysing data which were subsequently analysed by a mixed methods approach. Findings The use of a “Project Controlling Unit” operated by an independent adviser organisation has significant advantages over traditional methods. It can provide timely, consolidated, independent guidance to the client and assistance to other participating organisations. Research limitations/implications The research has confirmed the effectiveness of the method on the project under study. Practical implications The findings provide guidance for enhanced project control on large complex infrastructural projects that will be of interest to other researchers, other clients and other construction organisations both within China and internationally. Social implications Organisations that seek to develop Project Controlling Units to implement the methods described in this paper will need to review their recruitment and training strategies to ensure that appropriate and experienced staffs are engaged. Originality/value The paper extends the knowledge relating to “project controlling” method. The findings provide additional insights to progress reporting and the management of construction production on HOPSCA and other large infrastructural projects.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:19:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2015-0118
       
  • Cross-sectional comparison of public-private partnerships in transport
           infrastructure development in Nigeria
    • Pages: 875 - 900
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 875-900, November 2017.
      Purpose Although scientific research community has shown considerable interest in identifying critical success factors (CSFs) for public-private partnership (PPP) projects, yet effort at assessing and compare CSFs within similar PPP infrastructure projects received scant attention. The purpose of this paper is to identify, assess, and compare the CSFs in PPP transport infrastructure projects. Design/methodology/approach The study adopted literature review and three PPP case studies including structured interviews and review of documentary reports in each case study. The outcome of literature review provided a total list of 26 identified success factors, which was used to design a case study protocol using failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) technique. FMEA was conducted on each 26 identified success factor to assess their criticality in the three PPP case studies. Findings The results of FMEA revealed a total of ten CSFs in the concession of the road; four CSFs in the concession of the airport; and eight CSFs in the concession of the seaport. Also, the cross-case analysis showed the three prevalent CSFs, this includes government involvement by providing guarantees, political support, and project economic viability. Practical implications The study findings including lessons learnt in each case study would positively influence policy development towards PPP transport infrastructure projects and the manner in which partners (i.e. public and private sector) go about the development of PPP transport projects. Originality/value This research would help PPP stakeholders to focus their attention and priorities in managing the identified CSFs in achieving long-term success in PPP transport infrastructure projects implementation.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:44Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-11-2015-0186
       
  • Construction safety and health problems of ethnic minority workers in Hong
           Kong
    • Pages: 901 - 919
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 901-919, November 2017.
      Purpose With increasing employment of ethnic minority (EM) workers from different nationalities to mitigate the growing demand for a construction workforce, the safety and health problems of these workers have become a significant concern. The purpose of this paper is to identify and rank according to severity the safety and health-related problems confronted by EM construction workers. Design/methodology/approach Grounded theory approach was employed to construct the main categories and subcategories of the construction safety and health problems of EM workers. A two-round Delphi survey of 18 experts, who are highly experienced in managing EM workers, was conducted to rank the relative severity of the identified safety and health problems. Findings A total of 14 subcategories and 4 categories of construction safety and health problems of EM workers were identified. Among the 14 subcategories, the most urgent and serious ones were insufficient safety materials and training in their native language, insufficient safety staff from EM origin, and safety communication barriers. In addition, safety and health problems at the corporate and governmental levels are also worth paying attention. Originality/value This study contributes to the update on the existing body of knowledge on safety and health problems encountered by EM construction workers and revelation of their peculiar situation in Hong Kong. Findings of the study will be of value to various stakeholders in formulating safety and health measures for EM construction workers.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:22Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-09-2015-0143
       
  • Critical factors impacting the performance of mega-projects
    • Pages: 920 - 934
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 920-934, November 2017.
      Purpose Mega-projects (MP) are important not only to the stakeholders involved in their development and construction, but also to the societies, economies, and environments impacted by them. Given the importance of MP and the prevailing trend toward poor performance, the purpose of this paper is to identify changes in project development and execution to increase the likelihood of success on MP. Design/methodology/approach The researchers performed an extensive literature review in the initial phase. Then, interviews with experienced mega-project professionals were conducted to gather information on factors contributing to success and failure on MP. A detailed survey was then carried out to quantify and assess the frequency and impact levels of these factors. Finally, case studies were performed to analyze the manifestations of these impact factors on MP and identify mitigation strategies. Findings After gathering data from more than 100 projects, the researchers identified and prioritized 34 factors that have high frequency and negative performance impacts on MP, categorizing them into five categories. These factors were then used to create a mega-project preparedness assessment process and a lessons learned repository around these factors, which includes factor descriptions, examples from actual projects, and recommendations. The result is a structured method for enabling comprehensive mega-project risk management and mitigation planning. Originality/value The research has gone beyond any previous generic lessons learned, to enable project teams to make structured assessments of critical mega-project impact factors. Assessing these impact factors will enable more accurate and thorough mitigation planning for them and, thus, improve mega-project performance.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-05-2016-0117
       
