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  Subjects -> POLITICAL SCIENCE (Total: 954 journals)
    - CIVIL RIGHTS (12 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (113 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCE (801 journals)
    - POLITICAL SCIENCES: GENERAL (28 journals)

POLITICAL SCIENCE (801 journals)                  1 2 3 4 5 | Last

Showing 1 - 200 of 281 Journals sorted alphabetically
A Contracorriente     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Ab Imperio     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Acciones e Investigaciones Sociales     Open Access  
Acta Borealia: A Nordic Journal of Circumpolar Societies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Acta Politica Estica     Open Access  
Acta Universitatis Sapientiae, European and Regional Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Administory. Zeitschrift für Verwaltungsgeschichte     Open Access  
Administrative Science Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 166)
Affirmations : of the modern     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
AFFRIKA Journal of Politics, Economics and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa Conflict Monitor     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Africa Insight     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
Africa Institute Occasional Paper     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Africa Renewal     Free   (Followers: 6)
Africa Report     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Africa Review : Journal of the African Studies Association of India     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Africa Today     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
African Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 65)
African Conflict and Peacebuilding Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
African Diaspora     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
African East-Asian Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 7)
African Identities     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
African Journal of Democracy and Governance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Journal of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
African Renaissance     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
African Yearbook of Rhetoric     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Africanus     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Africa’s Public Service Delivery and Performance Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Afrique contemporaine : La revue de l'Afrique et du développement     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Agenda Política     Open Access  
Agenda: A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Agrarian South : Journal of Political Economy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Akademik İncelemeler Dergisi     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Alternatives : Global, Local, Political     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Altre Modernità     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
América Latina Hoy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
American Communist History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
American Enterprise Institute     Free  
American Foreign Policy Interests: The Journal of the National Committee on American Foreign Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
American Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 304)
American Political Science Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 250)
American Political Thought     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
American Politics Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 28)
American Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Anacronismo e Irrupción     Open Access  
Analecta política     Open Access  
Análise Social     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Annales UMCS, Politologia     Open Access  
Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 42)
Annual Review of Economics     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 32)
Annual Review of Political Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 163)
Anuario Latinoamericano : Ciencias Políticas y Relaciones Internacionales     Open Access  
AQ - Australian Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription  
Arabian Humanities     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arctic Review on Law and Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Arena Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Armed Conflict Survey     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Asia & the Pacific Policy Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 16)
Asia Minor Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Asia Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Asia-Pacific Journal : Japan Focus     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Asia-Pacific Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Affairs: An American Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Asian Journal of Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Asian Politics and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Astropolitics: The International Journal of Space Politics & Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
AUDEM : The International Journal of Higher Education and Democracy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 10)
Aurora. Revista de Arte, Mídia e Política     Open Access  
Australasian Review of African Studies, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Australian Journal of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Australian Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Austrian Journal of Political Science     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Austrian Journal of South-East Asian Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Balcanica Posnaniensia Acta et studia     Open Access  
Baltic Journal of European Studies     Open Access  
Bandung : Journal of the Global South     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Basic Income Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Behavioral Sciences of Terrorism and Political Aggression     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Beleid en Maatschappij     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
BMC International Health and Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Brazilian Political Science Review     Open Access  
Brésil(s)     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
British Journal of Canadian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
British Journal of Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
British Journal of Politics and International Relations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
British Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
British Review of New Zealand Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Brookings Papers on Economic Activity     Open Access   (Followers: 46)
Bulletin d'histoire politique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Bustan     Hybrid Journal  
Cadernos de Estudos Sociais e Políticos     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
CADUS - Revista de Estudos de Política, História e Cultura     Open Access  
Cahiers de l'Urmis     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cahiers de Sciences politiques de l'ULg     Open Access  
Cambio 16     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Cambridge Review of International Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Canadian Foreign Policy Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Canadian Journal of Political Science/Revue canadienne de science politique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 23)
Caucasus Survey     Hybrid Journal  
Central and Eastern European Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Central Asian Affairs     Hybrid Journal  
Central Banking     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Central European Journal of Public Policy     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
China : An International Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 19)
China perspectives     Open Access   (Followers: 12)
China Quarterly     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 50)
China Report     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
China Review International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
China-EU Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Chinese Journal of Global Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of International Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Cittadinanza Europea (LA)     Full-text available via subscription  
Civil Wars     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Claremont-UC Undergraduate Research Conference on the European Union     Open Access  
Class, Race and Corporate Power     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Cold War History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
Commonwealth & Comparative Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Communication, Politics & Culture     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Communist and Post-Communist Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Comparative Political Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 162)
Comparative Politics (Russia)     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 9)
Competition & Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Conferences on New Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Confines     Open Access  
Conflict and Society     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Conflict Management and Peace Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 32)
Conflict Trends     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Conflict, Security & Development     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 381)
Congress & the Presidency: A Journal of Capital Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Conjunctions. Transdisciplinary Journal of Cultural Participation     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Constellations     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Contemporary Italian Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Contemporary Japan     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Contemporary Journal of African Studies     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Contemporary Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Contemporary Review of the Middle East     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Contemporary Southeast Asia: A Journal of International and Strategic Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Contemporary Wales     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Contenciosa     Open Access  
Contexto Internacional     Open Access  
Cooperation and Conflict     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
CQ Researcher     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
CQ Weekly     Full-text available via subscription  
Criterio Jurídico     Open Access  
Criterios     Open Access  
Critical Asian Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Critical Review : A Journal of Politics and Society     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Critical Reviews on Latin American Research     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Critical Social Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
Critical Studies on Terrorism     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Cuadernos de historia de España     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Cultura de Paz     Open Access  
Cultural Critique     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Culture Mandala : The Bulletin of the Centre for East-West Cultural and Economic Studies     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Debater a Europa     Open Access  
Décalages : An Althusser Studies Journal     Open Access  
Decolonization : Indigeneity, Education & Society     Open Access   (Followers: 10)
Defence Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Defense & Security Analysis     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Democracy & Education     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Democratic Communiqué     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Democratic Theory     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Democratization     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Democrazia e diritto     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Demokratie und Geschichte     Hybrid Journal  
Demokratizatsiya: The Journal of Post-Soviet Democratization     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Der Donauraum     Hybrid Journal  
Der Staat     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Desafíos     Open Access  
Development and Change     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 51)
Digest of Middle East Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diplomacy & Statecraft     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Diplomatic History     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 20)
Diritto, immigrazione e cittadinanza     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Dissent     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Diversité urbaine     Full-text available via subscription  
