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  Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 1753 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (9 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (22 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1465 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (118 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (28 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (12 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (37 journals)

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)

Showing 1 - 34 of 34 Journals sorted alphabetically
Autismo e disturbi dello sviluppo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bilingual Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dislessia. Giornale italiano di ricerca clinica e applicativa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disturbi di Attenzione e Iperattività     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Exceptionality Education International     Full-text available via subscription  
Frühförderung interdisziplinär     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gifted and Talented International     Hybrid Journal  
Gifted Child Today     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Gifted Children     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Journal of Health and Physical Education Pedagogy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for the Education of the Gifted     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gifted Education Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Language Teaching and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Nonformal Education     Open Access  
Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Special Education Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Learning & Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Learning Disability Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Lernen und Lernstörungen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Physical Educator     Full-text available via subscription  
TEACHING Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vierteljahresschrift für Heilpädagogik und ihre Nachbargebiete     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal Cover New Zealand Physical Educator
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   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1178-1076
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [403 journals]
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Staff introductions
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Is challenge really better than competition':
           Testing the theory in my practice
    • Abstract: McHaffie, Andrew; North, Chris
      This practitioner-research compares the effects of competition and challenge on students' enjoyment in PE. The data was collected during six lessons in the context of a gymnastics unit in a junior high school setting. Three lessons were based on challenge and the other three on competition. Data sources included my students, my associate teacher and my own reflections. The findings from all three data sources suggested that competition had an overall negative effect on student enjoyment. Two key themes emerged during analysis: student participation and student interactions. After transitioning to competition from challenge, 42% of the students reported a decline in their desire to participate and it was noted by all sources that there was an increase in negative student interactions. Details of context are provided so readers can consider the importance of this research for their own teaching practices. Pedagogical approaches to PE framed through challenge appear to open up the possibilities for students to engage with learning as envisioned in the New Zealand Curriculum.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - HPE teachers' understanding of socially critical
           pedagogy and the New Zealand health and physical education curriculum
    • Abstract: McIntyre, James; Philpot, Rod; Smith, Wayne
      In 1999, New Zealand's new Health and Physical Education curriculum (HPENZC) marked a significant shift in philosophy and its professed socially critical perspective invited practitioners to rethink the purposes of physical education and modify their teaching practices. This paper reports the findings of a research project that sought to find out how practicing teachers understand and incorporate a socially critical perspective into their teaching.

      Data were gathered through semi-structured interviews with six practicing health and physical education (HPE) teachers. The content analysis reveals different understandings of socially critical pedagogy that represent varied interpretations of the curriculum document. We conclude that the HPE teachers' interpretations may lead to a focus on individual student behaviours rather than a challenge to the social structures that influence these behaviours. This may serve to work in tension with the espoused aims of HPENZC by reinforcing healthism rather than challenging it.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Guest editorial
    • Abstract: McBain, Sue
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - The learning effect of augmented false positive and
           false negative feedback on agility performance on senior secondary school
           students aged 15-17
    • Abstract: Williams, Zenyatta KK; Slade, Dennis G
      This investigation provides teachers of the New Zealand NCEA Senior School Physical Education programme with an easily reproduced experiment that may provide their students with considerable interest in the topic of feedback, as the hypothesis is not intuitive. It may also contribute some momentum to student work in their NCEA programme where they are required to provide feedback as it relates to improving or monitoring performance in others.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - To be critical or not to be critical - that is the
           question: A look at whether sociocritical thought has a practical place in
           the curriculum HPE
    • Abstract: Smith, Cameron
      What does it mean to be physically educated' Does it mean to be good at sports; to have the best beep test result or the most muscular physique; or have we moved on as a profession to the point where students develop sociocritical thought as part of their learning in Health and Physical Education (HPE)'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Out with the old, in with the new
