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  Subjects -> EDUCATION (Total: 1744 journals)
    - ADULT EDUCATION (24 journals)
    - COLLEGE AND ALUMNI (9 journals)
    - E-LEARNING (22 journals)
    - EDUCATION (1456 journals)
    - HIGHER EDUCATION (118 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS (4 journals)
    - ONLINE EDUCATION (28 journals)
    - SCHOOL ORGANIZATION (12 journals)
    - SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)
    - TEACHING METHODS AND CURRICULUM (37 journals)

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATION (34 journals)

Showing 1 - 34 of 34 Journals sorted alphabetically
Autismo e disturbi dello sviluppo     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bilingual Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Clinical Psychology and Special Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dislessia. Giornale italiano di ricerca clinica e applicativa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Disturbi di Attenzione e Iperattività     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Exceptionality Education International     Full-text available via subscription  
Frühförderung interdisziplinär     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Gifted and Talented International     Hybrid Journal  
Gifted Child Today     Partially Free   (Followers: 6)
Gifted Children     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Global Journal of Health and Physical Education Pedagogy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Journal for the Education of the Gifted     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Applied School Psychology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Journal of Correctional Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Early Hearing Detection and Intervention     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Journal of Gifted Education Research     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Language Teaching and Research     Open Access   (Followers: 27)
Journal of Nonformal Education     Open Access  
Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation     Open Access   (Followers: 21)
Journal of Special Education Technology     Full-text available via subscription  
Journal of Teaching in Physical Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Learning & Perception     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Learning Disabilities : A Multidisciplinary Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Learning Disability Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Lernen und Lernstörungen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
New Zealand Physical Educator     Full-text available via subscription  
TEACHING Exceptional Children     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Tizard Learning Disability Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
unsere jugend     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Vierteljahresschrift für Heilpädagogik und ihre Nachbargebiete     Full-text available via subscription  
Zeitschrift für Psychodrama und Soziometrie     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Journal Cover Tizard Learning Disability Review
  [SJR: 0.385]   [H-I: 5]   [27 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1359-5474 - ISSN (Online) 2042-8782
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Spina bifida and hydrocephalus: our heritage. The role of heritage
           exhibitions in tackling social isolation
    • First page: 117
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose Using the Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus: Our Heritage exhibition as a case study, the paper looks at how heritage exhibitions can be used to address social isolation and also serve as a way to give an identity to a community with a disablilty Design/methodology/approach The paper reviews the process of creating the exhibition, some of its most significant elements and its impact. Findings A heritage exhibition can be an effective way to address social isolation and inclusion. Originality/value This was a unique exhibition with considerable impact on members of the Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus community and with the potential to have a broader value in promoting change in attitudes towards disability.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:23:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2016-0036
       
  • Reflections on writing and exhibiting learning disability history:
           commentary on "Spina bifida and hydrocephalus: our heritage"
    • First page: 132
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose This is a commentary on the article "Spina Bifida and Hydrocephalus: Our Heritage: the role of heritage exhibitions in tackling social isolation in communities of people with a disability." Design/methodology/approach This provides some further reflection and points for discussion on topics arising from the themes in the original article. Findings Issues are raised about the medicalisation of conditions and the ways in which a social and cultural model of disability challenges preconceptions and assumptions about personhood and victim status. Reference is made to the broader context of hidden histories and the ways in which people with learning disabilities are now taking active roles in reclaiming the story of their lives in the past and now. Originality/value The article aims to raise awareness of critical issues of learning disability history prompted by the original paper.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:24:02Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2017-0014
       
  • Working with persons with an intellectual disability: the transferential
           process between therapist and client and the systems they inhabit
    • First page: 136
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose To appraise ‘transference’ and ‘countertransference’ when working with People with intellectual disabilities (PWID). Design/methodology/approach A review of the literature was conducted, followed by a discussion. Findings No research articles were found. Potential reasons for this are discussed. Historical influence, complexity of the topic and resistance among professionals may be contributing factors. Despite this , these phenomena are important for several reasons. These include the high levels of trauma these clients experience; the manner in which they have been marginalised by mainstream society; the strong likelihood of PWID evoking difficult countertransference from therapists; and the myriad of coping mechanisms and defences that these clients may employ. Research limitations/implications Research is needed to further current understanding of these issues. Practical implications An awareness of these issues amongst practitioners and other key members of a PWID’s system is important. Originality/value This is the first review and commentary on these issues.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-09-2016-0026
       
