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Showing 1 - 83 of 83 Journals sorted alphabetically
Accounting and Business Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Accounting and the Public Interest     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Accounting Education: An International Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Accounting Forum     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Accounting, Organizations and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 44)
Advances in Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Advances in Developing Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 30)
Afro-Asian Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
American Journal of Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 23)
Annual Review of Organizational Psychology and Organizational Behavior     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 42)
Asia Pacific Journal of Human Resources     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 331)
Attachment & Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Australian Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
British Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Burnout Research     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Coaching : Theorie & Praxis     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Contemporary Accounting Research     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 29)
Corporate Governance and Organizational Behavior Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Critical Perspectives on Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
EURO Journal on Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
European Accounting Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
FOR Rivista per la formazione     Full-text available via subscription  
German Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Global Perspectives on Accounting Education     Full-text available via subscription  
HR Future     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Human Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 59)
Human Resource and Organization Development Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Human Resource Development International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Human Resource Development Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
Human Resource Development Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 31)
Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 86)
Human Resource Management Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 78)
Human Resource Management Research     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Human Resource Management Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 62)
Intangible Capital     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Journal of Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
International Journal of Accounting Information Systems     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
International Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Performance Evaluation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Banking, Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
International Journal of Behavioural Accounting and Finance     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Critical Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Economics and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Journal of Human Capital and Information Technology Professionals     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Human Resource Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 54)
International Journal of Human Resource Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
International Journal of Human Resources Development and Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 29)
International Journal of Management Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Management Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Journal of Accounting and Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 46)
Journal of Accounting and Public Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of Accounting Education     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Journal of Accounting Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of Contemporary Accounting & Economics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Corporate Citizenship     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Journal of HR intelligence     Open Access  
Journal of Human Capital     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities : A Multi-Disciplinary Journal for People-Centered Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Human Resource and Sustainability Studies     Open Access  
Journal of Human Values     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Journal of International Accounting, Auditing and Taxation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Journal of Marketing and HR     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of Organizational Culture, Communications and Conflict     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Journal of Professions and Organization     Free   (Followers: 6)
Kelaniya Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access  
New Horizons in Adult Education and Human Resource Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Open Journal of Leadership     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 69)
Personality and Individual Differences     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
Professions and Professionalism     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Psychologie du Travail et des Organisations     Hybrid Journal  
Public Personnel Management     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Quarterly National Accounts - Comptes nationaux trimestriels     Full-text available via subscription  
Research in Accounting Regulation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Research in Human Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Review of Accounting Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
Review of Public Personnel Administration     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Review of Quantitative Finance and Accounting     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Revista Gestión de las Personas y Tecnología     Open Access  
Revista Portuguesa e Brasileira de Gestão     Open Access  
South Asian Journal of Human Resources Management     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Southern African Journal of Accountability and Auditing Research     Full-text available via subscription  
Sri Lankan Journal of Human Resource Management     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Review of Public Personnel Administration
Journal Prestige (SJR): 1.225
Citation Impact (citeScore): 2
Number of Followers: 11  
 
Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal   * Containing 6 Open Access Open Access article(s) in this issue *
ISSN (Print) 0734-371X - ISSN (Online) 1552-759X
Published by Sage Publications Homepage  [1087 journals]
  • Data Compatibility Issues: How to Prevent Miscoding and Dropped
           Observations When Using U.S. Office of Personnel Management Data Sets
    • Authors: Ashley M. Alteri
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      A critical comparison of the agency identifier codes in the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS) and FedScope data sets reveals three distinct types of issues will occur when researchers attempt to merge the data sets: (a) a single agency is assigned different codes across data sets; (b) a single code is assigned to different agencies across data sets; and (c) a single code is assigned to two or more agencies in the FEVS data set and a separate agency in the FedScope data set. Between 2013 and 2016, these issues are present in almost all major federal departments. Compatibility issues between the agency identifiers could cause the user to drop observations unnecessarily or unknowingly combine two different agencies’ data improperly. If uncorrected, these issues will distort the analysis of studies that rely on this combination of data. However, researchers can correct for this issue and still use Office of Personnel Management (OPM) identifiers to combine data across multiple data sets.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2020-02-13T11:09:21Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X20904998
       