Dynamics of Asymmetric Conflict: Pathways toward terrorism and genocide     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
East European Jewish Affairs     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
East European Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Economia Politica     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 37)
Ecopolítica     Open Access  
eJournal of eDemocracy and Open Government     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
El Cotidiano     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Electoral Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 34)
Em Pauta : Teoria Social e Realidade Contemporânea     Open Access  
Encuentro     Open Access  
Environmental Politics     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Equal Opportunities International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Espacios Públicos     Open Access  
Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Estudios Políticos     Open Access  
Estudos Avançados     Open Access  
Ethical Theory and Moral Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Ethics & International Affairs     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Ethics & Global Politics     Open Access   (Followers: 7)

        1 2 3 4 5 | Last

Journal Cover Australasian Review of African Studies, The
  [2 followers]  Follow
    
   Full-text available via subscription Subscription journal
   ISSN (Print) 1447-8420
   Published by RMIT Publishing Homepage  [400 journals]
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Native colonialism: Education and the economy of
           violence against traditions in Ethiopia [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Jakwa, Tinashe
      Review(s) of: Native colonialism: Education and the economy of violence against traditions in Ethiopia, by Yirga Gelaw Woldeyes, The Red Sea Press, New Jersey, 2017, pp. 236, ISBN 9781569025093.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - African studies in Australasia: Views on China and New
           Zealand
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya
      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - China's evolving role and approach to international
           peacekeeping: The cases of Mali and South Sudan
    • Abstract: Neethling, Theo
      China's expanded involvement in post-Cold War United Nations (UN) peacekeeping operations coincided with Beijing's efforts in the early 2000s to expand its economic and diplomatic influence globally through trade and diplomatic links. Towards the mid-2000s, China was involved in all seven UN peacekeeping operations on the African continent. At the same time, Beijing's views on peacekeeping have consistently been premised on state sovereignty and the associated principle of non-intervention and noninterference in the affairs of other states. However, as China's strategic and material interests have become more integrated with the African continent, Beijing has been compelled more and more to consider its national (economic) interests and to protect those interests. Consequently, China's growing involvement in peacekeeping has evolved and become increasingly more difficult to reconcile with the country's historical commitment to noninterventionism, as specifically evident in recent Chinese peacekeeping involvement in Mali and South Sudan. Furthermore, the sending of Chinese combat forces to Mali and South Sudan suggests that China has become more comfortable with UN combat operations under certain situations.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - China's baby steps in Africa: A Historical reckoning
           of Chinese relations with Mozambique and Sudan until 2011
    • Abstract: Robinson, David; Hale, Benjamin
      China's presence in Africa has grown rapidly over the past two decades, as Africa's oil and minerals have become increasingly important for China's resource-hungry economy. China's network of relations with developing states began its expansion during the 1990s, and by the early Twenty First Century had become an increasing cause for concern amongst Western commentators. Critics of Chinese influence in Africa argue that China's economic relations are self-serving, and that their actions might detrimentally affect progress for democratisation, human rights, and sustainable development in Africa. Others argue that, in fact, Chinese policies aim to create long-term stability and development in African nations, on a mutually beneficial basis. This article will assess Chinese policies as implemented in the period up to 2011, in the two African nations of Sudan and Mozambique. Criticisms of Chinese relations with Africa will be considered, which commonly include that those relationships will hurt African economies, encourage corruption and authoritarianism, and threaten the security of African civilians. This article concludes that there is some truth to each of these criticisms, but that the reality is more complex, varies substantially from case to case, and does not preclude positive outcomes from these growing relations.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - 'Remembering' absent and recent pasts through
           photographs: Young Eritrean women in New Zealand
    • Abstract: Humpage, Louise; Marlowe, Jay
      This article presents a Photovoice project that explores the narratives of five young women of Eritrean heritage living in New Zealand. The photographs taken by the women suggest that their current individual and collective identities are mediated by two different kinds of 'memories': 'post-memories' of an absent past in their ancestral country that they were too young to experience, which build identity and belonging at the collective level, and 'autobiographical memories' of recent, lived experiences which remind participants of their individual achievements since resettlement and/or help them articulate a future in New Zealand.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - African mothers' experiences of raising 'Afro-Kiwi
           kids' in Aotearoa / New Zealand
    • Abstract: Connor, Helene; Ayallo, Irene; Elliott, Susan
      This article presents findings from qualitative research data gathered from a group of ten refugee-background and immigrant African mothers living in Auckland, Aotearoa/New Zealand. The research study-From Mama Africa to Papatuanuku: The experiences of a group of African Mothers living in Auckland-focused on the mothers' narratives and their perceptions of their experiences of mothering within the cultural and social contexts of Aotearoa/New Zealand, and how they set about raising their 'Afro-Kiwi kids' (a term used by several of the women to describe their children's dual identity) in their adopted country. Findings are specific to the cohort's experiences and the Auckland community in which they have made new homes for themselves and their families. The role and place of African women migrants in resettlement and research into their mothering is limited, and this research was cognisant of addressing this gap in the literature. The study acknowledged the strong role women have within their families as guardians of culture and language, and an underlying rationale was to increase understanding of the ways mothers contribute to new migrant and refugee-background communities and to uncover some of the challenges they face. Identifying central themes from the narratives was a significant aspect of this research. Identifying and reporting on the themes provided an inherently flexible approach and enabled the researchers to work collaboratively with the women to make sense of and interpret the data. Themes identified included: integration, language, connections with Maori culture, cultural reproduction and mothering practices.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Contesting transformation popular resistance in
           twenty-first-century South Africa; A flawed freedom rethinking Southern
           African liberation [Book Review]
    • Abstract: MacWilliam, Scott
      Review(s) of: Contesting transformation popular resistance in twenty-first-century South Africa, by Marcelle C Dawson and Luke Sinwell eds., London: Pluto Press, 2012 pp. 300, ISBN 97807453 35025; A flawed freedom rethinking Southern African liberation, by John S Saul, London: Pluto Press and Toronto: Between the Lines, 2014, pp. 199, ISBN 9780745334790, Between the Lines 978 1771131506.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Negotiated belongings: Stories of forced migration of
           Dinka women from South Sudan [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Levy, Wendy
      Review(s) of: Negotiated belongings: Stories of forced migration of Dinka women from South Sudan, by Melanie Baak, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2016, 231pp, ISBN 9789463005869.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 2 - Fees must fall: Student revolt, decolonisation and
           governance in South Africa [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Abraham, Ibrahim
      Review(s) of: Fees must fall: Student revolt, decolonisation and governance in South Africa, by Susan Booysen (ed), Johannesburg: Wits University Press, 2016, 350 + ix pp, ISBN 9781868149858.

      PubDate: Wed, 6 Dec 2017 12:08:01 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - ARAS submission guidelines
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Call for papers: The 40th AFSAAP annual conference
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - The Petro-developmental state in Africa. Making oil
           work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea [Book Review]
    • Abstract: MacWilliam, Scott
      Review(s) of: The Petro-developmental state in Africa. Making oil work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea, by Jesse Salah Ovadia, London: Hurst, pp. 246, ISBN 9781849044769.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - My friends were there for me: Exploring the
           pedagogical adaptations of secondary Nigerian-Australian students in
           Tasmania
    • Abstract: Kidmas, Lois; Ashman, Greg; Short, Megan
      This article explores the experiences of migrant Nigerian secondary students and their observations of teaching and learning within the Tasmanian context. These students and their families had migrated from Nigeria to Australia and their parents were skilled migrants serving as professionals in different fields (Department of Immigration and Border Protection, 2011). Australia's skilled migration program encourages professionals from various countries to seek employment opportunities where there are shortages. A particular focus of this article is the way in which students from these families have adapted to the pedagogical context of secondary schooling in Tasmania. In interviews, the students were encouraged to reflect on their prior schooling in Nigeria and to compare their experiences in Nigeria with their current schooling in Tasmania. A qualitative methodology was employed utilising semi-structured interviews and an analysis of written responses via a journaling exercise. The results suggest that three areas of adaptation (the social, the academic and the cultural) were important to the students' successful school experiences in Tasmania. The active role that the students played in their successful adaptation was also identified. Some recommendations for teachers, based on the literature and the findings of the project, are offered.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Afrikaner Emigres in Australia: Perception vs. Reality
           in human decision-making
    • Abstract: Jagtenberg, Hanna
      Based on ongoing ethnographic research among post-1994 first generation Afrikaner immigrants in Australia, I argue in this article that the majority of them base their decision to emigrate from South Africa on their perception of reality rather than on reality itself. The primary reason why they have left their home country was due to the 'affirmative action' policy, which they view as racist leading to 'reverse discrimination'. They believe that their children did not have a future in South Africa because of the fact that they have white skin. However, the preliminary results of this study show that in reality, only a very small number of participants have had an actual negative experience with affirmative action, and secondary sources demonstrate that white privilege still prevails in post-apartheid South Africa. Thus, the underlying, subconscious reason why Afrikaners are emigrating is their fear of the threat that affirmative action poses to their children's future. As such, it can be analysed according to Maslow's human needs theory, which shows that they are fundamentally in search of survival.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - "There are NO (Teddy) bears in Africa!" discuss
    • Abstract: McDougall, Russell
      In November 2007 a middle-aged English primary-school teacher in Khartoum named Gillian Gibbons was arrested and jailed for allowing her class of seven-year olds, after due electoral process, to name a teddy bear "Mohammed." Gibbons might have thought she'd be safe in Khartoum. The Civil War had ended two years earlier; and Khartoum was a long way from the ravages of famine and the fighting in Darfur. But with the Rift Valley Fever epidemic starting up and the terrible floods that year she should have known it would not be a teddy bears' picnic (BBC News, 2007).