  • Commentary: enabling good emotional support for and with people with
           learning disabilities
    • First page: 144
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose Picking up from Cotter et al.’s article on the transferential process, this commentary aims to set out some arguments about ways of meeting the emotional needs of people with learning disabilities. Design/methodology/approach The commentary draws on two studies: one is about understanding and changing disabling practices, and the other is about bereavement support for people with learning disabilities. Both use qualitative approaches, and in both studies, people with learning disabilities are active agents or co-researchers, who have assisted in shaping the ideas and values of the research. Findings Professional practices, including those within a therapeutic context, can act as institutional barriers which create people with learning disabilities as passive or incompetent. However, this paper sets out some preliminary findings showing that not only can people with learning disabilities support each other, but also that face-to-face support workers can support people with learning disabilities to understand and cope with their emotions. Practical implications Frontline support workers should be seen as professionals, with their own range of resources to provide good emotional support. Further, people with learning disabilities can come together in groups to develop peer support about difficult and sensitive topics. Originality/value Talking therapies for people with learning disabilities have long been overlooked. As their value is now recognised, it is important that the views and wishes of people with learning disabilities themselves are heard, so that they can contribute to the processes which support them.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:23:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2017-0017
       
  • A review of social skills interventions for adults with autism and
           intellectual disability
    • First page: 148
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose Individuals with autism and intellectual disability (ID) have increased needs regarding social interaction. Social skills interventions have focused on children, however, development of these skills is important across the lifespan. This article critically reviews strategies and interventions used to develop social skills with adults with autism and ID. Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature search identified five studies meeting inclusion criteria. Findings Positive outcomes were reported in promoting positive social behaviours. However, it is not possible to make conclusions regarding the efficacy of social skills interventions for this population due to the limited quantifiable data and small sample sizes. Research limitations/implications The limited number of studies in the review impacts on its conclusions. Two of the papers included only one participant with both ID and autism. Practical implications A range of people need to be involved in supporting and developing social skills (peers, care staff, professionals). More research is needed in a variety of settings. Future research should attend to consistency of outcome measurement, service user perspectives, generalisation of skills, and documenting consent procedures. Originality/value This review focused on interventions for both positive and negative social behaviours used with adults with ID (of all levels) and autism.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:24:04Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-05-2016-0015
       
  • Developing social skills
    • First page: 159
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose This article discusses the different features of social skills and outlines a hierarchy of social skills model. Design/methodology/approach This article draws on clinical work over 25 years and presents the results of research using a hierarchical approach to developing social skills Findings Social skills interventions delivered according to a hierarchy of social skills (1. Self-awareness & Self-esteem 2. Body language 3. Conversational skills 4. Friendship skills 5. Assertiveness) are effective in improving social skills. Practical implications Effective assessment should determine which skills to start with. Intervention should involve the environment, peers and a variety of direct instructional approaches to maximise the potential for success and generalisation into everyday life. Originality/value This paper provides an overview of social skills and social competence, stresses the importance of good assessment to target the start point for intervention and emphasises the need to involve others to maximise success and generalisation.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:24:03Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2017-0020
       
  • Estimating the number of people with Down’s syndrome in Scotland and the
           cohort at elevated risk of early onset dementia
    • First page: 164
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose To estimate the size of the population of people with Down’s Syndrome in Scotland in order to provide a basis for estimating likely numbers of people with dementia in Down’s Syndrome at a range of ages. Design/methodology/approach Record data was requested from all General Practitioner services in Scotland on people with an identified READ code denoting Down’s Syndrome. A statistical weighting model was then applied to account for non-response bias. Findings There were 3,261 people with Down’s Syndrome estimated by the application of a statistical weighting model. Of these, 1,118 people (34%) were aged between 40-59. This age banding includes the age groups reported as having the highest incidence of early onset dementia in Down’s Syndrome. Research limitations/implications It is not possible to apply a benchmark to the percentage of observed data which gives an indication of how accurate the estimates produced are. Rather, the quality of the estimates depends on the response rate itself and the extent to which response is correlated with the outcome variable. In short, the quality of the final weighted estimates depends on the extent to which the biasing effect is mitigated by the weighting. As a result, a different response rate to this survey would have resulted in variations in the weighting model and therefore provided a different set of estimates. Originality/value This is the first set of data collected from General Practitioner services in Scotland to examine this issue and attempt to identify the population of people with Down’s Syndrome in Scotland as a whole.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:23:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-11-2016-0041
       
  • Commentary on "Estimating the number of people with Down’s syndrome in
           Scotland and the cohort at elevated risk of early onset dementia"
    • First page: 172
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to consider the implications for people with Down’s Syndrome and families of identifying those people who are risk of developing dementia from the research study ‘Estimating the number of people with Down’s Syndrome in Scotland and the cohort at elevated risk of early onset dementia.’ Design/methodology/approach The commentary is based on a review of the associated literature. Findings Estimating the numbers is important but has serious implications for people who have an elevated risk and their families. Preparation and ongoing support and planning are vital to ensure that quality of life is maintained as the dementia is identified and progresses. Originality/value The commentary considers the research presented from a practitioner perspective.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:24:01Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2017-0019
       