  • Modular concrete construction
    • Pages: 935 - 949
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 935-949, November 2017.
      Purpose This study evaluates the enablers and barriers for modular concrete construction in Lebanon. The purpose of this paper is to investigate various factors (time, cost, technical know-how, organizational, sustainability, etc.) and their influence on the choice of the construction method. The paper examines the different assessments of designers, manufacturers, and contractors regarding precast construction in comparison to traditional in-situ methods, and highlights the major differences in their views. Design/methodology/approach Structured face-to-face surveys were conducted with top management personnel of precast manufacturers, architectural and engineering firms, and contracting companies in Lebanon. In addition, a case study from the largest precast project in Lebanon was used to provide a deeper understanding of factors encouraging the use of precast concrete, and to highlight major onsite issues associated with its implementation. Findings On the one hand, the findings highlight technical, logistical, organizational, and cultural factors that inhibit the use of precast concrete as a construction method. On the other hand, results reveal that cost, time, sustainability, and flexibility factors are the main enablers for increasing the uptake of modular concrete construction. Originality/value The main contribution to knowledge is that this study presents different stakeholders’ perspectives on precast concrete construction. Moreover, this is the first research addressing precast concrete construction in the Middle East and Lebanon. The results of the study provide valuable global insights and recommendations that may help increase the uptake of precast concrete construction. They can also guide project stakeholders to properly match project characteristics and precast concrete as a construction method.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-11-2014-0148
       
  • The adoption of 4D BIM in the UK construction industry: an innovation
           diffusion approach
    • Pages: 950 - 967
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 950-967, November 2017.
      Purpose British construction industry KPI data collected over recent years shows a trend in projects exceeding their time schedules. In 2013, the UK Government set a target for projects timeframes to reduce by 50 per cent. Proposed interventions included more rapid project delivery processes, and consistent improvements to construction delivery predictions, deployed within the framework of 4D Building Information Modelling (BIM). The purpose of this paper is to use Rogers’ Innovation Diffusion theory as a basis to investigate how this adoption has taken place. Design/methodology/approach In total, 97 construction planning practitioners were surveyed to measure 4D BIM innovation take-up over time. Classic innovation diffusion research methods were adopted. Findings Results indicated an increasing rate of 4D BIM adoption and reveal a time lag between awareness and first use that is characteristic of this type of innovation. Research limitations/implications Use of a non-probability sampling strategy prevents the results being generalisable to the wider construction population. Future research directions and methods are suggested, including qualitative investigations into decision-making processes around 4D BIM, and case studies exploring the consequences of 4D BIM adoption. Practical implications Recommendations of how to facilitate the adoption of 4D BIM innovation are proposed, which identify the critical aspects of system compatibility and safe trialling of the innovation. Originality/value This paper reinforces 4D BIM as an innovation and records its actual UK industry adoption rate using an accepted diffusion research method. By focusing on UK industry-wide diffusion the work also stands apart from more typical research efforts that limit innovation diffusion exploration to individual organisations.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-03-2016-0066
       
  • Assessing collaborative performance on construction projects through
           knowledge exchange
    • Pages: 968 - 987
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 968-987, November 2017.
      Purpose How knowledge exchange (KE) can be used for the continuous assessment and improvement of collaborative performance of project-based organisations in construction is explored. Collaboration on construction projects must be facilitated by people alongside practice of continuous performance assessment and improvement. Currently available assessment tools fail to explicitly define appropriate behaviours and actions due to a poor understanding of what it means for people to collaborate. In contrast, it is established that KE is the focus of collaborative efforts on construction projects; therefore, as most knowledge resides with people, it represents their role in collaboration. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach Through a phenomenological/interpretivist and qualitative methodology, how KE can be used for the continuous assessment and improvement of collaborative performance in project-based organisations in construction is explored. A single case study of a UK rail strategic alliance was adopted and six semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed through a thematic analysis. Findings An assessment tool is proposed based on a set of 20 characteristics of KE, divided into seven categories and linked to indicators of collaboration. The tool can be applied to highly collaborative projects where BIM and Lean are implemented, and project participants are collocated. By measuring their performance against the set criteria, project teams can assess which of their behaviours and actions are inappropriate, and focus their efforts on correcting them. Originality/value Defining the abstract indicators traditionally used to assess collaboration in terms of characteristics pertinent to day-to-day communication amongst participants on collaborative projects to facilitate the continuous assessment and improvement of collaborative performance.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:55Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2016-0179
       
