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  Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 1956 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (9 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (24 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1654 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (126 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (30 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (13 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (35 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (37 journals)

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (35 journals)

Showing 1 - 35 of 35 Journals sorted alphabetically
Ankara University Faculty of Educational Sciences Journal of Special Education     Open Access  
Autismo e disturbi dello sviluppo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bilingual Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dislessia. Giornale italiano di ricerca clinica e applicativa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disturbi di Attenzione e Iperattività     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Exceptionality Education International     Full-text available via subscription  
Frühförderung interdisziplinär     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gifted and Talented International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Gifted Child Today     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Gifted Children     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Journal of Health and Physical Education Pedagogy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for the Education of the Gifted     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Gifted Education Research     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Language Teaching and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 29)
Journal of Nonformal Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Special Education Technology     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Jurnal Ortopedagogia     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Learning & Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Learning Disability Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Lernen und Lernstörungen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Physical Educator     Full-text available via subscription  
TEACHING Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vierteljahresschrift für Heilpädagogik und ihre Nachbargebiete     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal Cover
Tizard Learning Disability Review
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.347
Number of Followers: 46  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 1359-5474 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8782
Published by Emerald Homepage  [341 journals]
  • Participation of adults with learning disabilities in the 2015 UK General
           Election
    • Pages: 65 - 71
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 65-71, April 2018.
      Purpose People with learning disabilities may experience discrimination which prevents them from exercising choice and control over their right to participate in democratic processes. The paper aims to discuss this issue. Design/methodology/approach Taking data collected by social workers during a campaign from the 2015 UK General Election, this paper analyses the variables associated with higher rates of democratic participation by people with learning disabilities. Findings The present authors undertook secondary analysis on data collected by social workers supporting adults with learning disabilities who were living in community housing units. In total, 1,019 people with learning disabilities who were living in 124 community housing units in one English county gave consent to participate. In total, 84 per cent were registered to vote and 26 per cent cast a vote on polling day. People were significantly more likely to cast a vote if they lived in a housing unit where they understood their rights (Wald χ2 =4.896, p=0.027). Practical implications The analyses are consistent with the hypothesis that supporting people with learning disabilities to understand their right to participate in elections increases the likelihood they will cast a vote on a polling day. There are practical implications from this finding for commissioning practices, support planning, and education of health and social care practitioners. Originality/value This is the first study of this size which examines data from people with learning disabilities on their experience of democratic participation and the role of social work.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:48Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2017-0022
       
  • Full and equal equality
    • Pages: 72 - 77
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 72-77, April 2018.
      Purpose This commentary takes the article, “Participation of adults with learning disabilities in the 2015 United Kingdom General Election”, as a jumping-off point for considering a tension between the aim of full and equal equality for all people with disabilities as set out in the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and more traditional beliefs, that on occasion, it is necessary to deny legal autonomy of men and women with intellectual disabilities in order to protect them. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach This issue is explored by reviewing the multiple and often conflicting ways in which disability and intellectual disability are conceptualised. Findings Given the multiple and contradictory ways in which both disability and intellectual disability are understood, any discussion of the rights of persons with disabilities is going to be highly problematic. Originality/value Equal recognition before the law and the presumption that all persons with intellectual disabilities can – with support – make autonomous decisions could be treated as an empirical question.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:45Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-11-2017-0044
       
  • Evaluating service users’ experiences using Talking Mats®
    • Pages: 78 - 86
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 78-86, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to establish the effectiveness of Talking Mats® (TM) in evaluating service users’ experiences, and explore their views of the implementation of person-centred active support (PCAS). Design/methodology/approach This is a mixed-methods study, employing qualitative interviewing and observational measures. Findings Both qualitative and quantitative measures indicated inconsistent implementation of PCAS. It was possible to effectively gain participants’ views on positive and negative aspects of quality of support and quality of life, using TM, across three themes, My life, My support and Self-determination. Research limitations/implications Generalisability of the research may be limited due to the sample, and the potential for researcher and interviewer bias is acknowledged. Practical implications TM provides a mechanism that may facilitate the inclusion of the views and experiences of people with intellectual and developmental disability (PWIDD) who have limited verbal skills. Their views need to be reflected in adaptions made to PCAS. Originality/value This study included a population who are often left out of qualitative research because of the methodologies adopted. It also included older PWIDD, where there has been less research about the effectiveness of TM.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:53Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-05-2017-0023
       
  • Commentary on “Evaluating service users’ experiences of using
           Talking Mats®”
    • Pages: 87 - 90
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 87-90, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide some thoughts following on from reading “Evaluating service users’ experiences of using Talking Mats®”. Design/methodology/approach This commentary outlines some considerations for the continued discussions about how to engage people who have profound and multiple learning disabilities. Findings The literature is not clear on the involvement of people with more profound and multiple learning disabilities, or for those who do not use much spoken language. Some papers have explored the notions of involvement and interpretation of pre-intentional communicators’ desires and interests. Originality/value There needs to be a robust discussion across carer, academic and service user communities to consider what the communication rights and needs are for people who have profound and multiple disabilities.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2017-0041
       