  • Does the Rank of the Perpetrator and Reporter Affect How Agencies Handle
           Workplace Aggression' A Test of Resource Dependence Theory
    • Authors: James Gerard Caillier
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Workplace aggression is a concern in many organizations. Despite this, research has not significantly examined whether or not organizations stop workplace aggression. Little is known about hierarchical aggression, coworker aggression, subordinate aggression, and agencies’ tolerance or rejections of such behavior. This study begins to fill this void by exploring what happens after employees report workplace aggression. More specifically, this study uses data from the Merit Systems Protection Board (MSPB) to examine workplace aggression committed by coworkers, supervisors, and subordinates and (a) the likelihood that perpetrators/agencies will retaliate against reporters of workplace aggression and (b) the likelihood that agencies will correct the adverse behavior in a manner that satisfactorily addresses the observers’ concerns. The findings in this article demonstrate that reporters of hierarchical aggression are more likely to face retaliation and less likely to get the behavior stopped than reporters of coworker aggression. Reporters of subordinate aggression, on the other hand, were not found to impact retaliation or corrective actions. Furthermore, the findings regarding retaliation were found to vary depending on whether or not the reporter was the target of the aggression.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2020-02-11T01:42:55Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X20903354
       
  • The Role of Inclusive Leadership in Supporting an Inclusive Climate in
           Diverse Public Sector Teams

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Tanachia Ashikali, Sandra Groeneveld, Ben Kuipers
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      In organizations with a diverse workforce, inclusive leadership is assumed to be required to support the full appreciation and participation of diverse members. To date, studies identifying how leadership enables an inclusive climate in diverse teams are scarce. The aim of this study, therefore, is to examine how inclusive leadership fosters inclusiveness in diverse teams. Hypotheses were tested on a sample of 293 team members clustered in 45 public sector teams using structural equation modeling. The results showed that inclusive leadership positively moderates the negative relation between team ethnic–cultural diversity and inclusive climate. This study shows that greater team diversity does not automatically yield an inclusive climate. Inclusive leadership is needed to support an inclusive climate in which different team members are valued for what they bring to work practices. Inclusive leadership is crucial for fostering inclusiveness in diverse teams. Limitations are discussed and recommendations for future research are proposed.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2020-01-22T11:22:11Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19899722
       
  • Fostering Well-Being Among Public Employees With Disabilities: The Roles
           of Disability-Inclusive Human Resource Practices, Job Resources, and
           Public Service Motivation
    • Authors: Luu Trong Tuan, Chris Rowley, Dinh Cong Khai, David Qian, Eryadi Masli, Hanh Quyen Le
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Regardless of their disabilities, employees with disabilities can contribute to the performance of public organizations. Our research purpose is to investigate how and when disability-inclusive human resource (HR) practices nurture the well-being of employees with disabilities in the public sector. Participants for this study consisted of employees with disabilities from departments and wards (grassroot-level governments) under the district-level governments in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Our results revealed the relationships between disability-inclusive HR practices and the well-being of public employees with disabilities via job resources as a mediator. The results further demonstrated that the effect of job resources on employee well-being was stronger for employees low in public service motivation than for those high in public service motivation.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2020-01-16T06:41:37Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19897753
       
  • Municipal Employees’ Performance and Neglect: The Effects of Mission
           Valence
    • Authors: Sylvie Guerrero, Denis Chênevert
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This article relates mission valence to two performance outcomes of municipal employees: task performance and neglect. We propose that mission valence is positively associated with task performance through perceptions of meaning, and negatively associated with neglect through cynicism. However, based on the negativity bias principle, we expect the relationships to be stronger through cynicism than through meaning. We test our research hypotheses on a sample of 177 employees and their supervisors working in a rural Canadian municipality. Findings highlight that cynicism is a key mediating variable between mission valence and employees’ performance outcomes. Mission valence affects meaning and cynicism, but meaning is not related to task performance and neglect.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2020-01-11T06:01:53Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19896013
       
  • The Effects of Family Responsibilities Discrimination on Public
           Employees’ Satisfaction and Turnover Intentions: Can Flexible Work
           Arrangements Help'
    • Authors: Lauren Bock Mullins, Étienne Charbonneau, Norma M. Riccucci
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Discrimination against caregivers is a topic of interest for the public sector workplace. This study assesses the degree to which family responsibilities discrimination (FRD) can diminish work satisfaction and lead to intentions of leaving the public service. It also examines the effects of flexible work arrangements on work satisfaction and intentions to leave. Applying Mahalanobis Distance Matching, we examine the Canadian Public Service Employee Survey and find evidence that family status discrimination has some impact on employees’ intention to leave the public service and can diminish satisfaction with work arrangements. We also find that federal public servants who feel like work and family/personal obligations adversely affected their career progression were less satisfied with their work arrangements and were more likely to want to leave their positions.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2020-01-09T10:17:02Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19894035
       
