for Journals by Title or ISSN
for Articles by Keywords
help
  Subjects -> BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (Total: 3075 journals)
    - ACCOUNTING (89 journals)
    - BANKING AND FINANCE (261 journals)
    - BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1154 journals)
    - CONSUMER EDUCATION AND PROTECTION (24 journals)
    - COOPERATIVES (4 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SCIENCES: GENERAL (158 journals)
    - ECONOMIC SYSTEMS, THEORIES AND HISTORY (167 journals)
    - FASHION AND CONSUMER TRENDS (13 journals)
    - HUMAN RESOURCES (94 journals)
    - INSURANCE (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE (127 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND AID (81 journals)
    - INVESTMENTS (25 journals)
    - LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS (43 journals)
    - MACROECONOMICS (13 journals)
    - MANAGEMENT (517 journals)
    - MARKETING AND PURCHASING (86 journals)
    - MICROECONOMICS (24 journals)
    - PRODUCTION OF GOODS AND SERVICES (138 journals)
    - PUBLIC FINANCE, TAXATION (32 journals)
    - TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL DIRECTORIES (2 journals)

BUSINESS AND ECONOMICS (1154 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 1566 Journals sorted alphabetically
4OR: A Quarterly Journal of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Abacus     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Acta Amazonica     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Acta Commercii     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Acta Oeconomica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Acta Scientiarum. Human and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Acta Universitatis Danubius. Œconomica     Open Access  
Acta Universitatis Nicolai Copernici Zarządzanie     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AD-minister     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ADR Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Advances in Economics and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
AfricaGrowth Agenda     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 57)
African Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
African Journal of Business and Economic Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
African Journal of Business Ethics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Review of Economics and Finance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Afyon Kocatepe Üniversitesi İktisadi ve İdari Bilimler Fakültesi Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Agronomy     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Akademika : Journal of Southeast Asia Social Sciences and Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Alphanumeric Journal : The Journal of Operations Research, Statistics, Econometrics and Management Information Systems     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
American Economic Journal : Applied Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 125)
American Economic Journal : Economic Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 94)
American Journal of Business     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
American Journal of Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 50)
American Journal of Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
American Journal of Economics and Business Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 22)
American Journal of Economics and Sociology     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
American Journal of Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
American Journal of Health Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American Journal of Industrial and Business Management     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
American Journal of Medical Quality     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
American Law and Economics Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
ANALES de la Universidad Central del Ecuador     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annales de l'Institut Henri Poincare (C) Non Linear Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Annals in Social Responsibility     Full-text available via subscription  
Annals of Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
Annals of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Annual Review of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Applied Developmental Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Applied Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Applied Economics Letters     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Applied Economics Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Applied Financial Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Applied Mathematical Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Applied Stochastic Models in Business and Industry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Apuntes Universitarios     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arab Economic and Business Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Archives of Business Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Arena Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Argomenti. Rivista di economia, cultura e ricerca sociale     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
ASEAN Economic Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Business Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 310)
Asia Pacific Viewpoint     Hybrid Journal  
Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Operational Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Asian Case Research Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Asian Development Review     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Asian Economic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Asian Economic Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian Economic Policy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Accounting and Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Business Ethics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Asian Journal of Social Sciences and Management Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Asian Journal of Technology Innovation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Asian-pacific Economic Literature     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Atlantic Economic Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Australasian Journal of Regional Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Cottongrower, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Australian Economic Papers     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Australian Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Australian Journal of Maritime and Ocean Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Balkan Region Conference on Engineering and Business Education     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Baltic Journal of Real Estate Economics and Construction Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Banks in Insurance Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
BBR - Brazilian Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Benchmarking : An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
BER : Consumer Confidence Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Economic Prospects : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription  
BER : Economic Prospects : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Intermediate Goods Industries Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Manufacturing Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Motor Trade Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BER : Retail Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Retail Survey : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Building and Construction : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Manufacturing : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Survey of Business Conditions in Retail : An Executive Summary     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BER : Trends : Full Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
BER : Wholesale Sector Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Berkeley Business Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 11)
Bio-based and Applied Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Biodegradation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Biology Direct     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Black Enterprise     Full-text available via subscription  
Board & Administrator for Administrators only     Hybrid Journal  
Border Crossing : Transnational Working Papers     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Briefings in Real Estate Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
British Journal of Industrial Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Brookings Trade Forum     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
BRQ Business Research Quarterly     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Building Sustainable Legacies : The New Frontier Of Societal Value Co-Creation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Bulletin of Economic Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Bulletin of Geography. Socio-economic Series     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Bulletin of the Dnipropetrovsk University. Series : Management of Innovations     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Business & Entrepreneurship Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Business & Information Systems Engineering     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Business & Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business : Theory and Practice / Verslas : Teorija ir Praktika     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Business and Economic Horizons     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Business and Economic Research     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Business and Management Horizons     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Business and Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Business and Management Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Business and Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Business and Professional Communication Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Business and Society Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Business Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Business Ethics: A European Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Business Horizons     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Business Information Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Business Management and Strategy     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Business Strategy and the Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Business Strategy Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Business Strategy Series     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Business Systems & Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Business Systems Research Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Business, Management and Education     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Business, Peace and Sustainable Development     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bustan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos EBAPE.BR     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cambridge Journal of Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 55)
Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Canadian Journal of Administrative Sciences / Revue Canadienne des Sciences de l Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue Canadienne d`Economique     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Canadian journal of nonprofit and social economy research     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Capitalism and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Capitalism Nature Socialism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Case Studies in Business and Management     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
CBU International Conference Proceedings     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Business Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Central European Journal of Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Central European Journal of Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CESifo Economic Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Chain Reaction     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Challenge     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
China & World Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
China : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
China Economic Journal: The Official Journal of the China Center for Economic Research (CCER) at Peking University     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
China Economic Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
China Finance Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
China Nonprofit Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
China perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Chinese Economy     Full-text available via subscription  
Ciência & Saúde Coletiva     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
CLIO América     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cliometrica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
COEPTUM     Open Access  
Community Development Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Compensation & Benefits Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Competitive Intelligence Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Competitiveness Review : An International Business Journal incorporating Journal of Global Competitiveness     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Computational Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Computational Mathematics and Modeling     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Computer Law & Security Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Computers & Operations Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Construction Innovation: Information, Process, Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Contemporary Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Contextus - Revista Contemporânea de Economia e Gestão     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Contributions to Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Corporate Communications An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Corporate Philanthropy Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Corporate Reputation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Creative and Knowledge Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Creative Industries Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
CRIS - Bulletin of the Centre for Research and Interdisciplinary Study     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Crossing the Border : International Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Cuadernos de Administración (Universidad del Valle)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Economía     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Economia - Latin American Journal of Economics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cuadernos de Estudios Empresariales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Opinion in Creativity, Innovation and Entrepreneurship     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
De Economist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Decision Analysis     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Decision Sciences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Decision Support Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Defence and Peace Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
der markt     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Desenvolvimento em Questão     Open Access  

