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EDUCATION (1513 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 857 Journals sorted alphabetically
#Tear : Revista de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
(Pensamiento), (palabra) y obra     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
@tic. revista d'innovació educativa     Open Access  
Abant İzzet Baysal Üniversitesi Eğitim Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
About Campus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Academic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Academy of Educational Leadership Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 60)
Academy of Management Learning and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 53)
Accounting & Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 49)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Across the Disciplines     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acta Didactica Norge     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Acta Scientiarum. Education     Open Access  
Acta Technologica Dubnicae     Open Access  
Action in Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
Action Learning: Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 41)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 45)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 281)
Actualidades Pedagógicas     Open Access  
Adelphi series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Administrative Science Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 172)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 157)
Advanced Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Building Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in School Mental Health Promotion     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Africa Education Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 25)
African Journal of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
AGORA Magazine     Open Access  
Ahmad Dahlan Journal of English Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AIDS Education and Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Akadémiai Értesítö     Full-text available via subscription  
Aksiologiya : Jurnal Pengabdian Kepada Masyarakat     Open Access  
AKSIOMA Journal of Mathematics Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Al-Idarah : Jurnal Kependidikan Islam     Open Access  
Al-Jabar : Jurnal Pendidikan Matematika     Open Access  
Alexandria : Revista de Educação em Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Alsic     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Alteridad     Open Access  
Amasya Universitesi Egitim Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Biology Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
American Educational Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 163)
American Journal of Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
American Journal of Distance Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
American Journal of Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 190)
American Journal of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 60)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
American Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 56)
American String Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
ANALES de la Universidad Central del Ecuador     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal  
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Annals of Modern Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Apertura. Revista de innovación educativa‏     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Applied Environmental Education & Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Applied Measurement in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Arabia     Open Access  
Art Design & Communication in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Arts Education Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ASHE Higher Education Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asia Pacific Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Health, Sport and Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of English Language Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Asian Journal of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ASp     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Assessing Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Assessment Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
At-Ta'dib Jurnal Kependidikan Islam     Open Access  
At-Taqaddum     Open Access  
At-Turats     Open Access  
Athenea Digital     Open Access  
Aula Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Australasian Journal of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Journal of Special Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Educational Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Australian Journal of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Australian Journal of Environmental Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Indigenous Education, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 441)
Australian Journal of Teacher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 240)
Avaliação : Revista da Avaliação da Educação Superior (Campinas)     Open Access  
Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Balkan Region Conference on Engineering and Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BELIA : Early Childhood Education Papers     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
BELT - Brazilian English Language Teaching Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biblioteca Escolar em Revista     Open Access  
Biblioteka i Edukacja     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bildung und Erziehung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Bioedukasi : Jurnal Pendidikan Biologi FKIP UM Metro     Open Access  
Bioma : Jurnal Ilmiah Biologi     Open Access  
Biosaintifika : Journal of Biology & Biology Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Biosfer : Jurnal Biologi dan Pendidikan Biologi     Open Access  
BMC Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 43)
BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
BoEM - Boletim online de Educação Matemática     Open Access  
Boletim Cearense de Educação e História da Matemática     Open Access  
Boletim de Educação Matemática     Open Access  
British Educational Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 187)
British Journal of Educational Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
British Journal of Educational Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 150)
British Journal of Music Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
British Journal of Religious Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British Journal of Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Brookings Trade Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Business, Management and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de Física     Open Access  
Caderno Intersabares     Open Access  
Cadernos CEDES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Educação     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Tecnologia e Sociedade     Open Access  
Cadernos de Pesquisa     Open Access  
Cadernos de Pesquisa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Pesquisa em Educação     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadmo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de la recherche sur l'éducation et les savoirs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Calidad en la educación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cambridge Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 98)