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - The new black middle class in South Africa [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Abraham, Ibrahim
      Review(s) of: The new black middle class in South Africa, by Roger Southall, Woodbridge, Suffolk: James Curry, 2016, 296 + xix pp, ISBN 9781847011435.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Becoming Australian: Migration, settlement and
           citizenship [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fozdar, Farida
      Review(s) of: Becoming Australian: Migration, settlement and citizenship, by Brian Galligan, Martina Boese and Melissa Phillips, Melbourne University Press, Carlton, 2014, pp. 246, ISBN 9780522866377.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Women and power in postconflict Africa [Book Review]
    • Abstract: MacDonald, Catherine
      Review(s) of: Women and power in postconflict Africa, by Tripp, Aili Mari (2015), New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 292. ISBN 9781107535879.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Ethics and its discontents: Evidence from terrorism
           research in North-Eastern Nigeria
    • Abstract: Aghedo, Iro
      Terrorism and other forms of political violence have become a huge threat to human security, livelihoods and property in Nigeria in recent years. Though pervasive across the country, the North-East Geopolitical Zone has been the worst hit by insurgency since Nigeria's redemocratisation in 1999. This article examines the role of the researcher and their participants in areas affected by terrorism, and uses ethical principles as the framework of analysis. Following fieldwork-based experiential dilemmas in the terrorist environment (that is, where terrorists operate), this article argues that even though ethical principles are framed in general terms, their applicability is largely situational and contextdependent. Therefore, this article argues for a pragmatic situational ethical framework that gives 'voice' to respondents in North-Eastern Nigeria and similar terrorist environments.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Beyond minimisation of personal healthcare financing
           risks: An ethnographic study of motivations for joining Ghana's health
           insurance scheme in Daakye district
    • Abstract: Adusei-Asante, Kwadwo
      This article discusses the manner in which local contexts influence people to join health insurance schemes. The text is based on an ethnographic study that explored the modes of use of Ghana's National Health Insurance Scheme (NHIS) in the Daakye District, Ghana. The content is drawn from the author's Master of Anthropology thesis and the themes that emerged from participant observation and interviews with thirty respondents. Five reasons why people joined the NHIS in the research locality are presented. The findings show that 1) the prevailing sociocultural realities of Daakye District - where individuals saw themselves as being part of families, with socio-economic obligations - influenced how the local people received and used the NHIS; 2) people bought health insurance policies to minimise the healthcare financial risks for themselves and their families and other strategic reasons and 3) the conceptual framing of Ghana's NHIS policy was biased towards the individual rather than families. The study recommends a review of the individual focus of the NHIS to improve its cost effectiveness and operational efficiencies.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Why South Sudan's problems stem from the abuse of
           sovereignty: The case for co-governance
    • Abstract: Makinda, Samuel
      The continuing political crisis in South Sudan has been explained almost exclusively in terms of internal power dynamics. This article goes beyond the domestic focus and examines the manner in which the imbroglio has exposed weaknesses in South Sudan's sovereign statehood. It argues that it was the failure to uphold empirical and popular sovereignty that, in part, precipitated the problem. Therefore, it suggests that a resolution ought to involve a re-examination of the relationship between popular, empirical and juridical sovereignty. This article posits that a renegotiation of South Sudan's sovereignty, involving co-governance, would deliver good governance, strengthen economic management, facilitate state-building, and enhance regional security.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Somali oral poetry and the failed she-camel nation
           state: A critical discourse analysis of the Deelley poetry debate
           (1979-1980) [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Ahad, Ali Mumin
      Review(s) of: Somali oral poetry and the failed she-camel nation state: A critical discourse analysis of the Deelley poetry debate (1979-1980), by Ahad, 2015.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 38 Issue 1 - Human security in Africa
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - ARAS submission guidelines
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - David livingstone and the Myth of African poverty and
           disease. A close examination of his writings on the pre-colonial era [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: O'Callaghan, Margaret
      Review(s) of: David livingstone and the Myth of African poverty and disease. A close examination of his writings on the pre-colonial era, by Sjoerd Rijpma, Brill, Leiden, The Netherlands, 2015, pp. 610. ISBN 9789004293731.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Re-thinking values in Africa: For collective
           well-being [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Burke, Jean
      Review(s) of: Re-thinking values in Africa: For collective well-being, by Bawa Kuyini, Creatspace, 2013, pp. 125, ISBN: 1492771945.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Education, emigration, ethnicity and
           African-Australians
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Narrative and narrative strategies to explore trauma:
           'Up close from afar' - an African migrant's story
    • Abstract: Bacon, Eugen
      In this essay I discuss the process of writing autobiographical creative fiction, and how a narrative on trauma can offer the potential for catharsis to both the writer and reader. I give a self-reflective autoethnographic account that draws from my own personal feeling of discontinuity and an awareness of being between worlds as an African Australian migrant. I focus on the self-knowledge that emerged from the act of writing a short story in the wake of grief. I use narration-the act or process of storytelling-to understand my own narrative strategies, how I tell a story. The essay is interspersed with excerpts from my short story Up close from afar-a story that follows the emotional journey of protagonist Sienna, an African migrant in Australia, who loses her sister to HIV. In mirroring into the creative fiction aspects of my own experience (loss), my relationship with Sienna was symbiotic. I needed her as much as she needed me. As I developed her character and transferred to her my direct experiences, she responded. Without answering all my questions, Sienna came along with new meaning that helped me understand and process my grief. I divide my essay into background, the power of narrative, autoethnographic research, narrative devices and cathartic autobiography. My overall intention is to expose a written artefact (the short story) on death, an artefact that is, to me, also a metaphor for life.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Settlement and employment experiences of South
           Sudanese people from refugee backgrounds in Melbourne, Australia
    • Abstract: Abur, William; Spaaij, Ramon
      This article critically examines the settlement experiences of South Sudanese people from refugee backgrounds living in Melbourne, Australia, with a particular focus on unemployment and barriers to employment. Drawing on extensive primary data collected through semi-structured interviews with 20 South Sudanese Australians, the article demonstrates how unemployment features centrally in participants' narratives and appreciation of their settlement in Australia. Participants relate unemployment to issues such as social isolation, family breakdown, and intergenerational conflict, and foreground discrimination as a key barrier to employment. We reflect on these findings by discussing suggestions for future policy and practice in the area of refugee settlement and employment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Sudanese humanitarian migrants in Australian refereed
           journals
    • Abstract: Wickramaarachchi, Naduni; Burns, Edgar
      This article reviews the literature about Australian South Sudanese humanitarian migrants in refereed journals, and is underpinned by a concern for the settlement experiences of migrants and the reduced effectiveness of research which is compartmentalised into different academic disciplinary fields. Though a large volume of academic work has paid attention to many themes and issues, the present review identifies gaps in the understanding of Sudanese and South Sudanese views on family violence, economic stress, issues specific to older migrants, and perceptions of racialised policing. This article suggests the importance of bringing available knowledge from different disciplines into an accessible and cross-referenced platform to better serve southern Sudanese migrants' needs in assisting successful establishment of their new lives in Australia.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - News media reporting on substance use among people of
           African ethnicity in three Australian states, 2003-2013
    • Abstract: Horyniak, Danielle; Lim, Megan SC; Higgs, Peter
      The media play an important role in influencing public opinion and community discourse about health issues. Disproportionate reporting and misrepresentation of substance use issues among culturally and linguistically diverse groups can have adverse impacts on public perceptions of these communities. In the context of emerging media interest in substance use among African migrant communities, we examined the prevalence, characteristics and construction of print news media reporting related to substance use among people of African ethnicity. Relevant newspaper articles were identified through a systematic search of state-wide, regional and local community newspapers in Victoria, New South Wales and Queensland between 2003 and 2013. Descriptive analyses of the key content of the articles were conducted, as well as a qualitative analysis of important themes and linguistic constructs within the articles. Fifty-seven unique articles were identified. The most commonly identified substance was alcohol, which was mentioned in 68% of the articles. Most articles (81%) described specific incidents, with the key issues relating to substance use being violence (mentioned in 47% of articles), crime (32%) and drink-driving (29%). The refugee background of significant individuals in the incidents was emphasised, with these individuals constructed as either 'made vulnerable' by their refugee experiences and therefore deserving of sympathy, or as having a disregard for law and order and a lack of gratitude for the opportunities granted to them through migration to Australia, and thus deserving of punishment. Australian print media's portrayal of substance use among African migrants presents these communities as unaligned with Australian values, potentially marginalising them further. Continued efforts to address racism and discrimination at the interpersonal and structural levels are needed.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Zimbabwe's emigrants: Growth and change in Australia