        1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover Corporate Communications An International Journal
  [SJR: 0.703]   [H-I: 26]   [4 followers]  Follow
    
   Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
   ISSN (Print) 1356-3289
   Published by Emerald Homepage  [335 journals]
  • Communication evaluation and measurement: skills, practices and
           utilization in European organizations
    • First page: 2
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This study examines the status quo of communication evaluation and measurement practices in communication departments of companies, non-profits and other organizations across Europe. Design/methodology/approach The study argues that the challenge to conduct reliable measurement is three-fold: firstly, communication professionals have to understand and develop skills how to conduct evaluation; secondly, they have to evaluate whether communication activities have reached those goals in practice; and finally, they have to use those insights to advance and manage their future activities. These aspects are elaborated in the literature review. A quantitative survey of 1,601 professionals from 40 European countries was conducted to research prerequisites, implementation and benefits of communication measurement and compare practices across types of organizations. Findings Although robust knowledge of empirical research methods and their application for measuring communication effects is indispensable, many practitioners lack the necessary expertise to conduct reliable evaluation and measurement. Communication departments seldom measure communication effects on stakeholders and organizational goals. Many remain focused on media and channels. Last but not least, organizations do not fully exploit the potential of measurement data for strategically planning future communication activities. Practical implications The findings highlight the need to reconsider current education and training in communication research methods and their application in corporate practice. Knowledge about conducting applied research is as important as asking meaningful questions and using insights for management decisions in a corporate environment. Evaluation methods are often discussed, but individual skills and the organizational use of insights are important as well. This might be tackled through additional training in social science research techniques, sophisticated valuation methods, and decision-making. Originality/value The large-scale study shows that communication measurement practices are still in a nascent stage. Joint efforts of academics and professional associations have not really changed the situation until now. The three dimensions used in this research (skills, practices and utilization) can be used to assess the measurement readiness of individual organizations, to conduct further research in other regions, and to identify future challenges for advancing the field.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-08-2016-0056
       