  • Fall prevention for people with learning disabilities: key points and
           recommendations for practitioners and researchers
    • Pages: 91 - 99
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 91-99, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of what is currently known about the high rates of falls, and fall injuries, which are experienced by people with learning disabilities (LDs) throughout their lives. Design/methodology/approach Narrative review. Current evidence is summarised as key points and recommendations for practitioners and researchers. Findings People with LDs experience similar rates of falls as older adults in the wider population, but throughout their lives, or at an earlier age. Originality/value Key points and recommendations are summarised for practitioners and researchers to promote fall prevention strategies and interventions for people with LDs.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:35Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-06-2017-0026
       
  • Commentary on “Fall prevention for people with learning disabilities:
           key points and recommendations for practitioners and researchers”
    • Pages: 100 - 102
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 100-102, April 2018.
      Purpose Age-related processes are marked by physiological, psychological and social decline, threatening health, quality of life, functional status and the mobility of individuals. As the impact of demographic change also begins to affect persons with intellectual disabilities (ID), issues and needs regarding the aging process are slowly entering the field of ID research. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach In the population of older people with ID, important, age-related events such as falls have prompted increasing research. Falls may lead to several negative health outcomes, require that an individual receives higher levels of care sometimes including hospitalisation and, in the worst case, hasten death. Falls also lead to psychological consequences such as fear of falling which fuels a vicious circle in which older persons afraid of falling reduce their physical activity, in turn hastening their functional decline. Findings Fall prevention in persons with ID is just evolving and further research is clearly necessary. This research can draw on the existing evidence from other fall prevention areas, especially the work carried out with the general older population. Originality/value As stated by Finlayson, a useful next step would be the development of a consensus on the definitions and methodology that should underpin future fall prevention research with persons with ID.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2018-0002
       
  • Toward data-based clinical decision making for adults with challenging
           behavior using the Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form (BPI-S)
    • Pages: 103 - 110
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 103-110, April 2018.
      Purpose The Behavior Problems Inventory-Short Form (BPI-S) is a shorter version of the Behavior Problems Inventory-01. In this paper, BPI-S population norms are reported from a total administrative population of adults with intellectual disability (ID). To facilitate the use of the BPI-S in clinical services to assess behavior change, the purpose of this paper is to describe how to use BPI-S clinically significant and reliable change (RC) scores. Design/methodology/approach Data were gathered on 265 adults with ID known to services. Proxy informants completed the BPI-S on challenging behaviors over the previous six months. Clinically significant cut-off values and RC scores were calculated using the Jacobson and Truax’s (1991) method. Findings BPI-S clinical reference data are presented to provide benchmarks for individual and group comparisons regarding challenging behavior. Examples demonstrate how to use clinical norms to determine change. Practical implications Behavior change is a major goal of researchers and practitioners. Data from the present study can make the BPI-S a valuable tool for determining change in challenging behavior following service input or intervention. Originality/value Whilst well used in research, the BPI-S may be less extensively used in practice. This present study provides data to enable researchers and practitioners to use the BPI-S more widely in assessing clinical outcomes, such as intervention research and service evaluation.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:33Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-06-2017-0025
       
  • Supporting the direct involvement of students with disabilities in
           functional assessment through use of Talking Mats®
    • Pages: 111 - 116
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 111-116, April 2018.
      Purpose Bowring et al. describe ways of using the Behavior Problems Inventory – Short Form, illustrating how to use clinical norms to evaluate change. This commentary focuses on the importance of considering information gained directly from people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) during assessment. The paper aims to discuss these issues. Design/methodology/approach A pilot project involved interviews with four children with IDD. A Talking Mats® (TM) framework was used to gather children’s views regarding challenging behaviours (CBs) and variables relevant to a functional behavioural assessment, such as things they found to be reinforcing, things that set the occasion for CB and things that helped prevent this. Findings The children were able to provide information and insight into several areas that are influential in the maintenance of behaviour that challenges. Some of this information may not have been obtainable from other sources or informants using traditional assessment methods alone. Originality/value Gathering the views of people with IDD is important. The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (United Nations, 2009) states that people have the right to be heard. Many people with IDD have difficulties communicating. A TM framework is one method by which people may be able to express their views. Taking the views of the individual into account during the process of gathering information about behaviours that challenge should lead to greater understanding of the functions of any behaviours and therefore to more targeted, acceptable and effective forms of support.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:42Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2018-0004
       
  • Paid employment amongst adults with learning disabilities receiving social
           care in England: trends over time and geographical variation
    • Pages: 117 - 122
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 23, Issue 2, Page 117-122, April 2018.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine trends over time and geographical variation in rates of paid employment amongst working age adults with learning disabilities receiving long-term social care in England. Design/methodology/approach Data were drawn from NHS Digital adult social care statistics examining paid/self-employment for working age (18-64 years) adults with learning disabilities known to social care (2008/2009 to 2013/2014) or receiving long-term social care (2014/2015 to 2016/2017). Findings In 2016/2017, councils reported that 5.7 per cent of working age adults (7,422 people) with learning disabilities receiving long-term social care were in paid/self-employment, with higher employment rates for men than women and most people working less than 16 hours per week. Paid employment rates seem to be slightly declining over time, and there is wide variation across councils in reported paid/self-employment rates. Social implications Despite good evidence for the cost effectiveness of supported employment support, employment rates for adults with learning disabilities receiving long-term social care remain extremely low. Originality/value This paper presents in one place statistics concerning the paid employment of working age adults with learning disabilities in England.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2018-03-28T09:41:39Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2018-0003
       
 
 
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