    • Abstract: Edgar, Barbara; Lucas, David
      Prior to 2006 the Zimbabwe-born in Australia were largely ignored or subsumed within broader geographical "Africa" categories. However between 2001 and 2006 their numbers almost doubled to become the second most numerous birthplace group from sub-Saharan Africa. This prompted Lucas, Jamali and Edgar (2011) to analyse their basic characteristics, one finding being that they were increasingly of non-European ancestry. This article builds upon this work by analysing 2011 Australian census data with a particular focus on European and African components of the Zimbabwe-born. It examines the age/sex structures, occupations, industries, and Australian citizenship take-up rates of each subgroup, identified by their ancestries and languages. Both components are strongly represented in managerial/professional occupations. Unlike the situation in the United Kingdom, mentioned below, there is no strong evidence of deskilling. Although the ethnic composition has changed, the high socioeconomic status of Zimbabwean immigrants is indicated by the predominance of skilled migrants among settler arrivals since 1991. This is contrasted with immigrants from refugee source countries in Africa, who have often experienced interrupted schooling. Another finding is that the majority of both English speakers and African language speakers have taken up Australian citizenship, suggesting that return migration is unlikely to be significant in the immediate future. The substantial flows from Zimbabwe to Australia since 2000 are shown to reflect government policies and the state of the economy in both countries.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 2 - Parents, pay attention! Factors related to parental
           involvement with education in Northern Uganda
    • Abstract: Ezati, Betty Akullu; McBrien, Jody L; Stewart, Jan; Ssempala, Cornelius; Ssenkusu, Peter
      Prior to the colonial period (1896-1962), education of children in Uganda was a family responsibility. The introduction of formal British-styled schooling disrupted traditional learning by changing the nature of lessons into formal, Western style classrooms and lectures and by placing educational responsibility into the hands of missionaries, teachers, and the government. Since Uganda gained political independence in 1962, education and parental participation in their children's education have been further disrupted by numerous civil wars and resulting displacement, poverty, trauma, and government policies. The purpose of this article is to explore the relationship between historical effects and parental responses to education in northern Uganda. The authors used findings in the literature along with results from three research periods between 2007-2015 during which parents, teachers, and community leaders were interviewed in focus groups or individually, to understand ways in which parents were involved in or withdrawn from their children's education, and reasons for their involvement or inactivity. The authors draw from Epstein and Saunders' (2006) framework for involvement and Bronfenbrenner's (1979, 1999) ecological systems theory to frame the research. Our research indicates that a complexity of factors has contributed to reduced parental involvement, including poverty, dislocation, fear, alcohol consumption, and misunderstanding of policy. We conclude with some suggestions for improvement.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - ARAS submission guidelines
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Preventive arbitration: Towards strengthening the
           African union's mediation capacity for human protection
    • Abstract: Ifediora, Obinna Franklin
      The doctrine of human protection as articulated by United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in the Cyril Foster Lecture in February 2011 addresses immediate threats to human security. International responses to such threats are often initiated in the context of peace support operations by the United Nations (UN). These pacific measures available under Article 33 of the UN Charter, in particular international mediation, are fairly well developed within the UN. The role of regional organisations, particularly the African Union (AU), can be enhanced if these tools, such as mediation, are equally developed. As proposed in this article, this will involve restructuring the African Peace and Security Architecture (APSA) and African Governance Architecture (AGA) so as to bring mediation within the ambit of the latter, in line with the proposed Mediation Support Unit, and remove it from its current location under the APSA. Strengthening the AU's mediation capacity may also require developing additional pacific tools, such as arbitration. Arbitration capacities could then be integrated into a mediation mechanism for enhanced human protection. This article theorises the concept of 'preventive arbitration' as a means of strengthening the AU's pacific mechanisms for conflict prevention through peaceful means.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Sexual violence in the Congo free state: Archival
           traces and present reconfigurations
    • Abstract: Mertens, Charlotte
      Western imaginings and colonially scripted images of the Congo as barbaric, savage and the 'heart of darkness' have dominated understandings of events in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) since its colonial inception (Dunn, 2003). The contemporary global focus on sexual violence in the armed conflict of eastern DRC has only reinforced such framings (Eriksson Baaz and Stern, 2013; Verweijen, 2015). While sexual violence has captured the social imagination long before the Congo, contemporary international discourse has framed sexual violence as "the major horrendous crime of our time" and "an exceptional form of brutality" (Jolie, 2013). Drawing on largely unused archival material obtained at the Royal Museum of Central Africa and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Belgium, this article sheds light on how sexual violence prefigured our own times in King Leopold II's Congo Free State (1885-1908). The vivid memories and testimonies of the grotesque and spectacular violence inflicted upon the Congolese outline similar sexual atrocities to those that have taken place in the current conflict in eastern DRC. These memories are, in Mbembe's (2007) words, "traces and fragments" of colonial violence and excessive abuses. Yet today's international security discourses occur in the midst of an almost complete absence of such history and its memories. Ultimately it is argued here that the memories and testimonies as traces from a violent past, reshape historical understandings of colonial violence and open new avenues for rethinking past abuses and their endurance into the present.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - African challenges and challenges to African Studies
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya; Kelly, Max
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - AFSAAP 2016 - 39th annual AFSAAP conference call for
           papers
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Nigeria: A new history of a Turbulent century [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Neuhaus, Matthew
      Review(s) of: Nigeria: A new history of a Turbulent century, by Richard Bourne, Zed Books: London, 2015, 299pp, ISBN 9781780329062.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Somali poetry and the failed she-camel state: A
           critical discourse analysis of the Deelley poetry debate (1979- 1980)
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Kapteijns, Lidwien
      Review(s) of: Somali poetry and the failed she-camel state: A critical discourse analysis of the Deelley poetry debate (1979-1980), by Ali Mumin Ahad, New York: Peter Lang, 2015, 306pp, ISBN 9781433125157.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Darfur: Colonial violence, sultanic legacies and local
           politics [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Levy, Wendy
      Review(s) of: Darfur: Colonial violence, sultanic legacies and local politics, by Chris Vaughan, Suffolk: James Currey, 2015, 231pp, ISBN 9781847011114.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - 'Eat the heart of the infidel': The harrowing of
           Nigeria and the rise of Boko Haram [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Pijovic, Nikola
      Review(s) of: 'Eat the heart of the infidel': The harrowing of Nigeria and the rise of Boko Haram, by Andrew Walker, London: Hurst and Company, 2016, 281pp, ISBN 9781849045582.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Ethnomusicology, world music and analysis in African
           music
    • Abstract: Lewis, Tony
      The study of African music traditionally falls under the academic discipline of ethnomusicology, but with this categorisation comes a degree of colonial baggage. Under the purview of ethnomusicology, many have approached the topic from sociological and/or anthropological perspectives, rather than musicological per se. While not without value, these approaches have tended to imbue African music with mysticism rather than engage with the music analytically. In this context has arisen an anti-formalist position, which suggests that it is inappropriate to analyse African music, because to do so is to impose an external world view on the subject. As has been powerfully argued, however, those who take this position simultaneously practise and apply other disciplinary formalisms to the subject, which opens up a raft of further questions and issues regarding the study of the cultural 'other'. Recent developments in the musical academy have questioned the dichotomy of musicological and ethnomusicological practices. Further, a body of African scholars, led by Kofi Agawu, is recasting African music as a musicological rather than ethnomusicological topic. This approach calls for scholars to value, demand and practise greater structural analysis therein: to deny African music the right to analysis, some argue, is to deny it the right to legitimacy. This article discusses some of the key positions and practices in the historical study of African music, recent developments in detail, and projected futures for the discipline. The author draws upon his own first-hand experience of studying and analysing African music in Ghana and Zimbabwe, and of teaching African music in Australia, to offer perspectives on the challenges and inherent value in studying and analysing the music of Africa.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Zimbabwe's fast track land reform programme: Beyond