  • Proposed models to measure the quality of highway projects
    • Pages: 988 - 1003
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 988-1003, November 2017.
      Purpose Quality measurement is the trigger for quality improvement. Indeed, what gets measured gets done. The real scope of quality improvement in construction projects is the difficulty and-maybe-lack of quality measurement methods. The purpose of this paper is to identify the factors influencing the quality performance of highway projects in Egypt. Furthermore, this paper also contributes to develop models to measure the quality level of these projects. Design/methodology/approach A literature review is conducted to compile a list of factors influencing the quality of highway projects. The resulting list of factors is subjected to a questionnaire survey which was sent to owners, consultants and contractors of highway projects in Egypt. Furthermore, linear regression analysis and statistical fuzzy approaches are adopted for modeling process. Findings The survey results show that availability of experienced staff in the owner’s and contractor’s teams during the project execution, asphalt quality and type used in the construction process, pavement is not designed according to the regional conditions, and contractor’s labors and equipment capability are among the most important factors influencing quality performance. Originality/value The main contribution of this study is to develop models to measure the quality of highway projects in Egypt. The first model is based on the linear regression analysis, while the second one is based on a statistical fuzzy approach which is a hybrid approach from the fuzzy logic and regression analysis. Validation of the models reveals that the linear regression and the statistical fuzzy models can accurately assess expected quality of any future highway projects at confidence levels 68.97 and 87.44 percent, respectively.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0134
       
  • Project procurement systems for mechanical, electrical and piping projects
           in Saudi Arabia
    • Pages: 1004 - 1017
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1004-1017, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the empirical relationship between mechanical, electrical, and piping (MEP) project procurement systems and project performance in the context of the Saudi Arabian construction industry. The study plans to expand the understanding of the relationship of design-bid-build (DBB) and design-build (DB) performance with respect to change order rate, cost growth, and schedule growth. Design/methodology/approach The paper statistically analyzed 207 MEP projects. It investigates the relationship of project procurement systems and three project performance indicators. Hypotheses testing was used to assess the relationship. Findings The results show that projects using the DB procurement system are more likely to have less cost overrun and experience a lower change order rate compared to DBB for pricing and selection methods, yet neither procurement system had an advantage over the schedule duration based on the study’s sample. Research limitations/implications The lack of information identifying the cause of contract change orders limits the interpretation of the findings. Sample sizes in some of the test criteria were statistically small, thus limiting the reliability or confidence level of the analysis for those samples. Caution should be used when interpreting the results as representative of the Saudi Arabian construction industry as a whole; due to the owner’s project execution policies, procedures, and standards, the level of enforcement of those practices may differ from other owners. Originality/value The paper fulfills and identified the relationship between the project procurement system and MEP project performance in the context of the Saudi Arabian construction industry.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-02-2016-0055
       
  • Risk analysis of schedule delays in international highway projects in
           Vietnam using a structural equation model
    • Pages: 1018 - 1039
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1018-1039, November 2017.
      Purpose As in other developing countries, increased highway development in Vietnam provides enormous opportunities for international construction companies (ICCs). However, a prolonged schedule delay (SD) can have an extremely detrimental impact on a project’s efficiency, cost and investment reputation. The purpose of this paper is to identify potential SD risk factors in international highway projects (IHPs) in Vietnam, and to explore the effects of and influences on such factors. A specific risk management framework is proposed as a useful tool for ICCs. Design/methodology/approach A system of SD risk indicators is presented for IHPs in Vietnam through a questionnaire survey. The system comprises 50 indicators that are grouped into 12 main factors. A structural equation model (SEM) is then used to assess the influences and mechanisms of these factors. Based on the obtained results, corresponding suggestions for preventing SD risks are presented and discussed. Findings First, among the 12 aforementioned major factors, the authors identify eight facors that have significant effects on IHP SDs. Second, the SEM analysis reveals that policy flaws and the fiscal ability of the owner play the most important roles, on account of their direct and indirect influences on SDs. Originality/value Considering stakeholders and external environmental effects, a system of indicators is introduced to explore SD risks to IHPs. In particular, an SEM is used to assess the effects of potential SD factors and characterize their interacting influences. This study could help ICCs to avoid or mitigate project delays and cost overruns in Vietnam, and also provide valuable lessons for other developing countries.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:25Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0138
       
