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  Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 1753 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (9 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (22 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1465 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (118 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (28 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (12 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (37 journals)

EDUCATION (1465 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 857 Journals sorted alphabetically
#Tear : Revista de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
(Pensamiento), (palabra) y obra     Open Access  
@tic. revista d'innovació educativa     Open Access  
Abant İzzet Baysal Üniversitesi Eğitim Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
About Campus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Academic Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Academic Psychiatry     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Academic Questions     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Academy of Educational Leadership Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 58)
Academy of Management Learning and Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
Accounting & Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 47)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ACM Transactions on Computing Education (TOCE)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Across the Disciplines     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Acta Didactica Norge     Open Access  
Acta Scientiarum. Education     Open Access  
Acta Technologica Dubnicae     Open Access  
Action in Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 58)
Action Learning: Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
Action Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Active Learning in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 291)
Actualidades Pedagógicas     Open Access  
Administration & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Administrative Science Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 155)
Adult Education Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 148)
Advanced Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Advances in Health Sciences Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Advances in High Energy Physics     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Advances in School Mental Health Promotion     Partially Free   (Followers: 9)
AERA Open     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Africa Education Review     Partially Free   (Followers: 24)
African Journal of Chemical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Health Professions Education     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Agora     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
AGORA Magazine     Open Access  
Ahmad Dahlan Journal of English Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
AIDS Education and Prevention     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Akadémiai Értesítö     Full-text available via subscription  
AKSIOMA Journal of Mathematics Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Al-Jabar : Jurnal Pendidikan Matematika     Open Access  
Alexandria : Revista de Educação em Ciência e Tecnologia     Open Access  
Alsic     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
Alteridad     Open Access  
Amasya Universitesi Egitim Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access  
American Annals of the Deaf     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Biology Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
American Educational Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 147)
American Journal of Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Distance Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
American Journal of Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 171)
American Journal of Educational Research     Open Access   (Followers: 59)
American Journal of Health Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
American Journal of Physics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 54)
ANALES de la Universidad Central del Ecuador     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Annali dell'Universita di Ferrara     Hybrid Journal  
Annals of Dyslexia     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Annals of Modern Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Apertura. Revista de innovación educativa‏     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Applied Environmental Education & Communication     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Applied Measurement in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Arabia     Open Access  
Art Design & Communication in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Arts Education Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
ASHE Higher Education Reports     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Asia Pacific Education Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asia Pacific Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Asia-Pacific Education Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Health, Sport and Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Asian Association of Open Universities Journal     Open Access  
Asian Education and Development Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asian Journal of English Language Teaching     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Asian Journal of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ASp     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Assessing Writing     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 132)
Assessment for Effective Intervention     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Assessment in Education: Principles, Policy & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Assessment Update     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
At-Ta'dib Jurnal Kependidikan Islam     Open Access  
At-Turats     Open Access  
Athenea Digital     Open Access  
Aula Abierta     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australasian Journal of Educational Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Australasian Journal of Gifted Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Australasian Marketing Journal (AMJ)     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Australian Art Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian Educational and Developmental Psychologist, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Educational Computing     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Australian Educational Researcher     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Australian Journal of Adult Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Australian Journal of Career Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of Dyslexia and Learning Difficulties     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Australian Journal of Learning Difficulties     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Australian Journal of Music Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Journal of Public Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 408)
Australian Journal of Teacher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Australian Mathematics Teacher, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian Primary Mathematics Classroom     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Screen Education Online     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian TAFE Teacher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Australian Universities' Review, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Autism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 198)
Avaliação : Revista da Avaliação da Educação Superior (Campinas)     Open Access  
Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Balkan Region Conference on Engineering and Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