  • Unionization and Street-Level Bureaucracy: An Examination of Public School
           Teachers in the United States
    • Authors: Zachary Oberfield
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Union advocates and critics believe that unionization influences the performance of public organizations by altering organizational climates and street-level bureaucrats’ experiences and perceptions. However, few empirical works examine this expectation. This article contributes by exploring how variation in unionization is associated with street-level bureaucrats’ perceptions of red tape, discretion, leadership, and accountability. Using nationally representative teacher surveys from the United States, it examines how unionization was associated with teachers’ perceptions over a 9-year period. Although there was some evidence that unionization had a negative association with accountability, the article shows that unionization was not a strong, consistent predictor of street-level bureaucrats’ perceived experiences.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-12-31T11:47:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19894376
       
  • Bureaucrats, Authoritarianism, and Role Conceptions
    • Authors: Karl O’Connor, Colin Knox, Saltanat Janenova
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Governance literature in the developed world is rich with scholarship on the role conceptions of civil servants and how these guide their behavior in the attainment of political objectives set by elected representatives. There is however a dearth of research on the various roles civil servants play in developing countries, specifically those located in authoritarian states. This study uses Q methodology to examine the politician–bureaucrat interface in Kazakhstan, a highly centralized post-Soviet state. It finds evidence of three types of officials: job bureaucrats, policy entrepreneurs, and ethno-politicos. Tribalism and ethno-politics feature as an undercurrent in the political-administrative interface at the senior level. There is an overriding allegiance to the dominant political party that makes neutrality less important as an administrative tenet. Advancement as a career official has little to do with meritocracy, despite the façade, but rather connections are what matter.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-11-16T05:55:05Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19888009
       
  • Challenged by Great Expectations' Examining Cross-Level Moderations
           and Curvilinearity in the Public Sector Job Demands–Resources Model

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Robin Bauwens, Adelien Decramer, Mieke Audenaert
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This article extends the job demands–resources model in the public sector by including (a) cross-level (moderation) effects of job demands and resources, (b) positive and nonlinear effects of job demands, and (c) vitality as a key work engagement concept. Data on expected contributions and developmental rewards in public university colleges (n = 65 teams and n = 219 employees) reveals that individual-level higher expected contributions are associated with higher performance, mediated by vitality. This mediation is stronger in the presence of more team-level developmental rewards, suggesting a cross-level moderated mediation. We find indications for curvilinear effects of expected contributions. Contrary to expectations, these effects do not show inverted U shapes, but rather exponential relations. Our results contribute to “bringing in a psychological perspective” in public administration and suggest that public leaders could apply the job demands–resources model as a practical tool and vitality as a metric to create healthy and effective work environments.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-11-09T06:49:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19884102
       
  • Prosocial Motivation of Private Sector IT Professionals Joining Government
         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Ines Mergel, Nicola Bellé, Greta Nasi
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Attracting highly skilled IT talent has become a priority and an immense burden for government organizations—especially when they have other—higher paying—employment opportunities. We set out to explore why IT professionals choose a government job to make an impact on society. We aim at disentangling the effects of different types of motives, such as extrinsic, intrinsic, and other-oriented motivational forces on the decision to accept a challenging government IT job. We use self-determination theory (SDT) to analyze publicly available statements of former private sector IT professionals reporting their reason for joining 18F. Our study is one of the first attempts to use SDT as a comprehensive framework for conducting qualitative research into work motivation in the public sector. We shed light on the conceptual and empirical distinctiveness of motives, behaviors, and perceptions of prosocial impact, which are often lumped together in the public service motivation (PSM) literature. We contribute novel empirical evidence to a nascent stream of research that uses SDT to disentangle the intrinsic, prosocial, and purely extrinsic motives that drive individuals’ decisions to join public-sector organizations.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-11-09T06:46:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19886058
       
  • Intersectionality, Leadership, and Inclusion: How Do Racially
           Underrepresented Women Fare in the Federal Government'
    • Authors: Ashley Nelson, Jaclyn Piatak
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Women continue to be underrepresented in leadership positions, but how does the intersectionality of being both a woman and from a racially underrepresented group influence leadership representation and inclusion in the U.S. federal government' This study answers the call of scholars to examine intersectionality that has received little attention in public administration despite the emphasis on representative bureaucracy and social equity. Drawing upon data from the Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey, we find that women from racially underrepresented groups are less likely to be supervisors and feel less included in the workplace. However, we find significant variation across dimensions of inclusion, where women from racially underrepresented groups are more likely to feel their workplaces are cooperative and empowering but less likely to view them as fair, open, or supportive. Findings illustrate the importance of examining both intersectionality and different aspects of inclusion to paint a more complete picture of diversity management efforts.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-11-02T06:33:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19881681
       