Campus Legal Advisor     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Campus Security Report     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian and International Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal for New Scholars in Education/ Revue canadienne des jeunes chercheures et chercheurs en éducation     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of Education : Revue canadienne de l'éducation     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Canadian Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Canadian Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Catalejos. Revista sobre lectura, formación de lectores y literatura para niños     Open Access  
Catharsis : Journal of Arts Education     Open Access  
CELE Exchange, Centre for Effective Learning Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Charrette     Open Access  
Chemical Engineering Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Chemistry Education Research and Practice     Free   (Followers: 5)
Chemistry in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Chi'e : Journal of Japanese Learning and Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Child Psychiatry & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Childhood Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Children's Literature in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Chinese Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Christian Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Christian Perspectives in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ciência & Educação (Bauru)     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia en Desarrollo     Open Access  
Ciencias Sociales y Educación     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Classroom Discourse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clio y Asociados     Open Access  
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Cogent Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
College Athletics and The Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
College Teaching     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Colóquio Internacional de Educação e Seminário de Estratégias e Ações Multidisciplinares     Open Access  
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover Annals of Dyslexia
  [SJR: 0.857]   [H-I: 40]   [10 followers]  Follow
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1934-7243 - ISSN (Online) 0736-9387
   Published by Springer-Verlag Homepage  [2351 journals]
  • Bias in dyslexia screening in a Dutch multicultural population
    • Authors: Anick Verpalen; Fons Van de Vijver; Ad Backus
      Abstract: We set out to address the adequacy of dyslexia screening in Dutch and non-western immigrant children, using the Dutch Dyslexia Screening Test (DST-NL) and outcomes of the Dutch dyslexia protocol, both of which are susceptible to cultural bias. Using the protocol as standard, we conducted an ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristics) analysis in Dutch and immigrant third, fifth, and seventh graders, combining a cross-sectional and longitudinal design. Sensitivity and specificity increased with grade, but were non-significant for various subtests in the lowest grade, suggesting considerable non-convergence between the two measures. Effective subtests in all grades, presumably not strongly influenced by Cultural Background or Word Lexicon, were One-Minute Reading, Non-Word Reading, and Nonsense Passage Reading. In a multilevel analysis, cultural background, dyslexia diagnosis, parental education, and grade of first assessment were predictors of subtest performance. In a second analysis, Word Lexicon was added as a proxy of knowledge of the Dutch language and culture. After controlling for Word Lexicon, cultural background became significant for most subtests, suggesting the presence of cultural bias. Subtests assessing technical literacy, such as One-Minute-Reading, Non-Word-Reading, One-Minute-Writing, or Two-Minutes-Spelling, showed more convergence between the two assessments. Less-effective subtests were Naming Pictures, Backward Digit Span, and Verbal and Semantic Fluency. It is concluded that the DST-NL and the standard protocol do not show complete convergence, notably in the lower grades in the multilingual pupil group of our cohort, mainly because dyslexia and literacy difficulties are hard to disentangle.
      PubDate: 2018-02-23
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-018-0155-0
  • The roles of cognitive and language abilities in predicting decoding and
           reading comprehension: comparisons of dyslexia and specific language
    • Authors: Alexandra A. Lauterbach; Yujeong Park; Linda J. Lombardino
      Pages: 201 - 218
      Abstract: This study aimed to (a) explore the roles of cognitive and language variables in predicting reading abilities of two groups of individuals with reading disabilities (i.e., dyslexia and specific language impairment) and (b) examine which variable(s) is the most predictive in differentiating two groups. Inclusion/exclusion criteria applied to categorize the two groups yielded a total of 63 participants (n = 44 for the dyslexia; n = 19 for the specific language impairment). A stepwise multiple regression approach was conducted to examine which cognitive and/or language variables made the largest contribution to reading abilities (i.e., Phonetic Decoding Efficiency, Word Attack, Sight Word Efficiency, and Passage Comprehension). Results revealed that there were significant differences in which measures of cognitive and language ability predicted individuals with dyslexia and speech and language impairments reading ability, showing that the cognitive and language variables underlying their difficulty with reading abilities were not the same across the two groups. A discriminant function analysis showed that a measure of Verbal Comprehension, Phonological Awareness, and Phonetic Decoding Efficiency can be used to differentiate the two groups. These findings support the tenet that dyslexia and specific language impairment are two subgroups of reading disabilities and that thorough diagnostic evaluations are needed to differentiate between these two subgroups. Distinctions of this nature are central to determining the type and intensity of language-based interventions.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-016-0139-x
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2017)
  • The impact of multisensory instruction on learning letter names and
           sounds, word reading, and spelling
    • Authors: Nora W Schlesinger; Shelley Gray
      Pages: 219 - 258
      Abstract: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the use of simultaneous multisensory structured language instruction promoted better letter name and sound production, word reading, and word spelling for second grade children with typical development (N = 6) or with dyslexia (N = 5) than structured language instruction alone. The use of non-English graphemes (letters) to represent two pretend languages was used to control for children’s lexical knowledge. A multiple baseline, multiple probe across subjects single-case design, with an embedded alternating treatments design, was used to compare the efficacy of multisensory and structured language interventions. Both interventions provided explicit systematic phonics instruction; however, the multisensory intervention also utilized simultaneous engagement of at least two sensory modalities (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic/tactile). Participant’s graphed data was visually analyzed, and individual Tau-U and weighted Tau-U effect sizes were calculated for the outcome variables of letter name production, letter sound production, word reading, and word spelling. The multisensory intervention did not provide an advantage over the structured intervention for participants with typical development or dyslexia. However, both interventions had an overall treatment effect for participants with typical development and dyslexia, although intervention effects varied by outcome variable.
