Subjects -> LAW (Total: 1523 journals)
    - CIVIL LAW (36 journals)
    - CONSTITUTIONAL LAW (51 journals)
    - CORPORATE LAW (90 journals)
    - CRIMINAL LAW (27 journals)
    - CRIMINOLOGY AND LAW ENFORCEMENT (152 journals)
    - FAMILY AND MATRIMONIAL LAW (23 journals)
    - INTERNATIONAL LAW (190 journals)
    - JUDICIAL SYSTEMS (22 journals)
    - LAW (923 journals)
    - LAW: GENERAL (9 journals)

INTERNATIONAL LAW (190 journals)                     

Showing 1 - 190 of 190 Journals sorted alphabetically
Acta Juridica Hungarica     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
African Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
African Yearbook of International Law Online : Annuaire Africain de droit international Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Afrilex     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Agora International Journal of Juridical Sciences     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
AJIL Unbound     Open Access  
American Business Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
American Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 64)
American University International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Annuaire Français de Droit International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Annual Review of Law and Social Science     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 14)
Annual Survey of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 15)
Antitrust Chronicle - Competition Policy International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Anuario Colombiano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access  
Anuario de Derechos Humanos     Open Access  
Anuario Español de Derecho Internacional     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
Anuario español de derecho internacional privado     Partially Free  
Anuario Iberoamericano de Derecho Internacional Penal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Anuario Mexicano de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Arbitration International     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
ASA Bulletin     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Asia-Pacific Journal of Ocean Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal  
Asian International Arbitration Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Asian Journal of Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Asian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Australasian Policing     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Australian International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 22)
Australian Journal of Asian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Austrian Review of International and European Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Baltic Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Berkeley Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 23)
Boletin Mexicano de Derecho Comparado     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Boston College International & Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 13)
Brigham Young University International Law and Management Review     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
British Yearbook of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 35)
Brooklyn Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
California Western International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Canadian Yearbook of International Law / Annuaire canadien de droit international     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 3)
Cape Town Convention Journal     Open Access  
Case Western Reserve Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Chicago Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 8)
Chinese Journal of Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal  
Chinese Journal of Global Governance     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Chinese Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 24)
Climate law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Columbia Journal of Transnational Law     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Common Law World Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 18)
Commonwealth Law Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 13)
Comparative and International Law Journal of Southern Africa     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 4)
Comparative Strategy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Computer Law Review International     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Contemporary Security Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 19)
Cornell International Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Corporate Governance An International Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Criterios     Open Access  
Denver Journal of International Law and Policy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Deusto Journal of Human Rights     Open Access  
Duke Journal of Comparative & International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
European Business Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
European Company Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
European Foreign Affairs Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
European Journal for Security Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
European Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 230)
European Journal of Migration and Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 39)
European Labour Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
European Political Science     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
European Property Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Fordham International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 21)
Foreign Policy Bulletin     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
Frontiers of Law in China     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Georgetown Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
Georgia Journal of International and Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Global Jurist     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Global Justice : Theory Practice Rhetoric     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Harvard International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 51)
Houston Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
ICSID Review : Foreign Investment Law Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Indian Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal  
Inter: Revista de Direito Internacional e Direitos Humanos da UFRJ     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Intergenerational Justice Review     Open Access  
International & Comparative Law Quarterly     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 262)
International Area Studies Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