BELIA : Early Childhood Education Papers     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
BELT - Brazilian English Language Teaching Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Biblioteca Escolar em Revista     Open Access  
Biblioteka i Edukacja     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Bildung und Erziehung     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Bioedukasi : Jurnal Pendidikan Biologi FKIP UM Metro     Open Access  
Biosaintifika : Journal of Biology & Biology Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Biosfer : Jurnal Biologi dan Pendidikan Biologi     Open Access  
BMC Medical Education     Open Access   (Followers: 41)
BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
BoEM - Boletim online de Educação Matemática     Open Access  
Boletim Cearense de Educação e História da Matemática     Open Access  
Boletim de Educação Matemática     Open Access  
British Educational Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 174)
British Journal of Educational Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 144)
British Journal of Educational Technology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 128)
British Journal of Religious Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
British Journal of Sociology of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
British Journal of Special Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 43)
British Journal of Visual Impairment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Brookings Trade Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Business, Management and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Caderno Brasileiro de Ensino de Física     Open Access  
Caderno Intersabares     Open Access  
Cadernos CEDES     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos de Educação     Open Access  
Cadernos de Educação, Tecnologia e Sociedade     Open Access  
Cadernos de Pesquisa     Open Access  
Cadernos de Pesquisa     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cadernos de Pesquisa em Educação     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadmo     Full-text available via subscription  
Cahiers de la recherche sur l'éducation et les savoirs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Calidad en la educación     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cambridge Journal of Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 96)
Campus Legal Advisor     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Campus Security Report     Hybrid Journal  
Canadian and International Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal for New Scholars in Education/ Revue canadienne des jeunes chercheures et chercheurs en éducation     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Canadian Journal for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Journal of Education : Revue canadienne de l'éducation     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Canadian Journal of Higher Education     Open Access   (Followers: 24)
Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology / La revue canadienne de l’apprentissage et de la technologie     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Canadian Journal of School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Canadian Journal of Science, Mathematics and Technology Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Catalejos. Revista sobre lectura, formación de lectores y literatura para niños     Open Access  
Catharsis : Journal of Arts Education     Open Access  
CELE Exchange, Centre for Effective Learning Environments     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Cendekia : Jurnal Kependidikan dan Kemasyarakatan     Open Access  
Change: The Magazine of Higher Learning     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Changing English: Studies in Culture and Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Charrette     Open Access  
Chemical Engineering Education     Full-text available via subscription  
Chemistry Education Research and Practice     Free   (Followers: 5)
Chemistry in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Chi'e : Journal of Japanese Learning and Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Child Language Teaching and Therapy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
Child Psychiatry & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Childhood Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Children's Literature in Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Chinese Education & Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Christian Higher Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Christian Perspectives in Education     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Ciência & Educação (Bauru)     Open Access  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ciencia en Desarrollo     Open Access  
Ciencias Sociales y Educación     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Citizenship, Social and Economics Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Classroom Discourse     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clio y Asociados     Open Access  
CME     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Coaching: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Cogent Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
College Athletics and The Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
College Teaching     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Colóquio Internacional de Educação e Seminário de Estratégias e Ações Multidisciplinares     Open Access  
Communication Disorders Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Communication Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Communication Methods and Measures     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Community College Journal of Research and Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Community College Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Community Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Community Literacy Journal     Partially Free   (Followers: 3)
Comparative Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Comparative Education Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 33)
Comparative Professional Pedagogy     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Compare: A journal of comparative education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Compass : Journal of Learning and Teaching     Open Access   (Followers: 1)

        1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 | Last

Journal Cover Academic Medicine
  [SJR: 2.202]   [H-I: 107]   [58 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1040-2446
   Published by LWW Wolters Kluwer Homepage  [290 journals]
  • Developing Programs That Will Change Health Professions Education and
           Practice: Principles of Program Evaluation Scholarship
    • Authors: Sklar; David P.; Weinstein, Debra F.; Carline, Jan D.; Durning, Steven J.
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • New Conversations: Justice, Disparities, and Meeting the Needs of Our Most
           Vulnerable Populations
    • Authors: Sklar; David P.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Fostering Medical Student Activism With the Urban (and Rural) Poor
    • Authors: George; Daniel R.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • In Reply to George
    • Authors: Geiger; H. Jack
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Reflecting on Resident Attitudes About Quality Improvement
    • Authors: Sampson; Mindy M.; Cheng, Shan; Olson, Daniel A.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • In Reply to Sampson et al
    • Authors: Butler; Jorie M.; Anderson, Katherine A.; Supiano, Mark A.; Weir, Charlene R.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Unmatched U.S. Seniors and Residency Placement Fever
    • Authors: Jenkins; Tania M.; Reddy, Shalini T.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Educators Must Act Now to Protect Students in This Year’s Match
    • Authors: Wadhwani; Anil R.