      PubDate: 2017-10-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0140-z
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 3 (2017)
  • The effect of a specialized dyslexia font, OpenDyslexic, on reading rate
           and accuracy
    • Authors: Jessica J. Wery; Jennifer A. Diliberto
      Pages: 114 - 127
      Abstract: A single-subject alternating treatment design was used to investigate the extent to which a specialized dyslexia font, OpenDyslexic, impacted reading rate or accuracy compared to two commonly used fonts when used with elementary students identified as having dyslexia. OpenDyslexic was compared to Arial and Times New Roman in three reading tasks: (a) letter naming, (b) word reading, and (c) nonsense word reading. Data were analyzed through visual analysis and improvement rate difference, a nonparametric measure of nonoverlap for comparing treatments. Results from this alternating treatment experiment show no improvement in reading rate or accuracy for individual students with dyslexia, as well as the group as a whole. While some students commented that the font was “new” or “different”, none of the participants reported preferring to read material presented in that font. These results indicate there may be no benefit for translating print materials to this font.
      PubDate: 2017-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-016-0127-1
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 2 (2017)
  • Do dyslexic individuals present a reduced visual attention span'
           Evidence from visual recognition tasks of non-verbal multi-character
    • Authors: Menahem Yeari; Michal Isser; Rachel Schiff
      Pages: 128 - 146
      Abstract: A controversy has recently developed regarding the hypothesis that developmental dyslexia may be caused, in some cases, by a reduced visual attention span (VAS). To examine this hypothesis, independent of phonological abilities, researchers tested the ability of dyslexic participants to recognize arrays of unfamiliar visual characters. Employing this test, findings were rather equivocal: dyslexic participants exhibited poor performance in some studies but normal performance in others. The present study explored four methodological differences revealed between the two sets of studies that might underlie their conflicting results. Specifically, in two experiments we examined whether a VAS deficit is (a) specific to recognition of multi-character arrays as wholes rather than of individual characters within arrays, (b) specific to characters’ position within arrays rather than to characters’ identity, or revealed only under a higher attention load due to (c) low-discriminable characters, and/or (d) characters’ short exposure. Furthermore, in this study we examined whether pure dyslexic participants who do not have attention disorder exhibit a reduced VAS. Although comorbidity of dyslexia and attention disorder is common and the ability to sustain attention for a long time plays a major rule in the visual recognition task, the presence of attention disorder was neither evaluated nor ruled out in previous studies. Findings did not reveal any differences between the performance of dyslexic and control participants on eight versions of the visual recognition task. These findings suggest that pure dyslexic individuals do not present a reduced visual attention span.
      PubDate: 2017-07-01
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-016-0132-4
      Issue No: Vol. 67, No. 2 (2017)
  • Elegant grapheme-phoneme correspondence: a periodic chart and singularity
           generalization unify decoding
    • Authors: Louis Gates
      Abstract: The accompanying article introduces highly transparent grapheme-phoneme relationships embodied within a Periodic table of decoding cells, which arguably presents the quintessential transparent decoding elements. The study then folds these cells into one highly transparent but simply stated singularity generalization—this generalization unifies the decoding cells (97% transparency). Deeper, the periodic table and singularity generalization together highlight the connectivity of the periodic cells. Moreover, these interrelated cells, coupled with the singularity generalization, clarify teaching targets and enable efficient learning of the letter-sound code. This singularity generalization, in turn, serves as a model for creating unified but easily stated subordinate generalizations for any one of the transparent cells or groups of cells shown within the tables. The article then expands the periodic cells into two tables of teacher-ready sample word lists—one table includes sample words for the basic and phonogram vowel cells, and the other table embraces word samples for the transparent consonant cells. The paper concludes with suggestions for teaching the cellular transparency embedded within reoccurring isolated words and running text to promote decoding automaticity of the periodic cells.
