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  Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1054 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (31 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (41 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (67 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (16 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (131 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (20 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (155 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (16 journals)
    - LAW (572 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (5 journals)

LAW (572 journals)            First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Duke Environmental Law & Policy Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Duke Forum for Law & Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Duke Law & Technology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Duke Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 20)
East Asia Law Review     Open Access  
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecology Law Quarterly     Free  
Edinburgh Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Education and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
El Cotidiano     Open Access  
Election Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Energy Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Environmental Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Environmental Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Environmental Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
ERA-Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Espaço Jurídico : Journal of Law     Open Access  
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Ethnopolitics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
EU agrarian Law     Open Access  
Europaisches Journal fur Minderheitenfragen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Energy and Environmental Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
European Journal for Education Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance     Hybrid Journal  
European Journal of Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context     Full-text available via subscription  
European Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 129)
European Public Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
European Review of Contract Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
European Review of Private Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 24)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal  
Evaluation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Evidence & Policy : A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Faulkner Law Review     Full-text available via subscription  
Federal Communication Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription  
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Federal Probation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Feminist Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
feminists@law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Florida Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Florida State University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Fordham Environmental Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Fordham Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
FORO. Revista de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, Nueva Época     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Geoforum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
George Mason Law Review     Free   (Followers: 5)
George Washington Law Review     Free   (Followers: 5)
Georgia State University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Global Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal  
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Golden Gate University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Grey Room     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Griffith Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Hague Journal on the Rule of Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Hamline Law Review     Open Access  
Handbook of Law and Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Haramaya Law Review     Open Access  
Harvard Environmental Law Review     Free   (Followers: 9)
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy     Free   (Followers: 22)
Harvard Journal of Law and Gender     Free   (Followers: 13)
Harvard Law Review     Free   (Followers: 49)
Hasanuddin Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Hastings Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 5)
High Court Quarterly Review, The     Full-text available via subscription  
Houston Law Review     Free   (Followers: 1)
IALS Student Law Review     Open Access  
IDP. Revista de Internet, Derecho y Politica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
IIUM Law Journal     Open Access  
Indiana Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Indigenous Law Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Indonesia Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Information & Communications Technology Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Data Privacy Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Free and Open Source Software Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Children's Rights     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Journal of Disclosure and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Health Planning and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Law in the Built Environment     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Legal Information     Open Access   (Followers: 103)
International Journal of Liability and Scientific Enquiry     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Marine and Coastal Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Journal of Punishment and Sentencing, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Rural Law and Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of Speech Language and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Technology Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of the Legal Profession     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
International Journal of the Sociology of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
International Peacekeeping     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Sports Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Theory: A Journal of International Politics, Law and Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Internationales Handelsrecht     Hybrid Journal  
IP Theory     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Iuris Tantum Revista Boliviana de Derecho     Open Access  
Ius et Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
James Cook University Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Jeffrey S. Moorad Sports Law Journal     Open Access  

  First | 1 2 3 4 5 6 | Last

Journal Cover   feminists@law
  [3 followers]  Follow
    
  This is an Open Access Journal Open Access journal
   ISSN (Print) 2046-9551
   Published by Kent Law School Homepage  [1 journal]
  • About the cover image

    • Authors: The Editors
      Abstract: This volume features a piece of artwork by Hannah Tiernan.  Hannah graduated in 2013 from the National College of Art and Design, Dublin and is now studying photography at Griffith College Dublin.  She works mainly in photography but also in sculpture and installation.  She has exhibited her work on a number of occasions in Dublin, including a solo show at the Hendrons Collider gallery space.  The image Sharper Edge came about through observing abstract forms in everyday objects.  The picture was taken of a broken glass block window in a converted factory.  As the block was hollow, the break resulted in a natural layered effect.  This effect was not necessarily obvious to the naked eye when seen in 3D however when taken digitally in a photographic 2D format, the result was more surreal.  For more of Hannah's work please visit her Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/HannahTiernanArtist?ref=stream.
      PubDate: Wed, 22 Jul 2015 00:00:00 -070
       
  • General Scheme of Access to Abortion Bill 2015

    • Authors: Mairead Enright; Vicky Conway, Fiona de Londras, Mary Donnelly, Ruth Fletcher, Natalie McDonnell, Sheelagh McGuinness, Claire Murray, Sinead Ring, Sorcha ui Chonnachtaigh
      Abstract: Ireland has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world. Abortion has been criminalised since 1861, and the passage of the 8th Amendment in 1983 introduced ‘the right to life of the unborn’ into the Constitution. The effects of the 8th Amendment are felt on a daily basis by women leaving Ireland for abortion, by pregnant women receiving maternal care, by doctors caring for pregnant women, and by lawyers working for the health service. As predicted by the then-Attorney General Peter Sutherland at the time of the referendum, the 8th Amendment has introduced an uncertain and practically unusable position to Irish law. It has, simply put, become “unliveable”.In late 2014 Labour Women, a branch of the Irish Labour Party, established a Commission for Repeal of the 8th Amendment. That Commission comprised three groups: a political group, a medical group, and a group of legal experts. The authors of this Draft Bill are those legal experts. In the accompanying paper, we first outline the legal status quo as regards abortion in Ireland before making a case for constitutional reform. Having established the desirability of, and need for, constitutional reform we then outline the working principles that informed our drafting of the Access to Abortion Bill 2015, bearing in mind our intention to craft a model for reform that would be workable from the perspective of women’s lives, medical practice, and politics. Although drafted as part of the Labour Women Commission, and with some (limited) input from the other Commission groups, the proposed draft is that of the authors (working within the confines of our remit as ‘legal experts’ to the Commission) and not of the Labour Party or of Labour Women. It is made available here for discussion, debate and development by all interested parties.
      PubDate: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 00:00:00 -070
       