    • Abstract: O'Sullivan, Anna; Peacock, Jared; Thomas, Dave
      Over the last couple of years, our department has been in a constant cycle of reflection looking at how we can improve our junior Health and Physical Education programmes. The learning was outdated, students lacked engagement and teachers were feeling underwhelmed. The beginning step of this process was collaboratively developing our vision of what we wanted to achieve as Health and Physical Educators. We wanted student-centred practices that encouraged critical thought and aligned with senior programmes. We also wanted the cultural competencies to be an integral part of learning experiences. Exploring the cultural competencies as part of the He Kakano programme in 2012 and 2013 allowed us to see the opportunities for the cultural competencies to be embedded in Health and Physical Education. Focusing our programmes around the use of the cultural competencies naturally created a student-centred focus, where learners were expected to think about and co-construct their own learning, making learning relevant and meaningful.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Taking the e out of eLearning
    • Abstract: Walsh, Nathan
      Technology has, and will continue to have, a major impact on many different aspects of our lives. Smartphones, online banking and self-check out at the supermarket are just some examples of how technology has altered our everyday tasks. With an increasing prevalence of students bringing their own devices to school, and NZQA aiming to have all NCEA exams online by 2020, technology is changing the educational landscape too.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Re-envisaging primary school cross-country: How can we
           maximise learning and engagement while holding true to time honoured
           events and traditions'
    • Abstract: Keown, Rocelle
      It's that time of the year again, when we're starting to think about planning for Term 3. Experience tells us that many teachers (perhaps even people at your school or in your team), after looking at the term planning overview and seeing cross-country scheduled, without a second thought, make this event the core of their Health and Physical Education (HPE) programme for the term. Planning done in fact they might just pull out last year's planning and change the date. Does this happen at your school, or perhaps it's reminiscent of colleagues you have worked with before'

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Lifting the bar on quality sport delivery
    • Abstract: Clarkson, Dayle
      This pilot looked at the components that make for a quality experience for volunteers and participants that have sustainable positive outcomes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Developing thinking players [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Eighteen, Scenario
      Review(s) of: Developing thinking players: Baseball/ softball edition, by Gordon, B. (2015), Wellington, ETNZ.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - Non-specific games for teaching tactics through a TGfU
           approach
    • Abstract: Slade, DG
      The Teaching Games for Understanding (TGfU) philosophy requires the learner's needs be recognised and catered for in order for them to learn and understand how to play the game. To achieve that goal, the game typically requires some modification and this is frequently achieved through the use of small-sided versions of the game.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 2 - When life gives you lemons: A resource for young
           people dealing with depression and anxiety [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: When life gives you lemons: A resource for young people dealing with depression and anxiety, by Celia Painter and Abbie Krieble, CreateBooks NZ (2015).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Aquatic risk management and evidence-based decision
           making: Hunua Falls, Auckland, New Zealand
    • Abstract: Mulcahy, Nick
      Drowning is the third highest cause of unintentional death in New Zealand (Accident Compensation Corporation, 2005). On average, 108 people drown in New Zealand every year. Historically, a wide range of strategies have been implemented to reduce drowning and injury, and since the 1980s and 1990s these have led to a steady decline in the drowning rate. However, any tailored distribution of programmes and resources to particular aquatic sites has often been based on a 'best guess' of what was required, or a reactive response following a drowning incident. To further reduce the risk of drowning and injury in New Zealand, evidence-based decision making and effective use of finite resources is required. To achieve this, I have developed an aquatic risk management framework to enable the water safety sector to make informed decisions, and to ensure that high-risk locations are identified and resourced accordingly (Mulcahy, 2014).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Aquatic locomotion: Forgotten fundamental movement
           skills'
    • Abstract: Button, Chris
      In this article I will explain what fundamental movement skills (FMS) are and why they are considered an important platform for a healthy and active life. Then I make the case that notable absentees from most FMS taxonomies and assessment tools are the skills needed to move effectively in aquatic environments. Hence, I argue that certain aquatic skills should first be acknowledged as fundamental to human motor development, and that appropriate emphasis on teaching aquatic movement skills must follow.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - New Zealand water safety sector strategy 2020
    • Abstract: Water Safety New Zealand
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Water safety in New Zealand and Australia: An
           introduction to multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research and
           policy
    • Abstract: Booth, Douglas
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Immersing in thermal extremes: Hazards and
           opportunities
    • Abstract: Cotter, Jim; Gerrard, David; Thomas, Kate; Button, Chris; Bradford, Carl; Lucas, Sam