      PubDate: 2017-12-11
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0150-x
  • Dyslexie font does not benefit reading in children with or without
    • Authors: Sanne M. Kuster; Marjolijn van Weerdenburg; Marjolein Gompel; Anna M. T. Bosman
      Abstract: In two experiments, the claim was tested that the font “Dyslexie”, specifically designed for people with dyslexia, eases reading performance of children with (and without) dyslexia. Three questions were investigated. (1) Does the Dyslexie font lead to faster and/or more accurate reading' (2) Do children have a preference for the Dyslexie font' And, (3) is font preference related to reading performance' In Experiment 1, children with dyslexia (n = 170) did not read text written in Dyslexie font faster or more accurately than in Arial font. The majority preferred reading in Arial and preference was not related to reading performance. In Experiment 2, children with (n = 102) and without dyslexia (n = 45) read word lists in three different font types (Dyslexie, Arial, Times New Roman). Words written in Dyslexie font were not read faster or more accurately. Moreover, participants showed a preference for the fonts Arial and Times New Roman rather than Dyslexie, and again, preference was not related to reading performance. These experiments clearly justify the conclusion that the Dyslexie font neither benefits nor impedes the reading process of children with and without dyslexia.
      PubDate: 2017-12-04
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0154-6
  • Examining reading comprehension text and question answering time
           differences in university students with and without a history of reading
    • Authors: Megan Hebert; Xiaozhou Zhang; Rauno Parrila
      Abstract: The current study aimed to examine performance times during text reading and question answering of students with and without a history of reading difficulties. Forty-three university students with a history of reading difficulties (HRD) were compared to 124 university students without a history of reading difficulties on measures of word and nonword reading rate, text reading rate and comprehension, and question answering times. Results showed that students with HRD demonstrated slower word, nonword, and text reading rates than their peers, but had comparable reading comprehension scores. Results also showed that students with HRD took longer to answer specific types of questions even when reading rate was controlled. Specifically, when word reading rate was controlled, students with HRD took longer to answer vocabulary, literal, inferential, and background knowledge questions. When text reading rate was controlled, they still took longer to answer literal, inferential, and background knowledge questions. These results suggest that students with a history of reading difficulties require extra time to complete reading comprehension measures for reasons other than just slower word and text reading rate. Findings of this study have implications for supporting university students with a history of reading difficulties.
      PubDate: 2017-11-17
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0153-7
  • The role of feedback in implicit and explicit artificial grammar learning:
           a comparison between dyslexic and non-dyslexic adults
    • Authors: Rachel Schiff; Ayelet Sasson; Galit Star; Shani Kahta
      Abstract: The importance of feedback for learning has been firmly established over the past few decades. The question of whether feedback plays a significant role in the statistical learning abilities of adults with dyslexia, however, is currently unresolved. Here, we examined the role of feedback in grammaticality judgment, type of structural knowledge, and confidence rating in both typically developed and dyslexic adults. We implemented two artificial grammar learning experiments: implicit and explicit. The second experiment was directly analogous to the first experiment in all respects except training format: the standard memorization instruction was replaced with an explicit rule-search instruction. Each experiment was conducted with and without performance feedback. While both groups showed significantly improved learning in the feedback-based explicit artificial grammar learning task, only the typically developed adults demonstrated higher levels of conscious structural knowledge. The present study demonstrates that the basis for the grammaticality judgment of adults with dyslexia differs from that of typically developed adults, regardless of increase in the level of explicitness.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0147-5
  • Potential or problem' An investigation of secondary school teachers’
           attributions of the educational outcomes of students with specific
           learning difficulties
    • Authors: Stuart Woodcock; Elizabeth Hitches