  • A conceptual foundation for expectations of corporate responsibility
    • First page: 19
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose Ability to identify and meet stakeholder expectations is seen as imperative for succeeding in corporate responsibility (CR). However, the existing literature of CR communication treats expectations as predominantly positive constructions. The article addresses this positivity bias and offers insights for a more profound conceptual and empirical understanding of stakeholder expectations. Design/methodology/approach The article presents findings from a targeted literature search and empirical illustrations from a thematic analysis of interview data with a focus on the media sector. Findings The conceptual understanding of expectations is advanced by exploring positive (optimistic and hopeful), and negative (cynical and pessimistic) expectations. The empirical examples portray expectation analysis and how it becomes more complex when expectations turn negative. Research limitations/implications The data is limited to one sector but implications are discussed with a wider lens to aid future studies in addressing expectations of CR with less positivity bias and, instead, with more conceptual and empirical precision. Practical implications The identification of different expectation types can help practitioners to map and analyze stakeholder expectations of CR, assess interlinking between positive and negative issues, and address stakeholder criticism in a meaningful way. Originality/value The article addresses a gap in current literature concerning the positivity bias of expectations and offers conceptual and empirical tools for future research and practice.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:37:00Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-01-2016-0010
       
  • Strategic internal communication of corporate heritage identity in a
           hypermodal context
    • First page: 36
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This paper explores how corporate heritage identity (CHI) implementation strategies are communicated by Grundfos, a 70-year-old global company from Denmark, in their internal history references. Design/methodology/approach Drawing on an interdisciplinary methodological framework related to heritage identity communication, hypertextuality and multimodality, it proposes a multileveled analysis model through which communicative strategies are explored at the level of four semiotic modes (written text, speech, still image, and moving image) and at the level of their hypermodal interplay. Findings This exploratory case study explains how corporate heritage identity implementation strategies are communicated in accordance with the potential and constraints of semiotic modes and hyperlinking affordances. The analytical work suggests that the management employs complex CHI implementation strategies in order to strengthen organizational identity and to influence employees’ identification with the company across past, present and future. Research limitations/implications By examining the semiotic modes’ interconnectivity and functional differentiation in a hypermodal context, this paper expands existing research by extending the multimodal focus to a hypertextual one. Originality/value By exploring CHI implementation strategies from a hypermodal perspective and by providing a replicable model of hypermodal analysis, this paper fills a gap in the research of heritage identity research. Furthermore, it can also be of value to practitioners who intend to design company webpages that strategically communicate heritage identity implementation strategies in order to engage the employees in the company’s heritage.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-09-2015-0059
       
  • CSR communication in Japan: the case of Kikkoman
    • First page: 60
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This case study examines Kikkoman’s CSR (corporate social responsibility) communication with public schools associated with a new food education law in Japan. It describes how an internationally recognized soy sauce maker, Kikkoman, effectively entered a previously untapped market, public schools in Japan, and improved its corporate image using the vehicle of CSR activity. Design/methodology/approach Three traditional qualitative data sources were utilized: documents, interviews and observations. Findings Social, political, economic and environmental factors pushed Kikkoman to create a soy sauce lesson as a new CSR activity, which created challenges in corporate communication. The company, with the help of government, overcame the difficulties and was able to effectively communicate its CSR and improve its corporate image while promoting its signature product to children. This case presents a successful public relations strategy using a stakeholder approach as a framework. Research limitations/implications It is difficult to generalize the findings to CSR communication in Japan because this is a single case study with interviews with one company representative and observations at two schools. Practical implications First, collaboration between business people and public schools teachers is on the rise. This may open new opportunities for socially responsible corporations to engage in effective public relations activity through CSR in Japan. Second, human resource development in CSR activities is strategic and employees can play a pivotal role in Japanese CSR. Originality/value This paper examines the unique activities of a Japanese food industry leader from multiple data sources including observations of actual corporate behaviors in schools.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-02-2016-0017
       
