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LAW (689 journals)                  1 2 3 4 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 354 Journals sorted alphabetically
ABA Journal Magazine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Acta Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Acta Universitatis Danubius. Juridica     Open Access  
Actualidad Jurídica Ambiental     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Adelaide Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Administrative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 38)
Aegean Review of the Law of the Sea and Maritime Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
African Journal of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
African Journal on Conflict Resolution     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Air and Space Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Akron Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Al Ihkam : Jurnal Hukum & Pranata Sosial     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Al-Ahkam     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alaska Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Albany Law Review     Free   (Followers: 6)
Alberta Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Alternative Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Amazon's Research and Environmental Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Journal of Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 51)
American Journal of Jurisprudence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
American Journal of Law & Medicine     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
American journal of legal history     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
American Journal of Trial Advocacy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
American University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
American University National Security Law Brief     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Amicus Curiae     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Amsterdam Law Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Annual Survey of South African Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Anuario de Psicología Jurídica     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ANZSLA Commentator, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Appeal : Review of Current Law and Law Reform     Open Access  
Arbitration Law Monthly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Arbitration Law Reports and Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Arctic Review on Law and Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arena Hukum     Open Access  
Arizona Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Arizona State Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 2)
Arkansas Law Review     Free   (Followers: 5)
Ars Aequi Maandblad     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Art + Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Article 40     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Artificial Intelligence and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Asian American Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asian Journal of Legal Education     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Asian Pacific American Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Australasian Law Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Australian and New Zealand Sports Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Australian Feminist Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Australian Indigenous Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Australian Journal of Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
Ave Maria Law Review     Free   (Followers: 2)
Badamai Law Journal     Open Access  
Baltic Journal of Law & Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Bar News: The Journal of the NSW Bar Association     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Behavioral Sciences & the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Beijing Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Berkeley Journal of Entertainment and Sports Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Berkeley Technology Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 11)
Bioethics Research Notes     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Bond Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Boston College Environmental Affairs Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Boston College Journal of Law & Social Justice     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Boston College Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Boston University Law Review     Free   (Followers: 10)
BRICS Law Journal     Open Access  
Brigham Young University Journal of Public Law     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Brigham Young University Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
British Journal of American Legal Studies     Open Access  
Brooklyn Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Bulletin of Medieval Canon Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
C@hiers du CRHIDI     Open Access  
Cadernos de Dereito Actual     Open Access  
Cadernos do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Direito - PPGDir./UFRGS     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cadernos Ibero-Americanos de Direito Sanitário     Open Access  
Cahiers, Droit, Sciences et Technologies     Open Access  
California Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
California Lawyer     Free  
California Western Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cambridge Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 133)
Campbell Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Campus Legal Advisor     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Case Western Reserve Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Časopis pro právní vědu a praxi     Open Access  
Časopis zdravotnického práva a bioetiky     Open Access  
Catalyst : A Social Justice Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Catholic University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Chicago-Kent Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Chicana/o-Latina/o Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
China : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
China-EU Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Chinese Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Law & Government     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Cleveland State Law Review     Free   (Followers: 1)
College Athletics and The Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Colombia Forense     Open Access  
Columbia Journal of Environmental Law     Free   (Followers: 10)
Columbia Journal of Law and Social Problems     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Columbia Law Review (Sidebar)     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Commercial Law Quarterly: The Journal of the Commercial Law Association of Australia     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 39)
Comparative Legal History     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Con-texto     Open Access  
Conflict Resolution Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Cornell Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Criterio Jurídico     Open Access  