  • Managing sustainability efforts in building design, construction,
           consulting, and facility management firms
    • Pages: 1040 - 1050
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1040-1050, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate sustainability efforts in the managerial processes of design, consulting, construction, and facility management firms and to identify the differences between these parties. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire survey was administered to design, consulting, construction, and facility management firms in the USA to seek information about the state of sustainability efforts in these firms relative to strategic planning, marketing, business management, financial management, organizational structure, and people management. χ2 tests were performed on the data collected to determine if statistically significant differences exist between the project participants relative to sustainability efforts. Findings Sustainability efforts are related to a firm’s strategic positioning, reputation and experience, and hiring/employment policies, while profit margins are not higher in sustainable projects compared to traditional projects. Statistically significant differences were detected in three of the six items investigated, indicating conflicting interests among the parties. Research limitations/implications The study’s limitation is that it is limited to sustainability efforts in the USA. Practical implications It is concluded that sustainability demands have changed the nature of design, construction, and operation of buildings in ways that deserve special attention on the part of all parties involved. Originality/value The firms that participate in building construction projects need to adopt management practices that accommodate sustainable building design, construction, and operation in order to remain competitive in a market where demand for environmental sustainability has grown significantly in recent years.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2016-0165
       
  • Organisational culture of Chinese construction organisations in Kuwait
    • Pages: 1051 - 1066
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1051-1066, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify evidence for, first, the existence and nature of organisational culture of Chinese construction organisations in Kuwait, second, the differences and similarities when comparing with construction organisations in China and, third, the differences and similarities when comparing with construction organisations within the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). Design/methodology/approach Data were collected through researcher administered survey instruments from 33 Chinese construction project managers in Kuwait, then were analysed by using the Organisational Culture Assessment Instrument and empirical statistics. Findings The Hierarchy culture was found to be dominant. It matches the predominant organisational culture among construction organisations in China, but is different from the blend of Hierarchy and Group culture of construction organisations in the GCC. Originality/value Chinese construction organisations in Kuwait were found to foster an organisational culture that is close to Chinese construction organisations in China regarding Hierarchy, Market and Adhocracy culture, but closer to the GCC construction organisations regarding the Group culture. Practitioners need to be aware of the differences and similarities identified in order to manage cultural diversity effectively.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-07-2016-0157
       
  • Managing engineering contractors in the UK petrochemicals industry
    • Pages: 1067 - 1080
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1067-1080, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate, at the industry level, the modes of governance used by multinational companies in the UK petrochemical industry to outsource maintenance activities to engineering contractors. The study focusses on a form of novel governance structure called an Employer Panel (EP). Design/methodology/approach The study applies an inductive case study method to investigate the contractor governance mechanisms in 19 out of the 20 major petrochemical instillations located in the UK. Data included interviews, documentary and secondary evidence gathered from the cases and also industry bodies. Findings The study uncovered three distinct types of governance mode: market, managing contractor, and EP of contractors. The latter relies on the governance process of “mandated collaboration” to coordinate. Research limitations/implications The main limitation is the focus on a particular industry, albeit an important one. The research implications include extending the empirical research into other sectors which use on-site contracted maintenance such as ship and aircraft manufacturing. Practical implications The EP structure with its mandated collaboration process is of value to managers of contractual relationships as it gives insights into coordinative process and it may provide an alternative model for managing outsourcing relationships. Social implications The mandated collaborative process requires clients to engage its contractors in longer term relationships, thus increasing corporate social responsibility and providing wider job security for contractor employees. Originality/value The EP mode, as far as can be ascertained, has not been addressed in the literature before.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:19:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2015-0127
       
  • Using jigsaw method to enhance the learning of research and consultancy
           techniques for postgraduate students
    • Pages: 1081 - 1091
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1081-1091, November 2017.
      Purpose Students find courses in research methods delivered by lectures, both difficult and boring. The purpose of this paper is to provide empirical research on another teaching and learning method, jigsaw method, to three groups of postgraduate students over three academic years. Design/methodology/approach The fifth topic of the course, qualitative research methods, was selected for implementation of the jigsaw class. The students completed a feedback questionnaire after classes to express their opinions and comments on the new method. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used to test these data. Findings The students believed that the jigsaw method is an innovative teaching and learning activity and were generally satisfied with the process and the execution. They stated that participation was a valuable experience which enabled them to share knowledge with other classmates and gain a better understanding of the subject. Further improvements were also proposed by the students. Research limitations/implications First, the analysis of the implementation of the jigsaw methods is based on student perceptions rather than objective measures of learning gains. Second, the classes for full-time postgraduate students are relatively small. Data were collected, therefore, over three academic years to provide enough valid responses for analysis. Originality/value The research may be regarded as pioneering in relation to jigsaw classes for teaching and learning research methods in postgraduate course. The findings provide confidence to architecture, engineering and construction (AEC) academics to incorporate jigsaw methods in their courses. The results of this study provide useful information for AEC lecturers assisting them to design their classes using jigsaw methods.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:28Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-03-2016-0080
       