  • Deprivation of liberty applications concerning people with learning
           disabilities in England: trends over time and geographical variation
    • First page: 177
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 3, July 2017.
      Purpose To analyse trends over time and geographical variation in Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards (DoLS) applications for adults with learning disabilities. Design/methodology/approach Secondary analysis of national and local authority level statistics collected and reported by NHS Digital. Findings There has been a sharp national increase in the number of completed and granted DoLS applications regarding adults with learning disabilities since the 2014 ‘Cheshire West’ Supreme Court judgement, with a greater proportion of completed DoLS applications being granted. There is extreme geographical variation across local authorities in England in the rates at which DoLS application are being made and granted. Practical implications The extreme variation in DoLS applications regarding adults with learning disabilities is highly unlikely to be a function of differences in mental capacity and living circumstances experienced by adults with learning disabilities across local authorities, and urgent attention needs to be paid to this variation. Originality/value This is the first paper to analyse geographical variation at local authority level for completed and granted DoLS applications regarding adults with learning disabilities.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-05-18T11:24:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-04-2017-0016
       
  • More than pictures : developing an accessible resource
    • First page: 57
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose This paper describes the process of developing an accessible communication resource which enables people with a learning disability to reflect on their lives and raise issues of concern. Design/methodology/approach The process of making the resource and the facets that contribute to making it accessible are explored, e.g. design specification, the relationship between pictures and meaning, the order in which concepts are presented. The paper goes on to describe how the resource is put into practice using the format of a 'Talking Mat'. Talking Mats is a communication framework which has a strong evidence base that shows it improves the quality and quantity of information a person with a learning disability gives in a conversation. It provides practitioners with a consistent framework to support implementation. The impact of using the resource is explored through feedback from practitioners trained to use it and the stories that resulted. Findings A well constructed resource can support people with learning disability to express their views on what matters to them at a specific time and raise concerns they may have. The individual views that have emerged from people are varied. This resource enabled them to be genuinely included in planning the steps required to bring about positive change in their lives. Originality/value There is much emphasis on the development of accessible resources in the field of learning disability but little on the actual development process and the context of how resources are introduced. This paper aims to contribute to this knowledge base.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-10-2016-0028
       
  • More than pictures: who sets the agenda for sexuality education for people
           with learning disabilities?
    • First page: 66
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose This paper comments on some things raised by ‘More than Pictures’ (Cameron and Matthews (2017). In particular how much people with learning disabilities are involved in research and resource development and how the attitudes of caregivers impacts on how people learn about sexuality. Design/methodology/approach A commentary based on a brief literature review. Findings • Most published research is written by people who do not have learning disabilities but people with learning disabilities are taking part in research and they are making changes to the way things happen. • Parents, educators and caregivers are often reluctant to discuss sexuality with people with learning disabilities and this affects how much people can understand about it. Originality/value People with learning disabilities have the knowledge and skills to develop resources that could help others but their work is not often published for others to read and learn from. People with learning disabilities have the right to develop a sexual identity. Parents, educators and caregivers are often reluctant to engage in discussions that might help them to do this. It is important that we challenge this reluctance and help them to help people with learning disabilities to develop knowledge about their rights.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:09Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2017-0002
       
  • The NICE guidelines and quality standards on learning disabilities and
           behaviour that challenges
    • First page: 71
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose In 2014, NICE announced it was going to develop its first set of guidelines on learning disabilities. The topic was ‘behaviour that challenges’ and in May 2015 NICE published a full set of guidance (371 pages) covering service user and carer experiences, assessment, risk factors, and interventions for behaviour that challenges. The linked quality standards were published later in 2015. Design/methodology/approach This paper summarises the process and the outcomes contained in the Guidance. Findings This paper summarises the process and the outcomes contained in the Guidance. Originality/value This paper summarises the process and the outcomes contained in the Guidance.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-12-2016-0044
       
  • Commentary on the NICE guidelines and quality standards on learning
           disabilities and behaviour that challenges: these are children too
    • First page: 82
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose This paper provides a commentary, from a parent carer perspective, on Murphy’s overview of the NICE guidelines and quality standards on learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges. Design/methodology/approach The paper discusses the NICE approach, the content of these specific guidelines and quality standards and considers their practical relevance, with a particular focus on families of children and young people with learning disabilities and behaviour that challenges. Findings Gaps in research affect recommendations in some key areas including around transition and early intervention. Risk factors are not linked to clear recommendations for early identification and prevention. For families, additional work is needed to highlight where these guidelines fit with related national law and policies. Families also need to see how the guidelines can positively influence commissioners to improve life outcomes and avoid crises and deterioration in behaviour. Although NICE guidelines are often condition-specific, many of our children and young people have co-existing conditions and so do not fit neatly into just one set of guidelines. That is why data collection is very important to understanding needs and to effective commissioning. There is a need to urgently identify and address the research gaps so that essential interventions are included in future NICE guidelines and standards. Originality/value A family carer perspective suggests ways in which implementation of the NICE guidelines can be supported and argues for the importance of the further research that will strengthen future versions of the guidelines.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:12Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2017-0005
       