International Commentary on Evidence     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
International Community Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Comparative Jurisprudence     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
International Human Rights Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 26)
International Journal for Court Administration     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
International Journal for the Semiotics of Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Journal of Comparative and Applied Criminal Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Comparative Labour Law and Industrial Relations     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Discrimination and the Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
International Journal of Evidence and Proof     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Journal of Information Privacy, Security and Integrity     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 27)
International Journal of Language & Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Journal of Law in Context     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 61)
International Journal of Law, Policy and the Family     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 25)
International Journal of Nuclear Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
International Journal of Political Economy     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
International Journal of Private Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
International Journal of Public Law and Policy     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
International Journal of Refugee Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 40)
International Journal of Transitional Justice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
International Law: Revista Colombiana de Derecho Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
International Negotiation     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 15)
International Organizations Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
International Planning Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 6)
International Review of Law     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
International Review of the Red Cross     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 12)
International Security     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 76)
Israel Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Italian Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 4)
Ius Gentium     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Jerusalem Review of Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal  
Journal of Biosecurity Biosafety and Biodefense Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
Journal of European Competition Law & Practice     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 22)
Journal of Genocide Research     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 14)
Journal of International Commercial Law and Technology     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Journal of International Dispute Settlement     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal of International Economic Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 33)
Journal of International Humanitarian Legal Studies     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Journal of International Political Theory     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Law, Policy and Globalization     Open Access   (Followers: 18)
Journal of Liberty and International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Journal of Migration and Refugee Issues, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 34)
Journal of Private International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 11)
Journal of the History of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 16)
Journal on the Use of Force and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 16)
Korean Journal of International and Comparative Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 2)
Law and Practice of International Courts and Tribunals     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 21)
Legal Issues of Economic Integration     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
Leiden Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 38)
LEX     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
London Review of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 8)
Loyola of Los Angeles International and Comparative Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 9)
Loyola University Chicago International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Maastricht Journal of European and Comparative Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 25)
Maryland Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
Max Planck Yearbook of United Nations Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 10)
Melbourne Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 17)
Michigan State International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 6)
Netherlands International Law Review     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 20)
Netherlands Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 15)
New Zealand Journal of Public and International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 13)
New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, The     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 9)
Nordic Journal of International Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 18)
Northwestern Journal of International Human Rights     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Northwestern Journal of International Law & Business     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Notre Dame Journal of International & Comparative Law     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Oromia Law Journal     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Pace International Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 8)
Palestine Yearbook of International Law Online     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Penn State Journal of Law & International Affairs     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Polar Journal     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Public and Private International Law Bulletin     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Recht der Werkelijkheid     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
Review of European Community & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Review of European, Comparative & International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 7)
Revista de Derecho de la Unión Europea     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Revista de Direito Brasileira     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista de la Secretaría del Tribunal Permanente de Revisión     Open Access  