  • Women and Public Organization: An Examination of Mentorship and Its Effect
           on Reporting Workplace Discrimination
    • Authors: Helen H. Yu, David Lee
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      A number of studies have focused on mentorship as a variable often associated with career advancement; however, there is little to no research on the impact mentors have with women reporting workplace discrimination, specifically sex-based discrimination to include sexual harassment. Using a survey dataset of 1,113 female officers from a large federal law enforcement agency, this research employs coarsened exact matching to examine mentorship and to include mentor’s gender and its effect on women’s reporting behaviors. This study finds that the probability of reporting sexual harassment increases when women have mentors; however, the existence of mentors did not lead to a significant difference in reporting sex discrimination. In addition, there is no significance on the mentor’s gender with women’s reporting behaviors.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-10-14T11:12:27Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19880578
       
  • Effect of Self-Efficacy and Instrumentality Beliefs on Training
           Implementation Behaviors: Testing the Moderating Effect of Organizational
           Climate
    • Authors: Samina Quratulain, Abdul Karim Khan, Meghna Sabharwal, Basharat Javed
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the individual and work-related factors that can affect the transfer of training processes. Specifically, our study focuses on organizational, individual, and training-related factors that can affect learning transfer in public service organizations. Based on a survey of public sector employees, our findings indicate that instrumentality/utility and self-efficacy beliefs are significant predictors of training implementation behaviors. Furthermore, organizational flexibility and feedback dimensions of organizational climate interact with trainees’ cognitions (instrumentality and self-efficacy) and positively affect training implementation behaviors. Our findings provide important insights that pave the way to extend our current understanding of training transfer processes in public organizations. This study adds to the literature by unpacking instrumentality—an understudied but key element of Vroom’s valence–instrumentality–expectancy framework—as an important predictor of training implementation behaviors among public sector employees.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-09-26T02:40:44Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19876676
       
  • Job Mobility Among Millennials: Do They Stay or Do They Go'
    • Authors: Khaldoun AbouAssi, Jasmine McGinnis Johnson, Stephen B. Holt
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Millennials are a substantial segment of the workforce; they are perceived to be driven by higher pay, quick to be dissatisfied and leave a job, and committed to volunteering. This article examines how these perceptions translate to job mobility in terms of job switching within and across sectors, without drawing cross-generation comparisons. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 cohort (NLSY97) from 2008 to 2013, we notice a trend among millennials of frequent job switching within rather than across sectors. Job dissatisfaction is the strongest predictor of public-sector employees switching jobs within the sector. For sector switching, we find some variation: Low pay corresponds with exiting the nonprofit sector, whereas job dissatisfaction is the strongest predictor of leaving the public sector. Millennials working in the public and nonprofit sectors are less likely to switch sectors if they volunteer. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-09-16T05:05:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19874396
       
  • Can Training Enhance Public Employees’ Public Service Motivation' A
           Pretest–Posttest Design
    • Authors: Chung-An Chen, Chih-Wei Hsieh, Don-Yun Chen
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Recent evidence shows public service motivation (PSM) may be unrelated to one’s consideration of a public service career. In places where civil service examinations prevail, even adverse selection (selecting low-PSM individuals) can occur. This leaves public sector managers with tough questions: “Can we improve new recruits’ PSM' Does training matter'” The present study attempts to answer these questions by using a case of onboard training in Taiwan. We hypothesize that PSM, along with public service–related knowledge and a positive attitude toward public service work, improves after training, and that the improvement hinges on trainees’ satisfaction with training and perceived usefulness of training. Analytical results indicate that knowledge and attitudes are more “trainable” than PSM. Meanwhile, training satisfaction is associated with the growth of public service–related knowledge, while perceived training usefulness relates to a positive attitude toward public service work and PSM. Overall, these findings advance our understanding of the effectiveness of public service training, its determinants, and the implications for public employees’ public service orientations.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-09-05T12:07:26Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19872244
       
  • Pay-for-Performance and Other Practices: Alternative Paths for Human
           Resource Management Effectiveness in Public Social Care Organizations
    • Authors: Laura Mariani, Sabrina Gigli, Federica Bandini
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Pay-for-performance has been widely adopted in the public sector to improve effectiveness and efficiency in service provision, which in turn positively affects employees’ satisfaction and commitment. Despite the presence of these initiatives in nearly every reform effort, limited concrete evidence of success has been highlighted. Through a fuzzy set qualitative comparative analysis on 17 social care organizations in Italy, the aim of this work is to contribute to the debate on human resources management practices in the public sector. Results suggest that pay-for-performance is effective when supported by other empowering practices. Furthermore, alternative combinations can produce the same positive effect on satisfaction and commitment.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-08-13T07:09:00Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19863841
       