      Nearly all of New Zealand's coastal and inland waters are cold and well below the physiologically and perceptually optimal temperatures for resting (34-36 degreesC) and exercising (26-28 degreesC). While many factors precipitate, or at least facilitate, drowning, some are driven by cold temperature. In this article we provide physical educators with a brief update on the acute and adaptive effects of cold-water immersion, including gaps in the science. We also consider the effects of hot water as a stressor given that many Kiwis compete in open-water races held abroad in warm seas, and because immersion in hot water may have previously-unrecognised potential for health benefits.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - One day a waka for every marae: A southern approach to
           Maori water safety
    • Abstract: Jackson, Anne-Marie; ki Puketeraki, Hauteruruku; Mita, Ngahuia; Kerr, Hoturoa; Jackson, Samantha; Phillips, Chanel
      Kaupapa waka [the purpose of canoe] has a significant role in contributing to the survival and well being of our culture and people. The ocean was once the highway and playground of our tūpuna (ancestors) who traversed the greatest seas and overcame the many challenges that they faced, to seek a life out for us now the living descendants of exceptional explorers, of way finding and sea faring (Personal communication, Kelly Harrison, 2014). We are the whānau (families) from Hauteruruku ki.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Ngati Porou Surf Life Saving Incorporated: Maori,
           empowerment, water safety, and surf lifesaving
    • Abstract: Wikaire, Renee
      In this article I will illustrate the strategies and techniques used by Surf Life Saving New Zealand's (SLSNZ) newest affiliate club, Ngati Porou Surf Life Saving (NPSLS), to engage Māori and attract them into the surf lifesaving movement. I will begin by outlining the issue of high drowning rates among people of Māori descent. These rates belie the fact that Maori were once great ocean navigators who traversed vast oceans with inordinate skills, knowledge and expertise. I will then discuss the current Eurocentric culture of the surf lifesaving movement in New Zealand, the origins of this culture and the way it historically ostracised Māori. Lastly, I will look to the future and highlight the opportunity for growth, development and change within the surf lifesaving movement through initiatives such as the formation of NPSLS. In this last section I will discuss some of the strategies and techniques used by NPSLS to encourage Māori and draw them into surf lifesaving.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Surf and surf lifesavers as safety hazards: The myth
           of Bondi's black Sunday
    • Abstract: Booth, Douglas
      In Australian national culture the surf lifesaver is a paragon of virtue: selfless, steadfast and skilled. Surf lifesavers have provided a volunteer safety service on surf beaches since the early twentieth century and the governing body, Surf Lifesaving Australia (SLA) claims to have saved over 620,000 lives since 1907 (SLA, 2014a: 6). In 2013-14, SLA reported that its members performed 11,711 rescues (SLA, 2014a: 19). In its National Coastal Safety Report for 2014, which provides a detailed analysis of rescues in the surf, SLA boasted that 'no drowning deaths occurred' in the previous year 'between the red and yellow flags' (SLA, 2014b: 29). Red and yellow flags designate a supervised area of the beach, typically in front of a clubhouse, and announce that lifesavers are on patrol. Indeed, bathers rarely drown while swimming in patrolled areas. But there have been cases, including surf lifesavers competing in recent national titles (Surfprobe Australia, 2015), and these tell us much about the surf lifesaving movement, and patrolled surf as a hazard.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - The importance of visual rip current education
    • Abstract: Brander, Rob
      Rip currents, or 'rips', are strong, narrow offshore flows common on any beach characterised by breaking waves over a wide surf zone (Short, 2007). Bathers of all swimming abilities caught in rips can quickly find themselves being taken away from the shoreline where they may become distressed (Brander, Bradstreet, Sherker and MacMahan, 2011) and each year, rips are responsible for tens of thousands of surf rescues and hundreds of drownings globally (Brighton, Sherker, Brander, Thompson and Bradstreet, 2013). Rip related rescues and drownings are also common on open ocean New Zealand beaches, particularly in the North Island (Water Safety NZ, 2015).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - River crossing revisited: Bushcraft instructors'
           beliefs and values
    • Abstract: Boyes, Mike; Hill, Allen
      A plethora of rivers and streams flow from New Zealand's mountains and high country to the sea, and many recreational, educational and adventure tourism activities take place in and around these waters. Heavy rain and glacier melt can cause rivers and tributaries to rise quickly. Coupled with easy and unrestricted access in national parks, rivers present high risk natural environments (Dingwall, Fitzharris and Owens, 1989).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Eco-Sports - specialised environmental physical
           education which reinforces kaitiakitanga
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Developing thinking players
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: Developing thinking players, by Baseball/Softball edition Barrie Gordon Phd.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Sport NZ update
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 1 - Water safety and the value of interdisciplinary
           approaches: A concluding dip
    • Abstract: Pringle, Richard
      This collection of articles reveals some of the diverse recreational relationships that New Zealanders and Australians have with fresh and saltwater environments, from surfing to river crossing, competitive swimming to surf lifesaving, and, aquatics education to waka ama. Within each of these different fluid environments, there exists diverse sets of values, attitudes, identities, risks and joys. The associated pedagogical work, which Richard Tinning (2010) defines broadly as the re/production of knowledge, ideals and beliefs, is subsequently complex. The complexity of this pedagogical work requires a broadened understanding of water safety. Although water safety focuses on drowning prevention, it is also concerned with fostering enjoyment and wider issues such as safety issues associated with diverse cultural beliefs (e.g. tikanga Maori), identities (e.g. via challenging sexism in surf cultures), social practices (e.g. religion and women-only swimming times), the environment (e.g. ecology), and learning opportunities (e.g. attempting to retain school pools). This expanded view of water safety concomitantly challenges researchers, health and physical educators, and Water Safety New Zealand (WSNZ).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - PENZ awards 2015