  • The nature of qualitative construction partnering research: literature
           review
    • Pages: 1092 - 1118
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1092-1118, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the nature of qualitative construction partnering research. Design/methodology/approach In total, 20 qualitative peer-reviewed papers about construction partnering research are reviewed. Findings The results show four methodological gaps. All identified gaps have in common that specific time and place dependent details that may have influenced understanding of studied individuals are underexposed. Research limitations/implications The main limitation of this study is that empirical-based papers are divided into either qualitative or quantitative research, but the boundary between those categories is not as black and white as it may look like in first instance. Practical implications The identified gaps are translated to recommendations for further study. This will help the reader to become more aware of the difficulties and decisions encountered by the researcher, and in that way the reader is more aware and gains more understanding of the context-related character of the study. Applying the recommendations will lead to different conclusions and recommendations to improve construction partnering in working practice. Social implications More focus on local time- and place-dependent factors of the studied individuals as well as the process of studying it, inevitably leads to encountering (and becoming more aware of) personal, subjective and unexplainable decisions and behavior. Describing and analyzing these personal, subjective and unexplainable points in the research process will improve the quality of the research. Originality/value This study contributes to the further development of academic research on this topic and increase effectiveness of partnering in the construction sector.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-04-2016-0098
       
  • Building information modelling for facility management: are we there
           yet'
    • Pages: 1119 - 1154
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1119-1154, November 2017.
      Purpose Building information modelling (BIM) is increasingly being adopted during construction projects. Design and construction practices are adjusting to the new system. BIM is intended to support the entire project life-cycle: the design and construction phases, and also facility management (FM). However, BIM-enabled FM remains in its infancy and has not yet reached its full potential. The purpose of this paper is to identify major aspects of BIM in order to derive a fully BIM-enabled FM process. Design/methodology/approach In total, 207 papers were classified into main and subordinate research areas for quantitative analysis. These findings were then used to conceptualise a BIM-enabled FM framework grounded by innovation diffusion theory for adoption, and for determining the path of future research. Findings Through an extensive literature review, the paper summarises many benefits and challenges. Major aspects of BIM are identified in order to describe a BIM-enabled FM implementation process grounded by innovation diffusion theory. The major research areas of the proposed framework include: planning and guidelines; value realisation; internal leadership and knowledge; procurement; FM; specific application areas; data capture techniques; data integration; knowledge management; and legal and policy impact. Each element is detailed and is supported by literature. Finally, gaps are highlighted for investigation in future research. Originality/value This paper systematically classifies and evaluates the existing research, thus contributing to the achievement of the ultimate vision of BIM-enabled FM. The proposed framework informs facility managers, and the BIM-enabled FM implementation process. Further, the holistic survey identifies gaps in the body of knowledge, revealing avenues for future research.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:15Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0139
       
  • Organizational culture influence on client involvement
    • Pages: 1155 - 1169
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1155-1169, November 2017.
      Purpose Lack of client involvement in construction of public projects has been identified as the main cause of many operational problems. Organizational culture (OC) plays a major role in guiding and shaping behavior of organizations, which could lead to the lack of client involvement. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of OC on client’s involvement in construction project delivery. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire survey was distributed to various government agencies of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Structural equation modeling is used to determine the significance of the impact of OC factors on the involvement of clients in construction projects. Findings This study suggests that OC plays a major role in influencing and increasing the client involvement in construction projects by emphasizing team orientation, which includes team contribution and team accountability. In addition, it is also important to value employee’s idea. Research limitations/implications This study was limited to government agencies as clients in construction projects, i.e. only public sector construction projects (not private sector projects). Therefore, researchers are encouraged to investigate client involvement in the private sector projects. Originality/value This paper provides empirical evidence of the relationships between OC and the client involvement in construction projects by emphasizing team orientation.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0141
       
  • Impact of the built environment and care services within rural nursing
           homes in China on quality of life for elderly residents
    • Pages: 1170 - 1183
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1170-1183, November 2017.
      Purpose The ageing of rural Chinese populations is challenging health and social policy, driving growth in rural nursing homes. Living environment plays a role in enhancing elderly quality of life (QoL), however, the impact of the built environment and care services are under-studied. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of the built environment and care services on the QoL of elderly people within rural nursing homes in China. Design/methodology/approach A total of 242 residents of nursing home were surveyed, of which 76 percent were male and 24 percent were female. In total, 25.6 percent were aged between 60 and 69, 40.1 percent between 70 and 79, 31 percent between 80 and 89, and 3.3 percent were 90 or above. Quantitative data were analyzed through factor analysis, reliability test and multiple regression modeling. Findings The authors identified six built environment factors (room distance, space, barrier-free design, indoor environment, fire safety, and support facilities) and three services factors (i.e. daily care services, cleaning services, and healthcare services). QoL was measured over four dimensions: QoL, physical health, psychological health, and social relationships. Elderly QoL could be accurately predicted from room distance, space, barrier-free design, indoor environment, daily care services, and cleaning services. Practical implications Interventions in design of the built environment and the provision of care services are proposed, including dimensions of living space, heating, and provisions for qualified care providers. Originality/value This paper provides a clear picture about elderly special requirements on their built environment and healthcare services, helping architects, engineers and facilities managers understand elderly needs and improve built environment during design and operation stages.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2016-0187
       