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Proactive Approach for Improving Wellness Among Learners
    • Authors: Levine; Robert; O’Leary, J. Patrick
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Values Guide Us in Times of Uncertainty: DACA and Graduate Medical
           Education
    • Authors: Poll-Hunter; Norma I.; Young, Geoffrey H.; Shick, Matthew
      Abstract: With a new administration and Congress, there is uncertainty surrounding the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. In light of this uncertainty, medical schools have tried to better understand how they can support trainees with DACA. In their article in this issue, Nakae and colleagues describe the issues often encountered by medical students with DACA as they prepare for residency and by the program directors who receive their applications. They offer recommendations for best practices to support these trainees. The authors of this Invited Commentary expand on these important considerations, based on their experiences at a national level. They argue that the core values in academic medicine should drive decision making, the student voice is critical, teamwork is essential, and wellness deserves attention. Academic medicine is part of a larger movement with partners across the health professions and higher education focused on advancing the values of access and opportunity for all. The authors of this Invited Commentary argue that remaining steadfast and committed to the core values in medicine will allow the academic medicine community to successfully navigate these uncertain times.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Why Not Wait' Eight Institutions Share Their Experiences Moving United
           States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 After Core Clinical Clerkships
           
    • Authors: Daniel; Michelle; Fleming, Amy; Grochowski, Colleen O’Conner; Harnik, Vicky; Klimstra, Sibel; Morrison, Gail; Pock, Arnyce; Schwartz, Michael L.; Santen, Sally
      Abstract: imageThe majority of medical students complete the United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 after their foundational sciences; however, there are compelling reasons to examine this practice. This article provides the perspectives of eight MD-granting medical schools that have moved Step 1 after the core clerkships, describing their rationale, logistics of the change, outcomes, and lessons learned. The primary reasons these institutions cite for moving Step 1 after clerkships are to foster more enduring and integrated basic science learning connected to clinical care and to better prepare students for the increasingly clinical focus of Step 1. Each school provides key features of the preclerkship and clinical curricula and details concerning taking Steps 1 and 2, to allow other schools contemplating change to understand the landscape. Most schools report an increase in aggregate Step 1 scores after the change. Despite early positive outcomes, there may be unintended consequences to later scheduling of Step 1, including relatively late student reevaluations of their career choice if Step 1 scores are not competitive in the specialty area of their choice. The score increases should be interpreted with caution: These schools may not be representative with regard to mean Step 1 scores and failure rates. Other aspects of curricular transformation and rising national Step 1 scores confound the data. Although the optimal timing of Step 1 has yet to be determined, this article summarizes the perspectives of eight schools that changed Step 1 timing, filling a gap in the literature on this important topic.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Four-Tier Continuum of Academic and Behavioral Support (4T-CABS)
           Model: An Integrated Model for Medical Student Success
    • Authors: Stegers-Jager; Karen M.; Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Themmen, Axel P.N.
      Abstract: imageNot all students cope successfully with the demands of medical school, and students’ struggles may result in study delay or dropout. To prevent these outcomes, medical schools need to identify students who are experiencing academic difficul ties and provide them with timely interventions through access to support programs. Although the importance of early identification and intervention is well recognized, less is known about successful strategies for identifying and supporting struggling students.Building on the literature and their own empirical findings, the authors propose an integrated, school-wide model for medical student success comprising a continuum of academic and behavioral support. This Four-Tier Continuum of Academic and Behavioral Support (4T-CABS) model focuses on improving both academic and behavioral outcomes by offering support for students at four levels, which range from adequate instruction for all, to targeted small-group interventions, to individualized support, and also include exit support for students who might be better off in another degree program. Additionally, medical schools should provide both academic and behavioral support; set high, yet realistic expectations and clearly communicate these to students; and intervene early, which requires timely identification of at-risk students who would benefit from the different types and tiers of support. Finally, interventions should be evidence based and fit the needs of the identified groups of students. The authors argue that adopting the core principles of the 4T-CABS model will enable medical schools to maximize academic engagement and performance for all students.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evaluating the Impact of Educational Interventions on Patients and
           Communities: A Conceptual Framework
    • Authors: Bzowyckyj; Andrew S.; Dow, Alan; Knab, Mary S.
      Abstract: imageHealth professions education programs can have direct effects on patients and communities as well as on learners. However, few studies have examined the patient and community outcomes of educational interventions. To better integrate education and health care delivery, educators and researchers would benefit from a unifying framework to guide the planning of educational interventions and evaluation of their impact on patients.The authors of this Perspective mirrored approaches from Miller’s pyramid of educational assessment and Moore and colleagues’ framework for evaluating continuing professional development to propose a conceptual framework for evaluating the impact of educational interventions on patients and communities. This proposed framework, which complements these existing frameworks for evaluating the impact of educational interventions on learners, includes four levels: (1) interaction; (2) acceptability; (3) individual outcomes (i.e., knowledge, skills, activation, behaviors, and individual health indicators); and (4) population outcomes (i.e., community health indicators, capacity, and disparities). The authors describe measures and outcomes at each level and provide an example of the application of their new conceptual framework.The authors encourage educators and researchers to use this conceptual framework to evaluate the impact of educational interventions on patients and to more clearly identify and define which educational interventions strengthen communities and enhance overall health outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • An Expanded Conceptual Framework of Medical Students’ Primary Care
           Career Choice
    • Authors: Pfarrwaller; Eva; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Sommer, Johanna; Maisonneuve, Hubert; Bischoff, Thomas; Nendaz, Mathieu; Baroffio, Anne; Junod Perron, Noëlle; Haller, Dagmar M.