Revista Tribuna Internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revista Videre     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Revue québécoise de droit international / Quebec Journal of International Law / Revista quebequense de derecho internacional     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
Santa Clara Journal of International Law     Open Access   (Followers: 2)
South African Yearbook of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 2)
South Carolina Journal of International Law and Business     Open Access   (Followers: 4)
Stanford Journal of International Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 11)
Syracuse Journal of International Law and Commerce     Open Access   (Followers: 3)
TDM Transnational Dispute Management Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 6)
Texas International Law Journal     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 5)
Tilburg Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 5)
Transnational Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 5)
Uniform Law Review     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 3)
University of Miami Inter-American Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 1)
Utrecht Journal of International and European Law     Open Access   (Followers: 17)
Vanderbilt Journal of Transnational Law     Free   (Followers: 5)
Virginia Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 4)
Washington University Global Studies Law Review     Open Access   (Followers: 11)
Wisconsin International Law Journal     Free   (Followers: 4)
World Journal of VAT/GST Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 1)
World Trade and Arbitration Materials     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yale Journal of International Law     Free   (Followers: 18)
Yearbook of International Environmental Law     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Yearbook of International Humanitarian Law     Full-text available via subscription   (Followers: 7)
Yearbook of Polar Law Online     Hybrid Journal  
Zeitschrift für Außen- und Sicherheitspolitik     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 12)
Zeitschrift für das Privatrecht der Europäischen Union - European Union Private Law Review / Revue de droit privé de l'Union européenne     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 1)
Zeitschrift für öffentliches Recht     Hybrid Journal   (Followers: 17)
Zeitschrift für Zivilprozess International     Hybrid Journal  

           

Similar Journals
Journal Cover
Leiden Journal of International Law
Journal Prestige (SJR): 0.482
Number of Followers: 38  
 
  Hybrid Journal Hybrid journal (It can contain Open Access articles)
ISSN (Print) 0922-1565 - ISSN (Online) 1478-9698
Published by Cambridge University Press Homepage  [386 journals]
  • International legal sightseeing
    • Authors: Sofia Stolk; Renske Vos
      Pages: 1 - 11
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000682
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • On the uses and advantages of genealogy for international law
    • Authors: Kate Purcell
      Pages: 13 - 35
      Abstract: This article considers the relationship between the uses and forms of history within international law and questions of method in the development of histories of international law. It focuses on the advantages of genealogy as an approach to the history of international law given its capacity to both explain the way in which the law itself makes use of the past and intervene in this.Elaborating on the compatibility between genealogy and elements of the contextual approach to history associated with the ‘Cambridge School’, this article challenges recent suggestions that anachronism is irrelevant, unavoidable, or even a ‘method’ that might be fruitfully embraced in studies of international law’s past directed towards explaining and potentially altering its present. It argues that historians of international law should take the dangers of anachronism seriously, particularly if the histories they develop are to operate as a form of critique and basis for change. Genealogy is a form of history that allows a particularly potent critique of international legal thought and practice. It opens up possibilities for more radical change by questioning and moving beyond the normative framework that usually structures (and limits) calls for reform in international law.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000578
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The turn to history in international law and the sources doctrine:
           Critical approaches and methodological imaginaries
    • Authors: Matilda Arvidsson; Miriam Bak McKenna
      Pages: 37 - 56
      Abstract: Expanding now familiar debates about the impact of the ‘historical turn’ upon the field of international law, this article considers some of the different ways in which ‘turn to history’ scholars have confronted the methodological and theoretical tensions arising from the central, yet paradoxical, role occupied by the sources doctrine in international law. We suggest that the anxiety over the sources of international law as the basic methodological precepts of the discipline has been a catalyzing element for a radical reengagement with the canon of international law, one with a significant impact on the field’s existing parameters and doctrinal limits. Within the three streams of scholarship we explore here, history has become a site of creative engagement for scholars in opening up the discipline to diverse ends, one in which a new doctrinal universe can be created, and new issues, sources, subjects, and approaches can be explored. Yet, by opening up international law’s sources doctrine, reactionary causes and unjust ends may equally well be the result. This account is an attempt at diversifying the narrative surrounding the causal relationship between history and the ongoing changes to the field of international law, along with the differential practices, techniques and epistemological foundations behind the history of international law as an evolving discipline, and of the different scholarly motivations of its specialists.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000542
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • On judicial autonomy and the autonomy of the parties in international
           adjudication, with special regard to investment arbitration and ICSID
           annulment proceedings
    • Authors: Attila M. Tanzi
      Pages: 57 - 75