  • Country profile: intellectual and developmental disability in Nigeria
    • First page: 87
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to provide a contextual and general overview of intellectual and developmental disability (IDD) in Nigeria. Design/methodology/approach The paper uses a chronological approach, providing an assessment of the understanding and treatment of people with IDD from the pre-colonial era to the present. Findings Nigeria has experienced a different historical path in terms of treatment and service provision for people with IDD compared to industrialised and developing countries such as the UK and Brazil. Originality/value Nigeria is the most populous country in Africa with an emerging economy and thus important to review the treatment and social inclusion of people with IDD in the country’s development.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:18Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-07-2016-0019
       
  • Understanding disability in Nigeria: a commentary on "Country profile:
           intellectual and developmental disability in Nigeria"
    • First page: 94
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to respond to the country report from Nigeria by highlighting the important points that it raises and suggesting further areas for exploration. Design/methodology/approach The authors identify the main themes of the paper and situate these within an African context, recognizing the diversity of African countries while at the same time arguing that it is imperative for African countries to look to research from each other in addition to that emanating from the global North. Findings The issues of terminology and lack of demographic detail in the Nigerian context are discussed and suggestions made as to how these might begin to be addressed. Features of the African context which are apparent in Nigeria, such as poverty, a very young population and the effects of forced migration are amplified with reference to literature from other low income countries. The significance of family care in this context is highlighted and identified as a focus for future research. Originality/value This paper speaks to the need to build an African body of knowledge around disability that is not ignorant of the literature from the global North but which incorporates this knowledge in a critical way to understand better the African context.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:16Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-02-2017-0008
       
  • A family’s battle to understand ‘challenging behaviour’
    • First page: 99
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose This is about our son James’ life. It is a story of misfortune and a battle to find answers in which the greatest enemy was ignorance. Such experiences are not uncommon. It is our hope that sharing this will make some small contribution to bringing about change. Design/methodology/approach We discuss our experiences of care placements, and our battle to understand "challenging behaviour". Findings Reflecting upon James’ experiences of the care system it is clear that the system is fragmented and operates in silos that do not work together. Decision makers were all too often individuals not qualified to assess James’ needs and therefore implement appropriate solutions. The outcome was repeated failure which resulted in the view that he was a lost cause. Originality/value Such cruelty as James has experienced should be recognised and banished forever.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:21Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-09-2016-0025
       
  • Commentary on "A family's battle to understand 'challenging behaviour'"
    • First page: 105
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose This paper will provide a commentary on issues raised in the paper ‘A family’s battle to understand ‘challenging behaviour’. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on literature associated with issues identified in the paper this commentary will reflect on the evidence associated with providing specialist support to people with intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour. Findings Families, individuals and services are unable to access timely and appropriate specialist support for individuals with intellectual disabilities and challenging behavior. As individuals go on to develop behaviours associated with a lack of intervention their levels of vulnerability increase due to their exclusion from services and their local communities. Originality/value The commentary provides a discussion on the issues faced by individuals and their families in relation to intellectual disabilities and challenging behaviour.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2017-0006
       
  • Day services and home care for adults with learning disabilities across
           the UK
    • First page: 109
      Abstract: Tizard Learning Disability Review, Volume 22, Issue 2, April 2017.
      Purpose This paper compares data from national social care statistics on day services and home care for people with learning disabilities across England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. Design/methodology/approach National social care statistics (England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland) reporting the number of adults with learning disabilities accessing day services and home care, with data extracted on trends over time and rate of service use. Findings Regarding day services, despite some variations in definitions, the number of adults with learning disabilities in England, Scotland and Wales (but not Northern Ireland) using building-based day services decreased over time. Data from Scotland also indicate that adults with learning disabilities are spending less time in building-based day services, with alternative day opportunities not wholly compensating for the reduction in building-based day services. Regarding home care, there are broadly similar rates of usage across the four parts of the UK, with the number of adults with learning disabilities using home care now staying static or decreasing. Originality/value This paper is a first attempt to compare national social care statistics concerning day services and home care for adults with learning disabilities across the UK. With increasing divergence of health and social service systems, further comparative analyses of services for people with learning disabilities are needed.
      Citation: Tizard Learning Disability Review
      PubDate: 2017-02-20T12:19:13Z
      DOI: 10.1108/TLDR-01-2017-0004
       
 
 
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