  • Challenges and barriers to establishing infrastructure asset management
    • Pages: 1184 - 1202
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1184-1202, November 2017.
      Purpose The increased need for, and maintenance of, infrastructure creates challenges for all agencies that manage infrastructure assets. To assist with these challenges, agencies implement asset management systems. The purpose of this paper is to investigate and compare the importance of barriers faced by agencies establishing transportation asset management systems in the USA and Libya to contrast a case of a developed and developing country. Design/methodology/approach A literature review identified 28 potential barriers for implementing an asset management system. Practitioners who participate in decision-making processes in each country were asked to rate the importance of each barrier in an online survey questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, Kendall Concordance W., and Mann-Whitney are used to analyze the collected data. Findings Through an analysis of 61 completed questionnaires, 14 barriers were identified as important by both the US and Libyan practitioners. A total of 11 additional barriers, primarily in the areas of political and regulatory obstacles, were determined to be important only for Libya. These 11 barriers provide reasonable insights into asset management systems’ barriers for developing countries. Practical implications The list of barriers identified from this research will assist decision makers to address and overcome these barriers when implementing asset management systems in their specific organizational and country conditions. Originality/value The research identified standard barriers to implementing asset management systems and identified barriers that were specific to the country context, such as political and regulatory barriers in Libya. When viewed with the asset management literature, the results show broad applicability of some asset management barriers and the need to contextualize to country context (e.g. developing countries) for other barriers.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:05Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-12-2015-0200
       
  • The role of customers and vendors in modern construction equipment
           technology diffusion
    • Pages: 1203 - 1221
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1203-1221, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to address the gap in knowledge by exploring the role of customers and vendors in diffusion of modern equipment technologies into the construction industry. Design/methodology/approach To address the need to consider both vendors and customers in the innovation diffusion process and the need for in-depth cross-sectional studies, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 147 participants including 85 vendors and 62 customers of modern construction technologies at company, project and operational levels in Australia and North America. Thematic analysis and an analytic hierarchy process illustrate the critical role of both customers and vendors in the diffusion process of modern equipment technologies. Findings A new conceptual model is presented which classifies modern equipment technology customers into four categories: visionaries (group I); innovators (group II); pragmatists (group III); and conservatives (group IV) based on the way in which they interact with vendors in the innovation diffusion process. The results also reveal that there is a significant emotional/affective aspect of innovation diffusion decisions which has not been recognised in previous research. Originality/value The major contribution of this study is that it analyses the role of both vendors and customers in the equipment technology diffusion process at three different levels (strategic, project and operational) in large corporations and small-to-medium-sized businesses. The findings not only advance construction innovation research beyond traditional linear models of innovation, but also provide new knowledge which enable customers and vendors to interact more effectively in the diffusion of new construction equipment technologies.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0149
       
  • Empirical comparison of critical success factors for public-private
           partnerships in developing and developed countries
    • Pages: 1222 - 1245
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1222-1245, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the similarities and differences of critical success factors (CSFs) for public-private partnership (PPP) projects in developing and developed countries, using Ghana and Hong Kong as examples. Design/methodology/approach An empirical questionnaire survey was conducted with experienced PPP practitioners in Ghana and Hong Kong. Survey responses were analysed using Kendall’s concordance analysis, mean score ranking, quartile groupings analysis and Mann-Whitney U test. Findings The results indicate that a favourable legal and regulatory framework is very critical in both jurisdictions. Further, technology transfer, technological innovation, public/community participation and coordination and government providing financial support are of low importance in both jurisdictions. The non-parametric test shows that 16 CSFs are of different importance in Ghana and Hong Kong. Specifically, CSFs related to the socio-political and economic conditions of PPP projects are very critical in Ghana, whereas CSFs directly related to the organisation and relationship of PPP projects are very critical in Hong Kong. Originality/value The outputs of this study add to the international best practice framework for successful PPP implementation. Further, international private investors and governments who are yet to adopt the PPP concept would be considerably informed of the investment strategies to employ when engaging in PPP arrangements.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:19:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-06-2016-0144
       