      Abstract: imageIn many countries, the number of graduating medical students pursuing a primary care career does not meet demand. These countries face primary care physician shortages. Students’ career choices have been widely studied, yet many aspects of this process remain unclear. Conceptual models are useful to plan research and educational interventions in such complex systems.The authors developed a framework of primary care career choice in undergraduate medical education, which expands on previously published models. They used a group-based, iterative approach to find the best way to represent the vast array of influences identified in previous studies, including in a recent systematic review of the literature on interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing a primary care career. In their framework, students enter medical school with their personal characteristics and initial interest in primary care. They complete a process of career decision making, which is subject to multiple interacting influences, both within and outside medical school, throughout their medical education. These influences are stratified into four systems—microsystem, mesosystem, exosystem, and macrosystem—which represent different levels of interaction with students’ career choices.This expanded framework provides an updated model to help understand the multiple factors that influence medical students’ career choices. It offers a guide for the development of new interventions to increase the proportion of students choosing primary care careers and for further research to better understand the variety of processes involved in this decision.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Canadian National Guidelines and Recommendations for Integrating Career
           Advising Into Medical School Curricula
    • Authors: Howse; Kelly; Harris, June; Dalgarno, Nancy
      Abstract: imageCareer planning, decision making about specialty choice, and preparation for residency matching are significant sources of stress for medical students. Attempts have been made to structure and formalize career advising by including it in accreditation standards. There is an expressed need for national guidelines on career advising for medical students. The Future of Medical Education in Canada Postgraduate (FMEC PG) Implementation Project was created to ensure Canadian medical trainees receive the best education possible. From this, a diverse sub-working group (SWG), representing different Canadian regions, was formed to review career advising processes across the country. The SWG developed, through a modified formal consensus methodology, a strategy for medical student career advising that is adaptable to all schools in alignment with existing accreditation standards. The SWG outlined five guiding principles and five essential elements for Canadian universities offering an MD degree with recommendations on how to integrate the elements into each school’s career advising system. The five essential elements are a structured approach to career advising, information about available career options, elective guidance, preparation for residency applications, and social accountability. This Perspective endorses the view of the FMEC PG Implementation Project that national guidelines are important to ensure Canadian medical schools are consistently meeting accreditation standards by providing reliable and quality career advising to all medical students. The SWG’s position, based on national and provincial feedback, is that these guidelines will stimulate discourse and action regarding the requirements and processes to carry out these recommendations nationwide and share across borders.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Considerations for Residency Programs Regarding Accepting Undocumented
           Students Who Are DACA Recipients
    • Authors: Nakae; Sunny; Rojas Marquez, Denisse; Di Bartolo, Isha Marina; Rodriguez, Raquel
      Abstract: The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) initiative provides for the temporary deferral of enforcement of immigration laws for certain undocumented individuals brought to the United States before age 16. More than 50 medical schools now consider applicants who are DACA recipients, and medical school graduates with DACA are eligible to continue their training in graduate medical education. In this article, the authors summarize current policy and provide data on DACA recipients in medical school. They then review the implications for considering DACA recipients in graduate medical education, including employment guidelines, employer responsibilities, training at Veterans Affairs facilities, research funding, and professional licensure. They conclude by discussing the future of the DACA program and best practices for supporting students who are DACA recipients.First, there are no employment restrictions for DACA recipients with valid work authorization documents as long as their employers use Form I-9 Employment Eligibility Verification. Second, unlike H-1B or J-1 visa holders, DACA recipients do not generate additional immigration-related costs for their residency programs. Next, provisions in the Civil Rights Act prohibit employers from discriminating against applicants based on national origin or, in some cases, citizenship status. Furthermore, trainees with DACA are eligible to rotate through Veterans Affairs facilities. Finally, some states, like California and New York, have adopted policies and regulations allowing trainees with DACA who meet all professional requirements to receive a medical license. Given this state of affairs, DACA recipients should have equal standing to their peers when being evaluated for residency positions.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Promoting Learning and Patient Care Through Shared Reflection: A
           Conceptual Framework for Team Reflexivity in Health Care
    • Authors: Schmutz; Jan B.; Eppich, Walter J.