      Abstract: Despite strong support for inclusive education in principle, many teachers and administrators still demonstrate mixed responses to the inclusion of certain students in their classrooms. Students with specific learning difficulties (SpLD) form a large group of students in inclusive classrooms yet some provincial, state and national jurisdictions fail to acknowledge the existence of these students. Not acknowledging and understanding these students can deny them the recognition and resources necessary for their genuine participation in education and, in turn, society. The aim of this study was to examine British in-service secondary teachers’ attributional responses to students with and without specific learning difficulties. The participants included 122 British secondary school teachers who were surveyed in response to vignettes of hypothetical male students who had failed a class test. The study found that while teachers attributed more positive causes towards students without SpLD, they exhibited more negative causes towards students with SpLD. Teachers’ causal attributional outcomes of students’ level of achievement can impact upon the students’ own attributions, with teachers’ responses for students with SpLD having the potential to, unintentionally, influence students’ own sense of self-efficacy and motivation. The paper concludes with a consideration of the implications of the research and recommendations for practice.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0145-7
  • Inflectional morphology and dyslexia: Italian children’s performance in
           a nonword pluralization task
    • Authors: Maria Vender; Federica Mantione; Silvia Savazzi; Denis Delfitto; Chiara Melloni
      Abstract: In this study, we present the results of an original experimental protocol designed to assess the performance in a pluralization task of 52 Italian children divided into two groups: 24 children with developmental dyslexia (mean age 10.0 years old) and 28 typically developing children (mean age 9.11 years old). Our task, inspired by Berko’s Wug Test, had the aim of testing the subjects’ ability to apply pluralization rules to nonwords in the morphologically complex context of Italian nominal inflection. Results demonstrate that dyslexics display poorer morphological skills in comparison to controls, showing lower accuracy in the task. Furthermore, the dissimilar performances reported by the subjects in the different conditions indicate that the ability to inflect nonwords depends on factors such as the rule’s productivity, frequency, and opacity with respect to gender. Finally, the children’s performance in this task was significantly related to their reading proficiency, and it could predict accuracy in word reading independently of phonological awareness and working memory.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0152-8
  • Evaluating the impact of dyslexia laws on the identification of specific
           learning disability and dyslexia
    • Authors: B. Anne Barber Phillips; Timothy N. Odegard
      Abstract: Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that impacts word reading accuracy and/or reading fluency. Over half of the states in the USA have passed legislation intended to promote better identification of individuals with dyslexia. To date, no study has been conducted to investigate the potential impact of state laws on the identification of specific learning disability (SLD), and limited data has been presented on the rate at which students in public school settings are identified with dyslexia. The first aim of the current study was to determine if any detectable changes in the identification rates of SLD have occurred in states implementing dyslexia laws because most states do not report number of students identified as dyslexic but rather those students identified with an SLD. The second aim of the study was to characterize the rate of identifying dyslexia in the two states (Texas and Arkansas) that require public schools to report the number of students identified with dyslexia. The third aim was to characterize the identification rate across first to 12th grades. Current SLD rates range from 3.2 to 8.5% in all 50 states. Analysis of SLD prevalence rates did not vary between states with and without dyslexia laws in place. Moreover, there was no change in the identification of SLD once states had implemented these laws. Rates of dyslexia in Arkansas and Texas were less than 5%. Given the persistent levels indicating lack of reading proficiency, our review of data suggests that overall students with dyslexia are being underidentified.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0148-4
  • False memory for orthographically versus semantically similar words in
           adolescents with dyslexia: a fuzzy-trace theory perspective
    • Authors: Michał Obidziński; Marek Nieznański