Critical Analysis of Law : An International & Interdisciplinary Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Cuadernos de Historia del Derecho     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Cuestiones Juridicas     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Current Legal Problems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Danube : The Journal of European Association Comenius - EACO     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
De Jure     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
De Rebus     Full-text available via subscription  
Deakin Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Defense Counsel Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Democrazia e diritto     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Denning Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
DePaul Journal of Women, Gender and the Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
DePaul Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Der Staat     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Derecho PUCP     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Derecho y Ciencias Sociales     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Die Verwaltung     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Dikaion     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Dike     Open Access  
Direito e Desenvolvimento     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Direito e Liberdade     Open Access  
Diritto penale contemporaneo     Free   (Followers: 2)
Diritto, immigrazione e cittadinanza     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Dixi     Open Access  
Droit et Cultures     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Droit et Médecine Bucco-Dentaire     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Droit, Déontologie & Soin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Drug Science, Policy and Law     Full-text available via subscription  
Duke Environmental Law & Policy Forum     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Duke Forum for Law & Social Change     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 14)
Duke Law & Technology Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Duke Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 25)
DULR Online     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
East Asia Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ECI Interdisciplinary Journal for Legal and Social Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Ecology Law Quarterly     Free   (Followers: 3)
Edinburgh Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Education and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
El Cotidiano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Election Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Energy Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Environmental Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Environmental Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Environmental Policy and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
ERA-Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Espaço Jurídico : Journal of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
ESR Review : Economic and Social Rights in South Africa     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Ethnopolitics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ethos: Official Publication of the Law Society of the Australian Capital Territory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
EU agrarian Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Europaisches Journal fur Minderheitenfragen     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
European Energy and Environmental Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
European Journal for Education Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Journal of Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
European Journal of Psychology Applied to Legal Context     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
European Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 122)
European Public Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
European Review of Contract Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
European Review of Private Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
European Yearbook of Minority Issues Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Evaluation Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Evidence & Policy : A Journal of Research, Debate and Practice     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Faulkner Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Federal Communication Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Federal Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Federal Probation     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Feminist Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
feminists@law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Fiat Justisia     Open Access  
First Amendment Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Florida Bar News     Free  
Florida Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Florida State University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Fordham Environmental Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Fordham Intellectual Property, Media and Entertainment Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 19)
Fordham Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
FORO. Revista de Ciencias Jurídicas y Sociales, Nueva Época     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Fundamina : A Journal of Legal History     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Geoforum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
George Washington Law Review     Free   (Followers: 7)
Georgia Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Georgia State University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Global Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Global Labour Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
Golden Gate University Environmental Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Golden Gate University Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Grey Room     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Griffith Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
GSTF Journal of Law and Social Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 2)

        1 2 3 4 | Last

Journal Cover European Review of Private Law
  [29 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal  (Not entitled to full-text)
   ISSN (Online) 0928-9801
   Published by Kluwer Law International Homepage  [20 journals]
  • Revealing Underlying Tensions: Contracts and Other Dialogues
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Matthias E. Storme, Co-editor in chief.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Das Kindeswohl im spanischen Familienrecht. Eine vergleichende Analyse mit
           dem US-Recht