  • An integrated model for factors affecting construction and demolition
           waste management in Iran
    • Pages: 1246 - 1268
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1246-1268, November 2017.
      Purpose Factors influencing management of construction and demolition (C&D) waste within the Iranian context have yet to be investigated. The purpose of this paper is to define and address this knowledge gap, through development of a model to map the associations among the primary factors affecting C&D waste at project, industry and national levels. Design/methodology/approach A conceptual model is developed based on synthesising the findings of available studies on factors affecting C&D waste with a focus on developing countries. For collecting data, the study drew upon a questionnaire survey of 103 Iranian construction practitioners. The strength and significance of associations among these factors to modify and validate the model were assessed using the structural equation modelling-partial least squares approach. Findings Major factors affecting C&D waste management and their level of importance were identified at project, industry and national levels. Results clearly showed that the government should review regulations pertaining to C&D waste management and make sure they are implemented properly. The “polluter pays principle” is a useful guide in devising effective policies and regulations for the Iranian context. Originality/value This study contributes to the field through presenting the first major study on C&D waste management in Iran. The study provides a picture of C&D waste management status quo in Iran and encapsulates the factors affecting C&D waste management in the Iranian context at different levels within an integrated model. The findings have practical implications for policy makers and construction practitioners in Iran, similar developing economies and foreign firms planning to operate in Iran.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-01-2016-0015
       
  • An appraisal of paradigm shifts required of competence of the Nigerian
           quantity surveyors
    • Pages: 1269 - 1280
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1269-1280, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the competence of Nigerian quantity surveyors with a view to identify and assess required areas of interest. Design/methodology/approach A structured questionnaire was administered among relevant groups of respondent (quantity surveyors, architects, engineers, builders and clients) in Nigeria. The respondents were asked to give rating, on a five-point Likert scale, on the required competencies (variables) expected of Nigerian quantity surveyors. A mean item score statistical analysis was used to rank the variables and compare them within the different groups. The analysis was undertaken using the Statistical Packages for Social Science tool. In exploring the underlying relationship among the competence requirement, factor analysis statistical technique was used to categorize them into key components. Findings The results of the study identified required competencies and factorized them into three components. These are as follows: procurement and value management; commercial management; and communication and entrepreneurship. Originality/value The findings provide insight into the competencies needed to be incorporated and/or intensified in the training of quantity surveyors in Nigeria.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-02-2016-0038
       
  • Exploring the role of networks in disseminating construction project
           knowledge through case studies
    • Pages: 1281 - 1293
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1281-1293, November 2017.
      Purpose Project knowledge in the construction context needs to be disseminated within organisations to improve organisations’ performance and learning. Much of project knowledge is tacit, residing in social interactions in team relationships, and likely to be disseminated through social networks and processes within organisations. Social capital comprises both the network of strong personal relationships and the knowledge resources that may be mobilised through that network. The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of “networks” in disseminating project knowledge within the construction organisations in Sri Lanka. Design/methodology/approach The case study research method was used to investigate the research problem. The principal data collection technique used was semi-structured interviews. Content analysis, tables and cognitive maps were used to analyse data. Findings The findings revealed that strong network ties created with equal interaction of project and head office (H/O) individuals, frequent connectivity and much closer relationships enhance the flexibility of sharing project knowledge. The available invisible informal social networks within project and H/O individuals play a key role in disseminating project knowledge compared to business networks. Originality/value This research offers useful implications for construction organisation, in particular, to pay careful attention to nurture networks within their organisations in order to benefit from disseminating project knowledge widely within the organisations for effective re-use in future.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:17:46Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-10-2014-0125
       
  • Different perspectives of public project managers on project success
    • Pages: 1294 - 1318
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1294-1318, November 2017.
      Purpose The authors argue that public project managers do not consider the iron triangle (cost, quality and schedule) primary important in measuring the success of their projects. To investigate which success criteria are important to public project managers, the authors interviewed 26 Dutch project managers who are employed by the government and who are responsible for managing infrastructural projects. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In this research the Q-methodology is applied. Q-methodology helps to find for correlations between subjects across a sample of variables. Q-factor analysis reduces the individual viewpoints down to a few factors. A factor can be seen as the mathematical representation of an “average” perspective shared by a group of people. Findings Findings are based on the individual rankings of 19 success criteria; the authors distinguished three common perspectives: the holistic and cooperative leader, the socially engaged, ambiguous manager and the executor of a top-down assignment. In none of the perspectives the iron triangle criteria formed the top three to measure project success. Research limitations/implications The research results may have a national character. The way project success is perceived by public project managers may be culture dependent. For this the authors expand the research to other countries in the near future. Practical implications This paper contributes to the understanding of the public project manager by their private collaboration partners, like consultants, engineers and contractors. This will help them to understand their client and contribute to better collaboration in projects. Originality/value This paper shows that the difference in work attitude and value frame in the public sector leads to a specific view on project success.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-01-2015-0007
       