      Abstract: imageHealth care teams are groups of highly skilled experts who may often form inexpert teams because of a lack of collective competence. Because teamwork and collaboration form the foundation of effective clinical practice, factors that promote collective competence demand exploration. The authors review team reflexivity (TR), a concept from the psychology and management literatures, and how it could contribute to the collective competence of health care teams. TR captures a team’s ability to reflect collectively on group objectives, strategies, goals, processes, and outcomes of past, current, and future performance to process key information and adapt accordingly. As an overarching process that promotes team functioning, TR builds shared mental models as well as triggering team adaptation and learning.The authors present a conceptual framework for TR in health care, describing three phases in which TR may occur: pre-action TR (briefing before patient care), in-action TR (deliberations during active patient care), and post-action TR (debriefing after patient care). Depending on the phase, TR targets either goals, taskwork, teamwork, or resources and leads to different outcomes (e.g., optimal preparation, a shared mental model, adaptation, or learning). This novel conceptual framework incorporates various constructs related to reflection and unites them under the umbrella of TR. Viewing reflection through a team lens may guide future research about team functioning, optimize training efforts, and elucidate mechanisms for workplace learning, with better patient care as the ultimate goal.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Recruiting Faculty Leaders at U.S. Medical Schools: A Process Without
           Improvement'
    • Authors: Marsh; James D.; Chod, Ronald
      Abstract: Recruiting faculty leaders to work in colleges of medicine is a ubiquitous, time-consuming, costly activity. Little quantitative information is available about contemporary leadership recruiting processes and outcomes. In this article, the authors examine current recruiting methods and outcomes in colleges of medicine and compare academic search approaches with the approaches often employed in intellectual-capital-rich industries.In 2015, the authors surveyed chairs of internal medicine at U.S. medical schools regarding their recruiting practices and outcomes—specifically their selection methods, the duration of searches, the recruitment of women and minorities underrepresented in medicine (URM), and their satisfaction with search outcomes.The authors found that department chairs were extensively engaged in numerous searches for leaders. The recruitment process most commonly required 7 to 12 months from initiation to signed contract. Interestingly, longer searches (19+ months) were much more frequently associated with a recruitment outcome that chairs viewed as unsatisfactory or very unsatisfactory. Most leadership searches produced very few women and URM finalists. The biggest perceived hurdles to successful recruitment were the need to relocate the candidate and family and the shortage of good candidates.The process of recruiting leaders in academic medicine has changed little in more than 25 years. Process improvement is important and should entail carefully structured search processes, including both an overhaul of search committees and further emphasis on leadership development within the college of medicine. The authors propose specific steps to enhance recruitment of members of URM groups and women to leadership positions in academic medicine.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Artist’s Statement: Splitting
    • Authors: Lee; Daniel Juno
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Matter of Opinion
    • Authors: Rogers; John
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Commentary on A Matter of Opinion
    • Authors: Win; Aung Zaw
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • 2017 Hope Babette Tang Humanism in Healthcare Essay Contest: Second Place
           A Common Humanity We All Share
    • Authors: Chicoine; Nicole
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Development of an HIV Postexposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Protocol for Trainees
           Engaging in Academic Global Health Experiences
    • Authors: Arora; Gitanjli; Hoffman, Risa M.
      Abstract: imageProblemGlobal health (GH) education programs have become increasingly common in U.S. medical schools and graduate medical education programs, with growing numbers of medical students, residents, and fellows participating in clinical experiences in settings with high HIV prevalence and limited resources. However, there are no guidelines for provision of HIV postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) to trainees engaging in these academic GH experiences.ApproachFaculty of the Global Health Education Programs (GHEP) at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and GH partner institutions recognized the need for PEP access for trainees engaged in GH experiences. In 2013–2014, key UCLA faculty collaborated in the development of the UCLA GHEP PEP Protocol, which includes provision of PEP medications to trainees prior to departure, an on-call infectious disease/HIV specialist to advise trainees who have exposures, and a system for following up with exposed trainees while on the GH rotation and after their return.OutcomesBetween February 2014 and September 2016, 112 medical students and 110 residents received education on the PEP protocol during their predeparture orientation. The protocol was used for 28 exposures (27 occupational, 1 nonoccupational), with PEP recommended in 3 occupational cases (all needlesticks) and the single nonoccupational case. There were no reported HIV seroconversions.Next StepsThe authors plan to formally evaluate the PEP protocol, conduct a qualitative assessment with trainees and both UCLA and GH partner faculty, and discuss best practices with institutions across the United States and with GH partners.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Creating an “Education Shark Tank” to Encourage and Support
           Educational Scholarship and Innovation
    • Authors: Cofrancesco; Joseph Jr; Wright, Scott M.; Vohr, Eric; Ziegelstein, Roy C.