           emancipation, towards liberation
    • Abstract: Jakwa, Tinashe
      In this article I critique conventional understandings of the international relations' notion of juridical sovereignty. I argue that these understandings mask the fact that juridical sovereignty is a central governing rationality used to undermine the national self-determination of peripheral 'postcolonial' states. Independence has not resulted in the formation of an international community of equal sovereign states. I provide an alternative reading of juridical sovereignty and make a distinction between juridical independence and juridical sovereignty. This article is informed by the decoloniality perspective and draws from the works of Denise Ferreira da Silva and Sylvia Wynter - black women pioneers of the decoloniality framework - to argue that juridical sovereignty is rooted in Western modernity's conception of Man and, therefore, stands in direct and irreconcilable opposition to the juridical independence and self-determination of African states and peoples. The case study of Zimbabwe's Fast Track Land Reform Programme highlights how tensions between juridical independence and juridical sovereignty have affected the country's international relations and nation-building post-independence. This, in turn, highlights the challenges juridical sovereignty presents to the 'postcolonial' state.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - The power of non-governmental organisations in Sudan:
           Do structural changes matter'
    • Abstract: El-Gack, Nawal
      Non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are seen as drivers of change. This characterisation has led to the proliferation of NGOs, particularly in developing countries. Their numerous strengths and advantages have resulted in them being described as being 'there for the people'. Yet, despite their strengths, they have been criticised for their inability to meet structural and social challenges, as many of them are seen as being too professional, bureaucratic and focused on maintaining their funding, thereby perpetuating underdevelopment. Meanwhile, there are growing concerns regarding the partnership and accountability practices of NGOs. To contribute to this debate, this article will examine the roles of NGOs in the international arena and discuss the impact of funding in the creation and achievement of strategic goals, and how this directly affects the accountability of NGOs. In order to examine these issues, the author uses examples from Sudan to discuss how structural change and autonomy are both necessary for and detrimental to the accountability, reputation and role of NGOs in the development sector.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - The shades of black: Cultural anthropo-logical aspects
           of mutual perspectives and relations between African-Americans and African
           Migrants in the U.S.A. [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Natufe, OIgho
      Review(s) of: The shades of black: Cultural anthropo-logical aspects of mutual perspectives and relations between African-Americans and African Migrants in the U.S.A., by D. M. Bondarenko, (In Russian), Dom Publishers "YASK": Moscow, 2016. Pp. 216. ISBN: 9785990613331.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 37 Issue 1 - Dealing with government in South Sudan: Histories of
           chiefship, community and state [Book Review]
    • Abstract: O'Byrne, Ryan Joseph
      Review(s) of: Dealing with government in South Sudan: Histories of chiefship, community and state, by Cherry Leonardi, Woodbridge: James Currey, 2015, 253 pp, ISBN 9781847010674.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - African men's experience in Australia: Resettlement
           processes and the impact of service provision [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Muchoki, Samuel
      Review(s) of: African men's experience in Australia: Resettlement processes and the impact of service provision, by Juma Abuyi, Tasmania: Mercy Refugee Project, 2014, 185pp, ISBN 9780646920535.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Decoloniality in Africa: A continuing search for a new
           world order
    • Abstract: Ndlovu-Gatsheni, Sabelo J
      Decoloniality is re-emerging within a context of crisis of imagination of liberation, freedom, development and the future. The crisis is mainly manifesting itself at the ideological, theoretical and epistemological levels. Ideologically speaking, socialism as a utopic register has failed, and capitalism is battling to emerge from a deep crisis. Epistemologically and theoretically speaking, dominant social science theories (structuralism, post-structuralism, postmodernism and postcolonialism) are experiencing an epistemic limit. In the Global South, decolonisation that was aimed at liberating colonised peoples and deimperialising imperial power, has only succeeded in pushing 'the physical empire' to the background but failed to deal effectively with 'the metaphysical empire.' This article is a historical reflection on genealogies and the ideological basis of decoloniality in Africa in general, and an assessment of its current manifestations in South Africa in particular - the 'little Europe' of Africa and the last outpost of empire in Africa. Broadly speaking, decoloniality as posited in this article is part of the continuing search for a new base by the excluded and subordinated subjectivities from which to launch themselves into a new world order that is humane and inclusive.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Reflections on Africa and African studies: In memory
           of Cherry Gertzel
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya; Marlowe, Jay; Thornton, Alec
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Cherry Gertzel OA (1928-2015)
    • Abstract: Buswell, Clare; Lyons, Tanya; Miller, Karen; O'Callaghan, Margaret
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - This issue of the Australasian Review of African
           Studies is dedicated to Cherry Gertzel OA (1928-2015)
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - 'The diamond of western area is land': Narratives of
           land use and land cover change in post-conflict Sierra Leone
    • Abstract: Gbanie, Solomon Peter; Thornton, Alec; Griffin, Amy L
      In a rapidly changing urban environment, land use and land cover change (LULCC) have occupied the research agenda of the human-environment relationship discourse for decades. Although much LULCC research has addressed non-conflict environments, narratives that shape such emerging landscapes both during and after conflict have received little attention. This article therefore explores landscape dynamics in the Western Area (WA) of Sierra Leone through nine focus group discussion sessions involving 73 participants, and 30 key informant interviews with participants drawn from ministries, government departments and agencies whose work is environment related. Drawing on these data, this study has helped establish an understanding of the main drivers of post-conflict landscape change in the WA of Sierra Leone. Findings indicate that increases in WA's population, underpinned by the decade long civil conflict, culminated in high demand for land and hence its high economic value. The article also argues that weak environmental regulation, low staff capacity and the post-conflict land management framework contributed to the landscape changes observed after the conflict.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Spoken English does matter: Findings from an
           exploratory study to identify predictors of employment among African
           refugees in Brisbane
    • Abstract: Hebbani, Aparna; Preece, Megan
      This article presents findings from an exploratory survey aimed to identify predictors of employment for Sudanese, Somali, and Congolese former refugees living in the greater Brisbane area in 2009-2010. Quantitative data was collected from 56 participants (25 employed and 31 unemployed men and women). We found that only spoken English language proficiency increased the odds of being employed. Interestingly, we found no statistical significance between employment and demographics (i.e., age, gender, or marital status), length of residence in Australia, time spent in refugee camps, English proficiency (reading, writing or numeracy), or level of education. We discuss the implications of these findings and suggest improvements to policies along with ways to assist refugee employment.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Lexical borrowing from Arabic to Pular: Context and
           features
    • Abstract: Diallo, Ibrahima
      With the introduction of Islam, West Africa became a site for intense interaction and contact between the Arabic and African languages. This interaction subsequently strengthened due to West African languages borrowing substantially from Arabic for lexical expansion. However, studies of language contact between African languages and Arabic in West Africa have generally focused on the process of borrowing, and the outcomes of such borrowings have often been neglected. This article explores the language contact between Arabic and Pular in the Fuuta Jallon and the ways in which Arabic has impacted the lexicon of the Pular language. Pular, a language widely spoken in West Africa, has substantially borrowed from Arabic for lexical expansion. The study of the outcomes of these borrowings shows consistent recourse to linguistic simplifications, such as the substitution and deletion of complex sounds and the addition of suffixes. In addition, Pular speakers have appropriated Arabic words to coin new words and new meanings.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Development, witchcraft and Malawi's elite
    • Abstract: McNamara, Thomas
