for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 1753 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (9 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (22 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1465 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (118 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (28 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (12 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (37 journals)

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)

Showing 1 - 34 of 34 Journals sorted alphabetically
Autismo e disturbi dello sviluppo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bilingual Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Dislessia. Giornale italiano di ricerca clinica e applicativa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disturbi di Attenzione e Iperattività     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Exceptionality Education International     Full-text available via subscription  
Frühförderung interdisziplinär     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gifted and Talented International     Hybrid Journal  
Gifted Child Today     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Gifted Children     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Journal of Health and Physical Education Pedagogy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for the Education of the Gifted     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gifted Education Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Language Teaching and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Nonformal Education     Open Access  
Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Special Education Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Learning & Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Learning Disability Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Lernen und Lernstörungen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Physical Educator     Full-text available via subscription  
TEACHING Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vierteljahresschrift für Heilpädagogik und ihre Nachbargebiete     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal Cover Tizard Learning Disability Review
  [SJR: 0.385]   [H-I: 5]   [28 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1359-5474 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8782
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Adult autism advocacy in the UK: a policy review
    • Pages: 185 - 192
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 185-192, October 2017.
      Purpose The need for advocacy for autistic adults is emphasised in many government policy and good practice guidelines. The purpose of this paper is to investigate legislation and policy relevant to advocacy for autistic adults in England and explore whether this translates into practice. It also seeks to clarify which policies can be enforced under current legislation and highlight the gaps in legislative power to ensure implementation of good practice. Design/methodology/approach This paper aims to define what is meant by autism advocacy. Relevant legislation, including human rights, disability and autism-specific guidelines, are discussed in respect to autistic adults in England. Findings Implementation of autism advocacy policy appears to vary greatly according to local and individual resources. Originality/value Autistic adults, and services that support them, may be unaware of the policies and guidelines relevant to advocacy, they may also be confused by the plethora of different guidelines or unsure how to implement these. Further research is needed to review obstacles to the practical application of autism advocacy policy.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:38Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2016-0029
       
  • Advocating for advocacy
    • Pages: 193 - 197
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 193-197, October 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to consider how austerity and managerialism impact advocacy services. It outlines the many roles advocacy encompasses and the benefits advocating contributes to the rebalancing of power. Design/methodology/approach This is a commentary on Watts’ article on UK policy underpinning advocacy for autistic adults. Findings It is suggested that advocacy is poorly funded and therefore access is limited at a time when advocating for autism is most needed. Originality/value This viewpoint extends the current debate around advocacy by considering its core function: solidarity with people seeking adequate support.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:36Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-03-2017-0013
       
  • Learning disability market position statements, are they fit for
           purpose'
    • Pages: 198 - 205
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 198-205, October 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to review whether current learning disability market position statements (MPS) are actually helping to shape the market and explore their implications for people with learning disabilities and their families. Design/methodology/approach Published learning disability MPS were identified via the Institute of Public Care’s MPS database. The quality of the MPS was analysed using a good practice checklist developed by a range of stakeholders. Findings Learning disability MPS are not currently fit for purpose. They demonstrate that local authorities are not fully engaging in their market-shaping duties, as required under The Care Act 2014. It is suggested that this is in part due to the lack of recognition that market shaping is a council-wide responsibility and can only be successful if senior officers across the council (and their partners) acknowledge this and are held accountable. Unless this happens, people with learning disabilities will continue to lack the enablers that support them to lead the lives they choose in their communities. Originality/value This is the first review of the quality and potential impact of learning disability MPS.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-03-2017-0011
       
  • Learning disability market position statements, are they fit for
           purpose'
    • Pages: 206 - 210
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 206-210, October 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on the issues raised in the article “Learning disability market position statements (MPS), are they fit for purpose'” Design/methodology/approach The commentary draws on the literature and the author’s experience in developing commissioning. Findings Published documents such as MPS and joint strategic needs assessments do not give an encouraging picture of progress in commissioning with and for people with learning disabilities. Actual commissioning practice may or may not be stronger than the documents suggest; however, more robust planning may help to sustain progress through times of organisational and social change. Originality/value The commentary sets MPS in the context of other guidance on commissioning and development of services. It addresses questions about the need for published statements and the factors that help or hinder development of commissioning.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:32Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-07-2017-0033
       