    • Abstract: : The general principle of law is the best interest of the child. This principle is inserted in a general clause in the Spanish Youth Protection Act of 15 January 1996. As a result, the Spanish judge is now able to apply this principle directly rather than subsidiary, which means that Spanish family law is now required to be interpreted from the perspective of the best interest of the child. The best interest of the child is now the central axis and has priority in the Spanish family law. This paper studies the concept of best interest of the child in the Spanish legal system and its application in special cases that are discussed within Spanish law. These cases are: conflicts between the biologic family and the foster family, the open adoption, and the jurisdiction of judgments in matters of parental responsibility.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      José Manuel De Torres Perea, Professor Titular de Derecho civil Fachbereich Bürgerliches Recht an der Universität Málaga (Spanien).
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • How to Make the Best of Mandatory Information Requirements in Consumer Law
    • Abstract: : EU consumer protection relies inter alia on information requirements imposing on traders the duty to provide specific and mandatory information to consumers before the conclusion of a contract. If consumers make well informed choices this can serve their individual interest, but it is also thought to contribute to a healthy market. However, the imposition of stringent and specific information requirements has been criticized from several points of view. For example, behavioural scientist have argued that more information does not necessarily lead to better decisions. From an economic point of view, information requirements can even be harmful to consumer interests. Nevertheless, information requirements form a substantive part of EU consumer protection and therefor this contribution explores how information requirements may be of added value. It is argued that information requirements can add value to consumer protection when regarded in relation to general contract law. This point is illustrated by an analyses of the information duties of the Consumer Rights Directive in relation to general contract law.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Martien Schaub, Assistant professor private law at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Who Has the Last Word'
    • Abstract: : This article analyses the process of judicial lawmaking in European private law as a continuous dialogue between the national courts and the European Court of Justice (ECJ). It addresses questions into the structure, the legitimacy, as well as the effectiveness of those dialogues. With regard to the first question, a recurring pattern of dialogue is described and explained, namely the practice of claiming the last word without actually using it. In answer to the second question the participation in dialogues between courts is justified from the perspective of finding an equilibrium between the national and supranational interests and values involved (as prescribed by the identity clause of Art. 4 sec. 2 TEU). In the third part it is claimed that the quality of the judicial dialogues can be enhanced by better reasoned judgments of the participating courts, in which they truly inform each other on their respective legal systems. Thus, the notion of a judicial dialogue can not only help us to obtain a better insight into the nature of the process of judicial lawmaking, it can also contribute to the improvement of the process itself.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Marc Loth, Professor of Private Law at Tilburg University.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Should the Implied Term Concerning Quality Be Generalized' Present and
           Future of the Principle of Conformity in Europe
    • Abstract: : One of the main inroads to the so-called Classic Contract Law has been made by implied terms imposing a certain quality on the subject matter of contracts, an outcome that has been achieved by resorting to a variety of legal sources and tools. Modernization and harmonization of European Contract Law, to this respect, has mainly focused on sales contracts (as an archetype to others), including the requirement of conformity in its terms. The article deals with the concept of conformity and assesses its profound implications to traditional notions of Contract Law. As in many European legal systems the principle of conformity is restricted to certain types of sales, it is necessary to furtherly deepen in national Law to assess the existence of equivalent requirements to conformity whenever it does not apply. To this end, the work undertakes a Comparative Law perspective following a realistic and functional methodology. As a central instrument in the modernization of Contract Law, the article assesses the desirability of generalizing the principle of conformity to all contracts, a position that, from a legal and economic perspective, is not recommended. The relationship between freedom of contract and reasonable expectations of the parties is an underlying tension to this matter in respect of which the present work proposes a solution.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Francisco De Elizalde, LLM. Ass. Professor of Law, IE University.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • A Comparative Analysis of the Frustration Rule: Possibility of
           Reconciliation Between Hong Kong-English ‘Hands-off Approach’
           and German ‘Interventionist Mechanism’
    • Abstract: : This article is a comparative analysis on the general frustration rule with reference to the two most interesting legal systems – Germany and Hong Kong. In Germany, the broad notion of Störung der Geschäftsgrundlage originated from its unique socio-economic background during the World Wars. Since its statutory codification on 1 January 2002, the doctrine has been praised as the most flexible and extensive solution to the problem of changed circumstances. Particularly, § 313 BGB welcomes judicial involvement in revising contractual terms. At least in a theoretical sense, the German model can be properly regarded as a highly ‘interventionist mechanism’. In Hong Kong, the pendulum has swung back too far to the other extreme. As the Hong Kong law on frustration was transplanted from the restrictive English model, the former largely operates within the narrow confines of supervening impossibility and essentially minimizes the role of judges who are given no power to fine-tune contractual obligations. In the light of this inflexible approach, the chances of succeeding in having a contract frustrated are very slim. However, against this discouraging trend, contracting parties have developed their own self-help strategies by incorporation of an appropriately drafted force majeure clause, a practice that tends to be the norm in most commercial dealings nowadays. This reflects a ‘hands-off approach’ of Hong Kong courts. The analysis here discloses that these two apparently dichotomous approaches, while representing two polar extremes in dealing with the problem of changed circumstances, actually yield the same result – a proper allocation of contractual risk. The author of this article will argue that, despite the apparent merits of the German model, the ‘hands-off approach’ suits the practical needs of Hong Kong and should be retained, particularly in view of the widespread use of force majeure clauses and the leniency shown by the courts in interpreting such clauses.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Gordon Chung, Bachelor of Laws with Hons (LLB) Candidate (Year 4), School of Law, City University of Hong Kong.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Legal Education Under Fire