  • Abortion Law Reform in Ireland: A Model for Change

    • Authors: Mairead Enright; Vicky Conway, Fiona de Londras, Mary Donnelly, Ruth Fletcher, Natalie McDonnell, Sheelagh McGuinness, Claire Murray, Sinead Ring, Sorcha ui Chonnachtaigh
      Abstract: Ireland has some of the most restrictive abortion laws in the world. Abortion has been criminalised since 1861, and the passage of the 8th Amendment in 1983 introduced ‘the right to life of the unborn’ into the Constitution. The effects of the 8th Amendment are felt on a daily basis by women leaving Ireland for abortion, by pregnant women receiving maternal care, by doctors caring for pregnant women, and by lawyers working for the health service. As predicted by the then-Attorney General Peter Sutherland at the time of the referendum, the 8th Amendment has introduced an uncertain and practically unusable position to Irish law. It has, simply put, become “unliveable”.In late 2014 Labour Women, a branch of the Irish Labour Party, established a Commission for Repeal of the 8th Amendment. That Commission comprised three groups: a political group, a medical group, and a group of legal experts. The authors of this paper are those legal experts. In this paper, we first outline the legal status quo as regards abortion in Ireland before making a case for constitutional reform. Having established the desirability of, and need for, constitutional reform we then outline the working principles that informed our drafting of the accompanying Access to Abortion Bill 2015, bearing in mind our intention to craft a model for reform that would be workable from the perspective of women’s lives, medical practice, and politics. Although drafted as part of the Labour Women Commission, and with some (limited) input from the other Commission groups, the proposed draft is that of the authors of this paper (working within the confines of our remit as ‘legal experts’ to the Commission) and not of the Labour Party or of Labour Women. It is made available here for discussion, debate and development by all interested parties. 
      PubDate: Sun, 28 Jun 2015 00:00:00 -070
       
  • David A.J. Richards, The Rise of Gay Rights and the Fall of the British
           Empire

    • Authors: Neil Cobb
      Abstract: Review of David A.J. Richards, The Rise of Gay Rights and the Fall of the British Empire: Liberal Resistance and the Bloomsbury Group (Cambridge University Press, 2013).
      PubDate: Sun, 17 May 2015 00:00:00 -070
       
  • Accessible Justice? Rape Victimisation and Psychosocial Disability

    • Authors: Louise Ellison; Vanessa Munro, Katrin Hohl, Paul Wallang
      Abstract: In a context in which research evidence indicates high rates of alleged sexual victimization amongst adults with psychosocial disabilities (PSD), this paper sets out to explore some of the challenges that are posed to the criminal justice system by these types of complainants. We do so by drawing upon rape allegation data recently collected by the London Metropolitan Police Service over a two month period. Our analysis of this snapshot of Metropolitan Police rape reporting suggests that a significant number of rape complainants have recorded PSDs, and that these complainants are significantly more likely than those without recorded PSDs to experience additional, circumstantial vulnerabilities, including intellectual disability, alcohol and/or drug dependency, and repeat victimisation. Our findings also suggest that cases involving complainants with recorded PSDs are significantly more likely to suffer attrition – to ‘drop out’ of the criminal justice system - due to police or prosecutorial decision-making. In this paper we reflect upon possible explanations for this heightened attrition rate but also use our snapshot analysis as a stepping off point from which to highlight the need for more sustained critical research on the treatment of complainants, and the adequacy of police and prosecutor training and practice in this area.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 May 2015 14:35:26 -070
       
  • Challenging and Redressing Police Failures in the Context of Rape
           Investigations: The Civil Liability Route

    • Authors: Joanne Conaghan
      Abstract: The question of police attitudes to and conduct of rape complaints has been in the British public eye now for some time. A damning succession of studies have catalogued police failings, from initial reporting through to final disposition of a case, generating a mountain of data evidencing deep structural, institutional, and cultural problems going to the heart of the effectiveness of the criminal justice system. Located within a broader policy context of growing concern over the low rate of convictions for rape cases and set against a backdrop of substantial reform of rape law, not just in England and Wales but around the globe, the police handling of rape investigations has attracted repeated criticism and public scrutiny.One way of addressing these concerns is through strategic civil litigation. ooking beyond the UK, it is clear that both tort and human rights arguments have been successfully invoked to redress systemic and operational problems pertaining to the police conduct of rape investigations. Within the UK, such developments have been constrained by the doctrinal framework, particularly by the strong judicial deference given to policy considerations against civil liability first articulated in Hill v Chief Constable of West Yorkshire (1989). However, recent developments in human rights law and, in particular, the successful suit against the Metropolitan police for investigative failures in the context of the ‘Black cab rapist’ case (DSD & NBV v Commissioner of Police for the Metropolis (2014)) suggest that this avenue of redress may now be opening up.How should this development be viewed in the context of the wider problem rape presents to criminal justice? Can civil liability be deployed effectively to bring about transformative cultural and institutional change in the context of investigating and prosecuting rape? Might it deliver results where all else appears to have failed? The purpose of this paper is to begin to explore these questions.
      PubDate: Tue, 12 May 2015 14:21:32 -070
       
 
 
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