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Reflecting back looking forward
    • Abstract: Bowes, Margot
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Sport NZ update
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Physical literacy and defining "quality physical
           education"
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - The introduction of three-year teacher training during
           the 1960s
    • Abstract: Stothart, Bob
      The introduction of three-year teacher training during the 1960s provided a unique opportunity for Physical Education to establish itself more widely as an important subject in the wider tertiary sector of New Zealand education. The School of Physical Education was of course well established (since 1949), but in the teacher training sector (the Teachers Colleges) there was little incentive for staff to undertake research or to publish or in other ways, to enhance the status of Physical Education, a curriculum subject which traditionally struggled for respectability and acceptability in the world of academe. Primary teachers were trained in the Colleges for two years, and then undertook a probationary year of teaching before being qualified as a teacher.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Applying implicit teaching methods using a TGfU model
           of learning for improving performance in the overarm throw
    • Abstract: Slade, Dennis G
      A philosophical stance that one can anticipate not generating an argument, either in a sport coaching or practical physical education context, is the importance of young people acquiring basic competence in applied fundamental movements. Consequently, one does not need to look far to find support for the inclusion of the teaching of such basics within a physical education programme (Bailey, 2006; Haywood & Getchell, 2005). Indeed, Taggart and Keegan (1997) suggested that not acquiring such skills as a youngster likely inflicts a competency barrier on the adolescent and severely compromises their life-long participation in sport and physical recreation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Dear Shazza and Brucie
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Parkour in education
    • Abstract: Puddle, Damien
      Most early childhood education centres have a good thing going for them. An inclusive atmosphere where children have the almost limitless opportunity to explore; themes that include colours, shapes, textures, language, relationships, the environment, animals, play, movement, risk assessment and food, etc. The learning scope is vibrant, positive and enganging. In a warm and encouraging environment, this is where children want to be. Heck, this is where I want to be.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 3 - Working in partnership
    • Abstract: Knox, Leanne
      Leanne Knox, Secondary Schools Sports Director at Sport Auckland has been working with Onehunga High School to increase the number of students participating in sport and the quality of their sports programme. Relationship building has been the foundation to this partnership. Leanne has listened to the school's challenges and issues and, through her insights and intel, has been able to offer practical solutions. This opened the door to be able to work with the school to add value and not be seen as creating work.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Ma whero ma pango ka oti ai te mahi: With red and
           black the work will be complete
    • Abstract: Bowes, Margot
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - From PENZ's Chief Executive
    • Abstract: Merrett, Ross
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Planting seeds to honour the treaty: 'E Noho Marae' in
           the bachelor of physical education at the University of Auckland 2015
    • Abstract: Legge, Maureen
      The grey sheet of rain moves across the mud of the estuary flooding the ground and then hits the windows of my house with a wallop. The windows stream with water as Cyclone Pam begins her onslaught. It is Sunday night and I am about to take my second year Bachelor of Physical Education class to Te Rawhiti Marae in the Bay of Islands. With the cyclone bearing down I am concerned there will be poor driving conditions and flooding during the 300 kilometre trip. I will be travelling in a convoy of 11 cars with 49, second year students who are studying for a Bachelor of Physical Education (BPE) at the University of Auckland. Education outside the classroom (EOTC) is fraught with potential difficulties but with much potential to be a significant part of the journey to becoming a health and physical education (HPE) teacher.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - The new sexuality education guidelines: What do these
           mean for schools'
    • Abstract: Fitzpatrick, Katie
      This month the Ministry of Education released new sexuality education guidelines for all schools. These guidelines are an update of a document last published in 2002 and so reflect changes in New Zealand society, as well as the latest research. This opinion piece, from the lead writer of the guidelines, looks at why the new policy is needed and how schools might respond.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Sport in education project proving a winner
    • Abstract: Boyd, Sally; Hipkins, Rose
      A recent report prepared by the New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) summarising stories of success from the 8 schools in the Sport in Education (SiE) initiative suggests SiE is making a substantial difference for students, teachers, and schools.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Leading and reflecting with open dialogue
    • Abstract: Forward, Sam