    • Abstract: : Legal education has come under fire from all quarters, almost everywhere in the world. The crisis of legal education is not only an internal problem for universities and university scholarship, but also deeply affects public policies and the shaping of legal order. The main features of legal education that have shaped the major legal systems of the European area, but that are now experiencing a process of obsolescence are: the influence of Roman law, both directly and through the Pandectists; legal positivism, formalism and value-free scholarship, dogmatics and constructionism; the separation of the study and teaching of law from the study and teaching of history and of social sciences; the idea that law is a product of the State exclusively. To overcome these deficiencies, one should tear down the barriers between the fields, introduce new paradigms, a new grammar founded on the entire body of the law – not only on the field of civil law; open up the study and teaching of law to social sciences and history; place the study of transnational institutions and legal cultures alongside the study of local legal cultures, because legal science transcends national boundaries; reestablish links with public and private policies.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Sabino Cassese, Professor at the School of Government, Luiss University, Rome.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Fixing European Law Schools
    • Abstract: : To prepare law students for a tougher, rapidly changing legal world, European law schools need to reinvent themselves. This article argues that European legal educators should focus on equipping students with a broader skillset enabling them to become successful advocacy experts, effective legal risk analysts and creative legal problem-solvers. As part of a new, thoroughly interdisciplinary curriculum, legal education should concentrate on the acquisition of rhetorical skills and social-scientific tools allowing students to apprehend legal rules as the product of social dynamics as well as as instrument of social organization. To preserve their commitment to free, mass legal education, European law schools should also embrace full-scale digitalization to free up time and scarce teaching resources for more interactive and more experiential forms of learning.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Arthur Dyevre, Professor, KU Leuven Faculty of Law.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Penalty Clauses and the Recent Decisions by the UK Supreme Court in
           Cavendish v. Makdessi & ParkingEye v.Beavis
    • Abstract: : The UK Supreme court recently rendered two important decisions on penalty clauses: Cavendish v. Makdessi and ParkingEye v. Beavis. The penalty clause is a controversial legal concept in Europe because it can result in high and unreasonable payment obligations. Most European legal systems agree that some form of protection against unreasonable penalty clauses is needed, but differ in the way penalty clauses are restricted. The most extreme approach is followed by English law, where a distinction is made between invalid penalty clauses and valid liquidated damages clauses. The new UK Supreme Court cases introduce new elements in English law in this respect. In this issue, the two decisions are discussed from a comparative perspective by a number of authors from different legal systems (English & Welsh, Belgian, German, Dutch, French, Italian, Swedish and Polish law).
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Harriët N. Schelhaas, Professor of Private Law, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Case Note England and Wales, UKSC 4 November 2015, Cavendish Square
           Holdings BV v. Makdessi; ParkingEye Ltd v. Beavis
    • Abstract: : The UK Supreme Court decision in Cavendish Square Holdings BV v Makdessi; ParkingEye Ltd v Beavis marks an important turning point in the treatment of penalty clauses in England and Wales. In these two conjoined cases, the Court sought to give clarity to the previously complex law on this topic and to identify its underlying principles. The cases involved both commercial parties (Makdessi) and a consumer (ParkingEye). While refusing to abolish the rule against penalties, the Supreme Court, in adopting a very restrictive approach to intervention, highlights the continuing importance of freedom of contract reasoning in the common law of contract. It also provides a good illustration of the difficulties of applying a directive (here the Unfair Terms Directive 1993/13/EEC) in the national consumer law context.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Paula Giliker, Professor of Comparative Law, University of Bristol.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Belgique – A propos des clauses pénales qui ne peuvent être
           pénales
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Françoise Auvray, Chercheuse doctorante, Instituut voor Verbintenissenrecht, KU Leuven.
      Sanne Jansen, Chercheuse postdoctorante et B.A.E.F. Fellow Yale / Columbia Law School, Research Fellow Instituut voor Verbintenissenrecht, KU Leuven.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • German Case Note on the Penalty Clause Decisions of the UK Supreme Court
    • Abstract: : Under German law, penalty clauses are generally enforceable. However, unless the debtor is a merchant, the application of the penalty clause under the specific circumstances is subject to judicial review. In the course of this review, a German court would have to address the issues dealt with by the UK Supreme Court. As the special review applies only to penalty clauses, the German court would have to decide whether the clauses in question are penalty clauses or rather liquidated damages clauses or clauses adjusting the parties' primary obligations. If the clauses are to be construed as penalty clauses, a German court would have to decide whether or not the penalties ought to be reduced because they are unreasonably high; this is to be judged as of the time when the penalty was triggered. With regard to Beavis, an issue not discussed by the UK Supreme Court would raise difficult questions under German law: the issue whether the parties really had agreed on the clause. Nach deutschem Recht ist die Vereinbarung von Vertragsstrafen prinzipiell zulässig. Ist allerdings der Schuldner kein Kaufmann, kann das Gericht die Vertragsstrafe herabsetzen, wenn sie bei Berücksichtigung aller Umstände des Einzelfalls unverhältnismäßig hoch ist. Im Rahmen der Entscheidung über die Herabsetzung der Vertragsstrafe müsste ein deutschen Gericht diejenigen Gesichtspunkte ansprechen, die der UK Supreme Court erörterte: Da nur Vertragsstrafen herabgesetzt werden können, müsste das deutsche Gericht entscheiden, ob es sich bei den fraglichen Klauseln wirklich um Vertragsstrafen - und nicht um Schadenspauschalierungen oder die Anpassung der vertraglichen Leistungen - handelt. Falls es sich um Vertragsstrafen handelt, müsste ein deutsches Gericht entscheiden, ob sie unverhältnismäßig hoch sind; maßgeblich hierfür ist der Zeitpunkt der Verwirkung der Vertragsstrafe. Im Hinblick auf Beavis wäre nach deutschem Recht sehr zweifelhaft, ob sich die Parteien überhaupt auf die betreffende Klausel einigten - eine Frage, die der UK Supreme Court nicht problematisierte.  