      Abstract: The presented research was conducted in order to investigate the connections between developmental dyslexia and the functioning of verbatim and gist memory traces—assumed in the fuzzy-trace theory. The participants were 71 high school students (33 with dyslexia and 38 without learning difficulties). The modified procedure and multinomial model of Stahl and Klauer (simplified conjoint recognition model) was used to collect and analyze data. Results showed statistically significant differences in four of the model parameters: (a) the probability of verbatim trace recollection upon presentation of orthographically similar stimulus was higher in the control than dyslexia group, (b) the probability of verbatim trace recollection upon presentation of semantically similar stimulus was higher in the control than dyslexia group, (c) the probability of gist trace retrieval upon presentation of semantically similar stimulus was higher in the dyslexia than control group, and (d) the probability of gist trace retrieval upon target stimulus presentation (in the semantic condition) was higher in the control than dyslexia group. The obtained results suggest differences of memory functioning in terms of verbatim and gist trace retrieval between people with and without dyslexia on specific, elementary cognitive processes postulated by the fuzzy-trace theory. These can indicate new approaches in the education of persons with developmental dyslexia, focused on specific impairments and the strengths of their memory functioning.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0146-6
  • Length effects in pseudo-word spelling: stronger in dyslexic than in
           non-dyslexic students
    • Authors: Holger Juul; Dorthe Klint Petersen
      Abstract: It is often discussed whether dyslexics show a deviant pattern of reading and spelling development when compared to typically developing students, or whether they follow the same pattern as other students, only at markedly slower rate. The present cross-sectional study investigated phonological encoding skills in dyslexic Danish students. We compared dyslexic and non-dyslexic students from grades 3, 5, 7, and 9 and examined whether effects of item length were stronger in the dyslexic groups. Mixed between-within subjects analyses of variance revealed significant interactions between dyslexia status and item length as the dyslexics at all grade levels were more affected by item length than their non-dyslexic peers. A marked developmental delay was apparent as the dyslexic group from grade 9 performed on approximately the same level as the non-dyslexic group from grade 3. Although the overall difference between these two groups was not significant, a significant interaction between dyslexia status and item length remained because the grade 9 dyslexics were more affected by item length than the younger non-dyslexic students. This difference in error profiles suggests a difference in the developmental patterns of dyslexic vs. non-dyslexic students.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0149-3
  • Take Flight : the evolution of an Orton Gillingham-based curriculum
    • Authors: Jeremiah J. Ring; Karen J. Avrit; Jeffrey L. Black
      Abstract: Thirty years ago in this journal, Aylett Royall Cox reported on the development of Alphabetic Phonics, a revision of the existing Orton Gillingham treatment for children with dyslexia. This paper continues that discussion and reports on the evolution of that curriculum as it is represented in a comprehensive dyslexia treatment program informed by intervention research. The paper describes the curriculum and reports data from a hospital-based learning disabilities clinic that provides qualified support for treatment efficacy and the value of added comprehension instruction. The results are then discussed in the context of current and future issues in dyslexia intervention.
      PubDate: 2017-11-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0151-9
  • Parents’ reading history as an indicator of risk for reading
    • Authors: A. Giménez; A. Ortiz; M. López-Zamora; A. Sánchez; J. L. Luque
      Abstract: Children from families whose members have reading impairments are found to be poorer performers, take less advantage of instruction, and require more time to reach the reading level of children whose relatives are good readers. As a family’s reading history may not be available, a self-report of reading abilities is used to identify children’s background. In this paper, we explored the contribution of phonological, literacy, and linguistic abilities and reported parental reading abilities to predict reading achievement at the end of the school year in a Spanish sample. Children who were starting to read were assessed in a variety of oral language, phonological, and literacy tasks at the beginning and end of the school year. Parents filled out a self-report questionnaire about their reading abilities. Their answers were used to assign children to good or poor reader parent groups (GRP vs PRP). A logistic and ROC analysis were used to assess the variables’ discriminative capability, considering literacy scores at the end of the year as a measure of reading achievement. GRP children obtained higher scores than PRP children did. Performance on tasks of rapid naming assessment (RAN) letters (78.6%), Word Reading (75.7%), and Deletion (75.6%) were the most accurate predictors of children’s reading achievement. IPRA showed slightly lower accuracy (73.8) than did the behavioral measures and as high specificity as RAN letters (96.2%), similarly to the percentages found in previous studies. Although behavioral measures were shown as the best predictors, parents’ self-reports could also provide a quick estimation of family risk of difficulties in literacy acquisition.