      Among the myriad witchcraft narratives which operate in rural Malawi is the understanding of the supernatural as empowering the nation's elite and its international donors. This narrative clashes with academic and other literature that ignores contextual understandings of the supernatural and reduces witchcraft accusations to a resistance to development, and leads to the belief (on the part of some academics and many development practitioners) that the solution to witchcraft accusations lies in more development. Conversely, however, this particular Malawian intersection of development and witchcraft/supernatural narratives creates a situation where further development can inadvertently entrench both rural Malawians' renderings of the supernatural and their disempowerment vis-a-vis donors and technocrats. To support this claim, the article builds upon works detailing the intimate relationship between witchcraft and development and foregrounds the Malawi case to show how those invested in development may reinforce witchcraft beliefs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - The postcolonial state in Africa: Fifty years of
           independence, 1960-2010 [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wilkins, Sam
      Review(s) of: The postcolonial state in Africa: Fifty years of independence, 1960-2010, by Crawford Young, University of Wisconsin Press: Madison, 2012, 488 pp, ISBN 9780299291440.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Still a pygmy: A unique memoir of one man's fight to
           save his identity from extinction [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Doherty, Matthew
      Review(s) of: Still a pygmy: A unique memoir of one man's fight to save his identity from extinction, by Isaac Bacirongo and Michael Nest, Sydney: Finch Publishing, 2015, 234 pp, ISBN 9781925048421.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 2 - Oiling the urban economy: Land, labour, capital, and
           the state in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bosiakoh, Thomas Antwi
      Review(s) of: Oiling the urban economy: Land, labour, capital, and the state in Sekondi-Takoradi, Ghana, by Franklin Obeng-Odoom, London: Routledge, 2014, 237 pp, ISBN 9780415744096.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The Australasian Review of African Studies (ARAS)
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - 1st call for papers: 38th AFSAAP conference
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Friendship, decent and alliance in Africa [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Utas, Mats
      Review(s) of: Friendship, decent and alliance in Africa, by Martine Guichard, Tilo Gratz and Youssouf Diallo (eds), New York/Oxford: Berghahn Books, 2014, 211 pp, ISBN 9781782382867.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Reporting disasters: Famine, aid, politics and the
           media [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Hammond, Laura
      Review(s) of: Reporting disasters: Famine, aid, politics and the media, by Suzanne Franks, London: Hurst Publishers, 2013, 248 pp, ISBN 9781849042888.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The rise of the BRICS in Africa: The geopolitics of
           south-south relations [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Day, Benjamin
      Review(s) of: The rise of the BRICS in Africa: The geopolitics of south-south relations, by Padraig Carmody, London / New York: Zed Books, 2013, 176 pp, ISBN 9781780326054.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The introduction of rapid diagnostic test for malaria
           in Mozambique: Local appropriation and complementary therapeutics
    • Abstract: Sequeira, Ana Rita
      In 2008 Mozambique's Ministry of Health (MoH), with the technical and financial support of transnational and international organisations such as United Nations (UN) agencies, USAID (United States Agency for International Development) and INGOs (International Non- Governmental Organisations), amongst others, introduced the Rapid Diagnostic Test (RDT) for malaria to be implemented across the country. This new biomedical technology impacted not just clinical practice, where health workers had to draw blood to be able to diagnose malaria (parasitological confirmation), but interacted with local worldviews and therapeutic practices in ways that needed to be incorporated into therapeutic interventions, notwithstanding patients' overall acceptance of the reliability of RDTs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Proposal for compulsory land acquisition for economic
           investment in Uganda
    • Abstract: Mugambwa, John
      Under the Ugandan Constitution, the Government has the power to expropriate any land required for public use. This power does not include expropriation of land for economic investment. The writer argues that the Government should have this power, subject to appropriate checks and balances.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Married to freedom': The importance of marriage
           for African methodist episcopal missionary women in South Africa, 1900 -
           1940
    • Abstract: Cooke, Claire
      In this article, I study the predominantly African-American religious denomination, African Methodist Episcopal (AME). Between 1900 and 1940, the AME regularly sent African-American members to South Africa where they worked as missionaries. Close analysis of AME hierarchy and structure, demonstrates that the AME overwhelmingly preferred to send couples to work as missionaries. Consequently, African-American AME women who journeyed to South Africa were typically married and did not undertake mission work as a career. In comparison, the travel of South African women who converted to AME was not as circumscribed. African-American AME women were held to different standards than their South African counterparts, with the differing standards symbolising the predominant race and gender relations of the time. African-American women had to be married in order to enjoy the freedom to travel internationally, but, quite unusually, female South African converts surpassed this limited freedom and sojourned internationally as single women and pursued missionary careers.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Gendered reintegration in Liberia: A civilised '(Kwi)'
           failure'
    • Abstract: Hills, Christopher
      This article examines the conspicuous absence of discussion of the civilised/native dichotomy in post-conflict Liberia. While seminal to an understanding of both status and gender relations in the West African state pre-war, the oppositional terms of civilised/native have been very much ignored in analyses post-conflict. The article draws upon the impressive body of literature analysing disarmament, demobilisation and reintegration (DDR)-and gendered reintegration specifically-in Liberia and fuses it with pre-war anthropological work on the civilised/native dichotomy. It is argued that a lack of focus on this seminal dichotomy reflects a pattern of antipathy towards a nuanced understanding of gender in the planning and analyses of reintegration more generally, and poses critical questions on the impact of such neglect.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Rethinking Islamism in Western Africa
    • Abstract: Sulemana, Mohammed; Azeez, Govand
      What factors have caused and sustained Islamism in West Africa' In answering this historically relevant question, this article re-examines the dominant narratives and hegemonic schools of thought that have attempted to tackle this phenomenon. Drawing from existing theoretical trends, this article repackages and synthesises their hypotheses into a basic formula. Escaping the ideological trappings of the past and overcoming the old structure-agency and material-ideational divide, this article argues that in West Africa, and the Sahel-Sahara region in particular, prerequisites for terrorism and factors that allow an effective dissemination of 'Salafi-jihadism' are primarily located in geography (human and physical) and history. Islamism, this article argues, is thus a mix of context-derived geopolitical and contemporary factors and a case of ideational resuscitation of historical events and religious memories.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Public artworks: Creative spaces for civic and
           political behaviour in Kenya
    • Abstract: Ombati, Mokua
      The cycle of ethno-political violence experienced in Kenya every electoral period threatens democracy, development, peace and stability. The devastating effects of the violence have variously affected Kenyan society. A section of Kenyans determined to prevent the country from receding further as a result of the violence have (re)conceptualised and (re)formulated graffiti as alternative tools for social transformation. The physical space has become a rostrum of civic advocacy and citizen participation, as graffiti is (re)framed to engage the populace and political leadership, and to develop national consciousness and moral accountability. The graffiti writers ('artivists') use symbols and objects as signifiers in order to relate and understand others, and express concepts in the daily life of Kenyans. Framed within the Symbolic Interactionist theoretical perspective, the study employs ethnographic methodologies to examine the conceptualisation, design and production of objects, physical signs and symbols as primary means of interaction, as used in the graffiti. The study advances a typology of the unique contribution of graffiti to the struggle for social change and contention in Kenya, which is distinct from more traditional social activism and protests. In particular, the study explores the ways in which the graffiti reflects a particular identity, agency, activism and advocacy that values daring, risk, rebelliousness, ingenuity, commitment and sacrifice, while at the same time calling upon and reflecting particular national and traditional values.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Marginality and linguistic cartographies of African
           denizens as spheres of possibility in regional Australia
    • Abstract: Ndhlovu, Finex
      The received view on refugees and other displaced people (hereafter 'denizens') is that they constitute a disadvantaged social group-disadvantaged economically, socially, politically, linguistically and in many other ways. Such a reading of 'denizens' ignores the prospects, opportunities and spheres of possibility that belie the temporal experiences of multilingual migrants. In this article, I use the concepts of 'denizenship,' 'marginality' and 'cartography' to provide new insights into our understandings of the benefits of multilingualism among African denizens in regional Australia. The specific focus is on how the psychosocial distribution of multiple linguistic usages by African denizens maps onto everyday interactional processes, social welfare and some aspects of migrant resettlement. The overall intention is to capture previously undescribed language practices of individuals and groups, their linkages with life stories, migration histories and temporal experiences, and how these constitute spheres of possibility for building new friendships and social networks leading to better quality lives.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Denizens, 'artivists', and terrorists - disarmament,