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Florian Faust, Professor of Law, Bucerius Law School, Hamburg, Germany
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • The UK Supreme Court Cases on Penalty Clause Cases from a Dutch
           Perspective
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Harriët N. Schelhaas, Professor of Private Law, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • French Case Note on the Penalty Clause Decisions of the UK Supreme Court
    • Abstract: : This case note is a French perspective on UK Supreme Court decision in Makdessi. English law and French law are known to rely on different approaches towards contractual penalties. This seems to be confirmed after the recent (2016) reform of the French law of obligations. One of the central features of French law on contractual penalties is judicial intervention when the amount of the penalty is derisory or excessive. English law, after Makdessi, could be brought closer to French law as it puts the focus on the substance of the penalty clause and on the legitimate interest in the enforcement of the contract. However, it does so in a trend that further restricts judicial intervention, whereas French law is leaning towards a quite opposite direction.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Michel Cannarsa, Dean of Law, Lyon Catholic University.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • The New English Law on Penalty Clauses: An Italian Perspective
    • Abstract: : The contribution aims to evaluate some problematic issues addressed by the UK Supreme Court decisions on penalty clauses, taking into account discussions among Italian scholars and rulings of Italian jurisprudence. The focus is put on the issue of whether the rule against penalties should be abrogated or extended, on the scope of application of the rule against penalties (i.e. if it is applicable to primary obligations), on the benchmark to assess whether the rule against penalties should be applied and, finally, on the interpretation of the expressions ‘imbalance in the parties rights’ and ‘contrary to the requirements of good faith’ established by the Unfair Terms Directive. In conclusion, in the light of the innovative judgment, an assessment of the relationship between contractual freedom and the need to protect the debtor of a penalty will be put forward.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Francesco Paolo Patti, Bocconi University, Milan.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Swedish Case Note on the Penalty Clause Decisions by the UK Supreme Court
    • Abstract: : The UK Supreme Court has recently decided two interesting cases on harshremedies for breach of contract (the penalty doctrine). I will give approximate-descriptions of the cases and compare the outcome in the UK Supreme Courtwith the likely outcomes and reasonings as if the cases were tried by the SwedishSupreme Court. My conclusion is that the outcomes would be similar. The reasoningswould differ slightly, but not much. The applicable types of sources of law, however, differ considerably.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Christina Ramberg, Professor of Private Law, Stockholm University, Sweden.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • A Polish Perspective on Liquidated Damages and the Fairness of Contract:
           Comment on Cavendish Square Holdings BV v. Makdessi and ParkingEye Ltd v.
           Beavis
    • Abstract: : The comment presents the interpretation of contractual clauses under scrutiny in Cavendish Square Holdings BV v Makdessi; ParkingEye Ltd v Beavis according to Polish law. The authors describe the regulation on liquidated damages, the limitations to the freedom of contract and the role of general clauses in the assessment of the fairness of a transaction. Using different concepts and general clauses a Polish court would probably reach the same outcome in Cavendish and uphold the validity of the disputed clauses; the result can be different in ParkingEye.
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Ewa Bagińska, Professor of Law and head of the Civil Law Department at the School of Law.
      Paulina Ślufińska, Assistant Professor in the Civil Law Department at the School of Law and Administration, University of Gdańsk, Poland.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • Concluding Comparative Remarks in Relation to UK Supreme Court Cases on
           Penalty Clauses
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Harriët N. Schelhaas, Professor of private law, Erasmus University Rotterdam.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • World Tort Law Society’s Conference on Product Liability on 17th
           September 2015 in Vienna
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Authors
      Eva Ondreasova, Institute for European Tort Law, Austrian Academy of Sciences and University of Graz.
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
  • List of Contributors
    • Abstract:
      Content Type Journal Article
      Part of Volume 25, Issue 1
      Journal European Review of Private Law
      Online ISSN 0928-9801
      Print ISSN 0928-9801
      PubDate: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 12:00:00 +000
       
 
 
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