  • Variation in rates of inpatient admissions and lengths of stay experienced
           by adults with learning disabilities in England
    • Pages: 211 - 217
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 211-217, October 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyse rates of inpatient admissions for people with learning disabilities in England and to identify factors associated with higher rates of inpatient admission. Design/methodology/approach Secondary analysis of data submitted as part of the Transforming Care programme in England. Findings 2,510 people with learning disabilities in England were inpatients on 31st March 2016. Findings indicate that people with learning disabilities are at risk of higher rate of inpatient admission than can be explained by prevalence within the general population; this risk may be associated with areas where there are higher numbers of inpatient settings which provide assessment and treatment for people with learning disabilities. Research limitations/implications Variability in the quality of the data submitted by commissioners across the 48 Transforming Care Plan areas mean that greater attention needs to be paid to determining the validity of the common reporting method. This would improve the quality of data and insight from any future analysis. Practical implications The study’s findings are consistent with the hypothesis that geographical variations in the risk of people with learning disabilities being admitted to inpatient services are not consistent with variations in prevalence rates for learning disability. The findings support the hypothesis that building alternatives to inpatient units should impact positively on the numbers of learning disabled people who are able to live independent lives. Originality/value This is the first study which examines the data which commissioners in England have reported to NHS England on the experience of people with learning disabilities who are admitted as inpatients and to report on the possible factors which result in higher rates of inpatient admission.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:34Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-02-2017-0010
       
  • Variation in rates of inpatient admission and lengths of stay experienced
           by adults with learning disabilities in England
    • Pages: 218 - 221
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 218-221, October 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary from a Scottish perspective on some of the issues raised in the paper “Variation in rates of inpatient admission and lengths of stay experienced by adults with learning disabilities in England”. Design/methodology/approach The policy context in relation to people with learning disabilities in Scotland is reviewed, alongside an update about a current Scottish Government project focussed on understanding and addressing the issue of people with learning disabilities whose discharge from hospital is delayed. Findings As regards to people with learning disabilities who are inpatients in hospitals in Scotland, there are similar themes in common with those in the paper by Elaine James and colleagues; however Scottish policy has developed differently from that in England in this area. Originality/value This commentary adds to the discussion by contributing a Scottish perspective on issues and outlines work being done to address the need for people with learning disabilities and complex needs in Scotland to live within their local communities.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:40Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-07-2017-0027
       
  • Trends in the provision of residential educational placements available
           for young people with learning disabilities/autism in England
    • Pages: 222 - 229
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 222-229, October 2017.
      Purpose Little is known about the characteristics of residential educational settings for young people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (IDD) in England. Previous research has focussed on the characteristics and experiences of the young people attending such settings rather than the setting itself; therefore, an overview of national provision is needed. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach As part of a larger project, data were collected for all residential schools and colleges in England. Data relate to settings offering residential provision for at least 4 nights per week for 30 weeks per year, either at the school/college itself, or in an associated residential home. Due to the remit of the main project, settings offering placements only to young people aged under 16 were excluded. Data were collected from a range of sources, including school/college websites, Ofsted and Department for Education resources, and liaison directly with the setting. Findings In total, 342 residential educational settings were identified with 57 of these offering post-16 provisions only. A range of data is presented about these settings, including location, placement numbers and types available, age range catered for, special educational needs categories registered for, governance arrangements (e.g. LA maintained, privately owned, and charitable organisation), and Ofsted educational ratings. Originality/value These data provide a national overview of residential educational settings for young people with IDD. This enables a clearer picture of the location and type of provision offered and allows comparisons both within and between areas.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-07-2017-0028
       
  • Going to the Dentist
    • Pages: 230 - 230
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 4, Page 230-230, October 2017.

      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-09-19T08:52:31Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2017-0003
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.196.47.128
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016