      When it came to writing an article for the PENZ journal, I was left wondering 'what would physical education teachers throughout New Zealand want to hear about from me'' I must admit I was a little stumped, so I asked myself 'what would I like to read about'' Personally, I would like to hear from a range of teachers sharing their experiences about anything that they are learning or experiencing in their job. With that in mind, I will share with you some things that I have been thinking about recently.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Queer navigation: Expression of self in schools
    • Abstract: Meadows-Bonner, Chris
      There has been quite a stir surrounding sexuality and prejudice in sport, physical education, and health in New Zealand since recent research highlighting homophobia and heteronormativity (outonthefields. com; McGlashan, 2013). My intention is not to add to the debate surrounding the topic, however, it did inspire reflection on my own experiences as a gay male growing up in New Zealand. Additionally, it has raised concerns regarding my own sexuality and being a health and physical education (HPE) teacher. The purpose of this article is to reflect on my personal experiences around sexuality in health, physical education, and schooling. From these reflections, I will summarise where I stand about being an "out" teacher in today's socio-political environment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Media exposure and contribution to New Zealand's
           national identity through the America's cup
    • Abstract: Chattington, Simon; Slade, Dennis G
      The opportunity provided by a New Zealand NCEA Level 3 Physical Education programme to explore a major event or issue related to sport provided the catalyst for this article. This essay critically discusses New Zealand's involvement in the America's Cup from a sociological and economic perspective, while also reflecting on political involvement and the role of the media in helping shape our national identity during the America's Cup.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Joseph A. Duffy - president NZPE society c.1938
    • Abstract: Harvey, Ann-Marie
      This article is written in response to a request from the New Zealand Physical Education Society. It highlights the contribution of my grandfather Joseph A. Duffy to Physical Education, including his tenure as President of the NZPE Society c.1938. At that time Dr. Alexander Gillies was orthopaedic specialist at Wellington Hospital and Secretary of the NZPE Society, which he founded. He was a friend and colleague of Joseph A. Duffy.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Constraining to be flexible: Teaching the concept of
           flexible team structure through a game sense approach
    • Abstract: Slade, Dennis G
      Gaining and taking away time in invasion, net and wall games are standard defensive and attacking tactics. In squash, returning the ball high enough to prevent a volley and to the back wall is a defensive and time gaining tactic. In badminton, the overhead clearing shot to the back of the opponent's court allows for time to recover and anticipate the opponent's next shot, and, in tennis, the lob can be both offensive, to clear the player at the net, and also defensive (for example, returning a ball played wide to ensure you have time to get back on court). Knowing when to play these shots is almost instinctive though successful execution of technique is a much longer process of learning.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Enhancing children's cognition with physical activity
           games [Book Review]
    • Abstract:
      Review(s) of: Enhancing children's cognition with physical activity games, by Phillip Tomporowski, Bryan Mccullick, Caterina Pesce, 2015, Human Kinetics Bookstore, $55.80 or eBook $26.30.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Dear Shazza and Brucie
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 2 - Joe Wallace 1918 - 2014
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - What's worth doing'
    • Abstract: Gordon, Barrie
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - From PENZ's chief executive
    • Abstract: Merrett, Ross
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Overview of a current initiative: Taonga takaro in
           schools
    • Abstract: Manuel, Brandon
      What is the initiative' This powerful statement from Harko Brown emphasises the need for taonga takaro to be incorporated and increased within schools as a part of the physical education curriculum. Although he states the need to cherish and utilise these games for Māori people, taonga takaro have the power to benefit people from all walks of life regardless of their race, gender or culture (Brown, 2010; Brown, 2008; Te Reo Resources, n.d).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - The day the Japanese teachers came to Maungatapu
           School
    • Abstract: Maungatapu Primary School
      We all gathered outside our school Wharenui and waited for the bus to arrive. We had been preparing for their visit for a few days now and we were all excited to meet our visitors. The class had all worked together, to create some games that focus on several fundamental skills to teach to and then play with our visitors. Our first thoughts as we watched them step of the bus one by one was, 'how are they going to run around on the field wearing suits, ties and high shoes'' As part of our school's deep Maori culture, we were giving our special visitors a traditional welcome by greetings them at the gate with several of our students performing a Karanga, our mass singing of Waiata, and by Matua Matu saying a Mihi to welcome them all into our school. We were all very surprised when the Japanese group replied to our Waiata by singing several songs back to us in Japanese. It was really cool!

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - A place to feel safe and secure, because every body
           counts
    • Abstract: Maungatapu School
      In Room 16, we have been involved in helping create an inclusive school environment by sharing the values of Every Body Counts. We look out for each other inside and outside of the classroom, celebrate when things go well and are a friend when things don't. We feel that our classroom is a safe place for us to learn and make friends along the way. Feeling safe is one of the most important things for kids at school. Knowing that we have a place or a person to go to if we feel sad, lonely, unsure or a bit lost if we are new is really important.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - It's as easy as EBC: Getting kids to plan HPE!