  • Organizational crisis communication on Facebook: a study of BP’s
           Deepwater Horizon oil spill
    • First page: 80
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The purpose of this study is to explore BP’s crisis response on Facebook and factors contributing to its stakeholders’ perceptions of its crisis response strategies during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Design/methodology/approach Applying crisis response strategies, this study content analyzed BP’s crisis communication messages and Facebook users’ comments on BP America’s Facebook page. Findings The results revealed that information giving strategies dominated BP’s crisis response, and Facebook users were more likely to comment favorably when BP used information giving strategies and accommodative strategies. Bolstering strategies and third party endorsement did not achieve anticipated effectiveness. Originality/value The findings of this study will contribute to effective application of crisis response strategies.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:54Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-07-2015-0045
       
  • Effects of explanations communicated in announcements of alleged labor
           abuses on valuation of a firm's stock
    • First page: 93
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The study was designed to gauge the impact of the following on the share price of a firm that has allegedly committed labor abuses: the allegation itself, explanations (justifications and excuses) offered by the company spokesperson, and denials of responsibility for the alleged abuse. Design/methodology/approach The study uses archival data and an event study methodology. Findings Labor abuse allegations have a negative impact on the firm's share price. Allegations that are accompanied by an explanation (a justification or excuse) have a less negative impact than those that are not accompanied by an explanation. Denials of responsibility have a negative influence on the share price. Practical implications If managers want to avoid a negative hit on the share price from an allegation of wrongdoing, they should provide an explanation (a justification or excuse) and avoid the use of denials. Originality/value Extends findings of a negative impact from individual labor abuses to labor abuses as a general category. Extends findings from lab research on the impact of explanations on fairness judgments to a new context and a new dependent variable (the financial performance of the firm), which is on an organizational scale. Adds to the extreme paucity of empirical findings relative to the impact of denials. Adds to a small but growing literature on fairness judgments by third parties and their consequences.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:58Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-11-2015-0070
       
  • Cultural intelligence and state suspicion: attachment styles as moderators
    • First page: 113
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose State suspicion is a suspension in employees’ cognitive and motivational drives towards the organization. The aim of the research is to investigate the role of leaders’ cultural intelligence (CQ) in mitigating employees’ state suspicion. An understanding was also sought on moderating roles of employees’ attachment styles on the negative relationship between cultural intelligence and state suspicion. Design/methodology/approach Harvested from respondents from multinational software companies (MNCs) in Vietnam business context, the data were analyzed through hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Findings The data provided evidence for the negative effect of leaders’ cultural intelligence on employees’ state suspicion. Employee attachment styles were also found to play the moderating roles for that negative relationship. Originality/value This research advances suspicion research stream through its convergence with cultural intelligence research stream.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:57Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-06-2015-0032
       
  • Shielding or engaging: the use of online shareholder platforms in investor
           relations
    • First page: 133
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose This paper analyzes antecedents of listed corporations’ propensity to adopt online shareholder platforms. It differentiates two strategic investor relations frames, shielding and engaging, and explores their effect on ICT adoption. Design/methodology/approach Findings are based on a survey of 82 corporations listed on the Swiss, German and Austrian stock exchanges. We apply multiple linear regression analysis to test a multi-faceted adoption model. Findings We find that resource constraints, familiarity with online media and efficiency considerations drive listed corporations’ willingness to adopt online shareholder platforms. Beyond these opera-tional antecedents, strategic considerations significantly affect adoption: Investor relations (IR) functions geared towards shareholder engagement are more likely to apply interactive platforms, while IR departments geared towards shielding the corporation from shareholder interventions will be less attracted to the participatory affordances of online media. Research limitations/implications This study is limited in scope to corporations listed on the Swiss, German and Austrian stock exchanges and cannot account for antecedents distinct to other regulatory environments. Practical implications Investor relations functions need to carefully develop and apply communication strategies, which in turn will inform ICT adoption. We find that IR departments geared towards a two-way symmetrical communication model are more attracted to the participatory affordances of online platforms. Thereby, they are more likely to innovate by employing current digital applications. Originality/value This study contributes to research on the benefits of digital media to two-way symmetrical and dialogic corporate communications. It is the first to explore these relationships in the context of investor relations. It further contributes to research on the strategic role of investor relations by developing and applying two distinct strategic frames to the subject of ICT adoption in IR.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:59Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-05-2016-0037
       