           development and diagnosis: Understanding Africa in Australasia and the
           Pacific
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya; Marlowe, Jay; Mickler, David; Thornton, Alec
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - Agricultural development and food security in
           Africa.The impact of Chinese, Indian and Brazilian investments [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Rabin, Anna
      Review(s) of: Agricultural development and food security in Africa.The impact of Chinese, Indian and Brazilian investments, by Fantu Cheru and Renu Modi (eds.), London: Zed Books, 2013, 280 pp, ISBN 9781780323725.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 36 Issue 1 - The threat of liberation, imperialism and revolution
           in Zanzibar [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Okello, Stephen
      Review(s) of: The threat of liberation, imperialism and revolution in Zanzibar, by Amrit Wilson, London: Pluto Press, 2013, 192 pp, ISBN 9780745334073.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Tourism as a means for development in livingstone,
           Zambia: Impacts among local stakeholders
    • Abstract: McLachlan, Sam; Binns, Tony
      As the Zambian government has attempted to diversify the national economy following the collapse of the copper price in the 1980s, tourism has become an essential focus. Livingstone, undeniably Zambia's tourism capital, has experienced rapid growth both economically and socially, becoming a tourism hotspot within the Southern African region. With this growth has come the opportunity for local people to become involved in the tourism industry, giving tourism the potential to become an industry that is both socially and economically sustainable. Whilst a number of recent reports, policies and external comments focus strongly on tourism's economic potential, many have failed to include the perspectives of local industry stakeholders. This article addresses three key local stakeholder groups: workers in the craft industry, tourism-based employees, and guesthouse and lodge operators, in order to gain understanding of the current impact of tourism at the grassroots level, and to identify possible future pathways with the potential to ensure that tourism in Livingstone contributes to positive livelihood development.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Tourism or terrorism' African development and
           renaissance
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya; Marlowe, Jay; Harris, Anne
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - 38th AFSAAP conference
    • PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Africa and the war on drugs [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Bowan, Lorraine
      Review(s) of: Africa and the war on drugs, by Neil Carrier and Gernot Klantschning, London: Zed Books, London, 2012, 184 pp, ISBN 9781848139664.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Millennium development goals - Kenya: Sustaining the
           gains for maternal and child health
    • Abstract: Juma, Juliana; Hauquitz, Alan
      As the 2015 Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) deadline approaches, Kenya will not be able to meet all the MDGs targets. Despite good progress, evidence shows that MDGs 4 and 5 (reduce child mortality and improve maternal health) are among the MDGs off track, not only in Kenya but also in other developing countries. Poverty, unequal development and lack of equitable access to health services are some of the factors that affect the ability to achieve the MDGs 4 and 5. Although the targets seem elusive given the deadline, every effort should be made to get resources to maintain the MDGs momentum and sustain the gains made by making health services more accessible, affordable and acceptable. Use of innovative technology such as m- Health and e-Health in government owned health facilities can increase women's access to information as well as health services.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - The workplace and HIV-related stigma: Implications for
           public health prevention and control policies and programs in Malawi
    • Abstract: Tsoka, Catherine; Mwanri, Lillian
      HIV/AIDS is a serious global infectious and chronic condition with no cure currently available. There is significant stigma associated with being HIV/AIDS positive. This can have substantial health implications by interfering with prevention efforts and discouraging people from safe sex practices, care-seeking behaviours, and seeking a diagnosis and treatment. Because HIV mostly affects the economically productive age group between 15 and 49 years in Malawi, workplaces have been substantially affected. There is also some evidence of targeted stigmatisation of people affected with HIV and AIDS at workplaces. The socioeconomic impacts of HIV/AIDS in the workplace are well recognised. According to the Government of Malawi, the major economic cost of HIV and AIDS is the loss of human resources in both the private and public sectors. HIV/AIDS affects work productivity through increased sickness, absenteeism, and loss of staff through death and attrition. The aim of this article is to review the literature to elucidate the factors that fuel HIV-related stigma in the workplace. For effective responses to address HIV/AIDS issues, investigation of the processes that underpin HIV-related stigma and their implications for institutional policies and programs are highly recommended as key areas for future research in Malawi.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Improving educational achievement for students from
           Somali backgrounds in Auckland, New Zealand: An evaluation of a school
           catch-up programme
    • Abstract: Warsame, Mahad; Mortensen, Annette; Janif, Jennifer
      From arrival in New Zealand refugee students are disadvantaged as they will often not have had the experience of formal education. In New Zealand, the mismatch of age and placement in classes contributes to educational failure. Additionally, Somali and other refugee-background parents are often poorly engaged with their children's schools and with their education. This article reports on the findings of an evaluation of a student-centred approach to improving educational achievement, the Somali-led Refugee Student Catch-Up class for primary, intermediate and secondary school students in the Auckland region. A participatory action research approach was used for the evaluation study which included: interviews with programme leaders and teachers; a survey of student educational outcomes; focus groups with students; and classroom observations. The study found that the catch-up programme resulted in improvement in students' marks in English, Mathematics and Science. Students of all ages were consistently regular attenders at the weekend catch-up programme. The study concluded that the catch-up programme had succeeded in improving student achievement, notably at the secondary school levels. Somali community involvement was a critical factor in maintaining leadership, voluntary support and parent and student engagement.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Refuge New Zealand: A nation's response to refugees
           and asylum seekers [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Majavu, Mandisi
      Review(s) of: Refuge New Zealand: A nation's response to refugees and asylum seekers, by Ann Beaglehole, Otago: Otago University Press, 2013, 264pp, ISBN: 9781877578502.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - The African renaissance and the quest for epistemic
           liberation
    • Abstract: Mungwini, Pascah
      The idea of an African renaissance as a quest for the rebirth and regeneration of Africa provides an opportunity to think differently about Africa, particularly in the context of its varied and unrelenting challenges. The rebirth and renewal of Africa cannot be achieved overnight as a miracle but only through a series of appropriately calculated processes of rehabilitating Africa on many fronts, including knowledge generation and its articulation. This article, which focuses on the question of knowledge, argues that the African renaissance depends in part on the ability of Africa to reconstitute itself as a legitimate centre of knowing. We argue that revisiting indigenous languages as instruments for generating modern knowledge is one contending locus out of which the drive for an African renaissance can be championed because, as the saying goes, 'knowledge is power'. An African renaissance - as a project which seeks to reconnect the African knowing subject to Africa's epistemological traditions - remains important for postcolonial Africa.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 2 - Centenary of failure': Boko Haram, Jihad and the
           Nigerian reality
    • Abstract: Sulemana, Mohammed
      This article examines the two contrasting narratives of the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria; namely, the global jihadi rhetoric and the domestic factors argument. A review of the numerous commentaries from academics, policy makers and security practitioners, reveals a heavy dose of the jihadi narrative as the dominant theme in the counterinsurgency discourse of Boko Haram. This contrasts however with mounting evidence and strong indications that the insurgency is grievance-driven and largely a creation of conditions within the Nigerian state. Against this background, the fact that the insurgents are persistent in their lethal campaign for a caliphate means that Boko Haram has defied the military might of Africa's most populous, and perhaps strongest, state. I argue that the renewed momentum and increasing sophistication of Boko Haram are a forceful reminder that Nigeria, and West Africa, cannot afford the obscurity that afflicts the causative discourse on this security threat. Furthermore, I restate the primacy of domestic factors, as opposed to the global, in combating political violence in Nigeria.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Cultural practice as resistance in the British colony
           of Kenya
    • Abstract: Kenny, Christina