    • Abstract: Robinson, Annie; Eades, Jaimee
      EBC stands for Everybody Counts, this means no exclusive behaviour and valuing others for what they CAN do, not for what they can't. In our class, since EBC has been introduced, everyone has been more confident and inclusive.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - A. S. Lewis essay award winner
    • Abstract: Meale, Lauren
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Dear Shazza and Brucie
    • Abstract:
      Q Dear Shazza and Brucie. There seems to be a lot going on in terms of changes with senior physical education. Where are we at with the development of the old 3.1' What is happening with Scholarship PE' It is difficult to keep up with what is going on - we are keen to keep up with the play in order to be best prepared to provide quality teaching and learning programmes for our students.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Recognition
    • Abstract: Stothart, Bob
      Everybody likes to be recognised for what they do, especially, if what they do contributes to their profession or the wider society. The Queen recognises contributions by awarding honours at New Year and Queens Birthday weekend.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - PENZ awards 2014
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - Unlocking the potential of PE and school sport
    • Abstract:
      In March this year Sport NZ will launch its 2015-2020Community Sport Strategy. Although the Strategy signals a new approach we will continue to pay close attention to children and young people. That's because we know that developing a love of physical activity and sport at an early age makes people more likely to enjoy lifelong participation in sport and gain the range of educational, social, health and other benefits that come with sports participation.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 48 Issue 1 - There is genius in passion: "Reflections on developing
           competence and self-belief through human movement human movement"
    • Abstract:
      There is genius in passion: "Reflections on developing competence and self-belief through human movement human movement", by Gordon D Paterson, Publisher Ad Rem Publications, Published 31st August 2014, Retails $34.99.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Traditional Maori games
    • Abstract: Brown, Harko
      Without doubt participants of Traditional Maori Games (TMGs) workshops want relevant professional content and they want to feel inspired to charge ahead with its implementation. As we all know a teacher with passion is a force to be reckoned with! Having stated the obvious let's take a step back and ponder what motivators attract teachers to TMGs. Certainly there has been a huge emphasis in educational circles this century on this entity we call 'culture', by default meaning 'Maori Culture', because after all we have been swamped with the popularization of 'Culture Counts' and the dictum, 'What is good for Maori students is good for all students'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - The school sport futures project
    • Abstract:
      Sport NZ is undertaking a solutions-focussed project looking at positively influencing the quality and quantity of sport and physical education (PE) in schools. Over the last few months PENZ has been working with Sport NZ to provide expertise and advice on the physical education component of the project.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Skill acquisition for senior school physical
           education: Up'skilling' for the 21st Century
    • Abstract:
      This article argues for teachers of physical education to both critique and adopt skill acquisition knowledge that reflects a more contemporary multidisciplinary Systems framework for teaching students about skill acquisition. The first part of the article describes, defines and compares both traditional motor skill learning and contemporary skill acquisition theories and argues for the teaching of the more contemporary theories. The second part of the article provides evidence that traditional motor skill learning theories still dominate teaching in senior school Physical Education (SSPE) programmes and explores implications for teaching, learning and assessing contemporary skill acquisition knowledge in SSPE. The article concludes by challenging teachers to 'up skill' and to 'reconsider' which skill acquisition knowledge informs, is valued and is taught in senior school physical education programmes.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Too busy to ACT'
    • Abstract: Petrie, Kirsten
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Obituaries
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Getting a degree into the university
    • Abstract: Stothart, Bob
      Getting a degree established in a university (from outside the institution) is no easy task. The pressure on university resources is always intense and established programmes view new proposals with ferocious analytical study. In addition, if the Professorial Board of a university approves a new proposal it must be sent to all other universities for scrutiny and any one of them can disapprove. The first requirement is an outstanding proposal followed by available funding (not cheap) accompanied by advocates within the university fraternity. The big costs are staffing, library resources and accommodation. No one will support a new proposal out of the goodness of their hearts.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Transforming play through fantasy games that remove
           player inhibitions while promoting intelligent performance in games and
           sports
    • Abstract: Slade, Dennis
      Only ten cricketers have scored a century on debut for New Zealand and of that ten only three have achieved that against England the nation historically most associated with the game. It is a long time since I opened the batting for New Zealand against England and joined that illustrious list of New Zealanders. Although it wasn't yesterday when I did that, I still recall it as if it was.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Preparing to enter pre-service teacher education in
           physical education and health and feelings of confidence relative to
           teaching those with disabilities.
    • Abstract: Renall, Abby
      Throughout my life, I have formed many relationships with people who are affected by disabilities. Each individual has touched my heart in his or her own way. In choosing to become a teacher I envisioned that learning to teach those with disabilities would form a significant or at least a part of that education in order that I might be equipped to help to make the lives of those with disabilities a little brighter every day. However, now in my third year of the degree of Sport and Exercise with a major in a Physical Education, and while it is not a teaching qualification, I am dismayed by the fact that I have not yet been exposed to any specific pedagogical context that will help me to understand or eventually teach those with disabilities. Currently, I feel extremely ill equipped to teach students with disabilities whether they are cognitive or physical impairments. In addition, my investigation into the pre-service teacher education programmes (PSTE) available at the graduate level suggests on graduating from such a programme that I will not be significantly better placed to do that than I am now.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - PENZ 2014 "The best way to have a good idea is to have
           lots of ideas."