  • Understanding social media governance: seizing opportunities, staying out
           of trouble
    • First page: 149
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 22, Issue 1, February 2017.
      Purpose The rise of social media such as Facebook and Twitter has provided employees with means to share work-related information. Increasingly, social media governance policies are implemented to negotiate the risks and opportunities of such behaviors. This study aims to unveil the motivations behind managers’ attempts to govern these behaviors. Design/methodology/approach Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten communication managers of various organizations. Higgins’ regulatory focus theory (Higgins, 1997) was used to examine (1) whether managers adopted a prevention or promotion focus to social media, and (2) whether regulatory focus affected the measures taken towards social media governance. Findings Prevention and promotion foci were both observed among managers, and differed per communication model. Managers who employed dialogic models of communication were primarily promotion-focused and emphasized opportunities to improve stakeholder relations, while managers who employed one-way models were primarily prevention-focused and highlighted the risks of social media (e.g. the risk of employees publishing messages that contradict corporate communication and confuse stakeholders). Social media governance differed depending on regulatory focus. In the prevention scheme managers usually attempted to regain control by restricting social media to private use only, while in the promotion focus managers trained and facilitated employees for work-related social media use, to various extends. Originality/value By examining the interplay of regulatory focus, communication models and governance this paper sheds light on the rationale behind social media governance policies that are implemented in organizations.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2017-01-04T12:36:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-06-2015-0035
       
  • Facebook discussion of a crisis: authority communication and its
           relationship to citizens
    • Pages: 414 - 434
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 414-434, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the authority communication and its relationship to citizens during a disaster. This analysis is crucial for organisations to help them understand the different ways in which crises are perceived by citizens, and the reactions they may cause. The results will help authorities in planning their crisis communication. Design/methodology/approach Facebook comments written by authorities and citizens are studied and analysed in an exploratory case study related to the 2011 catastrophe in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant via content analysis. Findings The analysis of Facebook comments revealed that authorities have to be prepared for communicating with citizens with diverging interests, who have different perceptions on a crisis and that relation is not the same with those different profiles of citizens. Research limitations/implications This case study only focusses on the Fukushima debate from the point of view of the authorities and citizens. Practical implications This study argues that it is crucial for both authorities and public relations practitioners to acknowledge that competing opinion holders are challenging each other and authority online, and that crisis communication should be planned accordingly. Originality/value The participant profiles can help organisations to clarify citizens’ crisis perceptions that can emerge in online discussions. Practitioners need to concentrate on determining how to get their voice heard so that there are perceived credible and legitimate actors.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:12:30Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-08-2015-0049
       
  • How can companies succeed in forming CSR reputation?
    • Pages: 435 - 449
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 435-449, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore the channels companies use to communicate their corporate social responsibility (CSR) messages and to test the effectiveness of those channels – specifically, press releases, corporate websites, CSR reports, corporate Facebook pages, and TV advertising – on forming companies’ CSR reputations. Design/methodology/approach The two primary methods used in this study were secondary analysis of existing data and content analysis. The study sample was the 101 companies in the Reputation Institute’s 2014 CSR ranking of the 100 most highly regarded companies (two companies were tied) across 15 countries. Findings Corporate websites and CSR reports were the most common channels for CSR communications, but press releases – through their impact on news articles – and general corporate Facebook pages were the only effective channels in forming CSR reputation. Originality/value This study provides empirical evidence of the effectiveness of various CSR communication channels; it not only focuses on CSR reputation, a specific aspect of corporate reputation which has not been studied in this context before, but also examines several different channels simultaneously, in contrast to previous studies which have only investigated one or two channels at a time.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:11:10Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-01-2016-0009
       