  • Reversing the Lens: Assessing the Use of Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey
           in Public Administration Research
    • Authors: William Resh, Tima Moldogaziev, Sergio Fernandez, Colin Anguss Leslie
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the proliferation of published work using the U.S. Office of Personnel Management’s (OPM) Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey (FEVS) data, the scholarly community to date lacks a review of the practices and value associated with how scholars have used the survey data in their research. We turn a lens at the public administration research that has used the FEVS to this point. We assess the extent to which peer-reviewed studies follow the fundamental criteria of conducting empirical studies using survey data—from accepted guidelines and practices for preinferential evaluations of survey data to the reporting of baseline and advanced standards and practices of analytical methods for measurement and quantitative analysis. Our review provides an overarching appraisement of public management scholarship employing the FEVS, which can strengthen the partnership between OPM and public administration scholars as they jointly continue improving the survey instrument and pursue questions critical to effective governance.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-08-09T07:02:48Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19865012
       
  • An Examination of the Links Between Organizational Social Capital and
           Employee Well-Being: Focusing on the Mediating Role of Quality of Work
           Life
    • Authors: Myeong Chul Ko
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Although organizational social capital (OSC) is widely considered a potential resource for improving organizational performance, extensive research has paid limited attention to how employee well-being may be a positive outcome of OSC. Drawing on social exchange theory, need satisfaction, and spillover approaches, this study explores the effects of OSC on subjective well-being (SWB) through quality of work life (QWL) and job-related outcomes, such as organizational commitment and turnover intention. Using survey data obtained from public employees in South Korea, the results show that QWL mediates not only the association between OSC and organizational commitment but also the relationship between OSC and SWB. These findings highlight the importance of OSC as an intangible asset that can generate both organizational outcomes and employee well-being. In practice, these findings also imply that organizational resources and work environments should favorably respond to employees’ human needs to ensure improved employee well-being.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-08-06T06:46:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19865996
       
  • Gender, Race, and Diversity Values Among Local Government Leaders
    • Authors: Mary K. Feeney, Leonor Camarena
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the increased emphasis placed on diversity and inclusion, there is relatively little research that focuses on diversity values in small and medium-sized cities. This research uses data from a 2016 nationally representative survey to investigate how city department leaders’ perceptions of their organizations valuing diversity are related to the identity of the department head, the mayor, and the community. We find that women and people of color are underrepresented in city department leadership. Reporting that one’s organization values racial and gender diversity is significantly related to respondent gender, respondent race (for women), mayoral race (for women), and diversity in the community (for men), and that the interaction of mayoral and community identity is related to perceived diversity values. We conclude with a discussion of what these findings mean for diversity and inclusion in practice in local government departments, which often lack demographic diversity.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-08-02T07:09:36Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19865009
       
  • Relational Job Characteristics and Prosocial Motivation: A Longitudinal
           Study of Youth Care Professionals

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Joris van der Voet, Bram Steijn
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how changes in relational job characteristics relate to the prosocial motivation of public professionals. Drawing on relational job design theory, changes in job contact and job impact are hypothesized to covary with prosocial motivation. With a unique longitudinal design, we study youth care professionals in The Netherlands, who are embedded in a reform aimed at decentralizing youth care to bring professionals closer to their clients. Quantitative data were collected through a three-wave survey prior to the reform implementation and at, respectively, 1 and 2 years after its implementation. The results indicate that changing levels of job contact and job impact are related to changes in prosocial motivation. The study contributes to academic debates regarding the dynamic nature of prosocial motivation and our findings provide longitudinal evidence for relational job design theory.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-07-23T08:29:50Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19862852
       
  • A Career Stage Analysis of the U.S. Federal Employees’ Job Satisfaction
           and Turnover Intention: A Comprehensive Overview
    • Authors: Hyung-Woo Lee
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines how the determinants of job satisfaction and turnover intention are different across employee’s career stages, using a large-scale data set from U.S. federal agencies. A comprehensive examination of career stage differences provides a sophisticated understanding of the multifaceted nature of job satisfaction and turnover intention factors. The trajectory of career stage differences is linear, and the impact of career stages is rather minimal when it comes to the determinants of job satisfaction, whereas the differences in terms of turnover intention were more drastic and salient. Also, the patterns of career stage effect were more complicated than proposed in the existing studies. The implications of these findings are explored for future research and practitioners.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-07-18T05:39:09Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19856082
       