      In this article, I reframe the 'female circumcision controversy' 1928 - 1931, focusing on locating Ratna Kapur's 'erotic subject'. Kapur develops the terms 'sexual subaltern' and the 'erotic subject' in order to trouble the boundaries of, and ultimately expand the category of the legitimate, rights bearing subject (Kapur 2005). Searching for the voices of these disruptive subjects also compels fresh interrogations of the gendered, colonised subject.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Nationalism, nation building and the African diaspora
           in Australasia
    • Abstract: Lyons, Tanya; Marlowe, Jay; Harris, Anne
      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Christmas in South Sudan: Fieldnotes from a warzone
    • Abstract: O'Byrne, Ryan
      In many ways, this Christmas was like any other we had experienced. There was the early morning excitement, the quality time spent with friends and family, and the much-enjoyed consumption of unnecessary amounts of food prepared by Grace, our host mother. Drifting in and out of the conversation, however, was the recent outbreak of violence, news of which hung over proceedings like a cloud of smoke from the fires so common here in the dry season. After all, it had only been ten days since news of the 'coup' first broke, and the conflict's rapid escalation had everyone a little on edge. Worse still was the rumour violence had not only spread to Bor and Malakal, but perhaps even to Eastern Equatoria itself.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Ethnocinema: Intercultural arts education [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Mhando, Martin
      Review(s) of: Ethnocinema: Intercultural arts education, by Anne M Harris, New York / London: Springer, 2012, 201 pp, ISBN 9789400742253.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - 'I have to be my own mother and father': The African
           student experience at university, a case study using narrative analysis
    • Abstract: Lawson, Lynda
      Recent refugee arrivals in Australia are overwhelmingly young, with 45,900 of the 54,824 humanitarian visa entrants between 2002 and 2007 aged between sixteen and thirty years of age. At the critical transition of entering adult life, these young people experience a massive relocation shock and challenges to identity. Many have experienced extreme trauma and are making this transition without close family. As one Sudanese student commented, "I have to be my own mother and father". Tertiary education is a vital pathway for establishing the future of these young people. This article tells the story of one refugee student who has overcome enormous challenges to succeed in engaging both academically and with the university community. Drawn from a series of interviews of African students undertaken in 2011, this student provides rich evidence of the challenges faced and the factors that facilitate success in a tertiary setting. He is a gifted storyteller and the opportunity to tell his story through a student ambassador program has been a protective factor that has provided him with a powerful identity resource. A thematic and linguistic analysis is offered. This analysis provides insights into the needs of African students and some ways in which universities can meet those needs.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - 'But we can't make them drink': Understanding
           community ownership in the Namwera and Chiponde Afforestation Project
    • Abstract: Corbett, Jack
      This article explores the application and viability of a participatory development model through an examination of the barriers to community ownership apparent within the Namwera and Chiponde Afforestation Project (NCAP); a community-initiated forestry project developed in response to wood-fuel scarcity in the Mangochi District of Southern Malawi. Despite its participatory design, project stakeholders continued to express aspirations for increased material sponsorship, which project facilitators considered to be incompatible with the guiding principle of the participant driven development model - ownership. Conflicting views concerning sponsorship illustrate the degree to which the regional development context, defined by satisfying immediate needs, challenges community ownership of the NCAP. To that end, as a case the NCAP embodies both the possibilities and the constraints faced by these types of initiatives and the development model that underpins them.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - 'Once upon a time there was a wonderful country':
           Representations of history in Rwanda
    • Abstract: Mayersen, Deborah
      In April 1994, genocide erupted in Rwanda with an unprecedented ferocity. Over the course of 100 days, more than 800,000 Tutsi and moderate Hutu were killed. A major contributor to the violence was an intense propaganda campaign that dehumanised and demonised the Tutsi minority prior to and during the genocide. This propaganda presented the Tutsi as foreign and feudal oppressors, who would again oppress the Hutu majority as they had in the past if they were not targeted for extermination. Such dubious representations of history have deep roots in Rwanda, which can be traced to the early colonial period. This article will explore three examples of the way in which history has been represented and misrepresented in Rwanda, spanning from colonial to contemporary periods. It will consider how key stakeholders have sometimes portrayed Rwanda's history in skewed and inaccurate ways, and the profound impact this has had on ethnic divisions within the country. Moreover, it will examine how misrepresentations of Rwanda's history are continuing in the post-genocide period. It is only through interrogating (mis)representations of Rwanda's history that the political agendas that have and continue to shape them can be exposed and challenged.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - South Africa and the world economy: Remaking race,
           state, and region [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Elbra, Ainsley D
      Review(s) of: South Africa and the world economy: Remaking race, state, and region, by William G. Martin, Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2013, 271 pp, ISBN 9781580464314.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Kenya: Between hope and despair, 1963-2011 [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Rabin, Anna
      Review(s) of: Kenya: Between hope and despair, 1963-2011, by Daniel Branch, New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011, 366 pp, ISBN 9780300148763.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - African politics in comparative perspective, second
           edition [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wilkins, Sam
      Review(s) of: African politics in comparative perspective, second edition, by Goran Hyden, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, 316 pp, ISBN 9781107651418.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Narratives of return among refugee-background South
           Sudanese in New Zealand
    • Abstract: O'Byrne, Ryan
      Ideals about return to the country of origin are important among many refugee-background communities. In this article I describe and analyse the return narratives created and disseminated among refugee-background South Sudanese in New Zealand (NZ). The return narratives of this community promise returnees substantial social and economic rewards, such as easy employment and a peaceful life alongside family. These are positioned in opposition to the common problems of resettlement, such as lack of employment, poor literacy, and other indicators of marginalisation. The research underpinning this article was conducted in 2011, during which there was a unique historical conjuncture between South Sudanese independence and a community members' positive experience of return. In this article I use return narratives from three interviewees to examine the connections between this conjuncture and community members' resettlement experiences and their sense of belonging in NZ. The varying narratives of these interviewees illustrate the diversity of the NZ-based South Sudanese community and provide an instructive overview of the similarities and differences among their various return narratives. In describing these narratives, I show that they emerge from marginalising experiences of resettlement in NZ and present an argument demonstrating the intersection between these experiences and the community's widespread lack of belonging. I suggest that the prominence of return narratives is less about unambiguous feelings of belonging toward South Sudan than it is about lacking belonging in NZ. I argue that these narratives are connected to broader community projects of discursively and imaginatively constructing South Sudanese lives, and that the ideals of return allow South Sudanese in NZ to live within resettlement's constraints.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 35 Issue 1 - Border conflicts in a German African colony: Jacob
           Morengo and the untold tragedy of Edward Presgrave [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fitzpatrick, Matt
      Review(s) of: Border conflicts in a German African colony: Jacob Morengo and the untold tragedy of Edward Presgrave, by Peter Curson, Arena Books, 2012, 236 pp, ISBN 9781906791964.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - The last blank spaces: Exploring Africa and Australia
           [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Chan, Stephen
      Review(s) of: The last blank spaces: Exploring Africa and Australia, by Dane Kennedy, Cambridge Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, 2013, 353pp, ISBN 9780674048478.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - The Fante and the Transatlantic slave trade [Book
           Review]
    • Abstract: Mends, Siegfried
      Review(s) of: The Fante and the Transatlantic slave trade, by Rebecca Shumway, Rochester: University of Rochester Press, 2011, 246 pp, ISBN 9781580463911.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - The great African land grab': Agricultural
           investments and the global food system [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Fura, Gashahun L
      Review(s) of: The great African land grab': Agricultural investments and the global food system, by Lorenzo Cotula, London and New York: Zed Books, 2013, 248 pp, ISBN 9781780323114.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
  • Volume 34 Issue 2 - Multiethnic coalitions in Africa: Business financing
           of opposition election campaigns [Book Review]
    • Abstract: Wilkins, Sam
      Review(s) of: Multiethnic coalitions in Africa: Business financing of opposition election campaigns, by Leonardo R. Arriola, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013, 324 pp, 9781107605435.

      PubDate: Thu, 2 Nov 2017 11:47:20 GMT
       
 
 
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