    • Abstract: Houltham, Mel
      This quote totally sums up my experience at conference this year! Collaboration, discussions and networking are never to be overlooked. And these were the things I took away from conference, allowing me to move forward as an inspirational, and creative teacher! Getting new ideas through valid conversations with others allowed me to have many more about different topics. Ideas change the way we all think! And should never be taken for granted. We are always learning, progressing, revising and changing.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Political influences on health in New Zealand
    • Abstract: Gordon, Barrie
      Within the health and physical education learning area of the NZC there is the requirement that 'students develop their understanding of the factors that influence the health of individuals, groups and society: lifestyle, economic, social, cultural, political and environmental factors'.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Raising student achievement through learning logs and
           formative feedback
    • Abstract: Sulzberger, Xanthe
      Engaging in learning and teaching mechanisms that raise student achievement is rewarding for a teacher, and it is exciting to see it adopted and developed in an e-learning capacity department wide. This personal learning journey with our department at Botany Downs Secondary College, has been to develop Learning Logs and effective formative feedback by following feedback from the Best Evidence Synthesis (BES) Exemplar 5 for senior Physical Education classes. By using Hattie & Timperley's (2007) theory of 'power of feedback' by having students frame the Learning Log writing process around 'where am I going, how am I going and where to next' This process was undertaken by Physical Education teachers to see if there was marked improvement in achievement and how this process enhances quality teaching and learning for diverse learners.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Education a key to tackling obesity
    • Abstract: Gordon, Barrie
      There is of course no single factor that has led to New Zealand being one of the most obese nations in the world - it is a multifaceted problem involving social, cultural and economic forces interacting in a variety of ways. But, having acknowledged the complexities of the problem, equipping individuals to make positive and healthy choices through high quality education, clearly can make a difference.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 3 - Point of view: A changing landscape for HPE in primary
           school
    • Abstract: Grant, Bevan C
      In a recent Editorial of the PENZ journal Ben Dyson wrote, "physical education is marginalized in many [primary] schools ... there is also huge variation in the quality . something due in part to the inadequate preparation of teachers" (2014, p.4). But this is not a new claim for sixty years ago Dick Bedggood (1954) argued how physical and health education (HPE) in New Zealand suffered from being taught by people with a lack of expertise and the subject struggled for legitimacy. In between times, many others (e.g. Stothart 1971) have bemoaned the struggles with HPE in the primary school. Nonetheless, HPE remains a core subject.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 2 - When Arthur Steinhaus came to New Zealand
    • Abstract: Stothart, Bob
      From time to time international health and physical education luminaries visit New Zealand and we reap the benefits of their knowledge and experience. Often they come as keynote speakers at conferences: Brian Sutton-Smith, Daryl Seidentop, Ernst Jokl, James Hay, Peter Macintosh and many others. One such visit revolved around the great Arthur Steinhaus who was invited to tour by George Briggs, National Secretary of the YMCA. It was a very appropriate invitation as Steinhaus had worked most of his life at George Williams College, Chicago, known for its connection to the YMCA.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 47 Issue 2 - Engagement through passion: Incorporating
           student-centred contextualized learning into our planning and pedagogy
    • Abstract: McEvoy, Shea
      In a broad sense, contextualized learning is the backbone of Physical Education. Meaning, as physical educators, every day we use physical activity as a context for learning. Our students learn the Key Competencies (Ministry of Education, 2007) and a range of skills such as; self-management, interpersonal skills and social responsibility through a variety of physically challenging games and activities.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:22 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - The power of quality PE, physical activity and sport
    • Abstract:
      In March principals, teachers, children, the community, the Prime Minister and the Minister for Sport and Recreation joined Sport NZ chief executive Peter Miskimmin and Sport NZ staff at Upper Hutt's Fergusson Intermediate for the first anniversary celebration of Play.sport. The Waitakere Play.sport schools also celebrated this milestone with an evening event at the Waitemata Rugby club, attended by more than 60 people, where schools spoke of their experiences and learnings over the past 18 months.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Movements and promotions
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - The clever guts diet; show me the money honey [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: James, Alison
      Review(s) of: The clever guts diet, by Dr Michael Mosley, Published by Simon and Schuster; Show me the money honey, by Ian Wishart.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - From PENZ's chief executive
    • Abstract: van der Jagt, Richard
      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - When life hands you lemons
    • Abstract: Ovens, Alan
      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Robert (Bob) Athol stothart 1934-2016
    • Abstract: Laidler, Allan; Mitchell, Rosalie; Cockburn, Robyn; Bolwell, Jan; Fraser, Andy; Salter, George; Grant, Arohanui Bevan C; Culpan, Ian
      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - What critical pedagogy is possibly becoming and why
           this is not the preferred outcome
    • Abstract: Philpot, Rod