  • Is More Commitment Always Better' A Study on the Side Effects of
           Excessive Organizational Commitment on Work–Family Conflict
    • Authors: Hayoung Lee, Soo-Young Lee
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Despite the growing interest in and efforts for work–family balance, actual improvements in work–family balance have not been that significant in South Korea (e.g., increase in karoshi). This study considers an overly organization-oriented perspective as one of the reasons for this, and focuses on the side effects of excessive organizational commitment (OC) on work–family conflict (WFC), unlike most previous studies focusing on the positive effects of OC. Using the Korean Civil Service Survey, we found that OC has a significant U-shaped relationship with WFC and this U-shaped relationship appeared only in dual-income families. The results showed that when OC is too high, a negative transfer of resources from work to family overwhelms a positive transfer, thereby encroaching upon individuals’ personal lives. Therefore, organizational supports for employees to successfully perform their roles in the family while maintaining a high level of OC are needed.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-07-03T06:44:20Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19857799
       
  • Are We Innovative' Increasing Perceptions of Nonprofit Innovation
           Through Leadership, Inclusion, and Commitment
    • Authors: Kim C. Brimhall
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Innovation is particularly important for the sustainability, functioning, and improvement of public and nonprofit organizations. Researchers have called for the examination of how leaders can foster innovation in the nonprofit context. This study examined whether climate for inclusion and affective commitment were key mechanisms by which transformational leadership increased perceptions of innovation in a diverse nonprofit health care organization. Data were collected at three points in 6-month intervals from a U.S. nonprofit hospital. Longitudinal multilevel path analysis revealed transformational leaders increase perceptions of nonprofit innovation through helping every organizational member feel valued as an important member of the group and appreciated for their unique personal characteristics (fostering a climate for inclusion). Inclusion increases organizational members’ emotional attachment to the organization (affective commitment), which then enhances favorable perceptions of innovation wherein members feel comfortable sharing their ideas and perspectives with one another (critical to workplace innovation).
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T11:41:32Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19857455
       
  • Retirement and the Sectors: Do Private and Public Personnel Differ in
           Their Retirement Decision'
    • Authors: Racheli Levi, Dana R. Vashdi, Eran Vigoda-Gadot
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Retirement is a field of growing interest in both the public and the private sectors. Given the aging workforce in Western countries, understanding the factors that contribute to an employee’s decision to retire is an area of increasing interest to political, economic, social, and organizational scholars. Most retirement studies concentrate on a narrow set of factors, examining their impact on retirement in isolation of the broader context. Drawing from public management theory, and based on theories of person–organization fit (POF), we examine whether and when private and public personnel differ in their retirement decision. Findings indicate that previously shown relationships between individual-level financial status and the decision to retire are contingent on employment sector. The results of this research extend knowledge regarding the normative influence of mechanisms driving retirement and demonstrate the broader implications of sector on retirement decision-making.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-06-19T11:40:49Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19850886
       
  • Drivers of Social Engagement: Employee Voice–Advice Sharing
           Relationship
    • Authors: Adam M. Williams, J. Travis Bland
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Sparked by recent scholarly interest in identifying the drivers or antecedents of employee engagement, this article examines the relationship between an employee’s perception of voice and his or her propensity to socially engage in the form of sharing advice. In this article, we conceptualize an employee’s perception of voice as multi-directional in nature. This is because, whether directed upward, downward, or laterally, employees will develop multiple perceptions of voice as they distinguish between their social exchanges across and within the various levels of the organization. Surveying the city workforce of Marietta, Georgia, we found a positive perception of voice is a key driver or antecedent to advice sharing across vertical boundaries with superiors and subordinates and across lateral boundaries with peers. Yet contrary to what the literature would suggest about the influence of superiors on subordinates, we found that low perceptions of upward voice (i.e., perceptions shaped by those at higher levels of the organization) did not influence an employee’s decision to share advice with his or her own subordinates or peers. This research shifts some much-needed attention toward advice sharing as a social manifestation of employee engagement and establishes the importance of assessing and managing an employee’s multiple perceptions of voice.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-06-05T11:37:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19850873
       
  • The Attitudinal, Behavioral, and Performance Outcomes of Work Engagement:
           A Comparative Meta-Analysis Across the Public, Semipublic, and Private
           Sector