      Abstract: The article addresses the relationship between judicial autonomy and the autonomy of the parties principles. The issue is not addressed so much through the lens of the procedural rules on the conduct of the proceedings, as through the prism of the general principles of adjudication which dictate the boundaries of judicial, or arbitral, decision-making. The focus will be on the combination between the principles ne, ultra and infra, petita and non liquet as they flow from the consensual nature of international adjudication and arbitration, on the one hand, and the principle jura novit curia which mirrors the autonomy of the judicial function, on the other. The analysis does not draw from national legal systems, nor from commercial arbitration. Due to the significantly different configuration of the principles at issue in different jurisdictions, it will focus on international litigation as an autonomous phenomenon. It will address firstly inter-state adjudication and then international investment arbitration. Special attention will be given to the ICSID system in consideration of its unique annulment mechanism. The article draws from researched case law an encouragement, if not simply the need, for international adjudicative bodies to undertake a proactive attitude in the conduct of the proceedings. More generally potentials emerge from the analysis, to the effect that not only inter-state adjudication may impact on investor-state arbitration, but also vice versa.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000554
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • State liability for ‘politically’ motivated conduct in the
           investment treaty regime
    • Authors: Jonathan Bonnitcha; Zoe Phillips Williams
      Pages: 77 - 100
      Abstract: In framing investment treaty claims against host states, foreign investors routinely assert that the state’s conduct was ‘politically’ motivated. Arbitral tribunals must then grapple with these allegations. Yet, tribunals lack both a coherent conception of what constitutes politically motivated conduct and a consistent understanding of the relevance, if any, of such motivations for the disposition of an investor’s legal claims. This uncertainty points to an underlying tension within the investment treaty regime between the protection of investors’ interests on the one hand, and the legitimate scope for democratic decision-making and responsive politics on the other.Using concepts drawn from political science, we develop a new framework to map the variety of conduct that tribunals characterize as ‘political’. Our framework draws attention to different types of influence over government decision-making, as well as differences between government actors responsible for the conduct. We use this framework to show that tribunals have adopted different conceptions of what constitutes illegitimate political influence over government decision-making in factually similar cases. We then evaluate tribunals’ competing approaches in light of normative theories spanning both public law and private law. Engaging with multiple normative theories allows us to examine whether tribunals’ different approaches to politically motivated conduct might reflect diverse underlying normative commitments. We argue, however, that many arbitral tribunals demonstrate a reflexive distrust of domestic political contestation that is difficult to justify within any of the theories that we consider.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000566
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Elected member influence in the United Nations Security Council
    • Authors: Jeremy Farrall; Marie-Eve Loiselle, Christopher Michaelsen, Jochen Prantl, Jeni Whalan
      Pages: 101 - 115
      Abstract: This article reassesses how members of the UN Security Council exercise influence over the Council’s decision-making process, with particular focus on the ten elected members (the E10). A common understanding of Security Council dynamics accords predominance to the five permanent members (the P5), suggesting bleak prospects for the Council as a forum that promotes the voices and representation of the 188 non-permanent members. The assumption is that real power rests with the P5, while the E10 are there to make up the numbers. By articulating a richer account of Council dynamics, this article contests the conventional wisdom that P5 centrality crowds out space for the E10 to influence Council decision-making. It also shows that opportunities for influencing Council decision-making go beyond stints of elected membership. It argues that the assumed centrality of the P5 on the Council thus needs to be qualified and re-evaluated.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000657
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Around Arendt’s table: Bureaucracy and the non-permanent members of
           the UN Security Council
    • Authors: Isobel Roele
      Pages: 117 - 137
      Abstract: Non-permanent members’ strategies to augment their influence in the United Nations Security Council usually seek parity of status with the permanent members. A more radical and transformative strategy would seek to change the Council itself. Working methods reform holds more potential in this respect than composition reform. At present, however, working methods reform is oriented to increasing non-permanent members’ status and focuses on redistributing administrative roles like sub-committee chairing and penholding. The price non-permanent members pay for their offices, however, is bureaucratic drudgery, which both keeps them from pursuing their own political priorities, and socializes them into the permanent members’ rhythms of work. Using Hannah Arendt’s concepts of work, labour, and natality, this contribution analyses strategies for influence in the Security Council, and offers a negative reading of Arendt’s ideas to suggest that non-permanent members should present a more obstructive counterforce in the Council, by cultivating their difference.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000645
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The penholder system and the rule of law in the Security Council
           decision-making: Setback or improvement'
    • Authors: Marie-Eve Loiselle
      Pages: 139 - 156
      Abstract: This article analyses the decision-making process of the UN Security Council when it adopts outcome documents, such as resolutions, Presidential statements and press statements. It is commonly assumed that because of their veto power and permanency China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States have greater influence than their elected counterparts in shaping those outcomes. In recent years, that control has been strengthened by the penholdership system. Under this practice, one or more members, usually France, the United States or the United Kingdom (P3), take leadership over a situation on the agenda of the Council. When ‘holding the pen’ a member often decides what action the Council should take, then drafts an outcome document that it negotiates with other permanent members before sharing the text with elected members. This article explores the development of this practice and its impact on the respect for the rule of law in the Security Council’s decision-making process. It argues that, while concentrating power in the hands of the P3, hence diminishing transparency and the opportunity for all members to participate in the decision-making of the Council, at the same time the penholdership system also provides an avenue to strengthen elected members’ influence in ways that promote respect for the international rule of law.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000621