  • Internal audience segmentation and diversity in internal communication
    • Pages: 450 - 464
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 450-464, October 2016.
      Purpose Workforce diversity is becoming a crucial matter in the area of internal communication. Realizing that there are multiple brackets within the body of a workforce (i.e. internal audience), the purpose of this paper is to develop an intermediate approach to manage diversity by segmenting the internal audience. Design/methodology/approach Developing a segmentation approach for managing diversity, the authors recommended the use of a few mathematical methodologies, including the expectation-maximization algorithm, partial least squares structural equation model (PLS-SEM) methodology, and Chow test, on a surveyed data set collected from 1,236 nurses of the US healthcare system. A PLS-SEM model, including employees’ mission awareness, management’s mission fulfillment, employees’ mission fulfillment, and turnover intention, was examined with respect to two internal segments. Findings Using a simple set of demographic variables, the authors demonstrated a practical approach to segmenting an internal audience and showed that causal relationships in a nomological network of variables regarding mission integration are significantly different between internal segments. Based on the segmentation approach, the authors proved that managers, in an effort to gain maximum diversity, can mix and match both the centrifugal force of diversity and the centripetal force of diversity to value individuals and for mission integration in their practices, respectively. Research limitations/implications The authors highlighted a practical matter of internal communication by connecting the concepts of diversity and internal audience segmentation. However, the generalizability of the results must be assessed in other settings. Practical implications While managing diversity involves valuing employees as individuals, the segmentation concept can function as a practical and useful intermediate tool for managing diversity. Practitioners can utilize varied sets of segmented variables according to their contexts. Social implications The authors emphasized valuing employees as individuals and developed a managerial way to make personal differences an asset to the productivity of an organization and society. Originality/value Introducing a segmentation approach to internal communication and adopting a set of useful statistical techniques, the authors attempted to develop a unique managing model of diversity. The authors suggested a dynamic and substantial segmentation of an internal audience with a smaller set of appropriate variables in each context.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:10:24Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-05-2015-0024
       
  • Understanding emotionally involved publics
    • Pages: 465 - 482
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 465-482, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to examine the interplay of crisis type and felt involvement as well as product category on publics’ anger toward the company and empathy for the victims. Design/methodology/approach This study uses an experiment based on a 2 (crisis type: accident vs transgression) × 2 (publics’ felt crisis involvement: high vs low) × 2 (product category in crisis: food-related vs technology-related) mixed design. Findings Differential main effects on emotions were detected in different consumer product crises. One of the most interesting findings in this study was the main effects of high felt involvement over low felt involvement in strong feelings of anger toward a company and empathy for the victims in both food- and technology-related crisis situations. There was an interaction effect between crisis type and product category on feelings of anger toward a company. Participants in the food-related crisis condition reported more anger when exposed to a transgression crisis than an accident crisis. Research limitations/implications Future research needs to study other important crisis emotions and to measure them with multiple items instead of a single item. It would be useful to find out what combinations among crisis variables would produce interaction effects to better understand how different publics’ emotions are inducted and processed in different crisis situations. Practical implications The role of felt involvement on public emotions may not be product category specific, but rather be affectively influential across different product categories. From the standpoint of crisis management practice, the main contribution of the present study is to provide empirical evidence that crisis communication managers could use the level of publics’ felt crisis involvement to better predict publics’ emotions that are likely to be felt and displayed in crisis situations. Originality/value This study investigates the crisis-generated discrete emotions as a function of crisis type and felt involvement. Felt involvement should be considered as an important construct due to its potential consequences on publics’ emotions and their behaviors beyond perceptions of crisis responsibility. Crisis response messages should be strategically developed with a consideration of the interplay of crisis type, publics’ felt involvement, and product categories.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:12:56Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-10-2015-0064
       
  • Sponsorship selections: corporate culture, beliefs and motivations
    • Pages: 483 - 499
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 483-499, October 2016.
      Purpose Sponsorship can be an effective strategic marketing tool yet it attracts criticism as a corporate indulgence shaped by the personal interests of senior executives. While research into the outcomes of sponsorship is extensive, the practices involved in sponsorship selections have been largely ignored. Today, sponsorship selection in large corporations is recommended to be a formal process involving evaluation criteria aligned to corporate policy and strategic priorities. Yet, in reality, corporate culture influences sponsorship selection, as do sponsorship managers’ beliefs about sponsorship types and motivations. The purpose of this paper is to explore sponsorship selection practices and to consider the interplay between corporate culture and sponsorship managers’ beliefs about sponsorship types and their motivations. The findings provide not only new interpretation of the literature but also reveal a detailed picture of sponsorship selection. Design/methodology/approach This exploratory qualitative study comprises in-depth interviews with senior sponsorship managers from eight large Australian companies that use sponsorship as a strategic marketing tactic. Findings This study concludes that the sponsorship selection process is strongly influenced by corporate culture as well as the sponsorship manager’s beliefs about sponsorship types and their motivations. Originality/value This study contributes to the sponsorship management research stream by providing important insights into under-researched factors that influence the sponsorship selection process.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:12:07Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-11-2015-0072
       