      Abstract: imageProblemCreating and supporting opportunities for innovation that showcase and reward creativity in medical and biomedical education is critically important for academic institutions, learners, and faculty.ApproachIn 2014, the Institute for Excellence in Education at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine created a small grant program called Education Shark Tank, in which two to five finalist teams present their proposals on innovative initiatives to improve education to four or five senior educator “sharks” at an educational conference, with an audience. The sharks then “grill” the presenters, considering which if any to fund, focusing on the rationale, feasibility, appropriateness of the outcome measures, evaluation and assessment plan, and proposed method of dissemination. They also make suggestions that challenge the presenters to assess and improve their designs.OutcomesIn the program’s first year (2014), funds were divided equally between two projects, both of which were successfully completed and one of which led to a journal publication; this led to increased funding for the program in 2015. Participants have called Education Shark Tank a “challenging and rewarding experience.”Next StepsEducation Shark Tank can facilitate educational innovation and scholarship via engaging and challenging interactions between grant applicants and reviewers in a public venue. The authors plan to conduct a five-year survey (after 2018) of all Education Shark Tank finalists to determine the success and challenges the funded projects have had, what scholarly dissemination has occurred, whether nonfunded projects were able to move forward, and the value of the feedback and mentoring received.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Finding Mary at Home: Learning Through House Calls
    • Authors: Hegde; Shefali
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Effect of Rubric-Guided, Focused, Personalized Coaching Sessions and
           Video-Recorded Presentations on Teaching Skills Among Fourth-Year Medical
           Students: A Pilot Study
    • Authors: Tchekmedyian; Vatche; Shields, Helen M.; Pelletier, Stephen R.; Pazo, Valeria C.
      Abstract: imageProblemAs medical students become residents, teaching becomes an expected and integral responsibility. Yet, training-for-teaching opportunities are lacking. In 2014, the authors designed a pilot study using rubric-guided, focused, personalized coaching sessions and video-recorded presentations to improve student teaching skills among fourth-year students at Harvard Medical School.ApproachIn 2014–2015, the authors recruited students from an elective on how to tutor preclinical students for the pilot, which consisted of four phases: a precoaching teaching presentation, a 30- to 45-minute coaching session, a postcoaching teaching presentation, and blinded reviewer ratings. Students’ pre- and postcoaching presentations were video recorded. Using a scoring rubric for 15 teaching skills, students rated their pre- and postcoaching videos. Blinded reviewers also rated the pre- and postcoaching presentations using the same rubric with an additional category to gauge their overall impression.OutcomesFourteen students completed all four phases of the pilot. Students’ ratings demonstrated statistically significant improvement in several teaching skills, including presentation content (P < .001), rate of speech (P = .001), and opening statement and learning objectives (P = .004). Blinded reviewers’ ratings demonstrated statistically significant improvements in several teaching skills, including opening statement and learning objectives (P < .001), overall impression (P = .001), and conclusion and summary of learning objectives (P = .004). Students provided largely positive comments on the interventions.Next StepsThe authors will work toward addressing limitations in the rubric, using coaching in different teaching settings, addressing the interventions’ generalizability, training coaches, and performing additional evaluations.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Evaluation of and Feedback for Academic Medicine Leaders: Developing and
           Implementing the Memorial Method
    • Authors: Rourke; James; Bornstein, Stephen; Vardy, Cathy; Speed, David; White, Tyrone; Corbett, Paula
      Abstract: imageProblemGiving and receiving honest and helpful feedback for leadership development is a common challenge in all types of organizations but particularly in academic medicine.ApproachAt Memorial University of Newfoundland, in 2014, a consensus emerged to develop a new method for evaluating the leadership performance of the discipline chairs, dean, and vice dean, and to provide these leaders with the evaluation results to help them improve their performance. The leaders responsible for developing and implementing this method (called the Memorial Method) decided to use a survey to obtain faculty members’ perceptions about their leader’s performance. Beginning in October 2014, a portion of several regular meetings of the discipline chairs with the dean and vice dean was used to develop the survey, by first discussing the broad dimensions of leadership performance, then discussing these dimensions in more detail and drafting specific questions. The resulting survey included 44 quantitative questions addressing eight leadership dimensions. In March–April 2015, the survey was administered electronically to full-time faculty members on a confidential basis. The results were compiled and reported to each discipline chair and to the dean and vice dean.OutcomesIn total, 144/249 faculty responded to the survey (response rate: 58%). For the various dimensions, individual chairs’ mean scores ranged from 2.82 to 4.70, and overall mean scores ranged from 3.57 to 4.24. Psychometric properties of the survey suggested it was both reliable and valid.Next StepsThe survey will be repeated, this time with part-time as well as full-time faculty included.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • How Emotions Are Like Asbestos
    • Authors: Shah; Arya
      Abstract: No abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • A Study of Pediatricians’ Debt Repayment a Decade After Completing