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • The Security Council in practice: Haiti, cholera, and the elected members
           of the United Nations Security Council
    • Authors: Rosa Freedman; Nicolas Lemay-Hébert
      Pages: 157 - 176
      Abstract: While the cholera outbreak in Haiti still claims victims every month, it is also the backdrop of one of the biggest legal battles the UN has been engaged in – one for the recognition of harm caused and for reparations for victims of cholera. Having used its immunity to disengage from the issue, the UN finally changed its stance in December 2016 and apologized for the organization’s role in the cholera outbreak. This article analyses the role of the elected members of the Security Council – alongside other key stakeholders – in contributing to the UN’s change of policy. Based on privileged access to a number of actors in this politico-legal fight, this article argues that elected members of the Security Council have played a crucial role in pushing the UN to ‘do the right thing’. This article, along with other contributions to this special issue, sheds a different light on the practices inside the Security Council, demonstrating that elected members are far from being powerless, as most of the literature on the subject tends to assume. They can successfully play a significant role inside the organization when the right conditions permit them to play this role.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000633
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • State responsibility and positive obligations in the European Court of
           Human Rights: The contribution of the ICJ in advancing towards more
           judicial integration
    • Authors: Rosana Garciandia
      Pages: 177 - 187
      Abstract: The European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) follows its own rules regarding the responsibility of states, although the international law of state responsibility enshrined in the International Law Commission (ILC) Articles on State Responsibility for Internationally Wrongful Acts (ARSIWA) remains, as general international law, relevant to its decisions. However, case law of the ECtHR shows that the Court is departing from certain ARSIWA principles as it adopts a broad interpretation of rights contained in the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR) giving rise to positive obligations.1Exploring those trends in the state responsibility regime of the ECHR, this article argues that, by clarifying certain ARSIWA provisions, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) can play an important role by contributing to a higher degree of judicial integration on the law of state responsibility. It is desirable that the ICJ takes any upcoming opportunity to provide greater clarity on the challenges and nuances of the applicability of the law of state responsibility, in particular as it relates to positive obligations. That would contribute to a more systematic use of those rules by regional courts such as the ECtHR, and ultimately to guaranteeing a greater protection of human rights.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000591
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • jus+post+bellum+as+‘integrity’+–+Transitional+criminal+justice,+the+ICC,+and+the+Colombian+amnesty+law&rft.title=Leiden+Journal+of+International+Law&rft.issn=0922-1565&rft.date=2020&rft.volume=33&rft.spage=189&rft.epage=205&rft.aulast=Eskauriatza&rft.aufirst=Javier&rft.au=Javier+Sebastián+Eskauriatza&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S0922156519000530">The jus post bellum as ‘integrity’ – Transitional criminal justice,
           the ICC, and the Colombian amnesty law
    • Authors: Javier Sebastián Eskauriatza
      Pages: 189 - 205
      Abstract: This article is about a relatively new version of the ‘emerging’ jus post bellum concept. It asks whether the jus post bellum as ‘integrity’ is useful as a normative guide in the interpretation of international criminal law during transitions when the requirements of international criminal law are ambiguous or unclear. It develops the main elements of the jus post bellum as integrity as an analytical framework. It then evaluates the theoretical and practical application of the concept in relation to the task of the International Criminal Court in evaluating the ‘alternative sentences’ regime in Colombia. It argues that a Dworkinian approach to international criminal law must make certain assumptions about the international legal order which are difficult to sustain. The difficulties discussed here are related to the structural conditions needed for a ‘community of principle’ to arise in Dworkin’s theory. The article demonstrates that the jus post bellum as integrity may be useful for identifying the principles of international criminal law that should apply to states in transition from conflict to peace. However, despite its usefulness, the concept is susceptible to the usual arguments against adopting ‘natural law’ constructions in international legal method (and post-conflict law).
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000530
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Collective criminality and sexual violence: Fixing a failed approach
    • Authors: Susana SáCouto; Leila Nadya Sadat, Patricia Viseur Sellers
      Pages: 207 - 241
      Abstract: International criminal tribunals have developed a number of legal theories designed to hold individuals responsible for their role in collective criminal conduct. These doctrines of criminal participation, known as modes of liability, are the subject of significant scholarly commentary. Yet missing from much of this debate, particularly as regards the International Criminal Court, has been an analysis of how current doctrine on modes of liability responds to the need to hold collective perpetrators criminally responsible for crimes of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). Indeed, many writings in this area of the law address perceived shortcomings in the theoretical underpinnings of modes of liability doctrine in the abstract but ignore the application of this doctrine in concreto. As a result, facially neutral writings on modes of liability may in fact be gendered in application, either because they fail to account for the specific characteristics of sexual and gender-based violence or because they are applied in a manner that requires higher thresholds for finding culpability for the commission of SGBV crimes. This article fills the gap between theory and practice, examining past and present doctrine, and suggesting ways in which the treatment of modes of liability by international criminal courts and tribunals can both properly respond to the need for personal culpability and the dangers of collective criminal activity, particularly as regards SGBV crimes.