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Rick T. Borst, Peter M. Kruyen, Christiaan J. Lako, Michiel S. de Vries
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Eager to learn from private sector trends, practitioners in (semi)public organizations across the world have recently turned their eyes to the concept of work engagement to improve employee performance. Studies in the private sector show that work engagement is a more robust predictor of performance than, for example, satisfaction. The goal of this study is to find out whether the effects of work engagement on attitudinal, behavioral, and performance outcomes within the semipublic and public sector are also as high as expected and whether these relationships differ between the public, semipublic, and private sector. The results of the cross-sectoral meta-analysis of 130 studies showed that the most noticeable significant sectoral differences can be found in the mean work engagement and the effects of work engagement on the level of attitudinal outcomes (job satisfaction and commitment) and behavioral outcomes (workaholism and turnover intention).
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-06-03T07:25:42Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19840399
       
  • Job Security Rule Changes and Employee Organizational Commitment
    • Authors: Hyunkang Hur, James L. Perry
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This study assesses the impact of different job security rules on federal employees’ organizational commitment by looking at the effects of changes in the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) precipitated by MaxHR, introduced to DHS in 2005. The 2005 job security rule changes, as part of the “reformed” personnel system of the new DHS, reduced employee job security, which in turn weakened organizational commitment. The study found subsequent repeal of the job security rules in 2007 boosted organizational commitment among DHS workers by as much as 10 percentage points. Taken together, the results of difference-in-differences (DID) analysis for the new job security rules in the period 2005-2006 and subsequent repeal of the job security rules in the period 2007-2010 suggest that employees’ commitment to DHS was more favorable after the repeal of the job security rules than prior to the 2005 reforms.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-05-09T06:16:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19842622
       
  • Are the Best and Brightest Joining the Public Service'
    • Authors: Luke Fowler, Chris Birdsall
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The changing nature of public service has blurred the lines between economic sectors by intermingling public, private, and nonprofit missions, and made it easier for employees to balance extrinsic and intrinsic motivators by seeking employers positioned along a continuum that balance their interests. Using data from the “After the JD” study, the authors analyze responses of law school graduates to determine how academic qualifications and employee motives affect economic sector of employment. Findings suggest that the best and brightest law school graduates are predisposed to employment in the private or nonprofit sectors because they offer the strongest extrinsic or intrinsic incentives.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-04-27T05:17:22Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19836152
       
  • Leadership and Job Satisfaction: Addressing Endogeneity With Panel Data
           From a Field Experiment
    • Authors: Seung-Ho An, Kenneth J. Meier, Jacob Ladenburg, Niels Westergård-Nielsen
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The interaction between leaders and employees plays a key role in determining organizational outcomes and performance. Although the human resources management literature posits positive effects of leadership behaviors on employee job satisfaction, the causal path between the two is unclear due to potential endogeneity issues inherent in this relationship. To address the issue, we first provide theoretical explanations about why and how transformational and transactional leadership behaviors would enhance employee job satisfaction. Second, we test the relationship between leadership behaviors and employee job satisfaction using panel data from a year-long randomized field experiment that engaged leaders and employees from hundreds of public and private organizations in Denmark. Primary findings suggest that although leadership training does not have direct effects on changes in employee job satisfaction, leadership-training-induced changes in leadership behaviors (transformational leadership and verbal rewards) are positively related to changes in job satisfaction.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-04-04T07:18:25Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19839180
       
  • Trends and Gaps: A Meta-Review of Representative Bureaucracy
    • Authors: Sebawit G. Bishu, Alexis R. Kennedy
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      The representative bureaucracy theoretical framework explores the link between bureaucrats’ social and demographic characteristics and their likelihood to take actions that benefit citizens with whom they share identities. This meta-review analyzes 96 peer-reviewed representative bureaucracy journal articles to explore how the theoretical framework is described and applied and to track the contextual development of representative bureaucracy over time. Despite how far the field has come in connecting bureaucratic identity to normative policy outcomes, we find that the application of the theoretical framework is operationalized using a narrow set of shared identities (race and gender). In addition, we conclude that representative bureaucracy has been applied in limited geographic, methodological, and policy areas. Our article argues that the absence of studies that focus on intersectional identities, different geographic and policy contexts, and more qualitative and mixed methods impedes our understanding of the link between passive and active representation.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-03-19T07:14:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19830154
       
  • The Myth of Bureaucratic Neutrality: Institutionalized Inequity in Local
           Government Hiring
    • Authors: Shannon Portillo, Domonic Bearfield, Nicole Humphrey
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      As a field, we often relate merit and neutrality to the technical skills needed to be the “best” candidate for a job, but that was not necessarily what civil service reformers had in mind. The civil service system was meant to replace widespread political patronage, but the myth around the origins of the civil service system masked inequalities built into early testing requirements and institutionalized racial inequities in hiring practices. In this article, we argue the founding myth of bureaucratic neutrality was so powerful that it continues to reverberate in our field. We trace the current reverberations of the myth of neutrality through modern hiring practices and the contemporary legal landscape. By doing this, we present a systematic review of this rationalized myth in public employment, using an institutionalism framework. As the myth of bureaucratic neutrality continues to permeate decision-making, policy creation, and implementation, it will continue to institutionalize inequity within the field.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-02-14T01:54:10Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X19828431
       