      PubDate: 2017-11-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0143-9
  • Familial history of reading difficulty is associated with diffused
           bilateral brain activation during reading and greater association with
           visual attention abilities
    • Authors: Tzipi Horowitz-Kraus
      Abstract: Reading difficulty (RD; or dyslexia) is a heritable condition characterized by slow, inaccurate reading accompanied by executive dysfunction, specifically with respect to visual attention. The current study was designed to examine the effect of familial history of RD on the relationship between reading and visual attention abilities in children with RD using a functional MRI reading task. Seventy-one children with RD participated in the study. Based on parental reports of the existence of RD in one or both of each child’s parents, children with RD were divided into two groups: (1) those with a familial history of RD and (2) those without a familial history of RD. Reading and visual attention measures were collected from all participants. Functional MRI data during word reading was acquired in 30 participants of the entire cohort. Children with or without a familial history of RD demonstrated below-average reading and visual attention scores, with greater interaction between these measures in the group with a familial history of RD. Greater bilateral and diffused activation during word reading also were found in this group. We suggest that a familial history of RD is related to greater association between lower reading abilities and visual attention abilities. Parental history of RD therefore may be an important preschool screener (before reading age) to prompt early intervention focused on executive functions and reading-related skills.
      PubDate: 2017-11-02
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0144-8
  • Effect of chunk strength on the performance of children with developmental
    • Authors: Rachel Schiff; Pesia Katan; Ayelet Sasson; Shani Kahta
      Abstract: There’s a long held view that chunks play a crucial role in artificial grammar learning performance. We compared chunk strength influences on performance, in high and low topological entropy (a measure of complexity) grammar systems, with dyslexic children, age-matched and reading-level-matched control participants. Findings show that age-matched control participants’ performance reflected equivalent influence of chunk strength in the two topological entropy conditions, as typically found in artificial grammar learning experiments. By contrast, dyslexic children and reading-level-matched controls’ performance reflected knowledge of chunk strength only under the low topological entropy condition. In the low topological entropy grammar system, they appeared completely unable to utilize chunk strength to make appropriate test item selections. In line with previous research, this study suggests that for typically developing children, it is the chunks that are attended during artificial grammar learning and create a foundation on which implicit associative learning mechanisms operate, and these chunks are unitized to different strengths. However, for children with dyslexia, it is complexity that may influence the subsequent memorability of chunks, independently of their strength.
      PubDate: 2017-04-13
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0141-y
  • Beyond a reading disability: comments on the need to examine the full
           spectrum of abilities/disabilities of the atypical dyslexic brain
    • Authors: Jeffrey W. Gilger; A Special Topics Panel of The Dyslexia Foundation (TDF)
      Abstract: A panel of practioners and researchers convened to consider how to advance a broader understanding of the neurocognitive profile of people with dyslexia. While a great deal of research has been conducted on the reading process, the panel recognized that the “dyslexia brain” may be unique in other ways as well. In particular, the panel focused on complex nonverbal/spatial skills and correlated attributes such as career choice. The conclusion of the panel was that there is more to be learned about how people with dyslexia reason spatially and how these qualities manifest in academic, personal, and career behaviors.
      PubDate: 2017-03-15
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-017-0142-x
  • Performance of children with developmental dyslexia on high and low
           topological entropy artificial grammar learning task
    • Authors: Pesia Katan; Shani Kahta; Ayelet Sasson; Rachel Schiff
      Abstract: Graph complexity as measured by topological entropy has been previously shown to affect performance on artificial grammar learning tasks among typically developing children. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of graph complexity on implicit sequential learning among children with developmental dyslexia. Our goal was to determine whether children’s performance depends on the complexity level of the grammar system learned. We conducted two artificial grammar learning experiments that compared performance of children with developmental dyslexia with that of age- and reading level-matched controls. Experiment 1 was a high topological entropy artificial grammar learning task that aimed to establish implicit learning phenomena in children with developmental dyslexia using previously published experimental conditions. Experiment 2 is a lower topological entropy variant of that task. Results indicated that given a high topological entropy grammar system, children with developmental dyslexia who were similar to the reading age-matched control group had substantial difficulty in performing the task as compared to typically developing children, who exhibited intact implicit learning of the grammar. On the other hand, when tested on a lower topological entropy grammar system, all groups performed above chance level, indicating that children with developmental dyslexia were able to identify rules from a given grammar system. The results reinforced the significance of graph complexity when experimenting with artificial grammar learning tasks, particularly with dyslexic participants.
      PubDate: 2016-10-19
      DOI: 10.1007/s11881-016-0135-1
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