      The introduction of 'Health and physical education in the New Zealand curriculum' (Ministry of Education, 1999) signalled the introduction of significant changes to the way physical education was positioned in New Zealand. Notwithstanding the merging of three separate subjects (health, physical education and aspects of home economics) and the introduction of Hauora, a sociological perspective, and health promotion as new underlying concepts, 'Health and physical education (HPE) in the New Zealand curriculum' was a deliberate attempt to shift physical education from a technocratic imperative to a focus that privileged a sociocritical examination of the whole movement culture (Culpan, 2000). In the ensuing 18 years, the enactment of the HPE curriculum and the subsequent 'New Zealand Curriculum' (Ministry of Education, 2007) has brought concepts such as 'socially-critical pedagogy', 'social justice', 'critical pedagogy' and 'socio-cultural issues' into the everyday language of many New Zealand HPE teachers.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Introducing Richard van der jagt
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Introducing PENZ office manager Claire waring
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Understanding col's funding
    • Abstract: Stevens, Susie; McBain, Sue
      Rationale: Responding to the changing nature of professional learning development and the Ministry of Education's (MoE) future design of PLD across the compulsory school sector. Physical Education Zealand has produced the following overview to guide access to Professional Learning and Development for the sector.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Teachers' questions answered
    • PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 50 Issue 1 - Applying the tgfu model to promote kinesthetic
           awareness as a means to enhance decision making and anticipation in
           badminton
    • Abstract: Slade, Dennis G
      Dr Wayne Smith published an article (Smith 2016), that suggested that in looking at teaching 'basics' or 'fundamentals' in games we should think of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and fundamental game skills (FGS) as complementary pairs and that they should be taught in complementary ways at all stages of skill development. He was suggesting that we need not follow the often adopted practise of teaching FMS to young children and only introduce FGS when they were older.

      PubDate: Tue, 5 Sep 2017 12:51:33 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Dictionary of physical education and sports studies
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bowes, Margot
      Review(s) of: Dictionary of physical education and sports studies, by Bob Stothart and Ian Culpan, Aries Publishing Ltd.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - What is quality physical education'
    • Abstract: Keown, Rocelle
      The Health and Physical Education Curriculum is situated centre-stage to enable learners to participate in learning experiences which embody the vision of The New Zealand Curriculum. This is a vision of a '21st century learner' - children who are confident, connected, actively involved and lifelong learners.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - International physical literacy association - workshop
           report
    • Abstract: Stevens, Susie
      The purpose of this report is to disseminate findings from the IPLA workshop and inform those interested in the work of the International Physical Literacy Association (IPLA) and physical literacy.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Obesity and schools - Q and A
    • Abstract: Burrows, Lisette; Pause, Cat
      Q: What's the difference between 'being obese' and 'being fat''

      Lisette: My understanding is that obese is a medicalised term used to refer to people whose fatness compared to lean body mass exceeds a particular ratio. Often 'assessed' via BMI.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - HPS: Improving the health and wellbeing of our school
           communities through positive action
    • Abstract: Ireland, Therese; Wikaira, Clayton
      Cognition Education and Health Promoting Schools (HPS)

      Health Promoting Schools (HPS) is a globally proven initiative aimed at enabling school communities to take ownership of improving the health and wellbeing of their students, staff, and whanau.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - NGA Taonga Takaro II - the Matrix [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Myhre, Sandy
      Review(s) of: NGA Taonga Takaro II - the Matrix, by Harko Brown, Published by Penz 2017.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Transforming play to representative learning designs
           in sports
    • Abstract: Slade, Dennis G
      In my text Transforming play: Teaching tactics and Game sense (Slade, 2010), the models of instruction I utilised were TGfU, Game sense and mastery learning. I believe these models for teaching games and sports are the key to both tactical understanding and technical performance. However, the philosophy underlying that publication was a belief that the starting point for teaching or coaching games and sport is with the concept of play and its transformation.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - A cluster of conferences
    • Abstract: Stothart, Bob
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - 2016 PENZ awards
    • Abstract: Powell, Natasha
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - School of physical education, sport and exercise
           sciences
    • PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - What is the school's role in fighting obesity'
    • Abstract: Pause, Cat; Burrows, Lisette
      During this year's conference in Palmerston North, a panel discussion was held in which panellists were asked to answer the question: What is the school's role in fighting obesity' A range of perspectives was sought, and the speakers presented diverse and compelling arguments about obesity, health, children, health promotion, education, and the place and purpose of schools. What follows are the speeches made by two of the panellists - Professor Lisette Burrows and Dr Cat Pause - as well as their written responses to questions asked by the audience at the conference.

      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
  • Volume 49 Issue 3 - Schools and the 'war against obesity'
    • Abstract: Powell, Darren
      PubDate: Thu, 22 Jun 2017 19:55:06 GMT
       
 
 
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