  • (Un)willing to engage? First look at the engagement types of
           millennials
    • Pages: 500 - 515
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 500-515, October 2016.
      Purpose The purpose of this paper is to introduce a novel framework that includes degree, tone, and motives of consumer engagement of young consumers. Focusing on millennials, this paper offers preliminary look into their willingness and motives to engage with organizations on online environment. Based on narrative analysis, the authors establish nine different millennial engager types. The paper introduces a novel model grouping of motives for different tones and degrees of online engagement in the context of young consumers. Design/methodology/approach This paper is based on qualitative data collected through focus group interviews of 31 Finnish millennials (ages of 16-19 years). Data were analyzed by thematic analysis and constructing narratives. Findings The results show that there are nine different engager groups based on their motives for online consumer engagement. Out of the nine engagement types identified, two were negative and five included forms of disengagement. The findings are illustrated on a continuum of engagement that acknowledges three types of engagement: positive engagement, negative engagement, and disengagement. Practical implications The study introduces a model of grouping engager types by motives. The model, once developed further, is a helpful framework to identify and target different types of engagers. Organizations aiming to engage millennials should be aware of different tones and approach engagement via both degree and tone. Originality/value The value of the paper is in its attempt to introduce a novel framework that includes degree, tone, and motives of consumer online engagement. It sheds light on millennials willingness to engage online in reality, and more importantly, the lack of engagement, and highlights the necessity of understanding the willingness behind consumer engagement.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:09:43Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-06-2015-0038
       
  • Storytelling in organisations: supporting or subverting corporate
           strategy?
    • Pages: 516 - 532
      Abstract: Corporate Communications: An International Journal, Volume 21, Issue 4, Page 516-532, October 2016.
      Purpose Storytelling is claimed to be an effective way of communicating corporate strategy within organisations. However, previous studies have tended to focus holistically on storytelling in organisations rather than investigating how different groups may use and be influenced by stories. The purpose of this paper is to address these gaps in the literature by investigating how storytelling in internal communication can either support or subvert corporate strategy. Design/methodology/approach A qualitative study was conducted into storytelling in two large companies in the UK energy industry. Data were collected through 70 semi-structured interviews, documentary research, and observation research. Impression management theory was used to analyse how stories supported or subverted corporate strategy. Findings Storytelling by employees in the corporate and customer service areas of the organisations showed the greatest support for corporate strategy. There was more subversive storytelling in the operational areas, particularly by lower level employees. Stories subverted corporate strategy by recounting incidents and encouraging behaviour that contradicted the organisation’s vision/goals and values. Originality/value The study shows the important contribution of employees to the collective sensemaking process in organisations, by narrating supportive or subversive stories. Engaging employees in storytelling can enhance support for corporate strategy, however, managers should also see subversive stories as an opportunity to identify and address problems in the organisation.
      Citation: Corporate Communications: An International Journal
      PubDate: 2016-10-11T10:11:19Z
      DOI: 10.1108/CCIJ-02-2016-0020
       
 
 
JournalTOCs
School of Mathematical and Computer Sciences
Heriot-Watt University
Edinburgh, EH14 4AS, UK
Email: journaltocs@hw.ac.uk
Tel: +00 44 (0)131 4513762
Fax: +00 44 (0)131 4513327
 
Home (Search)
Subjects A-Z
Publishers A-Z
Customise
APIs
Your IP address: 54.158.152.80
 
About JournalTOCs
API
Help
News (blog, publications)
JournalTOCs on Twitter   JournalTOCs on Facebook

JournalTOCs © 2009-2016