           Residency
    • Authors: Cull; William L.; Katakam, Shesha K.; Starmer, Amy Jost; Gottschlich, Elizabeth A.; Miller, Ashley A.; Frintner, Mary Pat
      Abstract: imagePurposePediatricians’ education debt has been increasing. Less is known about the pace of their debt repayment. The authors examined patterns of debt repayment for pediatricians who completed residency from 2002–2004.MethodThe authors analyzed weighted 2013 survey data from the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatrician Life and Career Experience Study. They categorized participants based on education debt level at residency completion ($0; $1–$49,999; $50,000–$99,999; $100,000–$149,999; ≥ $150,000) and explored debt repayment and well-being by starting debt group using multivariable logistic regression.ResultsOf 830 pediatricians surveyed, 266 (32%) had no starting debt and 166 (20%) had ≥ $150,000 in starting debt. A decade after residency, the percentage of participants who completely repaid their debt varied from 76% (68/89) of those with $1–$49,999 of starting debt to 15% (25/164) of those with ≥ $150,000 of starting debt. The percentage of participants concerned about their debt increased with starting debt level, with over half of those in the highest group concerned. Starting debt was associated with all examined measures of debt repayment and with recent financial difficulties among those in the two highest debt groups ($100,000–$149,999: adjusted odds ratio = 3.82, confidence interval = 1.17–12.43; ≥ $150,000: adjusted odds ratio = 4.55, confidence interval = 1.47–14.14).ConclusionsA decade after completing residency, pediatricians had made progress repaying their debt, yet many still expressed concern, especially those with the greatest amount of starting debt. As debt levels continue to increase, these issues could worsen.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Changes in Personal Relationships During Residency and Their Effects on
           Resident Wellness: A Qualitative Study
    • Authors: Law; Marcus; Lam, Michelle; Wu, Diana; Veinot, Paula; Mylopoulos, Maria
      Abstract: imagePurposeResidency poses challenges for residents’ personal relationships. Research suggests residents rely on family and friends for support during their training. The authors explored the impact of residency demands on residents’ personal relationships and the effects changes in those relationships could have on their wellness.MethodThe authors used a constructivist grounded theory approach. In 2012–2014, they conducted semistructured interviews with a purposive and theoretical sample of 16 Canadian residents from various specialties and training levels. Data analysis occurred concurrently with data collection, allowing authors to use a constant comparative approach to explore emergent themes. Transcripts were coded; codes were organized into categories and then themes to develop a substantive theory.ResultsResidents perceived their relationships to be influenced by their evolving professional identity: Although personal relationships were important, being a doctor superseded them. Participants suggested they were forced to adapt their personal relationships, which resulted in the evolution of a hierarchy of relationships that was reinforced by the work–life imbalance imposed by their training. This poor work–life balance seemed to result in relationship issues and diminish residents’ wellness. Participants applied coping mechanisms to manage the conflict arising from the adaptation and protect their relationships. To minimize the effects of identity dissonance, some gravitated toward relationships with others who shared their professional identity or sought social comparison as affirmation.ConclusionsErosion of personal relationships could affect resident wellness and lead to burnout. Educators must consider how educational programs impact relationships and the subsequent effects on resident wellness.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Impact of Patient Affect on Physician Estimate of Probability of Serious
           Illness and Test Ordering
    • Authors: Kline; Jeffrey A.; Neumann, Dawn; Raad, Samih; Schriger, David L.; Hall, Cassandra L.; Capito, Jake; Kammer, David
      Abstract: imagePurposeThe authors hypothesize patient facial affect may influence clinician pretest probability (PTP) estimate of cardiopulmonary emergency (CPE) and desire to order a computerized tomographic pulmonary angiogram (CTPA).MethodThis prospective study was conducted at three Indiana University–affiliated hospitals in two parts: collecting videos of patients undergoing CTPA for suspected acute pulmonary embolism watching a humorous video (August 2014–April 2015) and presenting the medical histories and videos to clinicians to determine the impact of patient facial affect on physicians’ PTP estimate of CPE and desire to order a CTPA (June–November 2015). Patient outcomes were adjudicated as CPE+ or CPE− by three independent reviewers. Physicians completed a standardized test of facial affect recognition, read standardized medical histories, then viewed videos of the patients’ faces. Clinicians marked their PTP estimate of CPE and desire for a CTPA before and after seeing the video on a visual analog scale (VAS).ResultsFifty physicians completed all 73 videos. Seeing the patient’s face produced a> 10% absolute change in PTP estimate of CPE in 1,204/3,650 (33%) cases and desire for a CTPA in 1,095/3,650 (30%) cases. The mean area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for CPE estimate was 0.55 ± 0.15, and the change in CPE VAS was negatively correlated with physicians’ standardized test scores (r = −0.23).ConclusionsClinicians may use patients’ faces to make clinically important inferences about presence of serious illness and need for diagnostic testing. However, these inferences may fail to align with actual patient outcomes.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • The Hidden Value of Narrative Comments for Assessment: A Quantitative
           Reliability Analysis of Qualitative Data
    • Authors: Ginsburg; Shiphra; van der Vleuten, Cees P.M.; Eva, Kevin W.