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S092215651900061X
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • A+Theory+of+Punishable+Participation+in+Universal+Crimes+(2018),+Torkel+Opsahl+Academic+EPublisher,+756+pp,+ISBN+9788283481273&rft.title=Leiden+Journal+of+International+Law&rft.issn=0922-1565&rft.date=2020&rft.volume=33&rft.spage=245&rft.epage=247&rft.aulast=Drumbl&rft.aufirst=Mark&rft.au=Mark+Drumbl&rft.au=Lauren+Hancock&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S0922156519000608">Terje Einarsen and Joseph Rikhof, A Theory of Punishable Participation in
           Universal Crimes (2018), Torkel Opsahl Academic EPublisher, 756 pp, ISBN
           9788283481273
    • Authors: Mark Drumbl; Lauren Hancock
      Pages: 245 - 247
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000608
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • New+Technologies+for+Human+Rights+Law+and+Practice,+2018,+Cambridge+University+Press,+330+pp,+ISBN+9781107179639&rft.title=Leiden+Journal+of+International+Law&rft.issn=0922-1565&rft.date=2020&rft.volume=33&rft.spage=249&rft.epage=252&rft.aulast=Irving&rft.aufirst=Emma&rft.au=Emma+Irving&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S092215651900058X">Molly K. Land and Jay D. Aronson, New Technologies for Human Rights Law
           and Practice, 2018, Cambridge University Press, 330 pp, ISBN 9781107179639
           
    • Authors: Emma Irving
      Pages: 249 - 252
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S092215651900058X
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • UN+Security+Council+Referrals+to+the+International+Criminal+Court:+Legal+Nature,+Effects+and+Limits,+Brill,+2018,+268pp,+ISBN+978-90-04-34221-7,+€145&rft.title=Leiden+Journal+of+International+Law&rft.issn=0922-1565&rft.date=2020&rft.volume=33&rft.spage=253&rft.epage=256&rft.aulast=Lentner&rft.aufirst=Gabriel&rft.au=Gabriel+M.+Lentner&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S0922156519000669">Alexandre Skander Galand, UN Security Council Referrals to the
           International Criminal Court: Legal Nature, Effects and Limits, Brill,
           2018, 268pp, ISBN 978-90-04-34221-7, €145
    • Authors: Gabriel M. Lentner
      Pages: 253 - 256
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000669
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • Le+laboratoire+belge+du+droit+international.+Une+communauté+épistémique+et+internationale+de+juristes+(1869–1914).+Préface+de+Michel+Dumoulin.+Avant-propos+de+Martti+Koskenniemi.+Bruxelles:+Classe+des+Lettres.+Académie+Royale+des+Sciences,+des+Lettres+et+des+Beaux-Arts+de+Belgique,+2018,+232+pp,+ISBN+9782803106523,+€15&rft.title=Leiden+Journal+of+International+Law&rft.issn=0922-1565&rft.date=2020&rft.volume=33&rft.spage=257&rft.epage=260&rft.aulast=Rasilla&rft.aufirst=Ignacio&rft.au=Ignacio+de+la+Rasilla&rft_id=info:doi/10.1017/S0922156519000670">Vincent Genin, Le laboratoire belge du droit international. Une
           communauté épistémique et internationale de juristes (1869–1914).
           Préface de Michel Dumoulin. Avant-propos de Martti Koskenniemi.
           Bruxelles: Classe des Lettres. Académie Royale des Sciences, des Lettres
           et des Beaux-Arts de Belgique, 2018, 232 pp, ISBN 9782803106523, €15
    • Authors: Ignacio de la Rasilla
      Pages: 257 - 260
      PubDate: 2020-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000670
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2020)
       
  • LJL volume 33 issue 1 Cover and Front matter
    • PubDate: 2019-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000694
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2019)
       
  • LJL volume 33 issue 1 Cover and Back matter
    • PubDate: 2019-03-01T00:00:00.000Z
      DOI: 10.1017/S0922156519000700
      Issue No: Vol. 33, No. 1 (2019)
       
 
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