  • Examination of communication processes in design-build project delivery in
           building construction
    • Pages: 1319 - 1336
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1319-1336, November 2017.
      Purpose Design-Build (D-B) is a project delivery method in which the owner procures both design and construction services in the same contract from a single legal entity. There is limited research on how communication among parties influences the success of D-B projects. The purpose of this paper is to examine D-B communication issues and provides effective practices on communication to improve D-B procurement processes in the USA. Design/methodology/approach The research methodology for this study includes a comprehensive review of literature, survey questionnaire, and structured interviews. A questionnaire was developed to collect data from professionals with an average of 23 years of experience related to D-B procurement. Eight structured interviews were conducted to verify and validate the survey questionnaire results. Findings The results showed that the communication issues vary along with each phase of the D-B process. The primary communication practices influencing the success of D-B projects are: establishing clear points of contact; providing clear and understandable information among stakeholders during the D-B process; and the timely sharing of information to all stakeholders. Research limitations/implications The chief limitation of this research is that the primary data were mostly opinions from experts although several empirical data were collected for cross-validation. This research did not consider the relationship of relevant contract clauses and communication issues. Practical implications The findings from this paper will help professionals better understand the D-B procurement process. Originality/value This is one of the first attempts to discuss D-B communication issues in each different phase of a D-B project.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-12-2015-0192
       
  • Civil engineers’ personal values/demographics linkage in project
           team building
    • Pages: 1337 - 1349
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1337-1349, November 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between civil engineers’ demographics (e.g. age, marital status, education, work experience) and their personal values. The objective was to predict civil engineers’ personal values based on their demographics. Design/methodology/approach A questionnaire survey was administered to civil engineers to collect data on their demographics and their personal values. Statistical analysis was performed to verify whether a significant statistical relationship exists between civil engineers’ demographics and their personal values. Findings The most important and the least important personal values were identified for civil engineers. Statistical analysis indicated that civil engineers’ values do vary based on their demographics. Research limitations/implications The results of this study cannot be generalized, because individuals’ personal values and demographics are, by definition, local. Location and culture may affect the personal values of civil engineers. Practical implications Team leaders normally have access to information about the demographics of the engineers they employ; based on the results of this study, they should be able to predict their personal values, and to make more informed decisions when appointing them to particular positions on project teams. Originality/value The research presented in this paper, establishes for the first time, that a linkage exists between civil engineers’ personal values and their demographics, and makes it easier for team leaders to make assignment decisions.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:52Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-08-2016-0182
       
  • Framework for productivity and safety enhancement system using BIM in
           Singapore
    • Pages: 1350 - 1371
      Abstract: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, Volume 24, Issue 6, Page 1350-1371, November 2017.
      Purpose Despite recognition of its importance to Singapore’s economy, the construction industry is plagued by poor safety and productivity performance. Improvement efforts by the government and industry have yielded little results. The purpose of this paper is to propose a framework for developing a productivity and safety monitoring system using Building Information Modelling (BIM). Design/methodology/approach The framework, Intelligent Productivity and Safety System (IPASS), takes advantage of mandatory requirements for building plans to be submitted for approval in Singapore in BIM format. IPASS is based on a study comprising interviews and a questionnaire-based survey. It uses BIM to integrate buildable design, prevention and control of hazards, and safety assessment. Findings The authors illustrate a development of IPASS capable of generating productivity and safety scores for construction projects by analysing BIM model information. Research limitations/implications The paper demonstrates that BIM can be used to monitor productivity and safety as a project progresses, and help to enhance performance under the two parameters. Practical implications IPASS enables collaboration among project stakeholders as they can base their work on analysis of productivity and safety performance before projects start, and as they progress. It is suggested that the BIM model submitted to the authorities should be used for the IPASS application. Originality/value IPASS has rule-checking, hazards identification and quality checking capabilities. It is able to identify hazards and risks with the rule-checking capabilities. IPASS enables practitioners to check mistakes and the rationality of a design. It helps to mitigate risks as there are built-in safety measures/controls rules to overcome the problems caused by design deficiency, wrong-material-choice, and more.
      Citation: Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management
      PubDate: 2017-11-16T09:18:27Z
      DOI: 10.1108/ECAM-05-2016-0122
       
 
 
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