      Abstract: imagePurposeIn-training evaluation reports (ITERs) are ubiquitous in internal medicine (IM) residency. Written comments can provide a rich data source, yet are often overlooked. This study determined the reliability of using variable amounts of commentary to discriminate between residents.MethodITER comments from two cohorts of PGY-1s in IM at the University of Toronto (graduating 2010 and 2011; n = 46–48) were put into sets containing 15 to 16 residents. Parallel sets were created: one with comments from the full year and one with comments from only the first three assessments. Each set was rank-ordered by four internists external to the program between April 2014 and May 2015 (n = 24). Generalizability analyses and a decision study were performed.ResultsFor the full year of comments, reliability coefficients averaged across four rankers were G = 0.85 and G = 0.91 for the two cohorts. For a single ranker, G = 0.60 and G = 0.73. Using only the first three assessments, reliabilities remained high at G = 0.66 and G = 0.60 for a single ranker. In a decision study, if two internists ranked the first three assessments, reliability would be G = 0.80 and G = 0.75 for the two cohorts.ConclusionsUsing written comments to discriminate between residents can be extremely reliable even after only several reports are collected. This suggests a way to identify residents early on who may require attention. These findings contribute evidence to support the validity argument for using qualitative data for assessment.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Learner, Patient, and Supervisor Features Are Associated With Different
           Types of Cognitive Load During Procedural Skills Training: Implications
           for Teaching and Instructional Design
    • Authors: Sewell; Justin L.; Boscardin, Christy K.; Young, John Q.; ten Cate, Olle; O’Sullivan, Patricia S.
      Abstract: imagePurposeCognitive load theory, focusing on limits of the working memory, is relevant to medical education; however, factors associated with cognitive load during procedural skills training are not well characterized. The authors sought to determine how features of learners, patients/tasks, settings, and supervisors were associated with three types of cognitive load among learners performing a specific procedure, colonoscopy, to identify implications for procedural teaching.MethodData were collected through an electronically administered survey sent to 1,061 U.S. gastroenterology fellows during the 2014–2015 academic year; 477 (45.0%) participated. Participants completed the survey immediately following a colonoscopy. Using multivariable linear regression analyses, the authors identified sets of features associated with intrinsic, extraneous, and germane loads.ResultsFeatures associated with intrinsic load included learners (prior experience and year in training negatively associated, fatigue positively associated) and patient/tasks (procedural complexity positively associated, better patient tolerance negatively associated). Features associated with extraneous load included learners (fatigue positively associated), setting (queue order positively associated), and supervisors (supervisor engagement and confidence negatively associated). Only one feature, supervisor engagement, was (positively) associated with germane load.ConclusionsThese data support practical recommendations for teaching procedural skills through the lens of cognitive load theory. To optimize intrinsic load, level of experience and competence of learners should be balanced with procedural complexity; part-task approaches and scaffolding may be beneficial. To reduce extraneous load, teachers should remain engaged, and factors within the procedural setting that may interfere with learning should be minimized. To optimize germane load, teachers should remain engaged.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Core Competencies or a Competent Core' A Scoping Review and Realist
           Synthesis of Invasive Bedside Procedural Skills Training in Internal
           Medicine
    • Authors: Brydges; Ryan; Stroud, Lynfa; Wong, Brian M.; Holmboe, Eric S.; Imrie, Kevin; Hatala, Rose
      Abstract: imagePurposeInvasive bedside procedures are core competencies for internal medicine, yet no formal training guidelines exist. The authors conducted a scoping review and realist synthesis to characterize current training for lumbar puncture, arthrocentesis, paracentesis, thoracentesis, and central venous catheterization. They aimed to collate how educators justify using specific interventions, establish which interventions have the best evidence, and offer directions for future research and training.MethodThe authors systematically searched Medline, Embase, the Cochrane Library, and ERIC through April 2015. Studies were screened in three phases; all reviews were performed independently and in duplicate. The authors extracted information on learner and patient demographics, study design and methodological quality, and details of training interventions and measured outcomes. A three-step realist synthesis was performed to synthesize findings on each study’s context, mechanism, and outcome, and to identify a foundational training model.ResultsFrom an initial 6,671 studies, 149 studies were further reduced to 67 (45%) reporting sufficient information for realist synthesis. Analysis yielded four types of procedural skills training interventions. There was relative consistency across contexts and significant differences in mechanisms and outcomes across the four intervention types. The medical procedural service was identified as an adaptable foundational training model.ConclusionsThe observed heterogeneity in procedural skills training implies that programs are not consistently developing residents who are competent in core procedures. The findings suggest that researchers in education and quality improvement will need to collaborate to design training that develops a “competent core” of proceduralists using simulation and clinical rotations.
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
  • Apprenticeship to Entrustment: A Model for Clinical Education
    • Authors: Merritt; Chris; Shah, Bella; Santen, Sally
      Abstract: imageNo abstract available
      PubDate: Wed, 01 Nov 2017 00:00:00 GMT-
       
 
 
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