  • How Multiple Organizational Changes Shape Managerial Support for
           Innovative Work Behavior: Evidence From the Australian Public Service

         This is an Open Access Article Open Access Article

    • Authors: Jan Wynen, Jan Boon, Bjorn Kleizen, Koen Verhoest
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Public organizations were once seen as the epitome of stability and implacability. More recently, however, public organizations have been subject to fast-paced environmental change. One common response to the challenges posed by these volatile environments has been the adoption of various organizational changes to make public organizations more adaptable. However, following threat-rigidity theory, this study argues that as employees perceive multiple organizational changes, managerial support for innovative work behavior (IWB) of employees decreases. Analyses on the Australian Public Service (APS) employee census support these assertions. Our results contribute to the literatures on work behavior, organizational innovation, and human resources management, by demonstrating that multiple organizational changes negatively affect managerial support for IWB of individual employees, which may—through their negative impact on individual-level innovations—ultimately affect the very adaptability of organizations that many changes aspire to achieve.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-02-11T06:42:14Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X18824388
       
  • Contracting and the Bureaucratic Representation of Minorities and Women:
           Examining Evidence From Federal Agencies
    • Authors: Lawrence A. Brown, J. Edward Kellough
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      This study examines the question of whether the extent of contracting out by U.S. federal agencies has an impact on the representation of minorities and women in those agencies. Contracting often results in reductions in force (RIF), which may occur at the lower and middle levels where there is significant representation of minorities and women. As a result, agencies that engage in higher levels of contracting may have lower levels of representation of minorities and women overall and in selected grade levels, controlling for other known determinants of minority and female representation. A panel design is employed with data on outside contracts as a proportion of each agency’s budget from 2009 to 2015. Those data are matched with a 1-year lag to data on the employment of African Americans, Hispanics, and women from 2010 to 2016. Findings indicate that contracting is associated with lower levels of African American, Hispanic, and female employment in selected grade levels.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-01-19T06:31:19Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X18822051
       
  • Work–Life Program Participation and Employee Work Attitudes: A
           Quasi-Experimental Analysis Using Matching Methods
    • Authors: Sun Young Kim, David Lee
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Work–life programs (WLPs) have been widely adopted and implemented by public organizations as a means of providing employees with greater choices and flexibility in coordinating their work and personal lives. Although previous research has shown that these programs are positively related to various employee attitudes and behaviors, empirical evidence about whether and how such relationships vary by type of WLP is relatively scant. In this study, we categorize WLPs into two different types—work-oriented and life-oriented programs—and explore whether and how participating in distinct types of WLPs has varying impacts on employee work attitudes. A series of Mahalanobis distance matching is conducted using data from the 2011 Federal Employee Viewpoint Survey. The results indicate that the use of life-oriented programs has a positive and substantive impact on employee satisfaction and commitment, while the effect of participating in work-oriented programs is not statistically significant.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-01-14T04:47:17Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X18823250
       
  • Emotionally Engaged Civil Servants: Toward a Multilevel Theory and
           Multisource Analysis in Public Administration
    • Authors: Zehavit Levitats, Eran Vigoda-Gadot
      Abstract: Review of Public Personnel Administration, Ahead of Print.
      Excellent public services build on excellent civil servants who are both emotionally intelligent and engaged in their work. This article proposes a conceptual framework for a better understanding of the relationship between public employees and their complex workplaces. We focus on the engagement of civil servants, the role of managers’ and employees’ emotional intelligence, and on employees’ public service motivation (PSM) to provide better services to citizens. We develop three major propositions: (a) the positive effect of employees’ emotional intelligence on their engagement, (b) the moderating effect of managers’ emotional intelligence on the relationship between their employees’ emotional intelligence and engagement, and (c) the moderating effect of employees’ PSM on the relationship between public servants’ emotional intelligence and their engagement. Our conceptual framework may set the stage for future research on civil servants’ engagement and emotional intelligence and their aggregate impact on the quality of government actions and services.
      Citation: Review of Public Personnel Administration
      PubDate: 2019-01-14T04:43:57Z
      DOI: 10.1177/0734371X18820938
       
 
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